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TODAY’S DIET & NUTRITION


T

hanksgiving is a magnificent harvest celebration of fall flavors and family togetherness. Of course, it also has its stresses. So why add the stress of overeating, dense caloric loads, and unneeded weight gain? Don’t worry: We’re not trying to take away the traditional foods that make Thanksgiving a festive observance. Rather than play food police at a time of year set aside for celebrating delicious bounty, we put some twists on the classics that keep them authentic and preserve the indulgence factor. Here are five Thanksgiving recipes we promise will let you have your pecan pie and eat it too.

Pistachio-Cherry Turkey Roulade With Pomegranate Sauce 4 large pomegranates 2

⁄3 cup pomegranate juice cocktail or tart cherry juice

11⁄2 teaspoons corn starch 21⁄2 - to 3-pound boneless turkey breast, butterflied, skin on

Stir corn starch in a small bowl with a tablespoon of cold water until dissolved; set aside. Place turkey breast skin side down on a surface covered with plastic wrap. Cover with a second sheet of plastic wrap and pound gently to even thickness. Preheat oven to 400°F. Combine all but 1 tablespoon of the ground pistachios, the dried cherries, 3 ⁄4 teaspoon of the ancho chili powder, 1⁄4 teaspoon of the salt, and 1⁄8 teaspoon of the black pepper in a mixing bowl. Stir in 3 tablespoons of the orange juice. Spread mixture evenly on inside of turkey breast. Roll turkey breast with filling tightly; pull edges of skin around outside of turkey to cover. Tie with butcher’s string. Rub roulade with oil. Combine remaining ancho powder, salt, and pepper with the thyme and sprinkle over entire surface of roulade. Place roulade, skin side down, in an aluminum baking pan. Roast 30 minutes; turn skin side up. Pour pomegranate sauce mixture over turkey into roasting pan to deglaze drippings. Pour juice and drippings back into skillet, straining if necessary. Return skillet to stove and continue to reduce on low simmer for 20 minutes.

⁄4 cup ground pistachio nuts (about 1

3

cup whole nuts, ground) ⁄4 cup minced dried cherries

1

11⁄2 teaspoons ancho chili powder, divided ⁄2 teaspoon sea salt, divided

1

⁄4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper,

1

divided ⁄2 cup orange juice

1

2 teaspoons olive oil 1 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed

Halve the pomegranates. Using the tip of a spoon, pop out about 3 tablespoons of whole seeds; set aside. Squeeze remaining pomegranates with a citrus juicer. Combine juice in a shallow saucepan with juice cocktail or tart cherry juice. Bring mixture just to boiling; reduce heat to low simmer, stirring occasionally. NOVEMBER 2011 

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Pour remaining orange juice over roulade. Roast 20 minutes more. Remove from oven and let stand 5 to 10 minutes. Meanwhile, stir corn starch mixture and whisk into sauce the last 2 minutes of simmering. Before slicing and serving turkey roulade, spoon several tablespoons of the pomegranate sauce on top and sprinkle with reserved pomegranate seeds and ground pistachios.

Combine cranberries, cherries, apple, and juice in a large saucepan. Grate orange peel and squeeze orange juice into pan. Add cinnamon, rosemary, cardamom, and cloves. Cover and simmer over very low heat for 45 minutes, stirring often. Remove cinnamon sticks and rosemary sprig. Stir in syrup to taste. Serve warm or chilled. TD&N Nutrient Analysis (based on 12 servings): Calories:

TD&N Nutrient Analysis (based on 6 servings): Calories:

60; Total Fat: 0 g; Saturated Fat: 0 g; Polyunsaturated

415; Total Fat: 12 g; Saturated Fat: 2 g; Polyunsaturated Fat:

Fat: 0 g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0 g; Cholesterol: 0 mg;

3 g; Monounsaturated Fat: 6 g; Cholesterol: 93 mg; Sodium:

Sodium: 4 mg; Carbohydrates: 15 g; Fiber: 4 g; Protein: 0 g

241 mg; Carbohydrates: 35 g; Fiber: 3 g; Protein: 43 g

Pecan Grape Tart Very Red Cranberry Sauce 1 pound cranberries ⁄2 cup dried tart cherries

Crust 11⁄2 cups all-purpose flour ⁄2 cup white whole wheat flour

1

1

1 large apple, peeled, cored, and finely chopped

1

1 cup pomegranate juice cocktail

1

1 orange

1 large egg

4 sticks cinnamon

1

⁄2 cup confectioner’s sugar ⁄2 cup light margarine, chilled ⁄4 cup water

1 sprig fresh rosemary ⁄2 teaspoon cardamom

Filling

1

⁄4 teaspoon ground cloves

2 cups ripe green grapes

Maple syrup

2 tablespoons light margarine

1

⁄2 cup agave syrup

1

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract ⁄4 teaspoon cinnamon

1

⁄8 teaspoon ginger

1

Pinch cloves 1 egg 11⁄4 cups pecan halves

To prepare crust: Sift together flours and sugar into a food processor bowl. Cut cold margarine into pieces and scatter them into the flour mixture; pulse until cut in. Beat together egg and water and add in a little at a time, pulsing as you go just until dough forms. Turn dough onto a clean work surface; knead lightly if necessary. Cover and chill about half an hour.


Lightly grease a fluted 9-inch springform tart pan. On wax or parchment paper, gently roll dough into circle about 1⁄8 -inch thick. Transfer rolled dough into tart pan, pressing gently up the sides of the pan and trimming any excess from the edges. Prick bottom with a fork. Cover and return to refrigerator to chill. Preheat oven to 350°F. Bake tart crust 15 minutes or until light golden brown. Set on rack to cool slightly. To prepare filling: Combine all filling ingredients except egg and pecans in a 2-quart saucepan. Cook over medium-low heat for 10 minutes, stirring often. Transfer grape mixture to processor bowl. Pulse gently just until smooth, adding egg halfway through. Spoon grape mixture into tart pan. Cover with pecan halves. Bake 45 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and cool completely. Unmold before slicing and serving. If desired, top each slice with light whipped cream or nondairy topping.

Light and Fluffy Yams

TD&N Nutrient Analysis (based on 16 servings): Calories: 244; Total Fat: 14 g; Saturated Fat: 2 g; Polyunsaturated Fat: 4 g; Monounsaturated Fat: 7 g; Cholesterol: 26 mg; Sodium: 93 mg; Carbohydrates: 28 g; Fiber: 2 g; Protein: 3 g

DAVID FEDER, RD, is a former professional chef and author of The Skinny Carbs Diet. He’s director of S/F/B Communications Group, a cooperative of experts providing food and nutrition communications and consulting for all media.

Lemonade Sprouts

WHAT’S SO GOOD ABOUT THANKSGIVING EATS? Loaded with B vitamins and tryptophan, and the dark meat is rich in immunitybuilding iron and zinc l Pumpkin, yams, and carrots: Outstanding sources of vision-protecting beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthine l Potatoes: Boiled and mashed, potatoes are among the best sources of energy, plus they provide resistant starch for weight and blood sugar control and protection against colon cancer l Turkey:

One of the best fruits for delivering cancer-fighting proanthocyanidins and skinbeautifying vitamin C l Brussels sprouts: Little cabbages big with bone-building vitamin K and calcium l Nuts: The dense calories in nuts are good calories—they keep you satisfied longer and actually help you eat less while providing healthy omega oils and vital trace minerals l Cranberries:

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thanksgiving guilt free diet and nutrition mag 2011