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contents.

AUGUST 2012 VOLUME IV, â„– 8

FITNESS

14

THE PERFECT ABS WORKOUT

12

TO BE OR NOT TO BE

Check out the perfect regimen to get the abs you've always wanted. Just rip out the page and get ripped!

How to make good health decisions when so many different opinions are whirling around you.

WELLNESS

18 32

TORTURED SOLES With a combination of playing at the beach, walking around barefoot, and wearing those cute new heels, summer is rough on your feet. Learn how to take care of them from a professional.

BAD HAIR DAY What is it about your hair these days? It just never works! Find out what might be drowning your do and what you need to change.

NUTRITION

24 11

4

12 28 18 32 11 8 14

WHEN HEALTH IS UNHEALTHY Ever heard of being too healthy? Discover the new eating disorder, orthorexia, and why it can be dangerous to be too obsessed with nutrition.

HEALTHIEST FOOD APPS Need some help with your grocery shopping? Not sure where to start for a healthy dinner? Just grab your phone and you're on your way.

HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

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We are passionate patient caregivers.

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Healthy

Letter from the Editor

IDAHO

®

WITH

Summer Freedom

AUGUST 2012 VOLUME IV, № 8 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

John A. Anderson | editor@healthy-idaho.com PUBLISHER

Kenneth J. Shepherd| ken@healthy-idaho.com MARKETING DIRECTORS

Y

Julie Guyer | 208-371-4533 Steve Wallace | 208.850.4983 sales@healthy-idaho.com

ou want to know one of the best things about summer? Less TV time. I love that our TV is not on as often because there’s just too much life to live outside. And lets face it: reruns. Talk about a waste of time. As summer winds down, it's time to really drink it up - metaphorically.

MANAGING EDITORS

Kelsey Jones | Phillip Chadwick design@healthy-idaho.com

Stars, I’ve found so much more time to chat and interact with neighbors and friends and family. And nobody’s been fired or voted off! Instead, I’m able to convert the extra hours of daylight into biking, hiking, and a variety of sports and games my kids and their friends make up.

(OK, I'll come clean....I watch DWTS, and Brooke Burke is an engaging host.) I’ve you’ve ever said to yourself that you’d get more active if you had more time, well, in a way,

The interesting thing is that I’ve found I

during summer, you have more time. Clearly, a lot

am much more positive, more optimistic,

more daylight time, so turn off the tube and go

during the summer months. I wonder if

try something new. If you’re scratching your head

it has something to do with less TV. Sure,

about what to do, you’re in luck. This month’s

I know about the effect of shorter versus

magazine is full of great ideas, tips, and encourage-

longer days on our dispositions, and that

ments to get out there and improve your health.

plays a part. I love longer days. I enjoy

In our fitness section, we even have a ready-to-go

tossing a ball or taking a stroll through the

ab workout that you can tear out and put on your

purple dust of twilight. But I keep coming

wall! We even have a list of the cool nutrition apps

back to that ‘no time for TV’ thing. And

that are out there that will make being healthy that

there’s really something to it.

much easier. Essentially, this month we’re full to the gills with everything summer. We’re debunking

When I begin to think of the images,

summer health myths, studying the sun and we’re

messages, and meaninglessness that is

looking at staying healthy abroad. And if you’ve

so prevalent on television, I view turning

ever wondered what the top 5 foods for women

the TV off as a sort of mental detoxifica-

and men are, we’ve got them.

television gurus, some of whom are close

THE POINT IS SIMPLE: IT’S SUMMER. It's time to

colleagues of mine, but the ‘if it bleeds, it

celebrate and enjoy our freedoms. So, use the time

leads’ philosophy creates a negative per-

positively. Use it to make a healthy change. Use it

suasion that I don’t miss at all during the

to recharge your life and your relationships. But by

summer. And instead of hanging out with

all means, turn off the tube and step outside and

the likes of Donald ‘You’re fired!’ Trump,

create your own hot fun in the summertime!

those annoying hosts of Dances With the

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE

Tyler Woodcook | 208-867-6363 tyler@healthy-idaho.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Jessica Hagy, Heather Hooke, David Joachim, Tamarra Kemsley, Brooke Kittel, Ryan Larrondo, Michael Richardson, Mark Saunders, Patty Trela, Steven E. Warren DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

Sandy Wise | 866.884.3258 CIRCULATION

Healthy Idaho Magazine is printed monthly and delivered to higher income homes throughout Boise and is made available for pick up at hundreds of locations. Healthy Idaho Magazine is also mailed to all doctors, dentists, chiropractors, medical practitioners, health clinics, banks, and other businesses. If you would like to have Healthy Idaho Magazine delivered for distribution in your place of business, please contact us.

Healthy Idaho Magazine P.O. Box 170375 Boise, ID 83717 866.884.3258 PLEASE NOTE that the articles contained in this publication are meant to increase reader awareness of developments in the health and medical field. Its contents should not be construed as medical advice or instruction on individual health matters, which should be obtained directly from a health professional. The opinions expressed by the authors are not necessarily those of the publisher. Call for reprint permission.

FACEBOOK.COM/HEALTHYIDAHO

tion. Clearing the clutter. No offense to the

Simon ‘That was pathetic’ Cowell, and

ONLINE EDITOR

Ashley Romney | ashley@healthy-idaho.com

—JOHN A. ANDERSON (pictured with my wife, Marlo - who did NOT know about or approve this picture!)

TWITTER:HEALTHYIDAHOMAG

To be included in our free online directory, please email your contact information to directory@healthy-mag.com Healthy Magazine is dedicated to using recyclable materials.

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Copyright © 2012 Stardocs, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Edited by Kelsey Jones

health news [ HEALTH REPORT ]

THE LOWDOWN ON LEFTOVERS Q

SO HOW MANY DAYS CAN I KEEP MY COSTA VIDA LEFTOVERS IN THE FRIDGE?

&A

“Don’t rely on the sniff test,” says Shelley Fest, executive director of Partnership for Food Safety Education. Three to four days in the refrigerator is a good rule of thumb, but it also depends on whether the food sat at room temperature for more than two hours and the temperature of your fridge, which needs to remain between 33 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit. However, not all areas of your fridge are capable of maintaining these temperatures. The farther back you go, the cooler it is, so be sure to keep products like eggs, milk, cheese and leftovers in the back, and leave the warmer front area for things like sodas, water, beer and butter. Source: Fitness Magazine/Dakss

STOP! BEFORE YOU TAKE THAT PAIN PILL... You’re smart about safe dosing with over-the-counter pain meds, but have you checked your cough syrup lately? The pain reliever acetaminophen shows up in many remedies and if you take more than one containing it—even over the course of a day—you could have what’s called a staggered overdose. The risks according to a new study? Organ failure and even death if you take more than 4,000 mg in 24 hours (two tabs of extra-strength painkillers have 1,000 mg; a dose of cold medicine can have 325 mg). Check labels for acetaminophen and look out for terms such as AC, acetaminop, acetam, or paracetamol.

90 45 Source: Health Magazine

PERCENTAGE OF PATIENTS WHO’D LIKE TO KNOW WHAT DOCTORS ARE SCRIBBLING IN THEIR CHARTS

PERCENTAGE OF DOCTORS WILLING TO MAKE THEIR NOTES AVAILABLE TO PATIENTS Source: Health Magazine

SIDE EFFECTS

vs.

Permanent Propecia Problems?

Recent reports note that all Propecia users reported side effects such as erectile dysfunction, decreased sexual drive, problems with orgasms, shrinking and painful genitals, and even some neurological problems such as depression, anxiety and mental fogginess. For 96 percent of the men, the sexual problems lasted for more than a year after they stopped taking the drug. “Our findings make me suspicious that this drug may have done permanent damage to these men,” said Dr. Michael Irwig, the author of the study. “The chances that they will improve? I think it’s lower and lower the longer they have these side effects.” Source: abcnews.go.com

Cane Sugar or...Corn Sugar?

“Sugar is a solid, dried, crystallized food, whereas syrup is an aqueous solution or liquid food,” said Michael M. Landa from the Food and Drug Administration, denying a petition by the Corn Refiners Association to be allowed to call high-fructose corn syrup “corn sugar.” No, the FDA said in May, consumers aren’t confused by the term high-fructose corn syrup as the trade association contended. Consumer Union had urged the FDA to reject the petition. Source: Consumer Reports

$40 Million—  

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

}

That’s the settlement Skechers is paying into a fund for buyers of its rocker-style toning shoes. The money goes to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that the company’s claims for weight loss, toning, and muscle strengthening were unfounded. What’s more, Consumer Reports has also found that some wearers have been injured by the hyped-up shoe. To see whether you are eligible for a refund, go to skecherssettlement.com. Source: Consumer Reports Healthy-Idaho.com


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"

nutrition notes [ HEALTH REPORT ]

You have to decide what your highest priorities are and have the courage to say 'no' to other things. And the way to do that is by having a bigger 'yes' burning inside.

GREENS Want to ward off Type-2 diabetes? Load up on produce. The British Medical Journal reports that a daily serving of leafy greens may lower the risks of type 2 diabetes by 14 percent. The health benefit is derived from polyphenols in greens like cabbage and spinach, which stave the oxidative stress that can lead to diabetes and a host of other chronic diseases. For a simple side, steam them and drizzle with olive oil. Even add fresh spinach to your favorite smoothie. Hey—don't knock it 'til you try it!

~ STEPHEN COVEY

HEADS UP

Cola Cancers?

We know that the sugar in soda spikes insulin levels and that frequently spiked insulin levels is unhealthy. Now, according to a study in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, we are hearing that downing even two or more sodas a week may raise your risk of pancreatic cancer by a whopping 87% over the non-drinker of soda. Do your pancreas a favor and skip the sugary sodas (and don't even go there with the diet-soda sugar substitute question...another day).

STEALTH HEALTH FOOD

325 IN THOUSANDS, THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE HOSPITALIZED FOR FOOD-BORNE ILLNESSES EACH YEAR IN THE U.S. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

HIT THE

Beets

Deep-red root vegetables with an earthy, slightly sweet flavor, beets are equally delicious raw or cooked.

THE DIRTY BIRD—

The CDC estimates that roughly 1 in 6 Americans (or 48 million people) gets sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of food-borne diseases annually—and poultry is the top cause of food-borne illness. How can you avoid sickness? Wash your hands before and after handling raw chicken. Thaw frozen chicken in the fridge and cook your poultry until a meat thermometer stuck into the thickest parts of the thigh and breast reads 165 oF, suggests the USDA.  

Why they're healthy

Beets contain vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. They also have nitrates, which may help lower your blood pressure, a UK study finds.

How to eat them

Try them roasted, sliced, and topped with goat cheese, orange segments, and a drizzle of olive oil. Or shred them raw on top of salad.

FLAVANOIDS—

Looking to improve blood flow? Consider your diet. A high intake of flavanols—compounds found in tea, wine, and cocoa—improved indications of blood-vessel dilation by as much as 47% in those with coronary heart disease, according to researchers in California and Germany. Flavanols may boost the circulation of angiogenic cells, a variety that repairs arteries.  Healthy-Idaho.com


10HEALTHY {DIGI-KNOW}

phone apps to keep you

When used correctly, certain apps can make shopping, cooking and eating much easier and more enjoyable. Check out this list of apps that will keep you hip and healthy. 1. ALLRECIPES DINNER SPINNER When it comes to recipe apps, few are as good as the Dinner Spinner. No need to search for recipes: this app lets you enter the foods you have or that you want to eat and then lists recipes to fit those preferences.

2. FOODUCATE Scan the barcodes of products for a more comprehensible explanation of ingredients and product safety. As of 2011 the app was used for more than 10 million scans. The app also offers a grade for the product based on nutritional value.

3. HARVEST Do you ever find yourself at the store trying to pick the best watermelon but feeling completely clueless about how to choose correctly? Cue the Harvest app! It gives instructions on how to pick the best of a wide variety of produce. It also gives storage instructions to preserve produce for the maximum amount of time.

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4. BIG OVEN

7. COMPARE ME

Keep thousands of recipes and archive your own into your phone—pictures, grocery lists and all. As part of the app, you can enter what leftovers you have and get ideas for what to make. This app has received much praise from Newsweek, Time and even the New York Times, being downloaded more than 7 million times.

Few enjoy doing the math required to find out if 2.75 pounds of beef at $2.35/lb. is cheaper than 3 lbs. of chicken at $2.15/lb. Compare Me makes bargain shopping a breeze by doing the math.

5. REAL SIMPLE RECIPES Not everyone wants to make a gourmet meal every time they cook. In fact, with a busy schedule and active kids, parents have a hard time cooking altogether. The Real Simple Recipes app lets you enter how much time and what ingredients you have and then gives you step-by-step instructions.

6. GROCERY IQ Grocery IQ represents the forefront of modern shopping. When you run out of something at home, simply scan the barcode with this app and it will be added to your list. Then you can customize your shopping lists by store and e-mail lists to other people.

8. WILD EDIBLES Developed by Steve Brill, the “Wildman,” this app lets you know which plants are edible. Granted, most people don’t go out into the backcountry simply for a meal, but this app is pretty awesome nonetheless.

9. LOCAVORE This app lets you enter your zip code to see what produce is in season in your area, allowing you to choose the freshest, most local foods. It’s great for those wanting to support local farmers.

10. FOOD NETWORK This app lets those deliciouslooking meals on the TV screen come right into your home. You can find your favorite chef and then get his or her best recipes.

HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

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It's Not

{FITNESS}

SHAKESP EARE To Do or Not To Do That is the Question

Exercise, diet and fitness information is accessible—thanks to the Internet. Sometimes, however, there can be an information overload, like the health commercials that ramble on without really telling you anything. When you're looking for real answers it can be really overwhelming. An intelligent exerciser is always asking questions and using information to improve their workouts and their performance. The problem is that there are so many opinions and answers as to what is the “best” exercise or workout that it can be very confusing. If you search long enough you could find any data that supports either side of an exercise theory or debate.

HOW CAN YOU MAKE GOOD DECISIONS WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR HEALTH? CONSULT WITH QUALIFIED PROFESSIONALS.

Make sure the person you contact is giving you recommendations within their “Scope of Practice.” Many can make recommendations or share personal stories but they may not be applicable to you or their expertise.

READ INFORMATION FROM REPUTABLE RESOURCES.

Be careful of popular magazines that want to promote the latest “trend” or make promises of a skinny body in 5 minutes. Remember: check the source of the information to see if they are qualified to know what they are talking about.

KEEP UP ON THE LATEST FITNESS INFORMATION.

This can be difficult because the industry is ever-changing. The more science improves, the more we apply that information and evolve how we should train. If the information is too technical or confusing, use your qualified trainers to help you sort out information.

WHEN CHOOSING AN EXERCISE OR A WORKOUT, base your decisions by weighing out the pros and cons of why this certain program would be good for you. Avoid hard-edge judgments of saying this exercise is “right,” “never,” “the best way,” “contra-indicated" or “wrong.” An exercise that is good for one person may not be for another. There is no “one exercise program fits all.”

EVALUATE YOUR EXERCISE CHOICES and make sure that the ones you choose will help you achieve the goals you have set. Just because an exercise is good doesn't mean that it would be a good choice if it doesn't help you reach your goals.

WEIGH THE RISKS OF AN EXERCISE.

Even if the exercise is intense, fun, and challenging, you have to decide if the benefits outweigh the risks.

THE BOTTOM LINE: Effective and safe exercise programs should be based on an assessment of all the pros and cons of each exercise. You should weigh the risks vs. the benefits and personalize it to what your goals and physical needs are.

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lisa Mathews

is a Certified Personal Trainer and Certified Pilates Instructor with Treehouse Athletic Club editor@stardocs.com

Healthy-Idaho.com


{THE DISCOVERY CENTER OF IDAHO}

“For centuries, the medical community has learned about the inner workings of anatomy through the study of real human

BODIES: REVEALED fascinating & real COMES TOBOISE! SEPTEMBER 29, 2012 - MARCH 31, 2013

bodies, and now it’s possible for the public to gain an intimate knowledge as well,” said Dr. Roy Glover, professor emeritus

The human body specimens in the

of Anatomy and Cell Biology at the

exhibition are preserved through a

University of Michigan and chief medical

revolutionary technique called polymer

director for BODIES REVEALED. “The

preservation. In this process, human tissue

exhibition will change the way people of

is permanently preserved using liquid

Boise see themselves. It will enlighten,

silicone that is treated and hardened. The

empower, fascinate and inspire.” The

end result is a specimen preserved to the

exhibition features real, whole and partial

cellular level, showcasing the complexity

human body specimens that have been

of the body's many bones, muscles, nerves,

meticulously prepared and preserved,

blood vessels and organs. The full-body

giving visitors the opportunity to view and

specimens can take more than a year to

gain a powerful new appreciation of the

prepare. The specimens included in the

complexity of their own bodies.

exhibit have been donated by the deceased individual or his/her authorized family member for purposes of dissection and plastination for public education.

The BODIES REVEALED exhibition opens to the public at the Discovery Center of

Many partners have helped to make this exhibition possible. “Saint Alphonsus

Idaho on Saturday, September 29, 2012,

Health Systems has been essential as the Presenting Sponsor of BODIES

and will run through March 31, 2013. The 6000-square foot exhibition, the largest traveling show DCI has ever done, will take up about half the exhibits’ square footage of the center and will require hundreds of additional volunteers. “When I saw the exhibition for the first time, I was awestruck. It provides a unique mirror – a singular opportunity to see inside ourselves. Since then I

REVEALED.” said Bruce Schrepple, President of the Board of the Discovery Center of Idaho. The support of HP, Boise, Inc., United Dairymen of Idaho and KTVB has also been pivotal in bringing this exhibition to Boise. “The BODIES REVEALED exhibit is not only fascinating, it is informative,” said Sally Jeffcoat, President and CEO, Saint Alphonsus Health System. “As a health care institution we are committed to providing hope and healing in our communities. Part of that commitment is educating and informing individuals and families on how to take care of our bodies.”

have attended several of these exhibits in different cities, and each time I have

To learn more about BODIES REVEALED

a renewed respect and appreciation for

www.dcidaho.org/Discover/Bodies.php

the complexity of the human body,” said

For volunteer opportunities, http://bit.ly/DCIVol

Janine Boire, Executive Director of the

For advance ticket sales visit: http://bit.ly/BODIEStix.

Discovery Center.

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{FITNESS}

ABS the perfect

WORKOUT 300 REPS FOR PERFECT ABS. Do this exercise every other day in addition to cardio or strength training and you'll quickly see that, yes, you too can have amazing abs.

30 Crunches 20 Bicycle crunches 30 Toe touches 20 Reverse crunches

RIP HERE TO GET RIPPED HERE...

15 Side-plank hip lifts (r) 30 Crunches 15 Side-plank hip lifts (l) 40 Russian twists 30 Bicycle crunches 15 Oblique v-ups (r) 20 Reverse crunches 15 Oblique v-ups (l) 10 Leg lifts

OBLIQUE V-UPS

REVERSE CRUNCHES

RUSSIAN T WISTS

TOE TOUCHES

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

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ALLERGIST PROVIDED ASTHMA CARE LEADS TO: 76% Fewer E.R. Visits 77% Less Missed Work/school 77% Fewer Hospitalizations 45% Fewer Sick Visits The Allergy Group delivers friendly, competent, and experienced medical care for allergy, sinus, asthma, and related medical problems. Dr. Callanan is a board-certified physician in Internal Medicine and Allergy/Immunology, practicing Allergy in Boise since 1971.

Feel the difference ALLERGY

ASTHMA

ST LUKES MERIDIAN 520 S. EAGLE RD. #1245

IMMUNOLOGY

1000 N CURTIS RD SUITE 303 BOISE, IDAHO

WWW.THEALLERGYGROUP.COM

(208) 377-4000

Bothered by Arthritis? Concerned About

Heart Disease? We are conducting a research study of 3 approved medications commonly used to treat pain due to osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in people who also have or are at high risk for heart disease. Qualified participants will receive study-related medical care, regular study check-ups, and study medication at no charge.

To qualify you must • Be 18 years of age or older • Have had osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis for at least 6 months

• Have been prescribed regular medication for your pain for at least 6 months

• Have or be at high risk for heart disease, which includes a history of heart attack, stroke, or diabetes.

For more information, please call the number below.

Advanced Clinical Research

(208) 377-8653, ext. 102 or 104 2950 E. Magic View Dr. Suite 182 Meridian, ID 83642 www.acr-research.com www.facebook.com/ACRIdaho Facebook.com/healthyidaho

HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

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HEALING in the absence of

CURE

BY JUDY TAYLOR, RN, MSN

According to the CDC website and 2000 census, roughly one quarter of Americans live with a chronic disease, a disability or both. Despite the best our healthcare system can do, one in four of us will never be cured. The good news is that people living with chronic disease and disability can be healed. Healing is a state of wholeness and

TREAT AS COMPETENT ADULTS –

PROVIDE OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE –

harmony between mind, body and spirit.

Nothing about living with disease or

People with disabilities have talents and

Healing is not dependent on perfect health

disability cancels the right to self-

knowledge to offer, and love and caring

and functioning bodies. Healing is achieved

determination, and the need to be

to give. The ability to give back, or make

when a person can see themselves as

treated with dignity and respect. Healthy

life a little easier for others makes living

capable, lovable, and a contributor to their

relationships are based on shared power

through challenges feel worthwhile.

family and community.

and partnership. When we treat people

Focusing on what a person can’t do

with disabilities and disease like any other

blinds us to their worth and potential.

How can we all as health care providers,

competent adult, we help heal a self-image

Healing starts when people see that the

community members, family and friends

that may be damaged by lack of a cure.

challenges they live with allows them to

support healing in ourselves and in others?

make a contribution to the world.

It’s a big question, but these quick tips can

SUPPORT A CONNECTION TO NATURE

get us headed in the right direction.

– It is almost impossible to overstate the benefits of regular interactions with nature

REDUCE DAILY STRESSORS – People

on mind, body, and spirit. If a person’s

living with disease and disability have

ability to tolerate being outside is limited,

limited energy. Excessive glare, noise,

sitting by windows, indoor plants, gardens,

smells, boredom and important items

and water features, or even just pictures of

not easily available waste energy without

nature, should be part of daily surroundings.

giving anything in return. On the flip side,

To be at

peace spiritually is a hallmark of

controlling pain, improving sleep, and

healing,

and nature feeds our spirits.

Judy Taylor RN, MSN is director of clinical services at Elks Rehab Hospital, where she is privileged to lead hospital wide efforts to support healing in their patients.

engaging in meaningful activities, boost people’s ability cope with daily stressors.

RE-THINK GOALS – Part of healing is achieving realistic expectations and goals, then finding new ways to get there. This is an opportunity to give up things done only from obligation, and focus instead on things that provide happiness, satisfaction, or meet important needs.

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

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REHAB HOSPITAL

For 65 years, we have been providing care and plan to be here in the future, standing by, in case you or a loved one needs inpatient or outpatient care for: • Stroke • Traumatic brain injury • Orthopedic rehab • Spinal cord injury • Movement Disorders • Other physical rehab needs

We Are The Dedicated Rehab Experts. For more information, please visit our website at www.elksrehab.org or call 489-4444 to speak to one of our professionals.

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{HAPPY FEET}

TORTURED As far back as 1000 BC, women wore heels to establish social status and sex appeal. In addition to making legs look great, heels also cause a woman's back to arch and chest to thrust out, giving a super sexy "come-hither" stance. But current statistics show that 43 million Americans experience painful foot problems and high-heeled women comprise the vast majority of them. For every five women in the US, one suffers from aching feet as a result of donning heels.

SOLES

WRITTEN BY DR. PHIL VASYLI

The Pump Bump What most women do not know is that their most fabulous shoes render all of their other efforts to maintain sexy legs and pretty toes utterly useless. Misshapen legs, arched backs, fallenin ankles and knees and foot deformities such as hammertoes, bunions, stress fractures and Morton's Neuroma are all caused by excessively high heels. In addition, women get "pump bump," a bony enlargement on the back of the heel from pressure and rubbing due to women's pumps and dress shoes. Not sexy.

Arch Enemy Lacking in arch support, excess pronation is common amongst high heel wearers and is the number one cause of heel, ankle, knee, hip and lower back pain, and also potential foot and leg deformities as described above.

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

Healthy-Idaho.com


Hey, Sole Sister Our genetic makeup was designed to walk on soft surfaces—soil, sand and grass, which acts as a cradling device to help hold the foot and maintain an ergonomic structure between the ground and the human body. Walking in heels on a hard sidewalk leads to foot and arch collapse, pronation and a lengthening of soft tissues. This causes the joint surfaces to function at unnatural angles to each other, leaving the joints to become loose and flexible.  The lower leg turns inward, putting the knee and hip out of alignment and causes the back to be rotated or arched.

Back Out of Whack High heels can cause posture problems because the back and neck are forced to hyperextension due to the redistribution of body weight on the ball of the foot.

Phil Vasyli is an expert podiatrist, global "foot whisperer" and owner of Orthaheel, a footwear company specializing in healthier footwear.

Consider alternatives:

1

High heels are not necessarily bad for your feet, but you’ve got to set your limits. The normal human body was not intended to walk in high heels, so the most logical thing is to either not wear them or simply save them for special occasions or the weekend. If you want to wear a heel, the best option is to aim for a 1.5" to 2" heel with a wedge sole and, most important, some contact with the arch.

2

Try some yoga for high heels. Pelvic tilts and calf stretches will minimize any muscle cramping and shortening. Also, commit to stretching the muscles in the back of your leg before and after putting them on.

3

Orthotics count as a lesser evil. An orthotic is very similar to a human footprint which has ergonomic structure to reverse the angles of excess pronation and add needed support at that high level. Orthotics also help keep the arch contours in place in lower-heeled shoes.

4

Shop! Buy a wide variety of shoes, including sneakers, oxfords and sandals, and vary your footwear day to day. Look for the APMA seal of acceptance for the best options or go to their website, APMA.org, for a selection of brands. Also, buy shoes in the afternoon or evening since feet swell throughout the day.

FACT: High heels for women are believed to have originated with Catherine de Medici, a 16th century Italian noblewoman who was short in stature and wanted to make a bigger impression when she arrived in France to marry the future King Henry.

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1

{HAPPY FEET}

< Keep those sandals on! Wear shoes to protect your feet from puncture wounds and cuts. Sea shells, broken glass and other sharp objects, when stepped on, can ruin your day at the beach. Avoid the water if your skin does get cut—bacteria in oceans and lakes can cause infection. If you do suffer from a puncture wound, have it treated by a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours to avoid complications.

2

< Did you know that feet get sunburned, too? Rare but deadly skin cancers like melanoma can occur on the foot. Prevent skin cancer on your feet by lathering up with sunscreen. Don’t forget to apply to both the tops and bottoms of your feet!

3

5

< Remember jellyfish stings can still occur even if it’s washed up dead on the beach. Remove any tentacles that may stick to the foot or ankle and protect your hands. Vinegar, meat tenderizer or baking soda reduce pain and swelling. Most jellyfish stings heal within days, but if they don’t, see a doctor.

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

< Ouch, that's hot! Wear shoes to protect your soles from getting burned as you walk on blistering-hot sand, sidewalks and pavement. Take extra precaution if you have diabetes.

4

Written by Dr. Phil Vasyli

How to care for

BEACH FEET

As millions of Americans hit the beach this summer, remember these foot safety tips.

< Be careful with your footing while playing beach sports such as frisbee or volleyball—walking, jogging and playing sports on soft, uneven surfaces frequently lead to arch pain, heel pain, ankle sprains and other injuries. It’s best to wear supportive shoes while playing beach sports. If injuries occur, use rest, ice, compression and elevation to ease pain and swelling. Any injury that does not resolve within a few days should be examined by a foot and ankle surgeon.

And Remember:

People who have diabetes face serious foot safety risks at the beach. The disease causes poor blood circulation and numbness in the feet. A person with diabetes may not feel pain from a cut, puncture wound or burn. Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. People with diabetes should always wear shoes to the beach and remove them regularly to check for foreign objects like sand and shells that can cause sores, ulcers and infections.

Healthy-Idaho.com


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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

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BIG

$10,000

TREASURE VALLEY WEIGHT LOSS

Challenge

1st Place Woman Kathryn Harris Won: $3,000 Lost: 98.8 lbs or 35.6% bodyweight

losers Congratulations!

The St. Luke’s Humphreys Diabetes Center Weight Loss Challenge recently concluded with winners announced at a ceremony on June 7. Participants competed over a 5-month period. Initial and regular weigh-ins were required from January 7 thru June 7. Winners were determined by the percentage of body weight lost. There were 157 finalists who lost a total 3,604 pounds—an average of 23 pounds each—and 139 individuals who lost 5% or more of their total body weight. Research shows that overweight individuals who lose 5-10% of their total body weight cut their risk for Type II diabetes in half. Congratulations, winners!

1st Place Man Rich Siler Won: $3,000 Lost: 83.6 lbs. or 34.4% bodyweight

2nd Place Woman Kristina Villamor Won: $1,500 Lost: 72.6 lbs. or 32.7% bodyweight

2nd Place Man Elroy Zimmerman Won: $1,500 Lost: 117.4 lbs. or 33.5% bodyweight

RUNNERS UP: WOMEN 1st Runner-Up Monica Puga: Lost 69.8 pounds, 29.6% bodyweight 2nd Runner-Up Erica Jones: Lost 67.6 pounds, 28.8% bodyweight 3rd Runner-Up Judy Barnes: Lost 67 pounds, 28.1% bodyweight

RUNNERS UP: MEN

3rd Place Woman Chloette Ayling Won: $500 Lost: 70.4 lbs. or 30.2% bodyweight

3rd Place Man Richard Bleakman Won: $500 Lost: 93.4 lbs. or 32.8% bodyweight

1st Runner-Up Tim Jones: Lost 103 pounds, 31.9% bodyweight 2nd Runner-Up Joseph Deaver: Lost 87.8 pounds, 27.7% bodyweight 3rd Runner-Up Robert Bradley: Lost 65.4.0 pounds, 27.2% bodyweight

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE WEIGHT LOSS CHALLENGE AND HOW YOU CAN PARTICIPATE IN 2013, VISIT WWW.HDIABETESCENTER.ORG

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

Healthy-Idaho.com


This year, don’t let

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YOUR WAY!

) HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

23


{NUTRITION}

when HEALTH is unHEA Eating healthy food is good, but let’s not get carried away. The list of eating disorders may have a new and dangerous addition. Orthorexia, which comes from the Greek word “orthos,” meaning “correct or right,” is an unhealthy fixation on foods that a person deems pure, healthy and natural. Self-esteem is attached to their diet and the majority of their life revolves around controlling what they eat. Orthorexia is different than anorexia, the well-known eating disorder fueled by the desire to lose weight, although the two disorders can carry similar consequences. Orthorexic individuals can continue taking things out of their diet that they feel are unhealthy until they are not getting enough nourishment, leading to emaciation. Steven Bratman, M.D., the doctor who coined the term “orthorexia,” said the disorder can reach extremes that are just as dangerous as anorexia. He mentioned one case in particular where a girl died from starvation not because she wanted to be thin, but because she just wanted to eat healthy food.

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

Healthy-Idaho.com


WRITTEN BY MICHAEL RICHARDSON

ALTHY Bratman proposed a self-test consisting of two questions to help diagnose orthorexia.

1 2

Do you care more about the virtue of what you eat than the pleasure you receive from eating it? Does your diet socially isolate you?

Bratman warned that orthorexics often develop a sense of superiority over others who are not eating well. Some will avoid socializing if they can’t choose what will be eaten, skipping meals that they don’t consider to be worthy. Lora Erickson, a USATF certified running coach and nationally ranked athlete who resides in Idaho, said she has a lot of clients who are obsessed with eating healthy to an unhealthy degree. “I think a lot of it ties into the concept of “perfection,” but we must remember that nobody is perfectly healthy and what is healthy to one person isn’t to another,” she said. “It’s about balance.” Erickson enlists what she calls the 90-10 rule in her own life and with her clients, where 90 percent of the time she eats for fuel, and 10 percent of the time

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she eats for fun, allowing herself some freedom, which she said is important. Erickson said one problem with orthorexia is that very few foods are completely healthy. “The fact is all foods have substances that can be healthy and others than can be deemed as unhealthy; however, overall the food could be classified as healthy,” she said. “Often people obsessed with eating right avoid healthy foods because they contain things that are unhealthy.” But the line between eating disorder and consistent attempts at healthy eating is a grey one: the American Psychiatric Association (APA) does not recognize orthorexia as a mental disorder. Some worry that publicizing concerns and warnings about orthorexia will just hurt the health of the nation, since people who need to watch what they eat far outnumber those who need to stop watching what they eat. Whatever the true danger of orthorexia, those suffering from it carry certain characteristics often different than normal eating disorder warning signs. In studies of orthorexia, males have been shown to be more prone to it than females, which goes against the grain of other prominent eating disorders. Certified nutritional consultant Carol Cottrill told empowher.com that Obsessive Compulsive Behavior (OCD) is the root cause for orthorexia. She said many of her OCD patients want to count calories, grams of fat and so forth, but she coaches them against that. “Certainly this does not mean that healthy eating goes out the window, but balance, moderation and pleasure take the place of deprivation, extremism and limitation,” she said. Cottrill said what will often happen is that people will, over time, cut out certain food groups they judge to be unhealthy. Often it is pre-packaged foods that are eliminated first, then meats. Then they might suspect they are intolerant to other foods and drop them too, leading to malnutrition. Added to that, many orthorexics obtain a disabling anxiety about their food, according to CNN.com.

As a basic rule, one should never feel controlled by food. It should be the other way around. Judith Matz, co-author of “The Diet Survivor’s Handbook: 60 Lessons in Eating, Acceptance and Self-Care” told empowher.com that those with orthorexia or those leaning that way should focus on intuitive eating. “Rather than focus on ‘healthy’ foods, the goal for everyone should be to have a healthy relationship with food,” Matz said. “This means that you eat when you are physically hungry, eat what you are hungry for—choosing from a wide variety of foods—and stop when you feel satisfied.” Part of a healthy food relationship, according to Cottrill, is realizing that what we eat doesn’t determine who we are or our personal worth. Deviled eggs and angel food cake say nothing about our character.

HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

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DRUGS Doctors LOVE Han Solo has Chewbacca, Frodo has Sam, and Sherlock has Watson. It only makes sense that doctors, who solve problems and save lives in real life, should have their own sidekicks.

WRITTEN BY MICHAEL RICHARDSON

There are certain medications, some commonly known and others more obscure, that medical professionals have come to trust and that patients have come to rely on, sometimes unknowingly. Let’s introduce you to some of the heroes.

CORTICOSTEROIDS Asthma has America by the throat, with about 12 million diagnosed asthma sufferers. From 2001 to 2009, the number of people with asthma rose by 4.3 million. But medical science is putting up a fight with corticosteroids, which were developed from cortisone, a type of anti-inflammatory steroid produced by the body (much different than anabolic steroids used by athletes). Corticosteroids work by lessening inflammation in the airways and are a staple in asthma maintenance, according to Douglas H. Jones, MD, of Rocky Mountain Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in Idaho. “Inhaled corticosteroids and combination inhaled corticosteroids with long-acting beta agonist medications (like albuterol) are invaluable to treating asthma,” he said. “Americans would be in serious trouble without them.”

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

Healthy-Idaho.com


[ HEALTH REPORT ] HERCEPTIN About 25 percent of women with breast cancer have a cancer that expresses a gene called HER-2. Herceptin, which came out in the late 90s, targets HER-2 and works even when chemotherapy fails. Duke University Medical Center’s Dr. Kimberly Blackwell said the drug will prevent breast cancer from recurring in many women, improving survival rates. “More important, these drugs represent highly effective agents that target the cancer, not the patient,” she said.

ASPIRIN Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. About one-quarter (616,000) of American deaths in 2007 were from diseases of the heart. One common heart problem is coronary artery disease, where plaque builds up in the heart’s arteries, causing them to narrow over time. This can lead to heart attacks and heart failure. The medication of choice for coronary artery disease? Aspirin. Aspirin, which comes in many forms (Bayer, Bufferin, Ecotrin), has been shown to decrease the risk of heart attack or stroke, especially among those with existing conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, because it can prevent blood clots from forming in the arteries. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends the use of aspirin for men age 45 to 79 years and women age 55 to 79 years to prevent cardiovascular disease.

who have had serious heart surgery, according to mayoclinic.com. Cardiologist Amanda Donohue, DO, of the Jordan Valley Medical Center in Idaho said that for primary and secondary prevention of heart disease, aspirin and statins like Lipitor are her favorite sidekicks. “Statins and ASA(aspirin) are two of the cornerstones of cardiology,” she said. “Given to the right patients they can markedly decrease the risk of a cardiovascular event.”

STATINS The American Heart Association set a goal at the turn of the century that by 2010, coronary heart disease and strokes would decrease by 25 percent. By 2009, there was already a 40 percent decrease in death to coronary heart disease since then. Part of this success is owed to statins like Lipitor, which slow the progression of the hard, waxy plaque that builds up in arteries, narrowing them. Statins lower cholesterol levels by inhibiting an enzyme key to cholesterol production. High cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular disease.

CEPHALOSPORIN Cephalosporins, which can be altered to change their specific activity, were administered more than 8 million times in emergency departments in 2006. They make up 14 percent of all outpatient antibiotic prescriptions, or about 50 million per year. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), uses for the varieties of cephalosporin include:

But there can be serious side-effects of taking aspirin frequently, stomach bleeding being the worst. The risk of stomach bleeding can outweigh the benefits of taking aspirin to prevent heart attack, so don’t start taking aspirin every day unless a doctor recommends it.

• • • • • •

Men under 45 should not use aspirin to prevent heart attacks, and women under 55 should not use aspirin to prevent strokes, according to the USPSTF.

Some of the more common cephalosporins are Cefazolin, Ceftriaxone and Cefepime.

For those who can safely take it, however, aspirin has amazing benefits, even in time of emergency. It can be helpful to take an aspirin right after a heart attack, so that the blood clot causing the attack stays smaller. Many doctors recommend daily aspirin to those who have already suffered a heart attack or

Pneumonia Urinary Tract Infections Skin Infections Respiratory Infections Meningitis Bone and Joint Infections

Maybe Dr. Jones and His Corticosteroids may not be the dynamic duo you saw last night at the theater, but that doesn’t negate the amazing influence corticosteroids and these other medications have on our society and wellbeing. Suffice it to say, doctors have their favorite sidekicks, and those sidekicks could save your life.

PROPOFOL The drug may have gotten somewhat of a bad name when it was tied to the death of Michael Jackson. Jackson called propofol his “milk,” according to abcnews. go.com, using it as a sleep aid. The drug should never be used as a sleep assistant, and experts said Jackson may have injected himself with a fatal dose. In the hands of a professional anesthesiologist, the drug is safe. Propofol is used directly before surgery to sedate the patient and has become the leading anesthesia because of its effectiveness. Dr. Sloan Taylor, an anesthesiologist in Highland, Idaho, said Propofol is the medication of choice for anesthesiologists everywhere because it is fast-acting and has few side-effects. “Most of the stuff I use, I use because it’s immediate,” Dr. Taylor said. “Propofol is the best anesthetic drug just before surgery.” Propofol is also preferred because it is antiemetic, meaning it helps patient’s bodies avoid nausea and vomiting. Furthermore, it wears off quickly, making it great for out-patient surgery. One of the few down sides to Propofol, which is taken through IV, is that it can be painful on injection. Propofol has become so widely used that there is a nationwide shortage of it, which scares many medical professionals, since the alternative medicines are not as good.

"There is no medicine like hope, no incentive so great, and no tonic so powerful as expectation of something better tomorrow.” —Orison Marden

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

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DRUGS TOUCH Doctors Won’t

If doctors won’t use them — why should we? WRITTEN BY MICHAEL RICHARDSON

For doctors in every field, there are some medicines they simply won’t use even if they’re perfectly legal. Side effects, fear of litigation and simply knowing that some drugs don’t work leave certain medicines to gather dust. Consumers should know which drugs doctors avoid in order to make informed decisions about our health and avoid mistreating ourselves with ineffective or dangerous over-the-counter medications.

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Healthy-Idaho.com


[ HEALTH REPORT ] CERTAIN SUPPLEMENTS Dr. Andy Peiffer, medical director of the Men’s Health Center, said he avoids recommending any supplements that claim to do what prescription drugs can do, like lower cholesterol, lower blood pressure and treat depression.

a host of benefits, which is probably why 30 million American adults take them daily as reported in 2006 by the Harvard Medical School. NSAIDs ease pain from headaches, fevers, and arthritis, and also ease inflammation.

He said that many manufacturers of these supplements make unfounded claims about their products which are not tested in well-designed clinical trials. Peiffer said he believes that people who are seriously ill are most susceptible to believing baseless claims, but that many people look for and buy into special diets, supplements, devices and treatments to cure different conditions. “Statements like “promotes health” and “balances and improves metabolism,” are baseless, certainly in a society where so many other simple (free) things, like eating less or eating better and exercising more, would provide exponentially more benefit,” Peiffer wrote.

However, NSAIDs, can also increase the risk of a heart attack and the risk of complications after a heart attack since they can contribute to platelet clumping and constriction of blood vessels. NSAIDs are also not commonly recommended for those with a history of heart failure.

Furthermore, a lot of supplements like vitamins once thought to be harmless are now known to put people at risk for disease if taken at high doses. Peiffer also said he discourages people from taking supplements that use the words “holistic,” “cleanse” or “detoxify.” As stated before, good life-style habits are critical to health maintenance and no amount of supplements will compensate for overeating and lack of exercise. Medical peer-reviewed literature, rather than blogs and testimonials, are the way to avoid misrepresentation and fraud, according to Peiffer. "Well-designed clinical trials will show whether supplements really measure up to their claims and what risks they carry,” he wrote. “Without that evidence, just as for prescribed medication, it is irresponsible for me, as a medical doctor, to recommend a supplement."

IBUPROFEN FOR CARDIAC PATIENTS Cardiologist Amanda Donohue of the Jordan Valley Medical Center in Idaho said she rarely recommends ibuprofen for cardiac patients, especially after a significant cardiac event, such as a heart attack. Many pain killers have been linked to heart trouble in the past. In 2004 Vioxx was taken from the market because of possible cardiovascular side effects and Bextra was soon after taken off the market for some of the same reasons. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) may also have some negative effects on the heart. Aspirin and ibuprofen fall under the category of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These drugs provide

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NSAIDs can be especially dangerous for heart attack survivors, according to a Danish research study involving 84,000 Danish heart attack survivors. The heart attack survivors taking NSAIDs, including ibuprofen, were 45 percent more likely to suffer a second attack within a week of the first, compared with the heart attack survivors who took nothing, reported the Telegraph, an English newspaper. The American Heart Association released a scientific statement about the use of NSAIDs, warning of their potential cardiovascular risks and that each patient should be prescribed differently according to their situation and susceptibility to stomach and heart problems. “From both the patient’s and physician’s perspectives the problem lies in balancing the risks and benefits of medications for pain relief,” the statement reads. “More long-term data are needed to fully evaluate the extent to which these important adverse cardiovascular effects may be offset by other beneficial effects of these medications.” Research has shown that NSAIDs can cause upset stomach and even gastrointestinal bleeding, according to a Harvard Medical School Harvard Heart Letter, which reported that 100,000 hospitalizations and 16,000 deaths a year come from stomach bleeding and gastrointestinal damage from NSAIDs. NSAIDs like ibuprofen don’t harm most people, but doctors recommend strictly following the directions on the labels of the painkillers to avoid any complications. “Ask your healthcare provider if you have any concerns about the safety of your medication,” Donohue said.

ASTHMA AND ALLERGY MEDICATION In 2010, 18.7 million adults and 7 million children, or 8.4 percent of Americans, had asthma, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Because allergies and asthma are such widespread issues, there are unproven medications used by many.

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[ HEALTH REPORT ]

The FDA periodically releases what they call “Potential Signals of Serious Risks and New Safety Information” which is data taken by the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS). The list contains dozens of drugs currently on the market that have been associated with some risk. The list does not give actual verdicts on the safety of the drugs, but helps citizens monitor which drugs may be dangerous so as to make more informed decisions.

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Dr. Douglas Jones of the Rocky Mountain Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology said there are multiple common medications that he doesn’t recommend to patients. One is Benadryl (diphenhydramine), the most used over-the-counter anti-histamine. He said Benadryl is not as effective as other anti-histamines on the market and can have detrimental side-effects. “Medications like diphenhydramine have significant side effects such as sedation, psychomotor performance impairment, and urinary retention,” Dr. Jones said. “They have been shown to impair measures of driving performance under experimental conditions more than alcohol.” He said the drug puts patients more at risk for occupational injury, even compared with the effects of sedative hypnotics or narcotics, as Benadryl can cause not only sedation, but impairment. In addition, Dr. Jones said the drug can make it more difficult for children at school to concentrate. “There are better medications and treatment measures that can be taken for allergies,” he said. Primatene mist, for asthma, is another drug Dr. Jones does not recommend, he said, because it is ineffective and has side effects of fast heart rate and feeling jittery, even leading to serious lung damage. Primatene was an over-thecounter medication used by 2-3 million people every year, before it was taken off the market in 2012, according to L.A.Times.

“The biggest problem is that people would use it for symptom relief without seeing an asthma specialist and the underlying problem of inflammation was not being treated,” Dr. Jones said. “So, it can be fool's gold at times." It potentially can do more harm than good because people would treat themselves without knowing really what they were treating and also not knowing the potential adverse effects,” Dr. Jones said.

CONCLUSION Between 2004 and 2011, the FDA issued 1,700 drug recalls, according to research by Joshua Gagne of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, reported reuters.com. This included 2,900 announcements through an FDA alert system. Statistics like this shouldn’t shatter our confidence in modern medication. On the contrary, modern medicine saves and improves lives every day and we should be grateful for the progress. But we should also remember that not all medications work and not all side-effects are understood despite heavy screening of most drugs (except supplements). Medications can do great harm when people try to treat themselves without fully understanding the drug they are using—and it can be a huge waste of money. Follow the advice of medical professionals who have been able to see the effectiveness of many different medications. If the doctor won’t touch it, neither should you.

Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association: Use of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs. An Update for Clinicians. Circulation published online Feb 26, 2007; and Kathryn A. Taubert, Elliott M. Antman, Joel S. Bennett, Alan Daugherty, Curt Furberg, Harold Roberts

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JOSEPH VERSKA, M.D., SURGEON

DR.VERSKA Treating you, not the MRI. BOISE SPINE SURGERY (208) 378-7700 TWIN FALLS SPINE SURGERY (208) 737-9990

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September 29, 2012 – March 31, 2013 presented by

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

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{BEAUTY}

BAD HAIR DAY WANT MORE GOOD HAIR DAYS? DERMATOLOGISTS SAY HOW YOU WASH YOUR HAIR AND THE PRODUCTS YOU USE COULD GO A LONG WAY IN MAINTAINING SMOOTH, SHINY HAIR

When shampooing, concentrate on cleaning primarily the scalp, rather than the entire length of the hair, as washing only your hair can create flyaway hair that is dull and coarse,” said board-certified dermatologist Zoe D. Draelos, MD, FAAD. “When using a conditioner, the recommendation is different. Conditioners should only be used on the tips of the hair and not on the scalp or length of the hair since conditioners can make fine hair look limp.” To maintain healthy hair, Dr. Draelos recommends people also follow these tips:

WASH OILY HAIR MORE FREQUENTLY •

How often you wash your hair should be based on how much oil your scalp produces.

If your scalp is oily, you may need to wash it as often as once a day.

If you have chemically-treated hair, your hair may be drier, so you may want to wash it less frequently. As you get older, your scalp makes less oil, so you may not need to shampoo as often. But if you see flakes in your hair, you may not be shampooing enough. This can lead to dandruff and other scalp diseases.

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USE CONDITIONER AFTER EVERY SHAMPOO Unless you use a “2-in-1” shampoo, which cleans and conditions hair. Using a conditioner can significantly improve the look of damaged or weathered hair by increasing shine, decreasing static electricity, improving strength and offering some protection from harmful UV rays.

CHOOSE A SHAMPOO AND CONDITIONER FORMULATED SPECIFICALLY FOR YOUR HAIR TYPE For example, if you color your hair, use a shampoo designed for color-treated hair. If your hair is damaged or chemically treated, consider a “2-in-1” shampoo. Regardless of cost, many shampoo and conditioner brands provide the same benefits. 

PROTECT HAIR WHEN SWIMMING Protect your hair from the damaging effects of chlorine by wetting and conditioning your hair before swimming. Wear a tight-fitting swim cap and use a specially formulated swimmers shampoo and deep conditioner after swimming to replace lost moisture. “A dermatologist can address any questions or concerns that you have about caring for your hair,” said Dr. Draelos. “Be sure to see a dermatologist if you are experiencing unexplained hair loss as this may be a sign of a serious medical condition.”

SOURCE - The American Academy

of Dermatology www.aad.org. Follow on Facebook (American Academy of Dermatology) or Twitter (@AADskin).

Healthy-Idaho.com


Shampoo Myth:

Switching shampoos can make hair look healthier. TRUTH: It may seem so, but experts scoff. "Hair can't tell the difference between brands or build up tolerance to any product," says London-based hair and scalp expert Philip Kingsley. "Your favorite shampoo will work the same every time you lather up, week after week, month after month." If you have very oily hair or favor a particularly sticky styling product that contains wax, it does pay to use a clarifying shampoo once every two weeks to wash away residue. We are fond of Redken Hair Cleansing Cream and Neutrogena Anti-Residue Shampoo. SOURCE-GOODHOUSEKEEPING.COM

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8/12

events. &

sports recreation 1-7 RIDE IDAHO

An annual, seven-day, fully supported bicycle tour featuring different regions of the state. 350 riders explore Idaho's nostalgia, beauty and hospitality over the course of 400 miles.

rideidaho.org

4 LONG BRIDGE SWIM

This swim attracts a wide array of swimmers ranging from 7 years old to even an 86-yearold in 2008.

longbridgeswim.org

11 COEUR D'ALENE TRIATHLON & DUATHLON

Be a part of one of the most scenic races in the Northwest.

coeurdalene.org

11-12 SHOOTING STAR SLEEPOUT

Enjoy watching the Perseid Meteor Shower at Camp Perkins! Includes canoeing, kayaking, and exploring with a Saturday dinner and Sunday breakfast.

lhorton@ercsv.org

16 6 AT SOCHI CELEBRATION

Listen to live music, enjoy dinner from local restaurants and support the SVSEF Gold Team's quest to send 6 athletes to the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

svsef.org

18 HOMETOWN THROWDOWN

Watch some freestyle kayaking or join in the competition for freeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and receive prizes and hot dogs!

arts&entertainment 1-6 A FEW GOOD MEN

"A Few Good Men" is the Valley's premier men's a capella singing group. Nine men will be singing songs from Schubert to Shenandoah.

208.405.3000

18-25 PARAGLIDING WORLD CUP

208.720.0437

A Over 100 of the world's best paragliding pilots will compete in Sun Valley.

2-4 PLEIN AIR PAINTING WORKSHOP

800.976.4925

24 RALLY IN THE PINES

Includes trail rides, ATV/UTV geocaching, photo scavenger hunt, prize drawings, live music at Rally Park, and great food and drink.

islandparkchamber.org

This 3-day workshop explores the fundamentals of Plein Air painting. Lectures and demonstrations will take place outside and in the landscape.

artist@kevinmccainstudios.com

3 GALLERY WALKS

For more EVENTS in your area, visit HEALTHY-IDAHO.com

Visit 9 galleries with Wendy Jaquet in a guided tour or take in the new featured artists yourself with your friends.

info@svgalleries.org

4 TOUR OF HOMES

To have your event featured for FREE, email EVENTS@HEALTHY-IDAHO.COM

View oustanding private residences of Ketchum with a garden party and light refreshments.

lzondag@thecommunitylibrary.org

5 SCHWEITZER HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL

Come celebrate all things huckleberry and all sorts of kid's activities.

schweitzer.com

16-18 MADISON COUNTY FAIR

Free to the public and occuring from 9 am to 9 pm.

rexcc.com

1-31 WESTERN ACTION ADVENTURE SHOW AND DINNER

Enjoy and original Western farce by Bob LaVelle beginning with a covered-wagon ride through a 60-acre ranch.

coolwatercreekevents.com

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Healthy-Idaho.com


The 28th Annual Harvest Classic Fun Run offers something for everyone, from the professional runner looking for a fast course to families and kids looking for a fun, outdoor activity. The 8K route starts at Lake Lowell and finishes at the Nampa Rec Center. Shuttles are provided to the start line for convenience. The 2 mile run/walk is a paved route starting and ending at the Nampa Rec Center. The course includes mostly street racing but also utilizes Wilson pathway providing a scenic run along Wilson Creek. The 1 mile noncompetitive race is designed just for fun. Racers are not timed but all youth 14 and under receive a participation ribbon. The 1 mile race starts and finishes at the Nampa Rec Center and loops around Liberty Park.

The races are just the beginning. Once the run is over, participants and spectators can enjoy a variety of post race activities including live music, vendor booths, jump houses for the kids, and lots of food including a baked potato bar. In addition, everyone registered in the Harvest Classic receives free admission to the Nampa Recreation Center on race day. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget about the fabulous prize baskets! All race participants are entered into a drawing to win great prizes donated by local businesses. The Harvest Classic Fun Run is more than just fun. Proceeds from the event give back to the community by supporting physical education programs in schools and providing funds for recreation program scholarships. Upon registration, participants in the Harvest Classic Fun Run can designate a school to be entered into the race day drawing. Eight $250 awards are given to the winning schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; P.E.

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Departments to purchase much needed equipment. The more students and family members that participate, the more chances a school has to win. In addition to the school awards, the Harvest Classic helps fund youth recreation scholarships, enabling low income kids to participate Nampa Parks and Recreation Department programs like swimming, basketball, softball, and more. The Harvest Classic Fun Run is a greatly anticipated community event in Nampa, appealing to families, kids, walkers, recreational runners and competitive racers. People of all ages and all walks of life make this Fun Run an event to remember. This year experience the Harvest Classic Fun Run for yourself. It is truly a Fun Run! The 28th annual event is Saturday, September 15, 2012 at the Nampa Rec Center. For more information or to register for the Harvest Classic Fun Run visit www.namparecreation.org or call 208-468-5858.

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HEALTHSMART

POOR AIR QUAITY BY GARY SALZMAN, KTVB MANAGING EDITOR

If you’ve spent any time in Southern Idaho’s outdoors recently, chances are you've seen or smelled smoke. Fires around the state have significantly impacted air quality this summer.

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moke in the air can cause coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain and headaches. Anyone can suffer these negative effects from breathing unfiltered, smoky air, but people living with heart or lung diseases like congestive heart failure, emphysema and asthma are particularly sensitive to poor air quality. These types of health conditions can be made worse when smoke particles, from wildfires miles away, penetrate deep into lungs. Climatologists and fire weather forecasters say conditions are ripe for more fires this year. With many weeks to go before the snow falls and Idaho’s fire season comes to an end, doctors and state agencies are advising everyone to arm themselves with the knowledge of how to reduce their exposure to smoke.

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Here are 7 tips from the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare that you can use to protect yourself when Idaho’s summer skies get unhealthy:

Limit your outdoor activity Run a home air conditioning system—keep the fresh air intake closed to re-circulate the indoor air Replace or clean your air conditioner/furnace filter frequently If you don’t have an air conditioner, try using an air purifier with HEPA filtering (avoid air purifiers that produce ozone) If possible, don’t do heavy work or exercise during ‘unhealthy’ air quality levels Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water. Hydration helps dilute phlegm in the respiratory tract, making it easier to cough out smoke particles. Avoid dehydrating drinks like those with caffeine, sugar or alcohol If you wear contacts, switch to eyeglasses when in a smoky environment You can find daily updates on air quality conditions throughout Idaho on the Department of Environmental Quality’s Air Quality Reports and Forecasts webpage at DEQ.IDAHO.GOV.

HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

BETTER INDOOR AIR

If you’re stuck inside, don’t add to indoor air pollution by burning candles, smoking or vacuuming. These will add to or stir up particles already inside your home. If you don’t have air conditioning, shopping malls are good places to get out of the hot, smoky air.

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FIND INSPIRATION FOR HEALTHY LIVING AT AND WATCH

NEWS AT NOON

EVERY WEDNESDAY WITH CAROLYN HOLLY TO LEARN LIFE STRATEGIES FOR YOUR BETTER HEALTH!

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

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stlukesonline.org

Sometimes, the spirit needs healing, too. It’s been said that music is what feelings sound like. And for a child in the hospital, expressing his or her feelings is a vital part of the healing process. So we practice music therapy. Kids at St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital sing, clap, learn to play and even dance. It’s part of our belief that kids should be treated like… well, kids. And it’s just one more reason why your children will receive the most remarkable care we can give them.

Every child deserves the best care.

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HEALTHY IDAHO AUGUST 2012

Healthy-Idaho.com

Healthy Idaho | August '12  

Our August Issue of Healthy Idaho is all about SUMMERFUN, and mental fitness, happy feet, bad hair days, and the healthiest phone apps.