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China Adams (b. 1970) Glass Box #25 1995 Artists burdensome possessions 21 1/2 x 21 1/2 x 25 in. 3582

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on January 1, 1995.

China Adams was born in Berkeley, California in 1970. She earned her BFA from UCLA in 1995 and went on to earn an MFA from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 2000. Her conceptual art works have been featured in exhibitions worldwide, including several solo shows at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles and a number of group shows in Europe. Ranging in scope from sculpture to stylized photography, Adams’ works employ a variety of media. She often exercises traditional techniques such as papermaking and hand sewing, creating highly conceptual works that exhibit an unexpected reverence for handcrafting. In her 1996 show “The Official Stitch and Hide Procedure,” she attempted to rid herself of all extraneous possessions by enshrouding hundreds of objects in rubber-coated white cloth stitched closed with unwaxed dental floss, exemplifying a unique juxtaposition of the conceptual and the conventional. Adams has stated her work, to some degree, explores how “recognition gives meaning to or lives and helps us define ourselves.”


David Amico (b. 1951) Gold Field 1992 Oil and wax on canvas 36 x 25 in. 3583

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on December 28, 1997.

A vanguard of the developing Los Angeles art scene in the 1970s and 80s, David Amico was born in Rochester, New York in 1951. He attended Hunter College in New York before earning his BFA from California State University, Fullerton. In 1976 he had his first show at P.S. 1 in New York. Soon after, Amico moved cross-country into a 9000 square foot space in the heart of downtown Los Angeles, where loft space was both plentiful and cheap. He used the space to host exhibitions and performances for emerging artists of the time, including T-Bone Burnett and an exhibition of Amico’s own work accompanied by a sixty-four-piece orchestra. As his notoriety as a downtown painter grew, Amico’s work was featured in several prominent exhibitions including the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art’s first show in 1983 and the Newport Harbor Art Museum’s first biennial in 1984. He currently lives in Los Angeles and holds a position as an Associate Professor of Art at Claremont Graduate University. Amico’s paintings often look to the artist’s own downtown surroundings, reimagining the harsh urban environment with profound delicacy and grace. Addressing this unique interpretation he stated, “It’s always been part of what fascinated me about living downtown. We’re living in the middle of the city (with)… all the paraphernalia, clothes being hauled out onto the docks, goods and services, all of that stuff. There’s an industrial edge, patterns off of material and stuff.” Since the early 80s, his style has evolved from dramatic sketch-life figurative paintings to more abstracted works with a greater emphasis on organic form. However throughout his career, Amico has maintained his unique talent to integrate and transform the harsh realities of urban life into amazingly lyrical compositions.


Lawrence Carroll (b. 1954)

Untitled 1990 Oil on canvas 26 1/4 x 31 in. (22 1/4 x 17 1/2 in. unframed) 3675

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on July 30, 1994.

Lawrence Carroll is an American painter born 1954 in Melbourne Australia. He moved to Santa Monica, California with his parents in 1958. He attended Art Center College of Design in Pasadena where he studied art on a full scholarship. In 1984 Carroll moved to New York city from Los Angeles with his own family . In 1988 he had his first solo exhibition of his paintings in New York City. In 1989 he was invited by Harald Szeemann as one of 9 young American artist to participate in Szeemans international exhibition Einleuchten at the Deichtorhallen in Hamburg Germany alongside international artists such as Joseph Bueys, Bruce Nauman, Robert Ryman and others. In 1992 he was invited to participate in “documenta IX” in Kassel, Germany. Later in 1995 Carroll exhibited in the Guggenheim Museums exhibition “Material Imagination” in NYC. In 2000 he participated in “Panza, legacy of a collector” at MOCA in Los Angeles. In 2005 he participated in “50 years of documenta” in Kassel, Germany. Carroll has exhibited widely in Europe and the United States, and is represented in the permanent collections of a number of museums and public galleries, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art,Los Angeles, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Museum of Contemporary art San Diego, Jumex Collection Mexico City, MART Rovereto Italy, Panza Collection Varese, Italy, Panza Collection Sassuolo in Modena, Italy, Art Gallery of New south Wales, Sydney Australia. Stadtisches Museum Abteiberg Monchengladbach Germany and many other private and public collections worldwide.


Mary Corse (b. 1945) Black Light Painting 1992 Micro glass spheres in paint on canvas 16 x 16 in. 3587

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on August 2, 1994.

Mary Corse was born in Berkeley, California in 1945 and thus belonged to a later generation of Minimalists. She earned her BFA from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1963 before earning her MFA from the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles in 1968. Since then, Corse’s work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions across the country, including shows at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. Throughout her career Corse has been the recipient of several prestigious honors and awards, most notably a New Talent Award from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1967 and the Theodoran Award from the Guggenheim Museum in 1971. Facing challenges of gender and geography, Mary Corse emerged as a significant artist of the Minimalist movement. In contrast to the stark Minimalism of the New York art scene, California Minimalism favored an exploration of light and color. Effectively keeping with the West Coast development of the Minimalist movement, Corse’s primary subject became light. Influenced by the likes of Barnett Newman, Larry Poons and Robert Irwin, Corse expressed a unique perspective on the Minimalist project through her use of tiny glass microspheres in lieu of conventional paint. Her shimmering canvases seek to reduce the elements to a dimensional expression of truth and reality.


Charles Fine Fieldmarks XI 1993 Oil, ink, Asphaltum on mylar on linen on panel 87 x 62 in. 3594

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on July 30, 1994.


Tim Hawkinson (b. 1960) Stamtrad 1997 Pencil on popsicle sticks 78 in. diameter 3604

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on December 28, 1997.

Tim Hawkinson was born in San Francisco in 1960. He went on to attend San Jose State University and later earned his MFA from UCLA in 1989. A renowned contemporary artist based out of Los Angeles, Hawkinson’s work has been featured in exhibitions in the United States and abroad including the Venice Bienniale, Whitney Biennial, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. Over the course of his nearly two-decade career, Hawkinson has garnered a reputation as one of America’s most imaginative contemporary artists. His body of work ranges from paintings and photographs to miniature sculptures made from his own fingernail clippings, but he is best known for his large-scale kinetic and sound-producing sculptures. Using ubiquitous, even store-bought materials, Hawkinson crafts intricate works that are simultaneously familiar and surprising. His work often finds inspiration in his own body, completely re-imagining conventional self-portraiture. Hawkinson’s art ultimately explores the delicate relationships of life, death, and the passage of time.


Anton Henning (b. 1964) Untitled 1989 Mixed media on paper 46 x 35 in. 3606

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on July 30, 1994.

Born in 1964 in Berlin, Anton Henning dropped out of art school because he simply found it too boring. He preferred instead to train himself, quickly learning how to paint, sculpt, record videos, design environments and make music outside the confines of organized education. Henning has exhibited widely throughout Europe and his work is included in several prominent museum and private collections, though he is not well known in the United States. Today he lives and works in Manker, Germany. Much of Anton Henning’s work can be read as a contemporary interpretation of gesamtkunstwerk, or synthesis of the various disciplines into a single dialogue. Though primarily a painter, Henning also incorporates sculpture and installation into his work. In an age dominated by the “white cube” exhibition space, Henning seeks to integrate his works of art and the environment in which they are displayed. His Oktogon installation incorporated his paintings into a manufactured interior contained within a large octagon. However he always begins his pieces explicitly with painting, often reinterpreting the classic genres and plundering art history and popular culture for subject matter. Henning’s “Interieur” paintings are complex pictorial systems of paintings within paintings that integrate the artist’s own work with cultural, art historical and biographical references. Henning’s trademark motif, the “Hennling,” an abstracted tri-lobed form, is often incorporated into the artist’s paintings. Henning’s fusion of traditional modes of art production into a single work is a distinctive development in the trajectory of contemporary art, in essence commenting on the very nature of the production and display of art.


Jene Highstein (b. 1942) Untitled 1992 Bone black pigment on paper 41 1/2 x 53 in. 3609

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on August 5, 1998.

Jene Highstein was born in Baltimore Maryland in 1942. He earned a BA in philosophy from the University of Maryland in 1963. He completed post-graduate work in philosophy at the University of Chicago and went on to study drawing at the New York Studio School before earning his Post Graduate Degree from the Royal Academy Schools, London in 1970. In the late 1960s he turned his attention to sculpture, in which he continues to work. Highstein has received a number of awards, including four National Endowment for the Arts grants, a Guggenheim Award and a St. Gauden’s Memorial Prize. He currently lives and works in New York, where he has also taught at the New York School of Visual Arts as well as NYU. Highstein describes his work as thinking about “a sense of existence of a thing in the world which would bring along some of the mystery of our history, our human history…our common history. Often, Highstein begins with a drawing – dense black shapes which activate large white fields of paper – which are frequently displayed with the finished sculptures. Over the course of his career, Highstein’s sculpture has experienced an evident shift from a great dependency on negative space to a focus on dimension and fullness. His sculptures focus on the essential nature of form, without distractions such as color. He has stated, “the square is an ideal form…and I don’t work with ideal forms…” Thus in comparison to many of Highstein’s minimalist contemporaries, his totemic work is uncharacteristically human and inviting, addressing the viewer’s most basic emotions.


Susan Hutchinson Whole Lotta Love 1993 Resin on panel 47 5/8 x 47 5/8 in. 3680

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on July 30, 1994.


Jannis Kounellis (b. 1936) Untitled 1998 Fabric, lead sheets, scissors 79 x 71 x 14 1/2 in. 3681

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on January 9, 1999

Jannis Kounellis was born in 1936 in Piraeus, Greece. He studied at an art college in Athens before attending the Accademia di Belle Arti in Rome. While still a student, he had his first solo show at the Galleria la Tartaruga in Rome in 1960. He became one of the founding figures of the Arte Povera movement, which arose in Italy during the early 1960s. The Arte Povera artists viewed themselves as political artists, visualizing the dialogue between nature and industry and playing upon the political dimensions of industrial elements. The movement countered American minimalism, which primarily focused on elemental aspects of form rather than historical or political concerns. Today, Kounellis continues to live and work in Rome. Initially inspired by the expressionism of Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline as well as the earlier abstractions of Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian, Kounellis’ paintings soon became sculptural as he incorporated found elements ranging from stone, cotton, wool and coal to bed-frames, doors and shelves. In the late 1960s he began to use live animals in his pieces, one of his best known works being the installation of eleven live horses in a gallery space. In doing so, he questioned the traditionally pristine, sterile environment of the gallery and transformed art into a living entity. Eventually people were integrated into his works, adding aspects of performance art. His works have even flirted with elements of theater and opera, emphasizing the dramatic power of our present day experience. Over the course of his nearly fiftyyear career, Kounellis has adopted the idea that art should be replaced by life itself.


David Mach (b. 1956) Flower Vase 1996 Wire coat hangers 31 1/2 x 26 in. 3682

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on January 8, 1999.

David Mach was born in Scotland in 1956, and went on to study at the Duncan Jordanstone College of Art in Dundee, Scotland and the Royal College of Art, London. Since the launch of his career in the early 1980s, David Mach has achieved international acclaim as a celebrated sculptor and installation artist. In 1988, he was nominated for the prestigious Turner Prize. In 2000 Mach took a position as Professor of Sculpture at the Royal Academy of Arts and continues to develop his innovative style with public installations and performance art. Assemblages of mass-produced found objects often form the basis of Mach’s sculptures and installations, incorporating everything from magazines and newspapers to tires and teddy bears. Early in his career, Mach began creating representations of human and animal faces constructed out of matchsticks, with the colored match heads arranged so as to create the surface of the face. After accidentally igniting one such work, Mach will now sometimes ignite his matchstick sculptures as a sort of performance art. In addition to temporary installation pieces, Mach has recently produced permanent public works including a representation of a steam engine constructed out of 185,000 bricks near Darlington, Scotland. According to Mach, “an artist must be an ideasmonger responding to all kinds of physical locations, social and political environments, to materials, to processes, to timescales and budgets.”


John Millei (b. 1958) Dismantling the Silence 1993-94 Oil on canvas 36 x 42 in. 3686

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on July 30, 1994.

John Millei was born in 1958 in Los Angeles, where he continues to live and work today. A prominent figure of the abstractionism that flowered in Los Angeles in the 1980s, Millei has exhibited extensively throughout California and the greater United States. His work has also been featured in several exhibitions worldwide. Millei has stated, “I don’t believe in style. It is a byproduct of intent. My work changes a lot.” Though the artist frequently produces works in series, sometimes hundreds of paintings of uniform size, he engages a novel approach with each new project. Himself an avid surfer, Millei’s 2002 series, “For Surfing,” incorporates visual interpretations of the ocean’s rhythms. Another 2002 series, “The Real Life of Flowers,” is an exploration of a repeated floral motif. Millei’s exuberantly abstract paintings do not pursue figuration, but rather vacillate between geometric, organic, material and color-field practices. An artist who embraces whimsy, Millei’s works are a unique synthesis of earnest abstractionism and the artist’s palpable love of painting.


Thomas Nozkowski (b. 1947) Untitled 1994 Oil on linen on panel 20 in. x 16 in. 3690

Thomas Nozkowski was born in New Jersey in 1947. He earned his BFA from Cooper Union in New York in 1967. His work has been featured in exhibitions worldwide since the 1970s and is held in the permanent collections of several prominent American museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Phillips Collection in Washington D.C. and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. In 2006 Nozkowski was awarded The Academy of Arts and Letters Merit Medal for Painting and in 2007 his work was featured at the Venice Biennale. The artist currently lives and works in New York. Heralded as “the Chardin of contemporary abstraction” by The New Yorker, Nozkowski’s paintings carefully balance the interplay of biomorphic and geometric forms. Deliberately untitled and rather coded by number, the abstract forms maintain anonymity. Nozkowski states his “project has been to make paintings that come from things in the real world. I mean ‘things’ to be taken in the broadest way – objects, ideas, moments – and I mean ‘real world’ to be taken as broadly, including both physical and speculative realities.” The artist has the unique ability to reinvent his style with each new canvas, as no two works are alike. Heavily influenced by the political climate of the 1960s, the artist stated, “I felt I could no longer do big paintings that were for an audience of the very institutions I then despised…I wanted to paint paintings that could lit in my friends’ rooms.” Thus Nozkowski has turned the traditionally bourgeois convention of the domestic-scaled painting into an object of political subversion.


Ron Reihel

Elutheria 1993 31 x 26 3/4 in. x 10 in. 3692

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on July 30, 1994.

Ron Reihel was born in the California desert but raised in the Bahamas and the Florida Keys, environments that have undoubtedly affected the artist’s aesthetic exploration of light and color. In the mid-1980s he moved back to California and studied art at Otis Parsons in Los Angeles. Ron Reihel’s innovative sculptural pieces and photographs seek to reinterpret light and space. By using color and light sensitive materials, his works are subject to and constantly evolve with the environment around them. Thus his work is a unique juxtaposition of the artificial and organic, distilling landscapes to their simplest forms and transporting the viewer into an ever-changing alternate reality. Despite the industrial, scientific nature of Reihel’s sculptures, they seem to emanate extraordinary ethereal warmth that encourages an emotional connection with the viewer.


Ross Rudel (b. 1947) Untitled #5 1992 Stained wood 23 x 18 x 5 1/2 in. 3694

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above.

Ross Rudel was born in Billings, Montana and earned his BA from Montana State University in 1983 before going on to earn his MFA from the University of California, Irvine in 1985. In 1993, Rudel was awarded the Regional Visual Arts Fellowship from the Western States Arts Federation. His work has been featured in exhibitions worldwide, including recent participation in “Made in California” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The artist currently lives and works in Los Angeles. From a distance, Rudel’s sculptures appear to be comprised of simple, elegant forms free of embellishment. However the descriptive surface is an essential element of the overall effect of each work, placing great importance on close viewing. It is only from up close that the subtleties of the work become apparent, highlighting Rudel’s meticulous workmanship. His wood, leather and fabric wall sculptures often call to mind abstracted bodily forms, generalizing them into lyrical compositions of organic curves.


Robert Therrien (b. 1947) Untitled (Purple Arch) 1976 Oil, wax and wood 96 x 26 x 4 in. 3695

Provenance: ACE Gallery, Los Angeles. Private collection acquired from the above on January 30, 1990.

Robert Therrien was born in Chicago in 1947. He received his BFA from the Brooks Institute in Santa Barbara in 1971 and went on to earn his MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1974. Over the course of his career he has exhibited worldwide, including shows at Gagosian Gallery in New York and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. He currently lives and works in Los Angeles, having built a reputation as one of the most accomplished artists working in Southern California today. Therrien’s unique oeuvre transforms banal elements of popular culture and everyday life into works of timeless clarity. Such works include his series of monumental tables and chairs, giant-sized stacks of pots, plates and bowls, and fifteen-foot fake beards hanging on their stands. Since the early 1990s, Therrien’s sculpture has become larger, more emphatically threedimensional and in many cases more clearly representational. Therrien’s works seem to become intrinsic to the environment they occupy. Consequently Therrien is often an active participant in the design of his exhibitions. As curator Lynn Zelevansky observed, “Therrien’s is an art of paradox and balance…In the perfection of their proportions these sculptures suggest rationality and objectivity but their narrative associations denote interiority and personal history.”


List of available works China Adams Glass Box #25 1995 Artists burdensome possessions 15 x 15 1/2 x 15 1/2 in.

Lawrence Carroll Untitled 1990 Oil on paper 26 1/4 x 31 in. (22 1/4 x 17 1/2 in. unframed)

3581

3676

China Adams Glass Box #25 1995 Artists burdensome possessions 21 1/2 x 21 1/2 x 25 in.

Lawrence Carroll Untitled 1990 Oil on paper 26 1/4 x 31 in. (22 1/4 x 17 1/2 in. unframed)

3582

3677

David Amico Gold Field 1992 Oil and wax on canvas 36 x 25 in.

Lawrence Carroll Untitled 1990 Oil on paper 58 1/2 x 47 1/4 in. (50 x 38 1/4 in. unframed)

3583

3678

David Amico Turnip 1995 Oil on canvas 42 x 36 in.

Mary Corse Black Light Painting 1989 Micro glass spheres in paint on canvas 36 x 36 in.

3584

3586

David Amico Green C 1990 Oil on canvas 36 x 25 in.

Mary Corse Black Light Painting 1992 Micro glass spheres in paint on canvas 16 x 16 in.

3585

3587

Lawrence Carroll Untitled 1995 Oil on paper 26 1/4 x 31 in. (22 1/4 x 17 1/2 in. unframed)

Mary Corse Triple Black Arch 1991 Micro glass spheres in paint on canvas 24 x 60 in.

3675

3588


Mary Corse White Light Painting 1990 Micro glass spheres in paint on canvas 48 x 48 in.

Tim Hawkinson Islamic Liturgy 1992 Gesso, wax, ink, shellac, on paper on board 47 in. diameter

3589

3597

Mary Corse White Light Painting 1992 Micro glass spheres in paint on canvas 16 x 16 in.

Tim Hawkinson Plexi glass framed clock 1996 Clock mechanism 10 1/4 x 8 1/4 x 1 in.

3590

3598

Charles Fine Thaw IV 1994 Encaustic on lead 38 x 25 1/4 in.

Tim Hawkinson Blindspots Contour Photography 1996 Photomontage on foam core 40 1/4 x 24 in.

3591

3599

Charles Fine Fieldmarks 1993 Oil, ink, Asphaltum on Mylar on linen on paper 32 x 22 in. each. (diptych)

Tim Hawkinson Shoes 1993 Plaster and shoes 14 x 7 x 6 in.

3592

3600

Charles Fine Huitlacoche 1992 Encaustic and bee’s wax on wood 19 x 11 x 3 in.

Tim Hawkinson Untitled 1992 Enamel on paper on wood 89 x 38 in.

3593

3601

Charles Fine Fieldmarks XI 1993 Oil, ink, Asphaltum on Mylar on linen on panel 87 x 62 in.

Tim Hawkinson The Log Section 1995 String, cardboard and wooden picks 30 1/2 in. diameter x 10 in.

3594

3602


Tim Hawkinson Tusk 1988 132 Jello molds on iron plate 17 x 13 x 11 in.

Jene Highstein Untitled 1992 Bone black pigment on paper 41 1/2 x 53 in.

3603

3609

Tim Hawkinson Stamtrad 1997 Pencil on popsicle sticks 78 in. diameter

Jene Highstein Totem 1992 Dry pastel on paper 50 x 38 in.

3604

3610

Tim Hawkinson Forest Ear 1995 Wood and mixed media 72 x 48 x 2 1/2 in.

Susan Hutchinson Sorrow Floats 1995 Resin and acrylic on wood panel 48 x 48 in.

3605

3679

Anton Henning Untitled 1989 Mixed media on paper 46 x 35 in.

Susan Hutchinson Whole Lotta Love 1993 Resin on panel 48 x 48 in.

3606

3680

Jene Highstein Untitled 1992 Pigment and graphite on paper 63 x 59 3/4 in.

Jannis Kounellis Untitled 1998 Fabric, lead, sheets, scissors 79 x 71 x 14 1/2 in.

3607

3681

Jene Highstein Untitled 1992 Pigment and graphite on paper 63 x 59 3/4 in.

David Mach Match Head Matches, glue 5 1/2 x 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 in.

3608

3700


David Mach Flower Vase 1996 Wire coat hangers 31 1/2 x 26 in.

John Millei Untitled Drawing #7 1992 Oil, ink, graphite on mylar 66 x 48 in.

3682

3688

John Millei Untitled Oil on paper 24 x 27 3/4 in. (unframed)

Thomas Nozkowski Untitled 1992 Oil on canvas board 31 1/4 x 16 1/4 in.

3683

3689

John Millei Untitled Oil on paper 35 5/8 x 31 5/8 in. 3684

Thomas Nozkowski Untitled 1994 Oil on linen on panel 20 x 16 in. 3690

John Millei Revised and Expanded 1993 Oil on canvas 36 x 42 in.

Thomas Nozkowski Untitled 1992 Oil on canvas board 23 1/4 x 29 1/4 in.

3685

3691

John Millei Dismantling the Silence 1993-94 Oil on canvas 36 x 42 in.

Ron Reihel Elutheria 1993 31 x 26 3/4 x 10 in. 3692

3686

John Millei Old School 1994 Oil on canvas 36 x 42 in. 3687

Ron Reihel C 1994 15 1/2 x 18 x 16 1/2 in. 3693


Ross Rudel Untitled #5 1992 Stained wood 23 x 18 x 5 1/2 in. 3694

Robert Therrien Untitled (Purple Arch) 1976 Oil, wax and wood 96 x 26 x 4 3695


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Heather James Fine Art Selected New Acquisitions  

Heather James Fine Art Selected New Acquisitions