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Spring & Summer 2019

The premier recreational guide for Benzie, Manistee and Mason counties


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partner to offer summer entertainment DAVE YARNELL ■ VENTURE STAFF WRITER If those participating in this summer’s Midweek Mornings in Manistee series aren’t careful, in addition to being entertained, they just might learn something. For the second summer, Old Kirke Museum, the Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts and the Vogue Theatre are teaming up to offer programs in July and August that will get people out — and get them thinking. Ramsdell programs will be on Tuesdays, Vogue programs on Wednesdays, and Old Kirke’s on Thursdays. All are at 10 a.m., except for the first program at the

The Vogue Theatre hosts Wednesday Morning Classics every week all year-round.

INDEX Midweek Mornings............................................... 3 Manistee County fishing....................................... 6 Canoeing, kayaking & tubing................................ 8 Nels Johnson clocks........................................... 10 Manistee sesquicentennial................................. 12 Historical golf course.......................................... 14 Bear Lake summer fun....................................... 18 Manistee Civic Players........................................ 20 Onekama boat house......................................... 22 Manistee County events calendar....................... 24 Alpaca farm....................................................... 28 Kaleva attractions.............................................. 29 Benzie County fishing......................................... 31 Benzie County events calendar........................... 35 Michigan Legacy Art Park.................................... 37 Beulah charm.................................................... 39 Frankfort shopping & dining .............................. 41 Ludington Pumped Storage Plant....................... 43 Ludington fishing tournament............................. 45 Mason County events calendar........................... 47 Service Directory................................................ 50

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Old Kirke, which is at 1 p.m. on July 4.

of this unique program for visitors and residents of our county.”

The Ramsdell’s theme is Talks, Tunes and Tours; the Vogue screens classic films on Wednesdays year round, and the Old Kirke’s theme is First Person Stories and Songs. The Ramsdell and Olde Kirke programs are free (donations are accepted) while there is a $2 charge for the classic films at the Vogue.

Ruth Cooper has been the host for the Vogue’s classic movies for several years and she and her husband Ken are also spearheading the programs at the Old Kirke.

According to Sara Herberger, volunteer and services manager at the Vogue, the program started three years ago with the Vogue and Ramsdell, and then the Old Kirke Museum joined last year. “We are honored that alongside the foundational grants for our organizations, the Jaycees, Chamber, Moose and Rotary lent financial support to help offset printing costs,” Herberger said. “This has been a grassroots and collaborative effort. This year we hope to increase our advertising

“From the start the Vogue planned to show classic movies and about a year into them I told Marty Yaple that I just love it on TCM (Turner Classic Movies) when people introduce the movies and give some background. I said I wish you would do that here, and he said, ‘Great, why don’t you do that?’ “I think this July will be my fourth year of introducing movies,” she said. In an interesting twist, the Coopers won a TCM competition recently for which Ken flew to Atlanta to introduce Ruth’s favorite movie, “The Music Man.” Ruth plans to show Ken’s TCM introduction when “The Music

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Man” is shown Aug. 21. “It’s great to have three groups working together to do this,” Ruth Cooper said. “We had lots of very positive comments last year about the program.” Summer visitors make up a lot of the audience, she said. “In the winter, the classic movies average about 30 people, but in the summer it really jumps up. It’s not uncommon to have over 100.” Ken Cooper said he was impressed with the turnout for the programs at the Old Kirke last year. “The smallest audience we had was 25 and I think we averaged 35 to 40 each week,” he said. “We had as many as 70. I think, considering that we just started the program, that was pretty good.” “I think we’ll do much better this year because we have air conditioning at the Old Kirke,” Ruth said. Ken added that improvements

to the exhibition space in the basement will also be a draw. “We are partnering with the Manistee County Historical Museum because it’s Manistee’s sesquicentennial. The Old Kirke is a year older, so we celebrated ours last year. There were 17 churches, nine of them in a four block area of the Old Kirke, which we’ll be talking about during the summer.” Ken Cooper said the Old Kirke will be open for tours more days this summer – the first two Saturdays of July, August, September and October. “We’re talking with people at other historic buildings so there will be a good number of us open on Saturdays,” he said. The Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts is located at 101 Maple St., the Vogue Theatre at 383 River St. and the Old Kirke at 402 Walnut St. Find a full schedule of all events starting on page 24.

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Entertaining Manistee and beyond for 80 years!

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• Manistee Civic Players were formed in 1939. • First production was “The Night of January 16th”. • In 1951, the Manistee Drama Festival was formed and opened with Ruth Gordon’s “Over 21”. • In 1953, James Earl Jones began as a stage carpenter with the summer theatre at the Ramsdell and from 1955-1957 as an actor and stage manager • In 1963, the Manistee Civic Players began producing 4 shows a year and put back profits realized into the restoration of the theatre. The interior was painted, the gilt work redone, lighting fixtures revamped, the lobby and restrooms remodeled and the new doors installed at the main entrance Backstage improvements, along with basement dressing room refurbishments were done and a new stage and house lighting dimmer system was purchased. • In 1972, the Manistee Civic Players signed a lease with the City which allowed them to

manage the theatre portion and continue their restoration work. • In 1989, the Manistee Civic Players began to manage the entire building. • In 1995, Toni Trucks played the youngest daughter in “Fiddler on the Roof”. • In 2004, it became obvious that supporting the building’s operations along with their productions was financially draining the Manistee Civic Players so they asked the City to consider the work of a Governance Planning Committee. • In 2005, the City formed the Ramsdell Governance Authority to provide ongoing oversight to management, maintenance and restoration efforts which freed up the Manistee Civic Players to focus exclusively on their productions.

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Fishing a booming industry in Manistee County DYLAN SAVELA ■ VENTURE STAFF WRITER So where's the best salmon fishery on the entire globe? Arguably, it's right in our backyard. Manistee County's economy has many moving parts, but a major cog is undoubtedly the fishing industry. Two longstanding and local organizations — the Manistee County Sport Fishing Association and Tournament Trail — have been stewards of the sport, enriching the fishing opportunities for residents and visitors alike, most noticeably in the summer months. Salmon fishing tournaments are aplenty for Manistee County in the summer.

"The fishing industry as a whole has a huge economic impact on Manistee County," said Kevin Hughes, president of the Manistee County Sport Fishing Association. "From the motels, restaurants, tackle and sporting good dealers, the marinas, party stores, gas stations... All of those things benefit. "A lot of people choose to retire in this area because of the fishing." Hughes, a charter boat captain for nearly 40 years, has been part of the MCSFA since its inception, over three decades ago.

The Manistee County Sport Fishing Association will again hold its popular Kid Fish event on June 19 at Manistee's Man Made Lake. 6 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

"It’s a combination of professional charter captains, individual fishermen and business owners," Hughes explained. "Our mission is to enhance the fishing opportunities in Manistee County."

The organization has certainly been dedicated to that year in, year out, and the upcoming summer will be no exception. The MCSFA again played a role in the popular Tight Lines for Troops event, as this year's 10th annual installment took place on May 17 and 18. The free fishing tournament is open to all Michigan Veterans from all eras, wartime and peacetime. It aims to bring the nation's heroes together, to build and foster new relationships, share their experiences and enjoy fishing on Lake Michigan. The community has embraced the event, which is highlighted by the veterans' return to the harbor, during which time many onlookers line the channel — equipped with Red, White and Blue — to salute their past service and sacrifice. Members of the MCSFA are also qualified to participate in the summer-long Salmon Derby, which typically runs from Memorial Day to Labor Day. This year's derby is slated for May 25 to Sept. 8. New to this summer's slate is the MCSFA's first-ever fishing league, open to its members. "A lot of our members get together a couple times a month for some evening fishing on the inland lakes," Hughes explained. "We started doing it a little last year and it sort of took off, so we


want to do a little bit more with it this summer." Perhaps the premier MCSFA events of the summer occur in June, when the organization holds its annual Kid Fish, Ladies Classic fishing tournament and Budweiser Pro/Am fishing tournament in rapid succession. Kid Fish celebrated its 25th year last summer, with this season's event scheduled for June 19 at Manistee's Man Made Lake. With help of local sponsors, the free event gives children the chance to enjoy a day of fishing and the opportunity to win some prizes. Several hundred children typically participate each year. The kids will then give way to the adults, whose annual tournaments keep Lake Michigan bustling with fishing boats throughout the weekend. This year's Ladies Classic will be held June 21 and the Budweiser Pro/Am will be run June 22-23.

While the MCSFA has run its annual tournaments for three decades, it wasn't until later in its lifespan the Pro/Am became part of Tournament Trail's summer fishing circuit. This summer it joins the Onekama Fishing Tournament (Aug. 16-18), Manistee Salmon Splash (Aug. 23-25) and Manistee Monster (Sept. 6-8) as stops along the trail. "Tournament Trail is a circuit of 15 Lake Michigan salmon and trout tournaments that travels all along the lake, and Manistee has unique representation within that circuit, because it’s the only port that offers multiple tournaments sanctioned by the Tournament Trail," said Scott MacDonald of Tournament Trail. Each individual tournament offers its own flavor, but Tournament Trail assures there are opportunities for everyone. "There are different divisions for ladies and kids teams, pro teams,

Manistee County Sport Fishing Association's Kid Fish event has been held annually for 25 years. amateur teams, weekend warrior teams," MacDonald explained. "There really is something for everybody as long as you have a boat to go out in." Registration costs vary, as do the payouts and prizes, but there is certainly a lot of money to win on the Trail. Not to mention, the thrill of fishing on Lake Michigan.

"It’s an opportunity to get out and enjoy our salmon fishery, which is really world class," MacDonald said. "It competes with anywhere else on the planet." For more information on the MCSFA, visit mcsfa.org. For more on Tournament Trail, visit tournamenttrail.net.

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The Little Manistee River flows through the heart of the Manistee National Forest.

Canoeing, kayaking and tubing abundant in Manistee County KYLE KOTECKI ■ VENTURE STAFF WRITER

Tubing is a great way to spend a relaxing day on the river.

Manistee County does not suffer from a lack of things to do in the summer. With beaches, golf courses, trails and more seemingly everywhere you look, there are plenty of outdoor activities in which one can partake.

trip by planning the route ahead of time.

lacking the equipment to get out on the water.

The Big Manistee is ideal for inexperienced paddlers. The river is — as the name implies — big, and due to its great width, tight turns and fast currents are at a minimum. Kayaks, canoes and inner tubes are all equally at home on the Big Manistee.

There are plenty of access points on the Big Manistee. Tippy Dam, High Bridge, Bear Creek and Rainbow Bend are great places to start and you can paddle all the way to Lake Michigan, though it is probably safer to get out at the Douglas Recreation Area's boat launch.

"The Big Manistee is a family-friendly river," said Jim Baldwin, of Manistee Paddlesport Adventures. "It's bigger, of course, and there are fewer hazards. It's a pretty easy float down the Big Manistee."

The further up the Little Manistee one goes, the more challenging the trip can be. Starting out at Nine Mile Bridge or Six Mile Bridge will lead to swift currents, hairpin turns and fallen trees which may require paddlers to portage. If you are looking to go tubing, these access points are probably not for you.

A great way to take in the splendor of Manistee County is to head to the river with a canoe, kayak or inner tube and make your way downstream. There are plenty of options available in Manistee County for those looking to traverse the great outdoors by water. You can head to the Big Manistee River, Little Manistee River or Pine River. Each river has multiple places to put in so you can adjust the amount of time and level of difficulty of the

If you do not have access to a kayak, canoe or inner tube, Manistee Paddlesport Adventures offers a number of trip options for those

8 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

"The Little Manistee, especially certain sections of it — like between Nine Mile and Six Mile — are quite challenging," Baldwin said. "We don't recommend small kids on it. That section is definitely for experienced paddlers. And even the other sections are a little more difficult than the Big Manistee." However, if you have the skills, that section is Baldwin's favorite stretch of river. "If they're experienced paddlers, I would recommend Nine Mile to Six Mile," he said. "It's a blast if they're looking for an adventure and don't mind getting wet." Inner tubes are more appropriate from the Little Manistee Weir down. Old Stronach Bridge is


another access point, and you can get out at the Stronach Township Park, right by Manistee Lake.

The other way is to keep drinking to a minimum and to watch the weather, or know where you are kayaking or canoeing.”

Adrenaline junkies and experienced paddlers can demonstrate their skills on the Pine River. There are plenty of sharp turns and white water sections on the Pine River, so this is not an ideal body of water for families with young children or those looking to go tubing.

Wearing a life jacket is not only a good idea — in the case of young children, it is the law. “In any kind of vessel, if the boat is moving, anyone under 6 years old has to wear a type one or type two life jacket,” Sekuris said. “They have to wear it.”

The Pine passes through Osceola, Lake, Wexford and Manistee counties, with just the final leg contained in Manistee, but the river can make for an unforgettable day on the water.

If you are torn between opting for a kayak or a canoe, Baldwin says the kayak is the way to go.

The Low Bridge and Norman Dickson access points are in Manistee County, but adventurers would probably be best served starting higher up the river.

A kayak's maneuverability makes it an excellent choice for navigating fast-flowing waters. paddlers grinning from ear to ear.

river is a life preserver.

"I like kayaking," Baldwin said. "I think kayaking in just an individual, single kayak is a lot of fun. That's my preference, but if it's a family and they have small kids, then canoes work well because you can throw a child in the middle."

River passes are required to paddle on the Pine, so additional planning is a must. The rewards outweigh the hassle and a day on the Pine River is sure to have adventurous

Precautions should always be taken to ensure a safe trip. Water, sunscreen, bug spray and proper attire are important, but the most important must-have when on the

“The best way to avoid drowning is to wear your life jacket at all times,” said deputy Mike Sekuris of the Manistee County Sheriff’s Marine Division. “That’s the best way.

It is hard to beat a day floating down the river in the heart of the Manistee National Forest. Gather some friends, pack a lunch and experience the great outdoors.

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Famed clock maker keeps Manistee ticking to this day KEN GRABOWSKI â&#x2013; VENTURE STAFF WRITER When people think of famed Manistee clockmaker Nels Johnson, the natural tendency is to lift their gaze toward the skies. The reasoning for that thought process is most of Johnson's most famous work was done in clock towers high above the ground, located in churches and other buildings of note. It is a craft that not only amazed the people of his era from the late 1800s to the early 1900s, but still does to this day. One of the many interesting things about this immigrant who came to America from Denmark is although he lived in an era prior to the internet, television and many other sources of communication, his work became known well beyond the borders of Manistee County. Over the course of his life, he created 50 clock towers located around the world, yet lived a simple existence in Manistee until his death in 1914. An article that appeared the Aug. 12, 1948, edition of the Manistee News Advocate included comments made by the famed clock maker's daughter Kate Johnson Shanabrook, who lived Los Angeles, California, at the time. "My father built over 50 clock towers, some of which were distributed to cities around the world, "said Shanabrook. "Two were sent to Detroit, one in the Fort Street Union Depot and the other was in the old post office

The clock tower at the First Congregational Church in Manistee is one of the works of famed clock maker Nels Johnson and is still running and keeping good time 100 years later. Johnson and custom house. Others were sent to California, Milwaukee, Rochester, New York, Isabella Theburn College in Indiana and two in the British Isles." Johnson also constructed many smaller clocks over the years, but it was his clock towers that drew the greatest interest. Manistee County Historical Museum executive director Mark Fedder said the impression Johnson made on Manistee exists to this day in his work. "His work is known around the world and some of his works in Manistee are the First Congregational Chuch clock (located at 412 Fourth St.), Guardian Angels Church clock (located at 371 Fifth St.) and St. Joseph Church clock (located at 249 Sixth St.)," said Fedder. "They were all Nels Johnson clocks so he still is very well

10 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

This photograph from 1892 shows the First Congregational church under construction and right before the clock tower was added to the front of the church that was created by Nels Johnson. known here in Manistee." Johnson also created the Arcadia Lutheran Church clock tower, located at 17191 Third St., Arcadia. Fedder said Johnson's brilliance extended beyond his knowledge of making clocks. "Simply put, he was a brilliant man and very unique individual," said Fedder. "He was a very unique

character in Manistee's history. He was a clock maker, businessman, philosopher, mathematician, astronomer and was an all around brilliant person." Johnson lived in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, prior to coming to Manistee working first as a blacksmith and then later in a machine shop. It was in that machine shop that he honed skills that would


assist in the tools being used in sawmills and other parts of the logging industry.

attended none of them did."

"He had no large factory, but did all the work in his own shop single-handedly and with his own materials and through his his own capital," said Shanabrook. "He started this business in 1872 and although his shop was basically for the building of saw mill machinery, he soon switched over to the manufacturing of clocks which was his hobby."

would show the correct time. So much, that he would often take it upon himself to climb the 129 steps to the tower to regularly check and make minor adjustments on the clock.

That was, in essence, true for the clock tower as well that Johnson At that time, Manistee was in its installed in 1905 with the assispeak of the lumber era, and when tance of lumber baron John CanJohnson arrived on the scene he field's family. The tower includes a teamed up in business with O.A. large bell and 90-pound hammer Wheeler, a commercial shipper and was a gift to the church. On and tug boat operator. Johnthe side of the bell an inscription son repaired and built sawmill reads "Presented to the First Conmachinery. gregational Church of Manistee by However, as his daughter later said his daughters in loving memory of their father, John Canfield." his true love lay in the creation of making clocks, which he created What made this clock even more out of his shop at the corner of interesting was Johnson had a First and Cedar streets in Manistee. certain affinity to making sure it

What amazed many was despite the success he was having with clocks towers being located all over the country and world, Johnson was essentially a one man band in his operation, according to his daughter. "My father never employed anyone in his clock shop and it was his wish that his two sons might continue in the business, but they never could quite follow in his steps," said Shanabrook. Although Johnson died in 1914, his legacy lives on in some of the churches today. The popularity is, in part, because of their great historical significance. First Congregational Church chairman of the board Duane Jones said the church was really a part of the lumber era is a large part of the community's history. "From a historical standpoint it had the nickname 'Lumber Barons Cathedral'," said Jones. "And interesting enough, all of the lumber barons put a lot of money in there and although all of their wives

He would also pencil in notes on the walls of the clock housing that would update the condition of one of his favorite pieces. He even added a personal touch writing one day, "Today is my 75th birthday."

The clock tower above the historic Guardian Angels Church in Manistee is another of many works of Nels Johnson that were put up around the country and across the world.

The clock is still wound weekly by volunteers who climb the steps. A group called the Guardian Angels Historic Preservation Project began in 2018 to preserve the church and hence the Johnson clock. Matt LaMore heads up the group, which submitted an application to the State Historic Preservation Review Board in Lansing seeking a spot on the national register. "Guardian Angels is a time capsule of our Victorian heritage and our lumber era," said LaMore. It is a sentiment shared at the historical St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Manistee as well. One of Johnson's first clock towers was installed locally in the Larsen Building at 351-355 River St. in 1900 and was a great point of community pride. However, a fire in 1913 destroyed the building and the clock taking away one of of his many great works.

The clock tower above the St. Joseph Church in Manistee is another local example of the work of Nels Johnson. VENTURE: SPRING 2019

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“An Evening in the Park” will be presented at 6 p.m. in early August at Rietz Park, which was a popular place to spend a Sunday afternoon at for decades. Pictured is group enjoying what it had to offer in the early 1900s.

Celebrating Manistee's Sesquicentennial Events to commemorate city’s history throughout 2019

The Manistee County Historical Museum, along with other area businesses and organizations, is hosting a variety of events throughout the year that will help in honoring the past 150 years. “The museum couldn’t be more excited to celebrate this special year in the city’s history,” said Mark Fedder, executive director of the Manistee County Historical Museum. "We wanted these events to be unique … not only to be educational but also honor the many different aspects of our community. When thinking about what topics to highlight, the museum decided to place emphasis on some of the aspects of the city that don’t always receive the most attention.” The following events will be taking place throughout the year to mark the celebration: • June 6 — “Manistee Before Manistee” 6:30 p.m. at Manistee County Historical Museum While the city of Manistee’s sesquicentennial celebrates everything from 1869 onward, what was Manistee like prior to 1869? Former museum director, Steve Harold will cover what was happening in Manistee before the city was incorporated. There is no cost to this event however, donations will be accepted. Seating is limited in the museum. 12 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

• June 26 — “Moments in Manistee’s History”

• July & August “The Old Churches of Manistee”

Manistee County Historical Museum

The Old Kirke Museum, 304 Walnut St.

The exhibit will begin on June 26 and continue through Sept. 30

Cost: Donations accepted

A unique photo exhibit at the Manistee County Historical Museum that will explore moments from the city’s last 150 years. Curated from thousands of photographs, this exhibit will display an array of photographs pertaining to buildings and people to fires and events that all played a part in shaping the community we live in today. There is a cost for admission to the museum. • July 6 — “A Peek Inside the Lighthouse” 1-4 p.m. Manistee North Pierhead Lighthouse (off of Fifth Avenue Beach) Take a look inside Manistee’s iconic North Pierhead Lighthouse. While the entire lighthouse will not be open for tours, local historian and former museum director, Steve Harold will be on hand to answer questions about the history of the structure as well as discuss possible future fundraising that will take place in order to restore the interior of the lighthouse. There is no cost for this event, but donations will be accepted.

The Old Churches of Manistee exhibit displays archival and contemporary photographs, artifacts, and brief histories of the churches built in Manistee in its early days as a city. The show is housed alongside the Madsen Lumbering Dioramas in the Museum’s newly developed exhibit space. The Museum is open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. the first and second Saturday of the month July to October and before and after the 10 a.m. First Person Stories and Songs speakers’ series each Thursday morning in July & August. It is also open other days by chance or by appointment; call John Hanson, (231) 723-2744. • Early August (check back soon for the official date) — “An Evening in the Park” 6 p.m. at Rietz Park Manistee has some of the most beautiful recreational opportunities in Northern Michigan. The development of these parks is rich in history; discover how they came to be. This presentation is for the entire family — lay a blanket on the ground or bring the lawn chairs and learn the


stories behind these parks. The presentation will be provided by Mark Fedder, executive director of the Manistee County Historical Museum. There is no cost for this event, but donations to the museum will be accepted. • Aug. 21 — “To Maxwelltown & Beyond: A Trolley Tour ” 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Manistee County Transportation, 180 Memorial Drive An often overlooked part of the city is the area that has been referred to as “Maxwelltown” for generations. This unique neighborhood is one of the most historic areas in all of the city with many buildings that have stood the test of time. Hop aboard the trolley at the Manistee County Transportation and explore the history of Maxwelltown. There will be two trolley tours. Seating capacity is limited to 21 people for each tour. The tour is free however, donations to the museum will be accepted. Tickets will be given out to the first people that RSVP in person at the Manistee County Historical Museum. Tickets on sale July 15. • Sept. 18 — “A Walking Tour of the ‘Hill’ Homes: PART 2” 2 p.m. meet at the Manistee County Historical Museum Take a walking tour and learn about the history behind the homes located on Manistee’s west side. Local historian, Teena Kracht will lead the tour. This tour is strictly a walking tour of the outside of the homes. Wear walking shoes. There is no cost to this event however, donations will be accepted. Tour will last approximately 1.5 to two hours. • Nov. 4 — “How It Was Made: The Past & Present of Manistee’s Industry and Manufacturing” 5:30 p.m. North Channel Brewing Co., 86 Washington St. Seating is limited to 50 people. Tickets are available at the Manistee County Historical Museum and go

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While everyone knows how lumber and salt has played an important part of the development of Manistee, this presentation will focus on the other industries and manufacturing that helped develop Manistee over the past 150 years with help from the Manistee Manufactures Council who will talk about current manufacturers. The presentation will be provided by Mark Fedder, executive director of the Manistee County Historical Museum. • November (An official date has not been selected. Call the Manistee County Historical Museum at (231) 723-5531 for further details) — “Vanderpool & Field Resuscitated” Manistee High School Auditorium, 525 12th St. A joint venture between the Manistee High School Drama Club and the Manistee County Historical Museum, this dramatic interpretation of one of Manistee’s most sensational murder cases will show (and tell) the mysterious events surrounding the death of Herbert Field presumably by the hands of his business partner, George Vanderpool. Rediscover the most stirring event that took place in the city of Manistee in 1869. • December — “Wintertime in the City” Manistee County Historical Museum Throughout the month of December (closed Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve) A special exhibit of photographs displaying the winter season in the city of Manistee over the last 150 years. Curated from the museum’s archives, this exhibit will feature photographs of buildings, people, fires and various events during the winter seasons of yesteryear. There is a cost for admission to the museum. For more information on the Sesquicentennial and to purchase tickets for some of the events, contact the Manistee County Historical Museum at (231) 723-5531; the museum is located at 425 River St.

Take a peek inside the Manistee North Pierhead Lighthouse from 1-4 p.m. on July 6 as part of the Manistee County Historical Museum's celebration of the city's sesquicentennial. Pictured is the lighthouse, circa 1940s.

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This view shows how the Manistee Golf and Country Club looks today. Additions have been made to the original structure over the years, but the appearance is similar to what was originally constructed more than 100 years ago.

Take a step back in time to play a round BY KEN GRABOWSKI â&#x2013; VENTURE STAFF WRITER The City of Manistee has always been known for promoting its rich heritage that came out of the lumber industry in the late 1800s, creating a true Victorian Village on the shores of Lake Michigan. From the ornate downtown architectural structures that line its River Street area to a magnificent 104-year-old Ramsdell Theatre, the community is blessed with many gems that are the envy of other communities. However, what is often overlooked is the fact that it is also the home to one of the oldest golf courses in Michigan.

The Manistee Golf & Country Club, located at 500 Cherry St., opened 118 years ago in 1901. Area golfers first began teeing off on this 18 hole, 5,614 yard course in June of 1901 when President Teddy Roosevelt occupied the White House and even before they had automobiles to drive to its location. Manistee Golf & Country Club board president Fred Niles said the old world charm of that bygone era is something they strive to remember and preserve to this day. "It is something we are certainly looking to do," said Niles. "It

14 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

This 1920s view of the Manistee Golf and Country club shows after it was moved to its present location. has been discussed getting the course on the (national) historical register. It isn't anything that was pursued in the past, but we have discussed it a bit. I think most of the board members and membership agree it would be worthwhile for us to maintain that historic sense of the club." Three years prior to its 1901 opening, the founders of the Manistee Golf & Country Club

began discussing the possibility of bringing golf to Manistee. According to the history of the MG&CC, lumber barons Frank Canfield, Edward Buckley and Robert Babcock and their wives boarded a Manistee and Grand Rapids Railroad train (where the former Johnson Funeral Home was located on River Street) and began a journey to Thomasville, Georgia. That was where their


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wives had family connections, and they combined that visit with doing some quail shooting for the holidays. The group had talked for quite some time about starting a golf course on the Canfield-Wheeler farm, which is the location of the present Manistee Golf & Country Club. According to local legend, Buckley was heard to say to Canfield, "Frank, if these Thomasville girls sell us on the idea of a country club, you ought to close up your farm and let us build a golf links." As it turned out, that is exactly what Candfield did. The local course was actually based off the Glen Arvin Country Club in Thomasville, Georgia, where the Manistee group vacationed, and it was the place where they met the man who designed the first nine holes of the course. Twenty-nine-yearold Scottish golf course designer Tom Bendelow designed the first 2,765 yards and nine holes of the course. Serving as the first set of officers for the new country club were Edward Buckley (president), Charles Canfield (vice president), George Swigert (secretary) and Robert Babcock (treasurer.) The directors included some of Manistee's finest citizens in J.W. Dempsey, Patrick Noud, E. Golden Filer, W.J. Gregory and J.E. Merritt. Niles said individuals like that add to the historical tale of the club. "We put together a video history of the club a few years ago and Pat Williams and Jim Sibley were the narrators of it," said Niles. "A lot of the printed history of the club is discussed on that video and it is available to watch on YouTube." One of the most historical aspects is the clubhouse. Although additions have been made to the structure over the

years, the front portion looks strikingly similar to what it did back in 1901. It was designed by architects from Manistee and Saginaw and constructed in a mere 60 days at the cost of only $2,000 by contractors Cichanowski and Bruns and was compact in nature because the Manistee and Grand Rapids Railroad tracks ran through the course until the clubhouse was later moved to its present location. Golf equipment was much different in those early days and people's understanding of the game were very rudimentary. Clubs had a hickory wood shaft and balls were nowhere near what is available today. As the lumber industry declined, the club reached out more to the public for members and during the Great Depression of the 1930s it struggled financially like everything else. In 1939, the decision was made by the directors to operate the club more like a business and hire a full-time manager to run it. Ed O'Conner served in that position until his retirement in 1977. During that time, the club grew in membership and in the way the course was maintained. Watering systems, locker room improvements, a restaurant and many other amenities were added. With the course featuring holes along Lake Michigan it gained in its reputation as a great location to play a round of golf, but it also never lost that historic appeal.

This advertisement from the early 1900s shows when a round of golf only cost $1 at the Manistee Golf and Country Club.

Now, Niles said there is often a misconception that the club is private, but that isn't true.rue. "It was at one time, but it has been a long time since the club has gone public," he said. "I guess we could characterize it as semi-private as there are memberships, but certainly the public is wholeheartedly welcome to the club."

16 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

This photograph shows the old clubhouse at the Manistee Golf and Country Club from the early 1900s when it was first constructed.


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Bear Lake offers summer fun, small town experiences ROBERT MYERS ■ VENTURE STAFF WRITER For some, it’s just another small town they have slow down for while traveling on U.S. 31, but for those who live there or have chosen to stop and visit, the Village of Bear Lake has a special summertime charm.

The road is dotted with small public access beaches. Typically, they have room for two cars at most to park, but this only means beach-goers will enjoy a tiny beach all to themselves. All they must do is pick their favorite spot.

Its charm may well begin with the lake that is the village’s namesake. One can experience glimpses of the lake driving by on U.S. 31, but the true experience demands more than a passing glance.

Bear Lake is shallow for a lake its size, meaning it warms up quickly Bear Lake’s small public access beaches on the east side of the lake in the summer. Particularly on the offer perfect spots to enjoy a summer afternoon. east side, swimmers can wander quite far from shore without the water ever reaching their waists.

One of the great ways to experience the summertime atmosphere of Bear Lake is to talk a walk, a drive or a bike ride along Lakeside Avenue. The roughly 1.5-mile stretch of road between U.S. 31 and Butwell Road takes you slowly by houses and cottages on the eastern shore of Bear Lake, mere feet from where the water gently laps against the shoreline. On a summer day, you’ll see families sitting out in their yards or on their docks, with children playing in the water. Oftentimes there is a summer meal on the grill, or families are gathered around a campfire. More often that not, you will run into other walkers, runners or bikers along the way. The east shore is for more than just cottage owners to enjoy.

If the small public access points are taken or beach-goers want to get a larger group together, larger beaches are available at the end of Butwell Road on the northwest side, Hopkins Park, as well as at the corner of U.S. 31 and South Shore Drive and end of Seventh Street on the south side. Hopkins Park offers plenty more than a beach. The park also serves as a friendly RV park along the shores of the lake just down the hill from downtown. Hopkins Park, named after one of the community’s early families in the 1800s, offers a playground, swim area and picnic pavilion. It is also a popular location to watch fireworks over the lake during the community’s annual Bear Lake Days celebration on the second Saturday of July.

18 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

Bear Lake's beaches are a popular summer destination. The park is also home to one of several boat launches around the lake. If you don’t have a boat, don’t worry. Bear Lake Marine is located right next to the park. They offer rentals for almost any vessel you're looking for on the

lake, including hydrobikes, pontoon boats, canoes, kayaks, water rafts, stand up paddle boards and more. After a fun day on the lake, Bear Lake offers several options to


grab a bite to eat. Lakeside Café is located downtown and offers lunch and dinner. Grill 44 can be found on the northeast end of town next to Saddle Up Grocery and features plenty of options for lunch and dinner, along with 22 beers on tap. Their wood-fired pizza is also a popular takeout item. Another popular spot for a takeout pizza is the Blarney Castle EZ Mart on the west side of town. If camping isn’t your thing, you can spend the night at Bella Vista Inn or find a unique experience at Bear Lake Bed and Breakfast. Outside of the village lies several other cabin and resort destinations, which can be found on the northern and western sides of the lake and offer their own unique opportunities and excitement. There are also several campgrounds nearby for those willing to stay further away from the lake. Visitors can take home a taste of

Bear Lake before they leave town by stopping at the Bear Lake Farmers Market, open from 2-6 p.m. on Fridays during the summer months. The farmers market is located just norther of another popular summer destination, the Bear Lake Highlands Golf Course, at 11962 Chippewa Hwy. In addition to the golf course, visitors to the community can find outdoor recreation at the Bear Lake Community Recreation Complex, located on school property between South Shore Avenue just 1.5 miles west of U.S. 31. The complex is home to baseball and softball fields as well as the Bear Lake High School cross country course where four state championship teams have run. The flat running course winds its way through a pine tree forest surrounding the ball fields. To find out more about Bear Lake, visit the village's webpage at http://www.bearlakemichigan. org/.

At the Bear Lake Community Recreation Complex you can play baseball, softball or run/walk the school's cross country course.

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In the 1950s, the Manistee Civic players produced "Ah Wilderness" at the Ramsdell Theatre.

Civic Players celebrates 80 years of community theater DAVID YARNELL ■ VENTURE STAFF WRITER Very few towns in America — or even big cities, for that matter — can boast that they've had community theater for 80 years. This year the Manistee Civic Players are celebrating 80 years. The group got its start in 1939 as a way to provide programming for Manistee's historic Ramsdell Theatre. “Being around long enough to celebrate our 80th anniversary is quite an accomplishment,” said Carol Burba, vice president of the MCP board of directors and chairperson of the MCP anniversary celebration. “We are one of the oldest community theaters in Michigan. I believe there are only three others that are older.” MCP board members Jackie Karnisz and Jennie Naffie are also on the 80th anniversary committee.

The highlight of the celebration will be the Manistee Civic Players' 80th Birthday Gala, set for Sept. 14 at the Ramsdell. The first MCP play, “The Night of January 16th,” opened exactly 80 years earlier – on Sept. 14, 1939.

vice president; Kari Reed, secretary; Wilford Green, treasurer; Rev. W.R. Catton; Charlotte Townsend; J.W. Krause; Alice Heckathorne; Crystine Emunson; Dennis Shea; John Wallace; John Hensel; Elizabeth Thomas; Ruth Clarkson; Robert Miller; Lee Howard; Leonard Franckowiak; Ray Kaminski; Phidelas Ziemba; Helen Henchey; Robert D’Arcy; Jane Dillard; Jeanette Peterson and Irma Olson.

“It will be a great evening,” Burba said. “There will be a silent auction, reception in Hardy Hall, memorabilia all around Hardy Hall, followed by live performances of music from past shows and video scenes from In the next two years, four more plays were presented — “The Brat” MCP productions in the theater.” in 1939, “It Won't Be Long Now” The organization was named “Civic and “The Tavern” in 1940 and “And Players” when formed on June Let Who Would Be Clever” in 1941. 5, 1939, under the leadership of World War II brought an end to Eugene Emunson, who was also shows at the Ramsdell, but in 10 the director for that first play. years a similar group was formed, The first officers and charter mem- “Manistee Drama Festival.” In bers of the group besides Emun1956 the name was changed to son as president were Max Hamlin, Manistee Drama Association and in

20 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

1964 it was changed to Manistee Civic Players. Beginning in 1951 the Ramsdell Theatre was best known for its summer theater. In fact one of the reasons for forming the Manistee Drama Festival group was to differentiate between summer professional theater and local amateur productions. The local theater group strove to produce two shows during the off season. When summer theater ended in 1963, the Civic Players' goal was to have at least four plays per year, with one being a musical. “Guys and Dolls,” in the fall of 1963, was the Civic Players' first musical and was the talk of the town for many years. The Civic Players hired the first professional staff in 1979 – Peter


Bliznick – as managing director. He held the post for two years until lack of finances led to the non-renewal of his contract. Ruth Cooper was hired as business manager in 1988, and she remained on staff for five years. Ron Steinberg, who had been on the Civic Players’ board of directors for many years, served as executive director from 1993 until the 2006. JoAnn Muma was on the MCP board of directors from 2004 to 2017 and was executive director from 2007 until 2018. The Civic Players’ entire 2019 season is dedicated to the 80th anniversary and includes “Legally Blonde, The Musical” at 7:30 p.m. on June 28, 29, July 5, 6 and at 2 p.m. on June 30 and July 7 at the Ramsdell Theatre; “Miss Holmes” at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 18, 19, 25, 26 and at 2 p.m. on Oct. 20 and 27 at Manistee High School; and “Elf the Musical” at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 6, 7. 13, 14 and at 2 p.m. on Dec. 8 and

you're in a play you want to do the best job you can because your grandmother, grandfather, spouse and kids are out in the audience. That's what it's all about.” Burba said that just as important as putting on shows for the community is the fact that MCP gives many people the opportunity to get on stage.

goodness I had some seasoned actors in the cast and help from the board of directors. I couldn't have done it without them.

“I've worked on the Christmas shows forever, it seems, and last year there were 17 kids in the cast,” she said. “I had a little girl come up to me after the show and she said, 'Miss Carol, I love this. I want to do this when I grow up.' She was the shyest little thing when she tried out, but she learned to be a confident actor and that's always really cool to see.

“We're held together by string,” she said of the Civic Players. “We've always had dedicated boards of hard working people who are not afraid to beg. The magic of community theater has held us together. When

“In most communities you don't get the opportunity to be on stage,” Burba continued. “For every show the puzzle pieces are different and it's just wonderful to witness the bonding that occurs.”

Manistee Civic Players performed "The Addams Family" in October 2018. 15 at Manistee High School. Through most years the Manistee Civic Players have struggled to survive – and Burba notes that putting on shows isn't an easy undertaking either. “The first time I stepped up to the plate to direct I was totally overwhelmed,” she said. “Thank

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The Fenmoor Cottage is iconic for its boat shape, and was constructed in 1930.

Unique home full of history JANE BOND ■ VENTURE STAFF WRITER

Northern Michigan is full of treasures to discover at every turn, but some of the most unique finds take a little exploring to stumble upon. One of those secrets is tucked along the winding roads near Portage Point in Onekama, quite literally "off the beaten path" on Lakeisle Avenue. The road begins with modest cottages that come to life in the summer season, but one in particular stands out among the rest: it's the one that looks like a boat. The R.E. Harris or "Fenmoor" Cottage was designed and constructed in 1930 by Roscoe E. Harris, a professor at Lake Forest College in Illinois. Built as an actual boathouse, Harris spent

two summers constructing his vacation home. Like many, Harris wanted a vacation home "up north," and elected to build it himself from the ground up. He was familiar with the area thanks to family friends who owned property just across Portage Lake, said his great-grandson John Hoffman. "There weren’t any houses yet, it was all empty lots. These were probably up for sale in the newspaper in the Chicago Tribune," said Hoffman. "My uncle Michael Hoffman says the lot sits on about five lots. My dad recalls that he didn’t buy a lot near Lake Michigan, because it was too expensive."

22 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

Harris built every part of the iconic cottage himself, including the electricity and plumbing. Part of the draw to build it in a boat-shape was his love of boats, said Hoffman. "He built his own functional boat, which he treasured," he said. "He held doctorates in both math and physics and per his own accord, anyone with doctorates in math and physics should be able to build something." When originally constructed, the home was complete with a living room, fireplace, kitchen and two bedrooms, according to information compiled by Onekama resident Tom Gerhardt in 2008. The windows were shaped to go along with the nautical theme of

the home while each room was given a ship’s name. "The whimsical cottage’s symbol on the smokestack is topographic for swamp; and the cottage’s name, 'Fenmoor,' is interpreted as moored in swamp, as the course of Portage Creek, even when it is not inundated from the high waters of the lakes, often is marshy from a nearby spring-pond," Gerhardt wrote. "The two bedroom and bathroom in the back was designed by my grandmother Barbara, and they called it 'The Dingy,"" said Hoffman. At 90 years old, the cottage has seen plenty of maintenance over the years to keep it in shipshape.


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Miriam Pico and David Chown

Pop, Light Rock, Show Tunes & Blues, Masterfully Done The symbol on the smokestack is topographic for swamp, a tribute to the cottage’s name which is interpreted as “moored in swamp,” due to the property’s marshy tendencies due to the nearby springpond. "It has a flat roof (and) it had to be re-tarred often, so that required a lot of maintenance to make sure there was no leaks," said Hoffman. "Even though the posts on the gangplank going in are cedar, they eventually rotted, so they’ve been replaced a couple times. The septic tank has also needed maintenance." Hoffman often spent summers at the cottage, which is still owned within the family. "I unfortunately could not go every year, but since I was a child, I called it 'my peaceful place,'" he said. "The porch is covered by a screen so the mosquitoes from the swamp won’t get you. I remember sitting out there — or sleeping— listening to the summer rain." Beyond the history of the cottage itself, it also holds a fair amount of family history. "(Harris) also built in various

secret places to store things, and I remember stumbling across some of them quite by accident," said Hoffman. "His kids spent every summer there (my grandmother), then when my dad was born, he spent every summer there. Even by the kitchen doorposts, the heights of my father and uncle remain etched in pencil." In 1984, the Fenmoor cottage was placed on the Michigan State Register of Historic Places and appears on the National Register of Historic Places. The family significance, however, means far more than the cottage's historical recognition. "I love the boathouse, it truly is a sight to see, but to me it always was a family beacon," said Hoffman. "I went up last summer, and the smell of the lake and wood of the boathouse has not changed."

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2019

Manistee County Events Calendar

MAY

• 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fridays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • Noon to 4 p.m. Sundays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee

JUNE

• 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • Noon to 4 p.m. Sundays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee JUNE 1 • 8 p.m. Dwight Yoakam, Little River Casino Resort, Manistee JUNE 6 • 11 a.m. Manistee Area Chamber of Commerce Summer Blast Off Golf Outing, Manistee Golf & Country Club • 6:30 p.m. Manistee Before Manistee, Manistee County Historical Museum, 425 River St., Manistee JUNE 8 • Free Fishing Weekend, free ORV weekend • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Michigan Sports Academy-Livingston, Rietz Park JUNE 9 • Free Fishing Weekend, free ORV weekend

The S.S. City of Milwaukee and U.S. Coast Guard cutter Acacia are open for tours throughout the summer. • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Michigan Sports Academy-Livingston, Rietz Park

Douglas Park, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building)

Paul Brewer Quartet, Douglas Park, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building)

JUNE 14 • 10th annual Thunder at the River salute to veterans, Little River Casino Resort, 2700 Orchard Hwy, Manistee • 7:30 p.m. The McCartney Years (Beatles tribute), Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts, Manistee

JUNE 19 • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association Kid Fish Day, Man Made Lake

JUNE 26 • Moments in Manistee's History, photo exhibit kicks off continues through Sept. 30, Manistee County Historical Museum, 425 River St, Manistee

JUNE 15 • 10th annual Thunder at the River salute to veterans, Little River Casino Resort, 2700 Orchard Hwy, Manistee • Noon-10 p.m. Spirit of the Woods Music Festival, Dickson Township Park, Brethren • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Saginaw Sugar Beets, Rietz Park • 8 p.m. Clay Walker, Little River Casino Resort, Manistee JUNE 16 • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Saginaw Sugar Beets, Rietz Park JUNE 18 • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: Paul Nelson Band,

24 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

JUNE 21 • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association Ladies Classic Pro/ Am, Manistee • Manistee Rendezvous, Manistee Clan Muzzleloading Club, Camp Road, Manistee JUNE 22 • Manistee Rendezvous, Manistee Clan Muzzleloading Club, Camp Road, Manistee • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association Budweiser ProAm fishing tournament, Manistee JUNE 23 • Manistee Rendezvous, Manistee Clan Muzzleloading Club, Camp Road, Manistee • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association Budweiser ProAm fishing tournament, Manistee JUNE 25 • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: Robin Connell and

JUNE 28 • 1-5 p.m. Farmer's Market kicks off, every Friday through Labor Day, on U.S. 31 in Bear Lake • 7:30 p.m. “Legally Blonde, The Musical”, presented by the Manistee Civic Players, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts JUNE 29 • 1-4 p.m. Founder's Day, Marilla Museum & Pioneer Place, 9991 Marilla Road, Copemish • 7:30 p.m. “Legally Blonde, The Musical”, presented by the Manistee Civic Players, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Oil City Stags, Rietz Park • 1-4 p.m. Music on Bear Lake: Clear Heels, Bear Lake JUNE 30 • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee


Saints vs. Oil City Stags, Rietz Park • 2 p.m. “Legally Blonde, The Musical”, presented by the Manistee Civic Players, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts

JULY

• 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • Noon to 4 p.m. Sundays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee JULY 1 • Old Churches of Manistee exhibit kicks off, runs through Aug. 31, Old Kirke Museum, 304 Walnut St., Manistee • 7 p.m. Concerts in the Park: Schrock Brothers with Madcat, Onekama Village Park, Onekama JULY 2 • 10 a.m. Tuesday Talks, Tunes and Tours: “Once Upon a Time at the Opera House” by author James Berton Harris, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: Organissimo, Douglas Park, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building) JULY 3 • 10 a.m. Wednesday Morning Classic film: “Field of Dreams”, Vogue Theatre, Manistee JULY 4 • Manistee National Forest Festival, Manistee • 1 p.m. First Person Stories and Songs: Ray Bradbury Stories by Ruth Cooper, Old Kirke Museum, Manistee • Dusk Manistee Forest Festival

Thunder at the River honors veterans. Fireworks over Lake Michigan, Manistee JULY 5 • Manistee National Forest Festival, Manistee • 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friends of the Manistee County Library Forest Festival Book Sale, Manistee Library at 95 Maple St., Manistee • 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 48th Annual Manistee World of Arts & Crafts fair, Manistee National Forest Festival, Red Szymarek Park, Manistee • 7 p.m. Summer Sounds Concert Series: Nina and the Buffalo Riders, Michigan Legacy Art Park • 7:30 p.m. “Legally Blonde, The Musical”, presented by the Manistee Civic Players, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts JULY 6 • Manistee National Forest Festival, Manistee • Book Expo 2019, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts, Manistee • 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 48th Annual Manistee World of Arts & Crafts fair, Manistee National Forest Festival, Red Szymarek Park, Manistee • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Troy Jetbox, Rietz Park • 1-4 p.m. A Peek Inside the Lighthouse, Manistee North Pier Head, Manistee • 7:30 p.m. “Legally Blonde, The Musical”, presented by the Manistee Civic Players, Ramsdell

Regional Center for the Arts JULY 7 • Manistee National Forest Festival, Manistee • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Troy Jetbox, Rietz Park • 2 p.m. “Legally Blonde, The Musical”, presented by the Manistee Civic Players, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 4 p.m. Scottville Clown Band Beach Show, Manistee JULY 8 • 7 p.m. Concerts in the Park: The Rough & Tumble, Onekama Village Park, Onekama JULY 9 • 10 a.m. Tuesday Talks, Tunes and Tours: “Music as Community” by Matt Thomas/Shoreline Music Society and New House Productions, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: Double Trouble with Mary Rademacher, Francesca Amari, and Co., Douglas Park, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building) JULY 10 • 10 a.m. Wednesday Morning Classic film: “Damn Yankees,” Vogue Theatre, Manistee JULY 11 • 10 a.m. First Person Stories and Songs: “The Great Himalayan Trail: A Walk Across the Roof of the World” by educator Griffin

Loynes, Old Kirke Museum, Manistee • 5-8 p.m. Onekama Block Party, Main Street in Onekama JULY 12 • Bear Lake Days, Bear Lake • 7 p.m. Summer Sounds Concert Series: Last Gasp Collective, Michigan Legacy Art Park JULY 13 • Bear Lake Days, Bear Lake • 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friends of the Manistee Library Bear Lake Book Sale, Bear Lake • 8 p.m. Cheap Trick concert, Little River Casino Resort, Manistee JULY 14 • Bear Lake Days, Bear Lake JULY 15 • 7 p.m. Concerts in the Park: Miriam Pico and David Chown, Onekama Village Park, Onekama JULY 16 • 10 a.m. Tuesday Talks, Tunes and Tours: "Travels of a Small Town Woman" by author Roxanne Rowley, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: Carla Cooke "The Sam Cooke Experience", Douglas Park, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building) JULY 17 • 10 a.m. Wednesday Morning Classic film: “Major League,” Vogue Theatre, Manistee

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JULY 18 • 10 a.m. First Person Stories and Songs: “The Ruggles and Buckley Feud” by Gary Skory, Old Kirke Museum, Manistee JULY 19 • 7 p.m. Summer Sounds Concert Series: The Go Rounds with Charlie Millard Band, Michigan Legacy Art Park JULY 20 • Kaleva Days, Kaleva • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Mid Michigan Starz, Rietz Park • 1-4 p.m. Music on Bear Lake, Bear Lake JULY 21 • Kaleva Days, Kaleva • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Mid Michigan Starz, Rietz Park JULY 22 • 7 p.m. Concerts in the Park: Scottville Clown Band, Onekama Village Park, Onekama JULY 23 • 10 a.m. Tuesday Talks, Tunes and Tours: Dr. Rick Plummer, director of the Ramsdell summer theater comedy “The Foreigner”, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: Planet D Nonet, Douglas Park, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building) JULY 24 • 10 a.m. Wednesday Morning Classic film: “The Natural,” Vogue Theatre, Manistee JULY 25 • 10 a.m. First Person Stories and Songs: “Baseball Is A Journey Through Life” by William M. Anderson, Old Kirke Museum, Manistee • 7:30 p.m. "The Foreigner," a comedy, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts, Manistee JULY 26 • Arcadia Daze, Arcadia • 7 p.m. Summer Sounds Concert Series: Channing & Quinn, Michigan Legacy Art Park • 7:30 p.m. "The Foreigner," a comedy, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts, Manistee

• 8 p.m. Lee Brice concert, Little River Casino Resort, Manistee JULY 27 • Arcadia Daze, Arcadia • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Midland Tribe, Rietz Park • 6-9 p.m. Pure Pro Wrestling, VFW Walsh Post #4499, 1211 28th St., Manistee • 7:30 p.m. "The Foreigner," a comedy, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts, Manistee

• Noon to 4 p.m. Sundays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee

AUG. 12 • Manistee County Fair, Fairgrounds, Onekama

AUG. 1 • 10 a.m. First Person Stories and Songs: “Quilting is My Life” by master quilter Marjorie Nelson, Old Kirke Museum, Manistee

AUG. 13 • Manistee County Fair, Fairgrounds, Onekama • 10 a.m. Tuesday Talks, Tunes and Tours: “Magic Through a Child's Eye” by Aaron Wissner, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: James Armstrong World-Traveled Electric, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building)

AUG. 2 • 7 p.m. Music at the Log Cabin: Caroline Asiala and Friends, Kaleva

JULY 28 • Arcadia Daze, Arcadia • 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Manistee Saints vs. Midland Tribe, Rietz Park • 2 p.m. "The Foreigner," a comedy, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts, Manistee

AUG. 3 • 7 p.m. Summer Sounds Concert Series: The Bootstrap Boys, Michigan Legacy Art Park

JULY 29 • 7 p.m. Concerts in the Park: Elvis Tribute by Jake Slater, Onekama Village Park, Onekama

AUG. 6 • 10 a.m. Tuesday Talks, Tunes and Tours: "News on Climate Change in Michigan" by Kaye La Fond, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: Tell Yo Mama, Douglas Park, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building)

JULY 30 • 10 a.m. Tuesday Talks, Tunes and Tours: "Artist for a Cause" by counter tenor Terry Barber, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: Petra VanNuis with the Phil DeGreg Trio, Douglas Park, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building) JULY 31 • 10 a.m. Wednesday Morning Classic film: “League of their Own,” Vogue Theatre, Manistee

AUGUST

• 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee• 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee

26 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

AUG. 5 • 7 p.m. Concerts in the Park: Awesome Distraction, Onekama Village Park, Onekama

AUG. 7 • 10 a.m. Wednesday Morning Classic film: “Streets of Fire,” Vogue Theatre, Manistee AUG. 8 • 10 a.m. First Person Stories and Songs: “What You Don't Know About Big Trucks and Why You Shouldn't Hate Them” by Jane Shatto, Old Kirke Museum, Manistee AUG. 9 • 7 p.m. Music at the Log Cabin: Ingemar and Lisa, Kaleva AUG. 10 • 7 p.m. Summer Sounds Concert Series: The Ragbirds, Michigan Legacy Art Park • Grapes on the River, downtown Manistee AUG. 11 • Manistee County Fair, Fairgrounds, Onekama • 7 p.m. Concerts in the Park: Benzie Playboys, Onekama Village Park, Onekama

AUG. 14 • Manistee County Fair, Fairgrounds, Onekama 10 a.m. Wednesday Morning Classic film: “Babes in Arms,” Vogue Theatre, Manistee AUG. 15 • Manistee County Fair, Fairgrounds, Onekama • 10 a.m. First Person Stories and Songs: “Puttin' on a Show” by singer/dancer Karen Curlee, Old Kirke Museum, Manistee AUG. 16 • Manistee County Fair, Fairgrounds, Onekama • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association Onekama Shake Down Fishing Tournament, Onekama Marine Inc., Onekama • Hoxeyville Music Festival, Wellston • 7 p.m. Music at the Log Cabin: Awesome Distraction, Kaleva AUG. 17 • Manistee County Fair, Fairgrounds, Onekama • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association Onekama Shake Down Fishing Tournament, Onekama Marine Inc., Onekama • Hoxeyville Music Festival, Wellston AUG. 18 • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association Onekama Shake Down Fishing Tournament, Onekama Marine Inc., Onekama • Hoxeyville Music Festival, Wellston AUG. 19 • 7 p.m. Concerts in the Park: Jim Hawley Recalls, Onekama Village


Park, Onekama AUG. 20 • 10 a.m. Tuesday Talks, Tunes and Tours: "Humor and Optimism" by Sherri Craig Protasiewicz, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: Cheryl Hodge Group, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building) AUG. 21 • 10 a.m. Wednesday Morning Classic film: “The Music Man,” Vogue Theatre, Manistee • 5-6 p.m. To Maxwelltown & Beyond: A Trolley Tour, beginning at Manistee County Transportation, 180 Memorial Drive, Manistee

Association's Salmon Splash Fishing Tournament, Manistee • 7 p.m. Music at the Log Cabin: Mary Sue and Roger, Kaleva AUG. 24 • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association's Salmon Splash Fishing Tournament, Manistee • Big Bear Butt Cruise, all through Manistee County • 1-4 p.m. Music on Bear Lake: Cousin Curtiss, Bear Lake AUG. 25 • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association's Salmon Splash Fishing Tournament, Manistee

AUG. 22 • 10 a.m. First Person Stories and Songs: “Beer Brewing in Early Manistee: The C.H. Daniels Brewery” by Bob Daniels, Old Kirke Museum, Manistee

AUG. 27 • 10 a.m. Tuesday Talks, Tunes and Tours: "The Importance of Singing in Community" by Becky Soph, Ramsdell Regional Center for the Arts • 7 p.m. Manistee ShoreLine ShowCase: Sunset Groove, Manistee (rain location: Armory Youth Project Building)

AUG. 23 • Manistee County Sport Fishing

AUG. 28 • 10 a.m. Wednesday Morning

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Classic film: “Going My Way,” Vogue Theatre, Manistee AUG. 29 • 10 a.m. First Person Stories and Songs: “Social Singing, Social Sounding: Music and Community” by Mark Stewart, Old Kirke Museum, Manistee AUG. 30 • 7 p.m. Music at the Log Cabin: Blue Water Ramblers, Kaleva AUG. 31 • Minnehaha Brewhaha Music Festival, Arcadia Marine, Arcadia • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friends of the Manistee County Library Summer's End Book Sale, Book House behind the Manistee Library at 95 Maple St., Manistee • 1-11 p.m. Manistee LaborFest, Douglas Park, Manistee

SEPTEMBER

• 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for

tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee • Noon to 4 p.m. Sundays, S.S. City of Milwaukee open for tours, located at 99 Arthur St., Manistee SEPT. 6 • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association's Monster Fishing Tournament, First Street Beach, Manistee SEPT. 7 • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association's Monster Fishing Tournament, First Street Beach, Manistee SEPT. 8 • Manistee County Sport Fishing Association's Monster Fishing Tournament, First Street Beach, Manistee

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Greg Erdman feeds his alpaca on a sunny spring day in April.

Manistee alpaca farm a thriving family destination ASHLYN KORIENEK ■ VENTURE STAFF WRITER

These cute, friendly creatures are ready to meet the public at G&D Alpaca in Manistee.

Greg and Debbie Erdman are passionate about alpacas, so much so that nearly a year ago they opened their small farm up to the public. Since then, business has only grown.

the domesticated South American camelid. "She's the leader, wherever she goes the rest of them follow."

we are very pleased with how last season went. We had visitors from 13 different countries, which amazes me."

The alpaca are not only popular with children.

In July 2018, G&D Alpaca welcomed visitors to meet five friendly alpacas, three of which were pregnant females.

"The kids love them, but so do the adults," Greg said.

Currently, three female alpacas are pregnant once again, and the new additions are expected to arrive in the summer months.

Now, the small farm located at 4796 Maple Road in Manistee has 10 alpacas — Addie, Annie, Clarice, Bo, Savannah, Conan, Izzo, Sundance, Dublin and Titus. According to Greg, however, each one has a unique personality of its own. "They have different personalities like humans," said Greg. "The offspring even take on their parent's personalities." A spunky alpaca named Adelaide has the biggest personality of them all. "I call her Addie, to me, short for attitude. She has one," Greg said of

The farm, which features “Deb’s Boutique” selling eclectic Michigan made items and alpaca goods, has gained a large following in the past year. "We have had unbelievable support from the community," Greg said. "It's been amazing." Recorded in a guest book at Deb's Boutique, visitors from not only the United States but other countries as well have found the charming farm, which is hidden within a thick wooded landscape. "People that are traveling or staying here are starting to find us," Greg said. "We were only open a half a season last year on July 1. We open up in May this year, but

28 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

"At that point we will have 13, and probably add three a year for a couple of years," Greg said. "We would like to top out around 20. It will be kind of neat for people to see how it changes into a pasture — it's a big deal." Those who visit the farm are welcome to stop by for an hour, or even stay for the entire afternoon. This year, the Erdman's are hoping to add yard games for families to enjoy. When viewing the alpaca, Greg said people are able to interact with them, and they might even get the chance to go beyond the gate for a closer look. "We have had people come here

and they will bring a picnic and hang out," Greg said. "We are trying to push the community part of it and have things for families to do." Another quirky feature of the Erdman's farm is the "Fairy Trail," which invites young visitors to build their own fairy house using items like sticks and shells. The forest has become a huge success. While the farm only grows in size, Greg said taking care of alpacas is actually quite manageable. However, the yard work is what keeps the Erdman's busy. "They are easy to take care of, typically I will spend about an hour in the morning," he said. "I will clean the barns, make sure they have hay, say hi to them — that kind of stuff. It's critical to have hay and water." Visitors can stop by G&D Alpaca free of charge, and the hours of operation are posted on the G&D Alpaca Farm Facebook page.


Kaleva: A small village but big attraction

DYLAN SAVELA ■ VENTURE STAFF WRITER Tight-knit and steeped in tradition, the small Village of Kaleva can be considered a big attraction in Manistee County. The community takes pride in preserving its history — most of which is rooted in a strong Finnish heritage — and continually enhances its appeal to the residents and visitors of today. Established by Finnish immigrants in 1900, Kaleva directly relates to Finland’s quest for independence. Since 1249, Finland had been ruled

by the Russians and was considered a Grand Duchy of Russia in 1809. Around the turn of the 20th century, however, many Finns were looking to flee. Kaleva’s first settlers were Finnish individuals and families either escaping the oppression and poverty brought on by Russia’s reign or avoiding conscription into the Russian army.

Kaleva's famed Bottle House Museum will be open from noon to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

are the result of preservation efforts by the village's historical society, and namely a comprehensive service learning project conducted by area high school students, and overseen by the society, just over Tributes to its heritage can be found two decades ago. throughout the village year-round. Beginning in 1996, Brethren High School students were charged with Many of Kaleva's local landmarks

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Manistee County’s longest running outdoor summer concert series will return this summer to the Log Cabin Theater in Kaleva. torical Society. “When the students started in 1996, it was a time when something was really needed, because the factory moved out and a lot of people left. “It was just kind of a feeling of despair around here.” From the Kaleva Depot to the Art Gallery, the Log Cabin to the Centennial Walkway; many of the village’s unique landmarks were products of the award-winning service learning project that spanned four-plus years and involved students and community members in the hundreds. “Service learning was a national movement, a way to make education relevant and to connect it with communities,” Asiala explained. “When Brethren school started a service learning program, students began looking around the community for ways they could improve it and help it thrive. They decided they were going to focus in Kaleva, the goals being to bring economic development and celebrate the Finnish heritage.” For the project, students first conducted surveys on what commu-

nity members would like to see improved and interviewed longtime Kaleva residents on how the village used to be, many of which were recorded and documented as oral histories that still exist today. For nine semesters spanning four and a half years, juniors and seniors who signed up for the service learning class would spend the last 40 minutes of each school day working on the various elements of the project, which grew in scope as time went on. “Little by little, we made some big progress,” said Asiala, a retired teacher who helped facilitate the project. Leading up to the village’s centennial celebration in the year 2000, students renovated the Kaleva Depot, transforming it into a museum; called upon local artists to create and operate Kaleva’s Art Gallery, which still thrives today; transported and constructed Kaleva’s Log Cabin, which now plays host to an annual summer concert series every Friday in August; and created the Centennial Walkway, which has become home to several local-

30 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

ly-themed sculptures that attract residents and visitors alike. Aside from major projects, the students built benches, flower barrels and various Finnish-themed decor around the village. They also were asked to present their service learning project to West Shore Community College and the University of Michigan at the time. “Kids really felt a pride in what they were doing,” Asiala said. “I think what's unique about our project is it wasn’t just a one-time thing and it was done. It was long lasting and can still be seen today.” For their efforts, the students gained statewide and even national attention, earning official service awards from then-Michigan Gov. John Engler and then-President of the United States Bill Clinton in 1999. Since the students’ completion of the project, community members accepted the torch and have kept up the beautification efforts in the village. The summer months present a perfect window of time to visit

Kaleva and its offerings. The village's famed Bottle House Museum — located at 14551 Wuoksi Ave. — will be open from noon to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Through September and October, the museum will keep the same hours, but just on Saturdays only. The Kaleva Depot will be open from noon to 4 p.m. on Saturdays from Memorial Day to Labor Day while the Kaleva Art Gallery is always open from noon to 4 p.m. on Fridays and Sundays, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays. Manistee County’s longest running outdoor summer concert series will return this summer to the Log Cabin Theater in Kaleva, located at the corner of Panu and Walta streets, across from the library. This year's lineup will be Caroline Asiala and friends on Aug. 2; Ingemar and Lisa on Aug. 9; Awesome Distracton on Aug. 16; Mary Sue and Roger on Aug. 23; and Blue Water Ramblers on Aug. 30. All shows are slated to begin at 7 p.m.


Fishing in Benzie County:

No boat required KYLE KOTECKI â&#x2013; VENTURE STAFF WRITER At its core, fishing is a sport for the everyman. Sure, the fish finders, expensive boats and GPS trackers can help one put more fish on the stringer, but when stripped down to the bare necessities, fishing requires little more than a rod, a reel and a little patience. While a boat allows one to cover more water, it is far from

mandatory. Benzie County offers plenty of angling opportunities of which even a landlubber can take advantage. Home to 33 inland lakes and plenty of rivers and creeks, Benzie County has plenty to offer anglers regardless of the target species. Those in Benzie County find

The Frankfort and Elberta Piers are often lined with anglers during the salmon run in the late summer months.

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Anglers of all ages can catch fish with nothing more than a rod, a reel and a little patience. themselves spoiled for choice. Christine Murphy, owner of the Frankfort Tackle Box, knows just where to send people looking for a place to wet their lines. "One of the best bass fisheries is right here in Betsie Bay," she said. "There are pike — people catch some nice pike out of there, too. I sell tons and tons of nightcrawlers and worms all summer long — that's all you need to fish there. There are also burbot and catfish." Murphy owns the Frankfort Tackle Box along with her husband, Brian. The store is in its 44th year of existence and the Murphys have owned it for the past 21. No major overhaul was necessary as the store's goal is to offer quality gear, fair prices and a homey atmosphere. "It's this little old white building

with blue awnings," Murphy said of the store. "We kept it the way it is. We paint it every couple years. ... And it's got the old table. You can sit down and have a cup of coffee and shoot the breeze. "But we kept all that because a lot of people come in and they say, 'My grandfather used to bring me here,' she continued. "'Now I'm bringing my kid.' We get a lot of that." Betsie Bay — also known as Betsie Lake — has multiple points of access for those without a boat. On the Frankfort side alone there is a t-dock, the Frankfort City Boat Launch — where anglers often fish the weeds just off the shoreline — and the Frankfort Municipal Marina. "There are a lot of places," Murphy said. "As long as you are not

32 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

Betsie River salmon fishing


obstructing the people who are renting slips, you can cast off those docks, too." Of course, the fish are on the other side of the bay, too, and Murphy knows of a great spot in Elberta. "At the Elberta Waterfront Park, they built a long fishing platform where the boats used to sit," she said. "It's where (the SS City of Milwaukee) used to sit. When they sucked it out, it created all of this structure under there. That boat sat there for years. They built a fishing dock and platform horizontally along the shoreline. "That is some of the best fishing there is," Murphy continued. "The fish will congregate there because of that spot — because of all the structure where the ship used to be." During the salmon run, the Frankfort and Elberta piers can be lined with anglers.

Benzie County offers plenty of places to spend time fishing with friends and family, even for those without a boat. "People fish the Frankfort Pier for the salmon run, and that can start some time in August or September — there is no set time for anything to work," Murphy said. "... I have guys who spearfish out there during the summer — underwater spearfishing.

"There is everything to do there," she continued. "And the Elberta Pier is the same way." Fishing the salmon run in Benzie County makes for some of the best fishing not only in Michigan, but in the nation.

"We have people come from all over the country to fish that salmon run," Murphy said. "That's the one trip of the year, the uncles and the cousins and the kids — at a certain age they're allowed to come with the boys. It's a huge thing."

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Frankfort pier With 33 inland lakes in Benzie County, it can be difficult to hone in on which one to fish. Murphy is quick to tell anglers to try their luck at Lower Herring Lake, however. "There's an inlet there that goes out to Lake Michigan. People fish that inlet all year long," she said. "... Depending on the time of year, (one can catch) largemouth, perch, rock bass, smallmouth, walleye, sucker and pike. Salmon and steelhead will run through there because of that inlet connecting to Lake Michigan." It is no secret that Crystal Lake holds a lot of fish. Whether you are after lake trout or a Master Angler rock bass, Crystal Lake has what you're after. Murphy said many people don't realize success can be found there even

without a boat. "There are lots of places for access," she said. "... They put floating docks on the east side of Crystal Lake at the town of Beulah, Michigan. They redid it a couple years ago and they have docks to fish from." Upper Herring Lake, Loon Lake, Platte Lake and Bass Lake all have public access docks that can produce a lot of fish. Bass Lake stands out as particularly picturesque, Murphy said. "Bass Lake is in the park at Trails End (Road), north of the Platte River," she said. "It has a platform built on it. You can just go casting there. I send a lot of people there. It's just beautiful because it's in the park and it's secluded." Those looking to fish in some current need look no further than

34 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

the Betsie River and Platte River. And if you're seeking a trophy salmon, the Betsie is the way to go. "The Betsie River is natural reproduction — one of the only natural reproduction for salmon in the state, and that's huge," Murphy said. "That's why we're having such great returns. "The fish that are caught coming through the bay, if they're clipped, they're planted," she continued. "But the biggest salmon that we catch out on the boats or in the bay — 30 pounds plus — all of them are natural. The bigger fish are natural — not the planted ones." And fortunately for Benzie County anglers, there are plenty of spots one can fish the Betsie River without a boat.

"There are many, many public accesses along the rivers that you're not trespassing on people's property," Murphy said. "Like that railroad bridge — the railroad used to go over it and now it's a fishing platform at the mouth of the Bestie. Along the Betsie Valley Bike Trail, there are places where you can just cast into the Betsie River when the fish are running. ... There are miles and miles of river." To say there are ample fishing opportunities in Benzie County — even without access to a boat — would be putting it mildly. Anyone can pop into the Frankfort Tackle Box and Christine or her husband Brian will happily point them in the right direction. Grab your rod, reel and bait and explore what Benzie County has to offer. Boats are optional.


2019

MAY

MAY 25 • Michigan Beer & Brat Festival, Crystal Mountain, Thompsonville MAY 26 • North Mitten Half Marathon 5K & 10K, Crystal Mountain, Thompsonville

JUNE JUNE 1 • 6 a.m. to noon Bike Benzie's UP North Fondo & Tour, Crystal Mountain, Thompsonville • 9 a.m. to noon Plant Sale, Periwinkle Garden Club of Frankfort, at Mineral Springs Park JUNE 3 • Frankfort Elberta Restaurant Week

Benzie County Events Calendar

Benefit Area Youth, Crystal Lake Golf Course

JUNE 14 • 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. UpCycled Art & Crafts Exhibit & Auction, Grow Benzie, 5885 Frankfort Hwy, Benzonia JUNE 15 • 8 a.m. Mason’s Antique Vehicle & Muscle Car Show, downtown Frankfort • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 23rd Annual Frankfort Craft Fair and Antique Vehicle and Muscle Car Show, Main Street, downtown Frankfort • 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. UpCycled Art & Crafts Exhibit & Auction, Grow Benzie, 5885 Frankfort Hwy, Benzonia

JUNE 4 • Frankfort Elberta Restaurant Week

JUNE 20 • Frankfort 48 Film Contest, The Garden Theater, 301 Main St., Frankfort

• 10:45 a.m. Michigan Legacy Art Park Golf Classic, Crystal Mountain Mountain Ridge Course, Thompsonville

JUNE 21 • Frankfort 48 Film Contest, The Garden Theater, 301 Main St., Frankfort

JUNE 5 • Frankfort Elberta Restaurant Week

• Michigan PGA Women's Open Pro-Am, Crystal Mountain, 12500 Crystal Mountain Drive, Thompsonville

JUNE 6 • Frankfort Elberta Restaurant Week

• 7 p.m. Concert in the Park: “Bandana & Friends” Special Performance for “Take-a-Kid Fishing,” Mineral Springs Park, Frankfort

JUNE 7 • Frankfort Elberta Restaurant Week JUNE 8 • Frankfort Elberta Restaurant Week JUNE 9 • Frankfort Elberta Restaurant Week • 1:30 p.m. Benzie Sunrise Rotary Club 9th Annual Golf Outing to

• 10 p.m. Nightcrawler hunt, Mineral Springs Park, downtown Frankfort JUNE 22 • Frankfort 48 Film Contest, The Garden Theater, 301 Main St., Frankfort • Michigan PGA Women's Open Pro-Am, Crystal Mountain, 12500 Crystal Mountain Drive, Thompsonville

Very Cherry Smorgasbord • 8 a.m. Take a Kid Fishing, Mineral Springs Park, downtown Frankfort

• 7 p.m. Music in the Park: Jake Allen, Beulah Village Park

JUNE 23 • Michigan PGA Women's Open Pro-Am, Crystal Mountain, 12500 Crystal Mountain Drive, Thompsonville • 4 p.m. Benzie Area Symphony Orchestra, Benzie Central High School auditorium JUNE 24 • Michigan PGA Women's Open Tournament, Crystal Mountain,12500 Crystal Mountain Drive, Thompsonville JUNE 25 • Michigan PGA Women's Open Tournament, Crystal Mountain,12500 Crystal Mountain Drive, Thompsonville JUNE 26 • Michigan PGA Women's Open Tournament, Crystal Mountain,12500 Crystal Mountain Drive, Thompsonville JUNE 27 • Michigan PGA Women's Open Tournament, Crystal Mountain,12500 Crystal Mountain Drive, Thompsonville

JULY JULY 1 • 9 .m. Fourth of July Medallion Hunt, sponsored by the Frankfort-Elberta Chamber of Commerce JULY 2 • 9 .m. Fourth of July Medallion Hunt, sponsored by the Frankfort-Elberta Chamber of Commerce JULY 3 • 9 .m. Fourth of July Medallion Hunt, sponsored by the Frankfort-Elberta Chamber of Commerce JULY 4 • 9 .m. Fourth of July Medallion Hunt, sponsored by the Frankfort-Elberta Chamber of Commerce • Frankfort Fourth of July Celebration, featuring a parade, carnival, fireworks and more • Beulah Fourth of July celebration, including a parade and fireworks • 7 p.m. Music in the Park: The Standing Hamptons, Beulah

VENTURE: SPRING 2019

35


Village Park

Springs Park, Frankfort

JULY 5 • Frankfort Fourth of July Celebration, featuring a parade, carnival, fireworks and more

JULY 18 • 7 p.m. Music in the Park: Don Julin and the Ol' Microtones, Beulah Village Park

• 7 p.m. Concert in the Park: Gus Christian, Mineral Springs Park, Frankfort

• 5-7 p.m. Very Cherry Smorgasbord, Frankfort United Methodist Church, 537 Crystal Ave. Frankfort

• 4:30 p.m. Bayou in the Barn: Grow Benzie Fundraiser, St. Ambrose Cellars, 841 S. Pioneer Road, Beulah

JULY 19 • 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free All-Ages Workshops at the Art Park, Michigan Legacy Art Park, 7300 Mountainside Drive, Thompsonville

JULY 6 • Beulah Art Fair • Frankfort Fourth of July Celebration, featuring a parade, carnival, fireworks and more JULY 7 • Frankfort Fourth of July Celebration, featuring a parade, carnival, fireworks and more JULY 11 • 7 p.m. Music in the Park: Jazz North Funk, Beulah Village Park JULY 12 • 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free All-Ages Workshops at the Art Park, Michigan Legacy Art Park, 7300 Mountainside Drive, Thompsonville • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Garden Walk, Periwinkle Garden Club of Frankfort, begins at Mineral Springs Park • 7 p.m. Concert in the Park: Cole Parkford, Mineral Springs Park, Frankfort JULY 13 • Beulah Art Fair, Beulah Village Park • 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free All-Ages Workshops at the Art Park, Michigan Legacy Art Park, 7300 Mountainside Drive, Thompsonville JULY 14 • 4 p.m. Chamber Concert: “Classics in the Country” Benzie Area Symphony Orchestra, St. Ambrose Cellars • 7 p.m. Concert in the Park: Benzie Community Band, Mineral

JULY 20 • Port City Run • UpNorth StandUp Paddleboard Classic, morning on Crystal Lake in Beulah, afternoon in Frankfort • 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free All-Ages Workshops at the Art Park, Michigan Legacy Art Park, 7300 Mountainside Drive, Thompsonville JULY 21 • 2:30-4:30 p.m. Stockade Labyrinth Sculpture Tour, Michigan Legacy Art Park, 7300 Mountainside Drive, Thompsonville JULY 24 • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Congregational Summer Assembly (CSA) 41st annual Arts and Crafts Fair, Congregational Assembly Ball Field, 2128 Pilgrim Highway JULY 25 • 7 p.m. Music in the Park: "Dig A Pony", Beulah Village Park JULY 26 • Benzie Fishing Frenzy, Mineral Springs Park • 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free All-Ages Workshops at the Art Park, Michigan Legacy Art Park, 7300 Mountainside Drive, Thompsonville JULY 27 • Benzie Fishing Frenzy, Mineral Springs Park • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Frankfort Street Sale, downtown Frankfort • 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free

36 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

All-Ages Workshops at the Art Park, Michigan Legacy Art Park, 7300 Mountainside Drive, Thompsonville JULY 28 • Benzie Fishing Frenzy, Mineral Springs Park

AUGUST AUG. 1 • 7 p.m. Music in the Park: Awesome Distraction, Beulah Village Park AUG. 2 • 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free All-Ages Workshops at the Art Park, Michigan Legacy Art Park, 7300 Mountainside Drive, Thompsonville AUG. 3 • Beulah Sidewalk Sale Day

Thompsonville AUG. 17 • 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Frankfort Collector Car Show, Market Square Park • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 42nd Frankfort Art Fair, Market Square Park AUG. 18 • 7 p.m. Songs of the Lakes, Benzie Area Symphony Orchestra, Benzie Central High School auditorium AUG. 23 • 7 p.m. Concert in the Park: Vicki Slater “Get Up & Dance” kid friendly, Mineral Springs Park, Frankfort AUG. 24 • 3-5 p.m. Let’s Go Fly a Kite-Lake Michigan Beach at Turn Around, Frankfort

• Sidewalk Sales Day, Beulah and Benzonia

• 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Benzie Area RC Club Air Show, Thompsonville Airport, 13531 Lindy Road, Thompsonville

• 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free All-Ages Workshops at the Art Park, Michigan Legacy Art Park, 7300 Mountainside Drive, Thompsonville

AUG. 30 • 7 p.m. Concert in the Park: Tim Kluck, Mineral Springs Park, Frankfort

AUG. 8 • 7 p.m. Music in the Park: The Back Porch All Stars, Beulah Village Park AUG. 9 • 7 p.m. Concert in the Park: Salt City Jazz Band, Mineral Springs Park, Frankfort AUG. 10 • Crystal Lake Team Marathon, Beulah Village Park

SEPTEMBER SEPT. 2 • 10 a.m. Cold Creek Bridge Walk, prizes, kids games and an Archibald Jones Program, Crystal Lake waterfront SEPT. 6 • Coho Festival, Honor SEPT. 7 • Coho Festival, Honor

AUG. 15 • 7 p.m. Music in the Park: The Accidentals, Beulah Village Park

SEPT. 8 • Coho Festival, Honor

AUG. 16 • 4-8 p.m. Frankfort Art Fair and Collector Car Show• 1-7 p.m. 42nd Frankfort Art Fair, Market Square Park

• Tri-Up North Triathlon – Bike, kayak, run, Frankfort.

• 7 p.m. Concert in the Park: Cheryl Wolfram, Mineral Springs Park, Frankfort • 6-9 p.m. Legacy Gala Benefit for the Art Park, Crystal Mountain,

SEPT 14

Find more information on events at: Benzie County Record Patriot: recordpatriot.com Benzie County Chamber of Commerce: benzie.org, Frankfort-Elberta Area Chamber of Commerce: frankfort-elberta.com, Crystal Lake Community Business Association: clcba.org/

B


Michigan Legacy Art Park contains 31 poetry stones.

Michigan Legacy Art Park

offers summer excitement ROBERT MYERS â&#x2013; VENTURE STAFF WRITER

Whether your passion is nature, art, music, local history or all of the above, the Michigan Legacy Art Park is a summer destination you might enjoy. Michigan Legacy Art Park first opened in 1995 in an effort led by internationally acclaimed artist David Barr, who can be

remembered by his many creations decorating the park. The 30-acre forest preserve sits in the middle of Crystal Mountain, featuring 49 permanent sculptures and 31 poetry stones, designed specifically to fit in with their surroundings and honor the history of the area.

Though the park is open yearround and a popular snowshoeing destination in the winter months, spring and summer will see visitor rates increase dramatically.

around the area will visit the park on class field trips over the course of the spring.

Michigan Legacy Art Park executive director Joseph Beyer said about 2,000 students from

One of the art parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major draws each summer is its Summer Sounds Concert Series.

About 10,000 people visit the park each summer.

great food. great prices. great people.

BENZONIA - 231-882-9093 MANISTEE - 231-655-0005 VENTURE: SPRING 2019

37


Beginning in July, Michigan Legacy Art Park will host six concerts at its outdoor amphitheater. All concerts will take place from 7-9 p.m. and feature an eclectic mix of music. CONCERT DATES ARE AS FOLLOWS: • July 5: Nina and the Buffalo Riders • July 12: Last Gasp Collective • July 19: The Go Rounds with Charlie Millard Band • July 26: Channing & Quinn • Aug. 3: The Bootstrap Boys • Aug. 10: The Ragbirds. All concerts are family friendly and free to kids 12 and younger. Tickets may be purchased at michlegacyartpark.org/summer-sounds or by calling (231) 378-4963. New this year, food trucks will also be present at Michigan Legacy Art Park on concert nights. While the concert series will wrap up in early August, the middle of the month has two big dates to mark on the calendar. On Aug. 15, the art park will introduce a brand new event. Michigan Legacy Art Park is collaborating with the Crooked Tree Art Center (located in Traverse City and Petoskey) to host a quick draw competition as part of the Crooked Tree Art Center’s painting festival called Paint Grand Traverse. As part of the quick draw competition at Michigan Legacy Art Park, more than 100 painters from around the world will gather all over Crystal Mountain and the art park. The artists will paint for two hours. Then, a jury will

award cash awards for the top paintings. “It’s kind of like the Oscars meets America’s Got Talent with painting,” Beyer said. “It’s a fun, casual event. People can come out that day, and Make It Benzie is sponsoring free chair lift rides.” At the end of the day, Beyer said that the paintings will be for sale at an affordable price. The proceeds from the sale will be shared between the artists and the art park. Michigan Legacy Art Park will hold its Legacy Gala Banquet the very next day, on Aug. 16. This year, they will honor 94-year old artist Charles McGee. His family plans to attend the banquet to accept the award on his behalf. “Charles has been working as an artist in Detroit for almost eight decades and has a lot of amazing murals all over downtown Detroit,” Beyer said. “They have become part of the city. Many years ago, he came up to Thompsonville when the Art Park was being built and visited it. He was friends with David Barr, who founded the Art Park. “We picked Charles, because we are all huge admirers of his work, and then we found out after he accepted the invitation that there were all of these connections with Crystal Mountain that we didn’t know about. He used to come up here and play tennis, softball and golf with David Barr, and they talked about what they wanted the art park to become. He’s a really interesting person.” Michigan Legacy Art Park is open every day of the year from dusk to dawn. For more information about the art park, visit michiganlegacyartpark.org.

38 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

Weeping Willow was created for the park by Les Scruggs.

"The Wheels of Progress" by Dewey Blocksma provides a colorful addition to the art park.


Visitors to the Village of Beulah can enjoy a sandy beach on the shores of the aptly named Crystal Lake.

Beulah brings

small town charm COLIN MERRY â&#x2013; VENTURE STAFF WRITER The Village of Beulah is a perfect spot for visitors to beat the summer heat. Located on the shores of the aptly named Crystal Lake, Beulah has been a vacation destination since the late 1800s. An attempt to create a canal between Crystal Lake and the Betsie River resulted in a significant lowering of the lake level, creating miles of

scenic beach front property on the almost 1,000 acre lake. The beach at Beulah attracts visitors to this day, where they can enjoy the sun or cool off in the clear waters of Crystal Lake. A swimming platform just offshore provides a place to lounge or dive off. A "day dock" allows for visitors to dock their boats and enjoy the beach or visit the

1123 Main St. Frankfort

352-7181 PERFECTING THE ART OF DRYING FRUIT SINCE 1973

Residents and visitors cross the bridge on Cold Creek in the Village of Beulah during the Cold Creek Bridge Walk, held Labor Day weekend.

13998 Honor Highway US 31 â&#x20AC;˘ Honor, Michigan

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Visitors check out the shops in the Village of Beulah during the village's sidewalk sale. shops downtown.

people looking to get out of the summer sun.

As for shopping opportunities, the downtown shops offer clothing, jewelry, shoes, novelty items, antiques and second-hand items, and art, including the work of ArtPrize winning artists Steve and Ann Loveless. Stand up paddle board and surfing equipment can be rented, as well.

Near the Beulah Village Park is Beulah's "trailer park" where visitors can park their trailer or camper along the shores of Crystal Lake. Often, visitors spend the entire summer in the park, creating a tight community of recurring summer residents.

As for dining options in downtown Beulah, there are multiple options, including pizza, burgers, tacos and several varieties of deli sandwiches.

Beulah also hosts a variety of summer events, hosted by area volunteers and the Crystal Lake Community Business Association.

Just outside the main drag, visitors have several other choices, such as turkey dinners and cherry pie, or Asian cuisine.

Activities include art fairs, Fourth of July celebrations, sidewalk sales and concerts in the park.

Aside from shopping and dining, there are plenty of other activities for visitors. The Betsie Vally Trail follows the shore of Crystal Lake west out of Beulah, leading to the Railroad Point Natural Area. The trail also leads east out of the village, through scenic woodlots.

The Beulah Art Fair is just one of the many activities held in the Village of Beulah. Visitors can fish from the fishing dock at the beach, or follow Cold Creek through town.

The Darcy Library in downtown Beulah can help visitors find some summer reading, and the Just outside of the village on U.S. Benzonia Area Public Library is 31 is the COGNiTiON Science and nearby, as well. Discovery Center, and the Benzie Beulah Village Park boasts a Area Historical Museum is just a large pavilion, park benches short drive south in Benzonia. and some large shade trees for

40 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

For more information on the Village of Beulah, visit the Benzie County Chamber of Commerce at www.benzie.org or call (231) 882-5801. Information on the Crystal Lake Community Business Association events, including event schedules, can be found at www. CLCBA.org.


Frankfort offers shopping, dining and great outdoors COLIN MERRY ■ VENTURE STAFF WRITER Whether entering under the iconic gateway arch, or along scenic M-22, visitors to the City of Frankfort will find plenty to see and do. With a long history in the lumber, maritime and rail yard business, Frankfort is located on Michigan's northwest coast. Betsie Bay winds along the south end of the city, while Main Street ends at Lake Michigan. Frankfort is home to a bustling

downtown district, where shoppers can find jewelry, clothing of all kinds, novelty items, outdoor gear, essential hardware, groceries, candy, ice cream, furniture and Native American art. Several shops also rent out stand up paddle boards, surf boards and bikes. Those looking for a book to read on the beach can check out the downtown bookstore, or visit the Benzie Shores District Library.

The City of Frankfort has a variety of shops and restaurants for visitors to explore.

FRANKFORT RESTAURANTS Where The Food's As Good As The Root Beer! Homecooked

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Visitors also can check out the Elizabeth Lane Oliver Center for the Arts, which hosts exhibits featuring local artists, art classes and discussions with artists. There are a variety of restaurants in Frankfort, and visitors can find everything from hamburgers, pizza and barbecue ribs to Asian-American cuisine, deli sandwiches and fresh fish. Options for breakfast, lunch and dinner can be grabbed on the go, or diners can sit down and experience a view of the bay while enjoying a meal. Enjoying the great outdoors in Frankfort is easy. The city itself is designated a Tree City USA, designated by the Arbor Day Foundation for its dedication to urban tree management. Trees can be found lining streets in both the downtown and residential areas, some creating gorgeous canopies. Frankfort is home to a number of parks. Open Space Park and Mineral Springs Park are set on Betsie Bay, the latter has an assortment of playground equipment. Cannon Park sits at the west end of Main Street, just before Lake Michigan and the beach. Market Square Park, which also features playground equipment, is situated off the main drag in the heart of Frankfort's residential district. Tank Park is a hidden gem nestled in the hill behind the city. Bellows Park, also known as 7th Street Beach, is located on Crystal Lake, just outside of the city. One of the most popular destinations is the beach on Lake Michigan. At the west end of Main Street, there is a large, sandy beach where visitors can enjoy the cool waters of Lake Michigan, play volleyball or take a walk north along the coast. The breakwall at Frankfort attracts a lot of attention as well, and visitors can take a walk out to the historic lighthouse, which currently houses one of the few remaining Fresnel lenses.

The historic lighthouse and breakwall are one of the City of Frankfort's most iconic attractions.

Visitors also can learn about Frankfort's past. A number of plaques can be found at locations throughout the city, documenting the location's historical importance. Great fishing is another great reason to come to Frankfort. The city offers world-class salmon fishing opportunities. Many charter captains will gladly take anglers onto Lake Michigan to fish for king and coho salmon, as well as lake and rainbow trout. Anglers can also fish from the breakwall. Betsie Bay offers great fishing opportunities. Bass, pike, pan fish and more can be caught in the bay, and there are plenty of places to fish from shore. In the fall, the king and coho salmon come into the bay to stage before going up Betsie River to spawn. Frankfort also hosts a variety of activities aimed at families, including art fairs, farmer's markets, park concerts, Fourth of July parade and fireworks display and street sales. For a list of events and event schedules, visit the Frankfort-Elberta Area Chamber of Commerce at www.frankfort-elberta. com or call (231) 352-7251. 42 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

Campers from Camp Lookout participate in the big Fourth of July Parade in the City of Frankfort.


Ludington Pumped Storage

offers scenic views, recreation facilities

DAVID YARNELL VENTURE STAFF WRITER

adding that the Pumped Storage Plant can go from a standstill to full power in six minutes. This allows a quick response to Michigan's energy needs.”

It may not be one of the seven wonders of the world, but Ludington Pumped Storage Plant is unquestionably an engineering marvel and something everyone should see because there are few facilities like it anywhere else on the globe. According to Brian Zatloukal, manager of operations and maintenance at Ludington Pumped Storage, when construction of the huge reservoir and hydroelectric power plant was completed in 1973 it was the largest facility of its type in the world. Today it is the fourth largest and an important part of Michigan's renewable energy plan, which is interesting since the term “renewable energy” wasn't even a thing when pumped storage was conceptualized in the late 1950s. “The idea of Ludington Pumped Storage dates back to 1958,”

Its peak of 1,872 megawatts can power 1.4 million homes. The six turbines are being replaced with larger, more efficient models that, at completion in 2020, will produce up to 2,172 megawatts, enough power for 1.7 million homes. said Bill Schoenlein, Consumers Energy executive director of renewable generation. “The location was selected in 1961 and construction began in 1969.” The engineering marvel consists of an 842 acre reservoir that was built entirely from scratch on the shore of Lake Michigan five miles south of Ludington. It is 2.5 miles long and one mile wide and its surface is as high as 370 feet above Lake Michigan. It holds 27 billion gallons of water and cost $315 million to build.

“When demand for energy is low, such as at night, the reversible turbines pump water uphill from Lake Michigan through six large pipes into the reservoir,” Zatloukal said. “Then when demand is high, water flows down through the pipes through the turbines to generate power. “This allows Ludington Pumped Storage to store energy, much like a battery, for those times when the electric grid was short of the needed power from the base load plants,” Zatloukal said,

Ludington Pumped Storage Plant is co-owned by Consumers Energy and DTE Energy, and operated by Consumers Energy. The plant won an international engineering award in when it was completed in 1973 and it was also named one of the top 10 civil engineering projects of the 20th century. Year round, visitors can view the plant from the Lake Michigan overlook area and from Memorial Day to Labor Day they can enjoy vistas of the reservoir and the

VENTURE: SPRING 2019

43


surrounding area from the upper reservoir observation platform. Visitors are not allowed in the hydroelectric plant itself. Other amenities associated with the plant include the Mason County Campground and a picnic area, fishing access, disc golf course, model airplane field and snowshoe trails. The recreation facilities are located at 5906 W. Chauvez Road. Campground reservations can be made by calling (231) 8457609. According to Matt Carmer, Consumers Energy natural resources administrator, the company provides recreational facilities at hydroelectric sites because “there's a public trust trade-off in that we use these resources and in return upgrade recreational opportunities for the public.” Carmer estimated that of the 12,000 acres at Ludington Pumped Storage, about 200 are dedicated to recreation. He said Consumers has 13 river hydroelectric facilities in Michigan and

each have recreation facilities. In this area that includes Tippy Dam and Hodenpyl Dam. “The number one activity at these facilities across the state is fishing,” he said. Another piece of Michigan's clean energy picture, located next door to the pumped storage plant, is Lake Winds Energy Park. It began operations on Thanksgiving Day 2012. Lake Winds consists of 56 wind turbines over a 16,000 acre area. Each turbine is almost 500 feet tall when the blades are at the top of their sweep, The facility provides up to 100 megawatts at full output. “Lake Winds, while located adjacent to LPS, does not provide direct power to Ludington Pumped Storage,” Zatloukal said. “All power generated today is sold to a regional transmission operator that is responsible for purchasing sufficient power to cover the forecast load. Therefore when we are using power to pump water out of Lake Mich-

44 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

igan, it is coming from the grid and provided by a wide variety of sources – wind, coal, nuclear, river hydro, etc.” Schoenlein said that the power generated by Ludington Pumped Storage is not in itself considered renewable because some of the energy used to pump the water comes from fossil fuels. “Since the pumping power is taken from the grid, it comes from

a number of sources,” he said. “But it does work works well with renewables as storage.” Ludington Pumped Storage strives to be a good Mason County community partner. “Consumers Energy’s purpose is to deliver world class performance in providing hometown service,” Zatloukal said. “We embody this purpose in our efforts to support the local regions in which we live and work."


Offshore/Big Boys Fishing Tournament to return to Ludington

The largest, freshwater salmon fishing tournament on Lake Michigan returns to Ludington for the 17th year from July 18-24. Sponsored by the Ludington & Scottville Area Chamber of Commerce and Betten Baker Ford, the Ludington Offshore/Big Boys Fishing Tournament attracts 250-300 boats to town — paying out nearly $80,000 in prize monies — each year. “The tournament is a great opportunity to showcase our community to fishermen and their families,” said Brandy Miller, President/CEO of the Ludington & Scottville Area Chamber of Commerce. “Waterfront Park, situated between our two largest marinas and just blocks from downtown and other nearby at-

tractions, offers a perfect setting for the event. There is something for everyone.” This year’s Ludington Offshore Classic tournament week kicks off July 18, with the Ruboy Thursday Shootout. Boats at least 18 feet long are welcome to join the fun and weigh their five best fish for the day. Ruboy Thursday has an anticipated payout of $5,700, and first place could walk away with $3,000 (based on number of boats). The ladies and kids head to the big lake on July 19 during the Youth Tournament and the Ladies Pro/Am. The Youth Tournament welcomes kids 17 and younger to participate and weigh their largest fish for prizes. Cash and trophies are up for VENTURE: SPRING 2019

45


grabs in the Ladies Pro/Am Tournament. Ladies will weigh their five best fish, with no more than three of any one species being weighed. Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pro/Am fishing begins on July 20 and continues July 21. A prize of $10,000 will go to the top pro boat again this year (based on a minimum of 30 boats participating). The Big Boys Tournament, sponsored by Auto Owners Insurance, returns on July 23 and July 24. Big fish and big payouts are the name of the game during this two-day, high stakes competition, held in conjunction with the Offshore Tournament. New to this famed fishing week in Ludington will be the Lake Michigan Pro Fishing Series. The LMPFS will include Michigan City, Indiana, and the Mitten cities of St. Joseph, Grand Haven, Ludington and Holland. The Ludington tournament will be the fourth location in the progressive series and held during the Big Boys event, July 23-24. The cost for a boat to enter is $500 for the first three events; the fourth and fifth tournament entry is $200 per event. The hope is to draw more boats from southern Michigan to the Ludington Offshore Classic, according to local organizer, Tony Hamm. Fishing crews will have the chance to win payouts based on the number of registered boats. Register for the Ludington Offshore online at LudingtonTournament.com. Information on individual events can be found on Facebook: facebook.com/ ludingtonoffshoreclassic. For more information on the LMPFS, see lakemipfs.com. 46 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE


2019

MAY

MAY 23 • 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Third Coast Djypsy Jazz, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington MAY 24 • Ludington North Breakwater Light opens for the season, Stearns Park Beach, Ludington

Mason County Events Calendar

County Day, Historic White Pine Village, Ludington

• 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Spring Plant Exchange, hosted by Mason County Garden Club at Leveaux Park, Ludington JUNE 3

JUNE 6

JUNE 8 • Free Fishing Weekend, all fishing licenses waived for the weekend • Ludington Lakestride 5K, 10K and Half Marathon, all races start on Lakeshore Drive, Ludington

MAY 30

• 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Native Plant Sale, Rotary Park, downtown Ludington

• 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Fremont John, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington

• 3 p.m. World Record Attempt: Largest Dessert Party, Rotary Park, downtown Ludington

JUNE 1 • Water Safety Days, Ludington • Noon Blessing of the Boats, Ludington Municipal Marina, downtown Ludington • 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 8th Annual Maritime Magic Arts/Crafts Show, Ludington Area Center for the Arts, 107 S. Harrison St., downtown Ludington • 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Mason

JUNE 13

JUNE 15

• 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Olivia Mainville, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington

JUNE

• 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. AAUW Used Book Sale, Lakeview School, Haight Street, Ludington

JUNE 4

• MAY 25

• 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Memorial Day Craft Fair, Rotary Park, downtown Ludington

• 7 p.m. Summer Kick-Off Concert with Scottville Clown Band, Waterfront Park, Ludington • Live in the Plaza: Mike Luusua, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington

• 4-7 p.m. Celebrating Success, Celebrating Scottville businesses, downtown Scottville

• Ludington Jaycees Minigolf Course opens for season, Ludington Jaycees Minigolf Course, Stearns Park, Ludington

JUNE 21

• Foster Track and Field Day, Oriole Field, Ludington

• WMOEC Swap Meet, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville • WMOEC Swap Meet, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville

JUNE 12

• 8 a.m. Gus Macker 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament, Stearns Park, Ludington • 4 Seasons Equestrian Association Open Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington • 10 a.m. WMOEC Antique Tractor Pull, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville

• MCFE Summer Cizzler Series Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington • Mason County Relay for Life, Oriole Field, Ludington • Coast to Coast Gravel Grinder Bike Race, downtown Ludington

• Noon-5 p.m. Big Sable Point Lighthouse Bus Tour & Music by AsperGrass, Big Sable Point Lighthouse, Ludington JUNE 23

JUNE 16 • Gus Macker 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament, Stearns Park, Ludington • 4 Seasons Equestrian Association Open Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington

• MCFE Summer Cizzler Series Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington JUNE 25 • Taste of the Lakeshore, Graystone Event Center, Ludington

• 1-4 p.m. Optimist Fathers' Day Strawberry Social, Rotary Park, downtown Ludington

JUNE 9

JUNE 20

• Mason County Saddle Club Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington

• 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. AAUW Used Book Sale, Lakeview School, Haight Street, Ludington

• Noon-8 p.m. West Shore Pride Fest, Rotary Park, downtown Ludington

• Fish on for Freedom, Ludington • 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Brad Lee, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington

JUNE 22

• 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. AAUW Used Book Sale, Lakeview School, Haight Street, Ludington

• 9-11 p.m. Rockin' 50s Shoreline Cruise on the S.S. Badger Carferry

• 1-4 p.m. 2019 Love Ludington Weekend Home Tour

• Fish on for Freedom, Ludington

JUNE 27 • 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Tom Zatarga, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington • 8-10 p.m. Sunset Beach Bonfire, Stearns Park Beach, Ludington JUNE 29 • 10 a.m. Garden Tractor Pulls, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville • Noon Mason County Sports

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Hall of Fame Induction, Historic White Pine Village, Ludington • 6 p.m. Mason County Sports Hall of Fame Banquet, Lincoln Hills Golf Club, Ludington • 6-9 p.m. Ludrock Allstars, Shagway Arts Barn, 5949 Shagway Road, Ludington

JULY JULY 2 • 7 p.m. Scottville Clown Band Patriotic Concert, Clown Band Shell, Scottville JULY 3 • 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Jimmy Dodson, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington • 6-7:30 p.m. Ludington Area Jaycees Freedom Festival Children & Pet Parade, downtown Ludington JULY 4

• 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Adam Knudsen, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington • Scottville 10 + 31 Celebration, downtown Scottville

• 10 a.m. Garden Tractor Pulls, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville

• 6-9 p.m. Ludington Library Used Book Sale, Ludington Library, downtown Ludington

• 4-10 p.m. Buccaneer Bash, Ludington Boat Club, Ludington

• 6-9 p.m. Friday Night Live, downtown Ludington

JULY 21

JULY 12

JULY 13 • Scottville 10 + 31 Celebration, downtown Scottville • 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ludington Library Used Book Sale, Ludington Library, downtown Ludington • 10 a.m. WMOEC Antique Tractor Pull, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville

• 1:45 p.m. Freedom Festival Parade & Fireworks (dusk) downtown Ludington

• Spartan River Run, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville

• 8:30-11 p.m. Ludington Fourth of July Fireworks Cruise, S.S. Badger Carferry

• Mason County Saddle Club Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington

JULY 6 • 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 51st Annual West Shore Art Fair, Rotary Park, Ludington • 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. LudRock 2019 Music Festival, Waterfront Park, Ludington • Dusk, Hamlin Lake Fireworks, Hamlin Lake, Ludington JULY 7 • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 51st Annual West Shore Art Fair, Rotary Park, Ludington • Noon-6 p.m. LudRock 2019 Music Festival, Waterfront Park, Ludington JULY 11 • Noon-5 p.m. Big Sable Point Lighthouse Bus Tour and music by Rough and Tumble, Big Sable Point Lighthouse, Ludington

Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington

JULY 14

• 1-4 p.m. Ludington Library Used Book Sale, Ludington Library, downtown Ludington JULY 18 • Ludington Offshore Classic Fishing Tournament & Big Boys Tournament, Ludington • 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Cheryl Wolfram, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington JULY 19 • Ludington Offshore Classic Fishing Tournament & Big Boys Tournament, Ludington • 6-9 p.m. Friday Night Live, downtown Ludington JULY 20 • Ludington Offshore Classic Fishing Tournament & Big Boys Tournament, Ludington • MCFE Summer Cizzler Series

48 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

• Ludington Offshore Classic Fishing Tournament & Big Boys Tournament, Ludington • MCFE Summer Cizzler Series Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington JULY 22 • Ludington Offshore Classic Fishing Tournament & Big Boys Tournament, Ludington JULY 23 • Ludington Offshore Classic Fishing Tournament & Big Boys Tournament, Ludington JULY 24 • Ludington Offshore Classic Fishing Tournament & Big Boys Tournament, Ludington • 9-11 p.m. Pirates of Lake Michigan Shoreline Cruise, S.S. Badger Carferry JULY 25 • 2:30-4 p.m. Antique Car Show, Oakview Medical Care Facility parking lot, Diana Street, Ludington • 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Eric Engblade, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington • 8-10 p.m. Sunset Beach Bonfire, Stearns Park Beach, Ludington JULY 26 • 7 p.m. Stratford on the Avenue Theatre Festival, Stage Left Theatre Company at Ludington's Rotary Park, downtown Ludington • 6-9 p.m. Friday Night Live, downtown Ludington

JULY 27 • 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ReJoyce Arts and Crafts Show, Christmas in July, Joyce Historical Home, 201 S. Washington Ave., Ludington • Noon-5 p.m. Big Sable Point Lighthouse Bus Tour and music by High Lonesome, Big Sable Point Lighthouse, Ludington • 6 p.m. West Shore Bank Rhythm & Dunes Concert: Your Generation, Waterfront Park, Ludington • 7 p.m. Stratford on the Avenue Theatre Festival, Stage Left Theatre Company at Ludington's Rotary Park, downtown Ludington JULY 28 • 8 a.m. to noon Ludington Lighthouse Du & Triathlon, Stearns Park, Ludington • 2 p.m. Stratford on the Avenue Theatre Festival, Stage Left Theatre Company at Ludington's Rotary Park, downtown Ludington

AUGUST AUG. 1 • 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. WMOEC 45th Annual Show, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville • 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Jason Hargreaves, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington • 7:30 p.m. Ludington Movies in the Park, Rotary Park, Ludington AUG. 2 • Blessing of the Badges, Downtown Ludington • Ludington Sidewalk Sales, Downtown Ludington • 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. WMOEC 45th Annual Show, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville


• 6-9 p.m. Friday Night Live, downtown Ludington • 7 p.m. Stratford on the Avenue Theatre Festival, presented by Stage Left Theatre Company, Ludington's Rotary Park, downtown Ludington AUG. 3 • Ludington Sidewalk Sales, Downtown Ludington • 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. WMOEC 45th Annual Show, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville • 9 a.m. Run the Beach 5K, Start/Finish at Loomis and Rath, downtown Ludington • 6 p.m. West Shore Bank Rhythm and Dunes Concert: Trinity, Waterfront Park, Ludington • 7 p.m. Stratford on the Avenue Theatre Festival, presented by Stage Left Theatre Company, Ludington's Rotary Park, downtown Ludington AUG. 4 • Ludington Sidewalk Sales, Downtown Ludington • 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. WMOEC 45th Annual Show, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville • 10 a.m. WMOEC Antique Tractor Pull, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville • 2 p.m. Stratford on the Avenue Theatre Festival, presented by Stage Left Theatre Company, Ludington's Rotary Park, downtown Ludington AUG. 6 • 81st Annual Western Michigan Fair, Tractor Pulls and Fireworks, Mason County Fairgrounds, U.S. 10, Ludington AUG. 7 • 81st Annual Western Michi-

gan Fair, ATR Monster Truck Madness, Mason County Fairgrounds, U.S. 10, Ludington AUG. 8 • 81st Annual Western Michigan Fair, Livestock Sales, Sizzling Summer Sing-Off Finale, Mason County Fairgrounds, U.S. 10, Ludington • Noon-5 p.m. Big Sable Point Lighthouse Bus Tour & Music by Jim Novak and Paul Cerny, Big Sable Point Lighthouse, Ludington

Waterfront Park, Ludington AUG. 11 • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gold Coast Artisan Fair, Rotary Park, Ludington

• 7:30 p.m. Ludington Movies in the Park, Rotary Park, Ludington

• Aug. 14

• 8-10 p.m. Sunset Beach Bonfire, Stearns Park Beach, Ludington

• 8:30-11 p.m. Bon Voyage to Summer Cruise, S.S. Badger Carferry • 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Tyler Reed, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington • 7:30 p.m. Ludington Movies in the Park, Rotary Park, Ludington

• 7 p.m. WMOEC Garden Tractor Transfer Sled Pull, Western Michigan Fair Grounds, Ludington

• Mason County Saddle Club Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington • 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. HELP M.A.D. Bicycle Ride, Trinity Evangelical Free Church, Ludington

AUG. 9

• Noon-5 p.m. Big Sable Point Lighthouse Bus Tour & Music by Fremont John, Big Sable Point Lighthouse, Ludington

AUG. 10 • 81st Annual Western Michigan Fair, Night of Destruction Demo Derby, Mason County Fairgrounds, U.S. 10, Ludington • 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Gold Coast Artisan Fair, Rotary Park, Ludington • Noon-1 p.m. Senior Center Annual Yard Sale, Ludington Area Senior Center, 308 S. Rowe St., Ludington • 1-7 p.m. Fish Fry/Boil to Benefit Hospice, Ludington Boat Club, Ludington • 6-9:30 p.m. Waterfront Worship Summer Concert,

• Lisa Terry AQHA/MQHA Memorial Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington AUG. 24 • Lisa Terry AQHA/MQHA Memorial Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington

• Aug. 17

• 7:30 p.m. Ludington Movies in the Park, Rotary Park, Ludington

• 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Senior Center Annual Yard Sale, Ludington Area Senior Center, 308 S. Rowe St., Ludington

AUG. 23

AUG. 15

• 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Mike Lenich & 80 Cows, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington

• 81st Annual Western Michigan Fair, High Flying Motocross, Mason County Fairgrounds, U.S. 10, Ludington

drew Schnitker, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington

AUG. 25 • Lisa Terry AQHA/MQHA Memorial Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington AUG. 29 • 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: Cousin Curtis, James Street Plaza, downtown Ludington

• 1-7 p.m. Suds on the Shore Craft Beer & Wine Festival, Ludington Rotary Park, downtown Ludington AUG. 18 • Mason County Saddle Club Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington

AUG. 31 • 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Third Annual Indoor Juried Fine Art Fair, Ludington Area Center for the Arts, 107 S. Harrison St., Ludington

SEPTEMBER SEPT. 1

AUG. 20 • 7 p.m. Summer Concert Series: Scottville Clown Band, Clown Band Shell, Scottville • Aug. 21

• Shoreline All Breed Youth Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington SEPT. 7 • 10 a.m. WMOEC Antique Tractor Pull, West Michigan Old Engine Club grounds, Scottville Riverside Park, Scottville

• Lisa Terry AQHA/MQHA Memorial Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington AUG. 22

• 1:30 p.m. Bloomer Cup Regatta, Ludington

• Lisa Terry AQHA/MQHA Memorial Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington

SEPT. 8

• 5-8 p.m. Live in the Plaza: An-

• Mason County Saddle Club Horse Show, Mason County Fairgrounds, Ludington

VENTURE: SPRING 2019

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Service Directory S ACCOMMODATIONS

Sunset Valley Resort 18726 Burnham Dr. • Arcadia

231-889-5987

• Family Vacation Spot with Beach on Lake Michigan • Open April to first of Nov. • Close to Restaur ants, Golfing, Fishing , Hiking & Biking Trails

AUTOMOTIVE

Auto Service Center

sAuto Parts ’ KASKINEN n a ir B Sales & Service Auto Sales Over 33 Years Experience

14149 9 Mile Rd. • Kaleva

231-362-3888

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR FACILITY NATIONWIDE LIMITED REPAIR WARRANTY NEW • USED • REBUILT

414 Parkdale • Manistee

723-8329

231-723-6288

Same personnel • Same service Full Auto Repair • Tires Quick Lube Oil Change All work nationally warranted

800-294-6288 FAX: 231-723-9441

24 hr. Wrecker & Flat Bed Jumpstart, Fuel Delivery, Lockouts and Towing

Fine Used Cars For Sale

2515 Grant Hwy. (on South US 31) • Manistee

Service & Tires

AUTOMOTIVE

Muffler Man

Vehicle Manufacturer Certified Collision Repair Facility Your SAFETY Matters!

of Michigan

Tires - Alignments Oil Changes - Brakes Farm & Commercial Tires Certified Mechanics on site for all your alignment and suspension repair needs. 74 Division St. • Manistee

Ph. 231-723-9941

• Guaranteed Repairs • Insurance Work Specialists!

245 Arthur St. • Manistee FREE INSPECTIONS! No Appointment Necessary! Mon. - Fri. 8 am - 5:30 pm Complete Auto Service

50 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

• FREE ESTIMATES

723-9921

• Rental Cars • 24 Hrs

231-352-7948 1310 Elm Street • Frankfort

www.PrecisionCollisionFrankfort.com

• ARMA Spray On Bedliners & Rust Protection • State of the Art Collision Repair Facility


Service Directory BARS & TAVERNS

Bud’s Tap Room 519 E. Dowland St., Ludington

231-845-5895 Open 7 Days a Week Daily Specials! Good Times... Great Food...

Coldest Beer in Town!

CABINS & COTTAGES Located on Tippy Dam back waters

Oldest Operating Saloon in Town Famous Broasted Chicken Homemade Soups • Full Menu

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Open 7 Days a Week Sun-Th 7am-9pm • Fri & Sat 7am-10pm

231-723-2487

723 Kosciusko

Manistee

CANOE RENTAL

Full-tilt Family Fun 30 minutes east of Manistee

Canoeing, Kayaking, Rafting

CABINS • CAMPING

32’ Rock Climbing Wall Disc Golf • Quiet Campground Stand-up Paddling

Pontoon, Fishing Boat and Dock Rentals

Pine River Paddlesport Center

998 Emmons Rd., • Wellston

848-4141

231-862-3471 www.thepineriver.com

VENTURE: SPRING 2019

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Service Directory S CHURCHES

St. Simon Catholic Community Daily Mass 8:30 am Fri. Communion Service 8:30 am Sat. 5:30 pm Sundays 8:30 am & 10:30 am 702 E. Bryant Rd. â&#x20AC;¢ Ludington

843-8606

We invite you to worship with us. Pastor, Fr. Wayne B. Wheeler, Jr. www.stsimonchurch.com

DINING

For Over 45 Years!

DINING

52 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE


y Service Directory GOLFING

www.facebook.com/ChestnutHillsGolf

Families Welcome Reasonable Rate

231.864.2458

www.chestnutgolf.com

LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE MANISTEE NATIONAL FOREST IN WELLSTON Check out our web site for a special $ off coupon!

553 Seaman Rd. • Wellston (231)

848-4174

www.fawncrestgolf.com

It’s a good look’n course – “Golf the Nut”

INSURANCE AGENCIES

Putting you first made us #1 Making you our #1 priority is what’s made State Farm® #1* Mary Sturdevant Ins Agcy Inc in auto insurance. I’m here to listen to your needs and to Mary Sturdevant, Agent help life go right. 306 Parkdale Ave Manistee, MI 49660 CALL ME TODAY. Bus: 231-723-9905

*Based on written premium as reported by SNL Financial 2014. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, IL 1601917

State Farm County Mutual Insurance Company of Texas Dallas, TX

VENTURE: SPRING 2019

53


Service Directory SENIOR CENTER Senior Citizens of today are just as vibrant, mobile, engaged and seeking fellowship as their younger counterparts.

Aging, it’s everyone’s future. Stay active • Stay informed • Stay involved

Serving Manistee County • 457 River St., Manistee • 231-723-6477

STORAGE

A Storage Inn 8x10 to 10x30 Storage Units Available

74 Arthur St. • Manistee

723-9362

Paul Adamski, Owner

VETERINARIANS

Dr. Liz Kaufman, DVM 11169 N. M37 • Irons

231-862-3113 www.ironsanimalhospital.com

54 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE


y

NEED HELP BUILDING A WEBSITE? A website itself can be used to accomplish many different marketing strategies to help your business grow. Interested in getting a custom quote? Contact: Paula Laws at 231-398-3116 or Ann Wilkosz at 231-398-3117 for details today!

VENTURE: SPRING 2019

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Community Ice Arena COMMUNITY ICE ARENA

Performing Arts Series PERFORMING ARTS SERIES

Recreation & Wellness Centers RECREATION AND

WELLNESS CENTERS

West Shore Community College proudly hosts many recreational and educational programs in our area. Visit our website to learn more, www.westshore.edu. West Shore Community College, 3000 N. Stiles Road, Scottville 231-845-6211 • 800-848-9722 • westshore.edu 56 MANISTEE NEWS ADVOCATE

Profile for Hearst Midwest

Venture Northwest: Spring & Summer 2019  

Venture Northwest: Spring & Summer 2019