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WINTER 2018

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Limiting Factors That Kill Fitness Goals What many call “goals” are just manifestations of wishful thinking. Here are some ways to turn wishes to goals that come to reality.

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Get Control Of Your Digital Life Let’s face it: controlling your digital life is a huge part of controlling your life in general. We go over how to be accountable for your time, taps and tech.

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It’s 2018: Five Foods to Ditch, Five To Embrace Break up with foods that do you no favors, and embrace your true dietary friends.

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7 Ways to Keep Your

Brain Fit As You Age

You’re never getting old, right? Age gracefully with the right habits.

28 Olivia Harlan:

Also:

College Football Sideline Reporter

Fat Shaming - A New Perspective What Fingernails Reveal About Your Health Does Stress Age You?

Olivia talks about her challenging career, staying healthy, and why sports matter. 8 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

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FROM THE EDITOR

Healthy ®

WINTER 2018 VOLUME XVIII, 1

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF John A. Anderson | john@stardocs.com PUBLISHER Kenneth J. Shepherd | ken@stardocs.com

I

LEARNED A VALUABLE LESSON AS A TEENAGER. IT CAME FROM MOWING LAWNS. AT FIRST, I DIDN’T CARE TOO MUCH ABOUT THE JOB I DID, BUT OVER TIME AND AS I GOT MORE MATURE AND WISE, I REALIZED THAT THE BETTER THE MOWING JOB, THE MORE MOWING OPPORTUNITIES I GOT. THE MORE I CARED ABOUT MY OUTPUT, THE MORE VALUABLE I BECAME TO OTHERS.

So, I began to study lawn mowing ‘design’. I began to notice the mower lines and patterns. I began to assess whether cross-cutting made a better result, and learned that I could charge a bit more by offering this service. I also learned that it is better to trim and edge first, then mow. And on big jobs I learned that to keep a straight line, I needed to pick a point in the distance, and keep the mower centered on that distant point, rather than looking down at each step. It wasn’t terribly profound at the time, but it’s become more so now that I’m at this point in my life. I’ve realized how important it is to become interested and passionate about what you do, and that truly caring about your ‘output’ is key to success in almost every area of life. And, obviously, I’ve learned that to stay centered in life, you must have a vision of the future, you must pick a point and stay focused on that point as you move towards it.

JOHN A. ANDERSON,

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF @JOHN_A_ANDERSON

I won’t bore you with where we’re headed as a publishing entity, but I’ll just say that the future looks bright, and we’re focused and enthused about the path to get there. And, I will encourage you to assess your situation in life, and make sure you’ve looked ahead in your future, picked a point, and have a centered line to follow as you get there.

MEDICAL DIRECTORS Steven N. Gange, M.D. and Lane C. Childs, M.D. OPERATIONS MANAGER Allyson Long | allyson.long@stardocs.com DESIGN EDITOR Phillip Chadwick | design@stardocs.com MANAGING EDITOR Michael Richardson | michael@stardocs.com ONLINE EDITOR Chelsa Mackay | chelsa@stardocs.com

You’ve heard the old cliché - The problem with waiting until tomorrow is that when it finally arrives, it is called today. Today is yesterday’s tomorrow. It’s just so terribly true. Here is a good question to ask yourself. Ten years from now you will surely arrive. The question is, where?

ASSISTANT DESIGNER Krista Bowen | krista.bowen@stardocs.com CIRCULATION MANAGER Ron Fennell | distribution@stardocs.com

Time marches on with such frightening consistency that we really cannot afford to put off anything of value in our lives. Sometimes we become guilty of wasting tomorrow’s opportunities by spending frivolously our time today. What we could have achieved may easily elude us, despite our intentions, until we inevitably discover that the things that might have been, have vanished, each unused day at a time. “Time is the great equalizer of all mankind. It has taken away the best and the worst of us without regard for either. Time offers opportunity but demands a sense of urgency. Each of us must pause frequently to remind ourselves that the clock is ticking. The same clock that began to tick from the moment we drew our first breath will also someday cease,” reminds Jim Rohn, a favorite business mentor of mine. So as you think of your dreams and goals of your future tomorrow, begin today to take those very important first steps to making them all come to life. And, look up. Look ahead, down the road a bit in your life, and envision where and what you want to be. Draw a line to that destination and stay centered on that path until you arrive. The future will be here too soon.

CONTRIBUTING & STAFF WRITERS Caitlin Schille, Angela Silva CIRCULATION

Healthy Utah® is distributed widely to more than 800 locations along the Wasatch Front. It is also direct mailed to doctors, dentists, practitioners, health clinics, banks and other businesses along the Wasatch Front.

Healthy Magazine 256 Main St., Suite F l Alpine, UT 84004 (801) 369-6139 l info@stardocs.com To be included in our free online directory, or to advertise or get content published please e-mail us at info@healthy-mag.com PLEASE NOTE: The content in this publication is meant to increase reader awareness of developments in the health and medical field and should not be construed as medical advice or instruction on individual health matters, which should be obtained directly from a health professional. The opinions expressed by the authors and advertisers are not necessarily those of the publisher. Call for reprint permission. All stock photography by Shutterstock.com, unless otherwise noted.

FACEBOOK.COM/HEALTHYMAG TWITTER: @HEALTHYMAGAZINE GOOGLE.COM/+HEALTHY-MAGAZINES PINTEREST.COM/HEALTHYMAG

published by stardocs media Copyright © 2018 Stardocs, LLC. All rights reserved. info@stardocs.com www.stardocs.com

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To discuss Stardocs creative, design, writing, websites, online marketing services, or even creating your Healthy-Magazines.com custom publication, call us at 801.369.6139.


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FITNESS

5FITNESS GOALS

LIMITING FACTORS THAT KILL

(AND HOW TO OVERCOME THEM)

W RIT T EN B Y TAY L O R EMP EY – C E RT I F I ED F I T NES S T R AI N ER & N U T R I T I O N S P ECI AL I S T, S ALT LAKE C ITY

I

n my experience as a seasoned fitness coach, I have helped thousands of people when it comes to accomplishing fitness goals. Whether it be fat loss, muscle building, performance, body image issues, dealing with eating disorders, or battling medical conditions, I’ve seen a lot. What I can tell you is that no matter the person, their age, sex, body type, goal, or experience level, every person who fails to reach their goals, including myself, did so as a result of one of these five key limiting factors.

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WISHFUL THINKING VS PERSONAL VALUES

A goal is not just something you say you would like to have – that is just a wish. A goal is something you identify that is missing from your life that, if accomplished, would increase the quality of your life substantially and is something you truly value. In my experience, many people have what they call “goals,” that are in reality just manifestations of wishful thinking or envy.

“Many people have what they call “goals,” that are in reality just manifestations of wishful thinking or envy.” The key here is to take the time to sit down and think about the things you truly value in your life. If your health, fitness, and a healthy body image truly are part of those values, you have found a solid foundation to build your goals upon.

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SETTING GOALS WITH AN UNREALISTIC TIMEFRAME

Often, clients have incredible goals they are working towards accomplishing. However, even in the midst of well thought out goals, people sometimes place unrealistic timeframes or deadlines for achieving those goals. Now, it is important for you to set a deadline and make sure that deadline does inspire some sense of urgency if you want to reach your goal. However, many people establish healthy goals, but establish them with seriously unhealthy deadlines. Just the other day (as I write this article) I was having a conversation with a potential client who wanted to lose 100 lbs. in a 28 week period. In the past, I have helped individuals lose over 100 lbs. in a healthy way; that is not the issue. The issue is the completely unrealistic timeframe this person set for themselves to accomplish their goal in a healthy manner. Inevitably, this person is setting themselves up for failure and disappointment not because their goal was unrealistic, but because the timeframe they wanted to accomplish it in was unrealistic and severely unhealthy.

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LACK OF PREPARATION & SYSTEMS FOR TRACKING PROGRESS

Another major issue I have found when working with clients is a lack of preparation and systems for tracking progress. One of my personal mentors, Darren Hardy, the publisher of Success Magazine, has often restated the quote by Peter Drucker, “You cannot manage what you do not measure.” Even if you establish a solid goal and a realistic timeframe to accomplish that goal, if you fail to plan and establish appropriate systems for managing the process of working towards the achievement of that goal, you are setting yourself up for failure. Whether it be systems of social accountability, working with a trainer, tracking your measurements and progress photos, using a fitness tracker device, or using a variety of mobile fitness apps to document your progress, you need to establish a system of accountability and tracking progress, so you can identify and celebrate your progress along your journey.

HOW TO REACH YOUR FITNESS GOALS

1) Establish a solid foundation for your goals (not just wishful thinking).

4

LACK OF COMMITMENT

Theodore Roosevelt said, “Nothing worth having comes easy.” What this means when it comes to working on your fitness goals is that it’s going to take time, hard work, energy, resources, and patience for you to achieve anything worthwhile. This philosophy states essentially that most things that come to us easily are usually fleeting and have little to no real value to us. If you truly value and want to accomplish your fitness goals you need to establish your “why.” Your “why” is the primary, emotionally inspiring driving force behind why your goals actually matter to you. If you have not established a solid reason why these goals are even important to you, you will fail to remain committed to them when the going gets tough. My personal recommendation is that your “why” should be powerful enough that it emotionally moves you or drives you to tears because your journey to a healthier, leaner, stronger you most definitely will. You need to have a reminder for why you are working so hard to reach these goals. Without it, you will fail.

2) Set an urgent but realistic timeframe or deadline for the accomplishment of those goals.

3) Set yourself up for success with proper systems of preparation and tracking your progress.

5

LACK OF SUSTAINABILITY

The final factor that regularly hinders people from achieving their fitness goals is simply failing to establish a plan for consistent sustainability once they have actually achieved their goals.

People get so focused on achieving a goal, they forget to make a plan for when they actually reach their goal. Once they get there, and some time goes by, they often fall back into old habits and eventually back into their old body and fitness level. The way to prevent this is by setting yourself up for success by having a solid plan for consistent sustainability once you have reached your goal.

4) Establish your “why” so when your confidence waivers, you can remind yourself why you are powerfully committed to your goals.

5) Set yourself up for success by designing a plan for consistent sustainability once you have accomplished your goals so you can maintain your progress.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Taylor Empey is a Certified Fitness Trainer & Nutrition Specialist based in Salt Lake City, UT with expertise in Kinesiology and Nutrition Science.

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Taylor's passion for fitness first began when he started training in Taekwondo. Since then he has trained in over eight different martial arts and self-defense styles. Taylor achieved his 1st degree black belt six years after he began his training. Soon After, Taylor began his personal training career in the health and fitness industry. He holds multiple nationally accredited certifications and specializes in strength and conditioning as well as nutrition. Taylor is a member of the Men’s Health Fitness Council and has been featured in both national and on local publications and news mediums including the ABC network.

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FITNESS

FIGHT THE

FLAB

Punching Bag Workout What is a punching bag workout good for? • • • •

Muscular strength Stamina Increased balance Improved quickness

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Healthy Choice:

YOU’LL NEED:

• •

A punching bag Tape or gloves

EVERLAST Cardio Strike Bag Original Don’t want to pay a gym membership? Set up your own punching bag at home without drilling into your ceilling with this Everlast Punching bag with a stand.

WARM UP: 20 pushups Arm rotations (go through your range of motion) 20 body-weight squats

THE WORKOUT

Take a 30 second break in between each round.

YOUR STANCE: • • •

Stable stance, bent knees Hands raised to chest level Feet are generally offset, so your non-dominant foot is slightly forward

HOOK VS JAB

2 minutes: Jabs

Jab:

2-3 minutes: Jabs and Hooks

This punch comes directly from your body, straight out from the chest.

Continually move around the bag, just throwing jabs, no big punches. Hit different levels of the bag with your punch.

Continue to jab with both hands. Work in hooks with your nondominant hand. After each hook, change your direction as you move around the bag

2-3 minutes: Combination Round

Jab right, jab left, hook right. Jab right, jab right, jab left. Continue to move around the bag, and change up your combinations. Your punches should come more quickly at this point in the workout. Remember, you shouldn’t be hitting the same spot on the bag each punch.

Hook: This is a swinging punch, meaning the the hand is slightly extended from the body, and the power comes from a sideways movement, rather than from a movement directly out from the body.

1 minute: Squat and Hook, Squat and Jab

For 60 seconds straight, do a body-weight squat, and then a combination of four hooks, alternating hands. Every other squat, do four jabs instead of hooks.

2 minutes: Combinations and Haymakers

This is a freestyle round, where you move around the bag and continue with single punches and combinations. Combinations should be as fast as you can make them. Every 15 seconds, throw a haymaker, meaning your hardest punch, be it a straight punch or a hook. Haymakers are best at the end of a combination.

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Things to Do for A Healthy

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New Ye

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1. Positive Thinking: Our attitude reflects directly into our lives. Research has shown that a positive attitude helps increase energy levels, build a healthier immune system, and improve our relationships, happiness and health. Here are some tips for growing a positive mind set: • Change your thoughts. Look for the good in every situation. Positive thoughts lead to a positive attitude. • Think less about yourself and more about others. Research has shown that helping others and participating in meaningful activities leads to a happier and more purposeful life. • Keep a gratitude journal. Try writing down a few things that you feel grateful for every day. Science has found that gratitude can increase happiness and protect against stress, anxiety and depression. • Humor. Learn to not take anything too seriously. If you make a mistake, laugh and move on. • Have purpose. Having a goal in life gives you meaning and something to work towards and look forward to. 2. Exercise. You could have probably guessed that exercise would be on this list, but the benefits from exercise are undeniable. If you don’t enjoy exercise, make it a goal to find a new, fun way to break a sweat. Zumba classes, outdoor yoga, trail running and swimming are just a few less-than-conventional options. Regular exercise prevents (or helps manage) a variety of health concerns, including type 2 diabetes, depression, arthritis, and many types of cancer. Exercise improves mood, boosts energy levels, reduces stress, improves self-confidence and sharpens memory. Get moving in 2018!

DON’T LOOK NOW, BUT THE NEW YEAR IS SLOWLY APPROACHING. CUE THE POSTS ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY TALKING ABOUT RESOLUTIONS, REFLECTIONS AND A NEW RESOLVE. THOUGH YOU MAY BE TEMPTED TO THINK ABOUT THE FAILED ATTEMPTS OF YESTERYEAR, DON’T! FORGET THE TIMES YOU FAILED TO START YOUR GOALS AND THE THOUGHTS OF, “NEXT WEEK I’LL START MY DIET” OR “TOMORROW I’LL GO TO THE GYM.” THIS NEW YEAR REALLY IS THE PERFECT OPPORTUNITY FOR YOU TO MAKE YOUR GOALS REALITY. HERE ARE A FEW IDEAS TO MAKE YOUR 2018 A HEALTHY ONE:

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WR I T T EN BY S O P H I E R I N GER

3. Habits. Do you have a bad habit that you want to kick? This year is your time to change. Here are a few tips to help get rid of your habit: • Be hyper-aware of your habit. You may think that ignoring a habit will make it disappear, but it won’t. To break a habit, you need to be completely aware of it, and keeping a journal is a great way to keep record. Understanding the behavior is the first step to effectively changing it. • Understand what triggers your bad habit. Understanding why you make decisions can help you to avoid the triggers, and therefore avoid the habit. • Small Steps. Breaking bad habits is hard, so be patient with yourself and focus on your small improvements. 4. Unplug. It’s no secret that our world is developing an unhealthy attachment to our devices. It’s hard to pull yourself away from your phone. With the internet, email, text and endless apps at our fingertips, we’re constantly distracted. This year, make a goal to unplug each day. Offtime, In Moment, BreakFree, and RealizD are all apps you can use to help manage and control how much time you use on your phone and/or in specific apps. 5. Get Organized. The goal of getting organized is not to make your house immaculate, it’s to make your life more functional. Organization promotes productivity. Get rid of clutter, create a list of goals and make assignments for you and each family member. Remember: measure your progress, share your goals with friends and family, be patient and be persistent. Leading expert in behavioral change and psychologist Dr. Marciano says, “achieving goals isn’t about willpower. It’s about developing the right skills, executing strategies, and having the patience that inevitably lead to success.” Sources: fulfillmentdaily.com, lifehacker.com, www.inc.com

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Q & A With

#goals

Olivia Har

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ESPN and Fox Sports Sidelin

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE (HM): College football, NBA, multiple networks, sideline NFL reporter… My first question is: how have you not gone insane? In other words, what advice do you have about juggling priorities?

My office is a basketball arena, or football stadium… and every day is different. I’m living my dream far earlier than I ever anticipated, and I am just happy to be a part of a space that I love so passionately.

OLIVIA (O): When it comes to priorities, I layer my to-do lists. Big picture (months, years down the line), intermediate (the current month), and far more detailed in the near future. My daily schedule is pretty exact! That being said, I schedule “me time,” and time for my fiancé, dog, family, friends, etc. I find that being rested, exercising, and eating fresh and healthy food fuels me to be better in my job and relationships. Priorities can vary day to day as well! I think people can be too hard on themselves to be everything, every day. It’s not possible! Be present and intentional in whatever needs to happen THAT DAY. HM: To the women who envy a beautiful TV personality, you can talk about the nitty gritty of your occupation? What’s the hardest thing you’ve overcome, and what are daily challenges? O: The glamour is non-existent, for one! Lots of flights before the sun is up, tough weather conditions for football, little sleep, and of course, lots of blisters from high heels! The preparation is rigorous and endless, the pressure is immense, and the actual game duration is so mentally taxing to be one step ahead and hyper focused. I can’t complain though, when I think about what I do for a living. My office is a basketball arena, or football stadium… and every day is different. I’m living my dream far earlier than I ever anticipated, and I am just happy to be a part of a space that I love so passionately. HM: Why are sports important? O: Sports are important at every level. For kids, it provides a literal example of working towards a goal as a group, for healthy competition, for rules and order, and exercise.

rlan

ne Reporter Facebook.com/HealthyMag

After that, whether high school, college, or pro, sports provide a fun space to bring people together. There are stories, there are heroes, there are battles. Every neighborhood, school district, state, and country have tradition in sport. We marvel at physical aptitude, overcome adversity, and best of all… the drama of an upset! HM: Many of our readers are parents. What advice do you have for parents of young athletes? What do you have to say about the environment athletics provide for young people? continued >>

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IIIIIIIIIIIIII

HEALTH &

FITNESS

HM: What’s your favorite speed snack? O: I love cut up cucumber with garlic salt, plain turkey roll ups, and Quest bars (the cookie dough or cinnamon flavors only)! I always try to bring snacks like these to games, so I don’t fall for the vendor food or heartier media meal (a lot of bread, pastas, hot dogs, etc.). It requires more preparation, but your body is worth it. I also try to start each morning with a probiotic, big glass of cold water, then a smoothie after a workout. My favorite is frozen spinach, frozen blueberries, and vanilla pea protein. I like using all frozen produce so you don’t have to add ice! I vary on the protein brand, but right now I like Vega. When I start my morning with those things and a good sweat, it sets a light and healthy tone to my day. I also try not to go to bed too full (but my fiancé likes big dinners and date nights, so that’s been a happy sacrifice!) HM: What’s your go-to half-hour workout plan?

O: As I mentioned, I find that so many good life lessons are grounded in organized sports. To be pushed or encouraged—physically, emotionally, mentally—in a safe environment is beneficial to a fruitful life. Friendships are forged, and good adult role models outside of the home can be helpful. The themes of teamwork, competition, and selfdiscipline are invaluable in the adult world. HM: Your career is incredibly diverse. What’s the value to you in being involved in so many things, versus just sticking with one sport, or one team? O: The diversity keeps me on my toes! During some months of the year, my basketball and football schedules overlap in the same week and, sometimes, day. They require different focus… especially college versus professional. I make it a priority to be caught up in all the news of the various sports I cover. Keeps me busy!

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O: I use an app called “Interval Timer” that is 23 minutes of one minute, and minutefifteen intervals. I decide what part of the body I want to work that day—arms, core, legs—and mix that in with cardio, usually on the treadmill. I design 4-5 workouts, and repeat. It’s so quick, that each one flies by, not to mention the whole workout. I really work up a sweat by keeping it 2:1 ratio cardio to weights. I also love the Beachbody DVDs. They are so easy to pull up on my laptop in hotel rooms or small hotel gyms. I also can add my own variations with different weights or slight adjustments. Essentially, they do timed workouts in a similar way! HM: Working with athletes so much, what have you learned about wellness and fitness? What are some principles you’ve seen to be true, and what are some common misconceptions out there?

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O: Being engaged to a professional athlete has given me further insight! I am amazed at the daily dedication Sam Dekker, Los Angeles Clippers, has to his body. It is no easy task, and his hunger to be faster, stronger, etc is beyond impressive. This separates athletes at that level. I’ve seen so many players put in tireless and unseen hours in the gym. That being said, Sam will be the first to admit that I have helped him make healthier food choices. Plenty of athletes don’t eat in the most beneficial way to fuel them. I see candy bars and sugary drinks aplenty in locker rooms, and dehydration is more common than you might think. Their bodies burn it up quick enough that the damage isn’t noticed. I’m no nutritionist, but I’ve done enough homework to know that they could get more out of their bodies for longer with a more disciplined diet.

OLIVIA'S

FAVORITE SMOOTHIE

+ FROZEN SPINACH + FROZEN BLUEBERRIES + VANILLA PEA PROTEIN

HM: What are some of your favorite ways to stay active? Did you play sports growing up? O: Like many kids, I grew up dabbling in many team sports. Even if I moaned and groaned and tried to fake sick to skip practice, I am thankful for the experience. I ended up cheerleading in high school, which I loved. I was the only cheerleader who preferred to face the field instead of the stands. I had to tell our captain when it was 1st and 10 so she could call that cheer! That experience gave me a strong feeling of being part of the team as we competed in our district and state. Such fun memories with my whole heart into the game. HM: You’re an obvious talent, and very knowledgeable. You clearly do your research. The diet and fitness world is full of people who want results without putting in work, so I hoped you could give some thoughts on work, preparation and reaping what you sow. O: My approach to diet and exercise is what will last. If I can’t do it for life, why do it now. I want to be fit and healthy forever, and I’m constantly learning what works best for my body and lifestyle. When I was 16 years old, I competed in and won the only beauty pageant I ever did (Miss Kansas Teen USA). The hyperfocus it put on every inch of my body (for the swimsuit portion of Miss Teen USA) at such a young, vulnerable age was not healthy for me. College years following swung the pendulum in the opposite direction. I’m at an amazing point in my life where every decision feels like mine. I know myself better than ever, and that includes knowing what I am not. That brings me such peace and happiness that translates to a healthy body image.

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CONTROLLING

Your Digital Life 3 Tips For Gaining Control Of Your Digital Life Let’s face it, a messy digital life is just as bad as a messy living room

Increasingly, learning to control one’s digital life is simply learning to control life in general, since the digital world is so fully ingrained in our lives. Sure, there’s social media and dumb phone games that ruthlessly steal time. But now, millions are using computers and phones for banking, shopping, planning, entertainment, directions, collaboration, careers, job hunting, photos, insurance and more.

Stop Notifications

2

Use the “Do Not Disturb Function”

3

Try phone separation. Leave your device at home.

Turn off notifications for all your apps except the most important, like text messaging and your calendar. The constant buzzing in your pocket is doing you no good. Shut off notifications for these apps: Facebook, sports/fantasy sports, SnapChat, games.

Most phones will allow you to turn off all sounds, buzzing, vibrations, etc. On Android, you can set how long this function lasts. Try it for an hour or two every day, preferably during the night as you wind down.

Have you ever gone on a walk or out to eat without your phone? Try it! It’s surprisingly liberating.

85%

Ironically, the devices and apps that are supposed to make life more convenient can actually clutter our minds and waste our time. Streamlining your digital life will make a huge difference in your overall wellbeing.

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About 85% of our smartphone time is on 5 non-native apps (ones you’ve downloaded). What are they for you?

Percentage of Minutes:

Source: Nielsen, Forrester Research

Facebook:

Google:

13%

12%

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2 Apps Worth Trying Password Problems? How many hours have you spent trying different passwords to log in to your bank, your library account, your Venmo account, or whatever? It’s a passworded world these days. The app for that is LastPass. With one master password, gain access to all of your accounts. The app can also autochange your passwords when necessary.

Inbox Woes? Newsletters can be awesome; but they sure can clog up an inbox. When you sign up to Unroll.Me, you’ll see all of your subscription emails in a neat list, making it easy for you to quickly unsubscribe from the ones you don’t want. It also bundles all the newsletters you actually want into one email, for when you actually have some time to peruse.

110 The number of times the average adult checks their phone, per day. Source: breakfree-app.com

Irresistible Engineering: They’re Designed to Steal Your Time Most designers of technology for masses want the masses to spend more time on their technology. This is why Facebook, Twitter, Reddit and Instagram have infinity scrolling. You could literally spend your life there and not reach the end of blurbs, memes and gifs. Same goes for Netflix and Tinder; they’re designed to keep you scrolling until you lose yourself in the depths of their cyberspace. Unlocking your smartphone is a bit like opening up a fire hydrant.

8

Billion The number of times, collectively, Americans check their phones every day. Source: Deloitte

2,617 The number of times the average person clicks, taps or swipes their phone every day. Source: Dscout

Continued on next page >>>>>>

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Too Tied To the Internet?

TEST YOURSELF

No, somewhat, or yes? 1. Do you find it difficult to stop using the internet? 2. Do you continue to use the internet, even when you intend to stop? 3. Do you prefer using the internet to spending time with others? 4. How often do you lose sleep because of the internet? 5. Do you find yourself thinking about getting back on the internet when you aren’t using it? 6. Have you unsuccessfully tried to spend less time online? 7. Do you rush through other things to get back to the internet? 8. Are relationships, work neglected because of your internet use? 9. Do you go onto the internet when you’re feeling down? 10. Do you get irritated when you can’t use the internet? If you are answering yes to a lot of these questions, change up your digital routine! Source: consciously-digital

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TOOLS YOU CAN USE TO BREAK FREE Space (iOS, Android) Monitors how many times you’ve unlocked your screen , and how much time you’ve spent on your phone. It also shows which apps have taken the most time. Try it and shock yourself. Offtime (iOS, Android) Block distracting apps, and control notifications. This also shows you how much time you’ve spent off your phone. Moment (iOS) Set daily limits to your phone usage, and get a notification when you go over. AppDetox (Android) This app is awesome for stopping your addiction to pointless smartphone games. You can set different parameters for different apps. For example, you can say “I don’t want to use this app at night” or “I want to know how many times I launch this app.” It has more than 100,000 downloads. QualityTime - My Digital Diet (Android) Monitor and get real time reports on how much time you spend on your smartphone and on your favorite apps. QualityTime offers in-depth analysis of your smartphone activities by tracking total usage, screen unlocks and individual apps with hourly, daily and weekly summary reporting options. Curb your habits by using actionable features allowing you to set your own time restrictions like ‘alerts’, ‘take a break’ and ‘scheduled breaks’.

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N U T R I T I O N & H E A LT H

How the American Diet Has Changed WRITTEN BY SOPHIE RINGER AMERICA HAS CHANGED A LOT IN THE LAST 50 YEARS. HAIR TRENDS, LANGUAGE AND DIET HAVE ALL EVOLVED. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENTS HAVE LED AMERICANS TO MAKE MANY DIETARY CHANGES, SUCH AS EATING CHICKEN INSTEAD OF RED MEAT AND CHOOSING ALMOND MILK OVER WHOLE MILK. TODAY, FOOD IS CHEAPER AND MORE AVAILABLE THAN EVER BEFORE, WHICH MAY NOT BE A GOOD THING! HERE ARE A FEW WAYS THE AMERICAN DIET HAS CHANGED IN THE LAST 40 YEARS. Research done by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) found that Americans are eating more grains, fats, oils, sugars and artificial sweeteners. Business Insider determined the averages of just how much each food group has increased between 1961 and 2013. SUGAR: The average daily calories from sugar and artificial sweeteners have increased from 515 calories to 600 calories per day. GRAINS: The average daily calories from grains have risen from 627 calories to 801 calories per day. OIL: The average daily calorie consumption of vegetable oil has increased by over 400 calories, from 276 calories to 689 calories per day. Research suggests that the Americans consume about 23.2% of their daily calories from the fats and oils group and most of the consumption of the oil is coming in the form of vegetable oils such as corn, canola and soybean. CALORIE INCREASE. Between 1961 and 2013 the average American’s caloric intake increased by 24%. Business Insider says that in 2013 the average American’s caloric intake was 3,600 calories a day, compared to 1961 where the average calorie intake was 2,880 calories. Now that we are approaching 2018, it would be interesting to know if that percent increased even more! If those numbers keep rising, so will our bathroom scale! According to USDA, a moderately active male, between ages 26-45, should eat around 2,600 calories a day. While a moderately active female, between ages 26-45, should eat around 2,200 calories a day. AMERICANS ARE DRINKING LESS MILK. Remember all those “Got Milk?” ads? Well there was a reason for those; milk intake has decreased significantly in the last few decades. According to the USDA, in the 1970s the average American drank around 30 gallons of milk a year and in 2016, the average American drank around 18 gallons a year. “Moms are still key decision makers when it comes to what kids are drinking,” says Julie Kadison, the chief executive officer at MilkPep. “With moms choosing alternatives, soy, almond, coconut and the like, kids are embracing those options well.” The USDA said that between 1970-2013 whole milk consumption decreased by 79 percent! MORE CHICKEN AND LESS BEEF. The U.S Department of Agriculture says that in 1970, people consumed more than twice as much beef than chicken. Now, according to Pew research, Americans eat more chicken than beef. Two possible reasons for the decline could be health concerns surrounding red meat and/or pricing. Red meat is linked to heart disease and diabetes, and is high in saturated fat. Prices for beef have been rising as well. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the price of ground beef was below $2.50 per pound in 2010. Now the price is around $3.75 per pound. CHEESE PLEASE! Research done by the Center for Science in The Public Interest suggests that Americans are eating more cheese. In 1970, the average American ate eight pounds of cheese a year, and in 2010 the average consumption for cheese per year was 23 pounds. The increased cheese consumption could be correlated to fast food and processed food companies. FAST FOOD. According to statista.com the fast food industry is growing at a significant rate; in 1970 America’s fast food revenue was $6 billion and in 2015 the revenue rose to $200 billion. Though you may be surprised to hear that it’s not all about the burgers and fries. According to business insider, pizza and mexican food chains are thriving. In particular, Domino’s has been doing well. Business Insider reported that in the last nine years, Domino’s nearly doubled its sales, reaching $10.9 billion in 2016, compared to $5.5 billion in 2008. Sources: cheatsheet.com, pewresearch.org, grist.org

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What

Fingernails Reveal About Your Health WRITTEN BY SOPHIE RINGER

NAILS DON’T GET MUCH THOUGHT UNLESS YOU’RE CLIPPING THEM OR PICKING OFF NAIL POLISH. BUT YOUR FINGERNAILS CAN ACTUALLY REVEAL VARIOUS ASPECTS OF YOUR WELLNESS. HERE ARE SOME THINGS TO LOOK FOR: YELLOW NAILS. Are your nails yellow? Don’t panic right away; the yellow tint could just be from aging or stained from nail dye. If the yellow color continues to show it could be a sign of something more serious. Vitamin and mineral deficiency can cause nails to appear yellow, and in more severe cases, yellow nails could be a sign of a thyroid condition, psoriasis, diabetes, or an infection. Tea tree oil, baking soda, oregano oil and hydrogen peroxide are a few things that can help remove the yellow color if there isn’t a serious underlying cause. Treatment depends on the cause, so if home remedies don’t cure the yellow nail pay a visit to your physician. DRY, CRACKED OR BRITTLE NAILS. There are a few reasons as to why you could be experiencing dry, cracked or brittle nails. 1. Aging. As we get older we lose natural oils that act as a glue for our nails, leading to dry cracked nails. 2. Lifestyle. For example, if your hands are in water constantly (swimming, washing dishes, etc.) or if you are frequently exposed to chemicals (such as cleaning products, solvents and chemical fumes) it could take a toll on your nails. 3. Disease and deficiency. Cracking and splitting nails could be a result of a fungal infection, thyroid disease, vitamin deficiency specifically vitamins A, C and B. To improve nails wear gloves when working with chemicals, hydrate nails everyday (creams, oils ointments), eat a nutritious diet, and take vitamin supplements. WHITE SPOTS. Though white spots may not be aesthetically pleasing, they are nothing to be too concerned about. Small white spots are usually a result of nail trauma and will fade and grow out on their own. If a white spot persists it could be a fungal infection, however that is rare. PITTING. Nail pitting is characterized by little depressions in the fingernail or toenail. Nail pitting can occur for several reasons: 1. Individuals who have psoriasis or psoriasis arthritis often experience changes in their nails. Studies have shown that psoriasis is commonly associated with nail pitting. 2. Connective tissue disorders, such as Reiter’s Syndrome. 3. Autoimmune diseases. 4. Atopic and contact dermatitis. If you notice pitting in your nails it’s advised that you see a doctor as it is often associated to serious health conditions.

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DARK DISCOLORATIONS. Dark streaks or painful growths are linked to chronic medical conditions such as kidney, liver, heart or lung conditions. In less severe cases red or black marks on the nail could be a result from a collection of blood under the nail caused by trauma. HORIZONTAL RIDGES “BEAU’S LINES.” Horizontal ridges may be a caused by psoriasis, uncontrolled diabetes, circulatory disease, or severe zinc deficiency. When beau’s lines appear on all 20 nails it could be a symptom of thyroid disease, diabetes, mumps or syphilis. CLUBBING. Clubbing is when the tips of your fingers appear larger or bulging and the nail becomes curved downward. Clubbing is usually a sign of low oxygen and is associated with inflammatory bowel disease, cardiovascular disease, AIDS, and liver disease. You may think an easy solution to your strange looking fingernails is a coat of bright colored nail polish, but you could be concealing something worse than an ugly nail. If you notice something different in your nails, be cautious, monitor them and visit a doctor if it persists. Sources: healthline.com, mayoclinic.org, mercola.com

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MAKE

WHEN

MEAN NOW in the

NEW YEAR A

WRITTEN BY JUDITH R A SB A ND

new year is in the works, and a new you may be waiting just inside the pages of your calendar. Make this the year to update or upgrade your appearance. Maybe you’d like a more professional image or simply need to polish your shoes more often. Maybe you’d like to build an at-home cluster of clothes or simply need to get a new layering piece to wear with tee-tops you already own. Include a real image goal on your list of resolutions for the new year.

TOP TEN IMAGE IMPROVEMENTS

1 2 3 4 5

“I will make an effort to learn what my appearance communicates— to me, to my family, to my colleagues.”

7

“I will hit the end-of-season sales and find a new jacket that camouflages my belly roll.”

“I will dress with more mindful intent so that I look like I belong in the places I go—look like I really know what I’m doing there.”

“I will stand and walk taller with an air of good health and confidence.”

“I will weed out any clothes that are too small for me now.”

“I will find some clothing styles that provide enough ease to slide smoothly over my body and allow attention to go to my face.”

6

8

“I will make time to find a muted blush color with a soft brush and start applying it softly across my cheek bones—it only takes a minute to apply.”

9 “I will get some color into my wardrobe to look more friendly and lift my mood.”

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“I will sort through a couple of hairstyling magazines, pick a few that appear to frame my face attractively, then talk with a hairstylist or barber about it.”

10

“I will get out of my jeans a few times a week and try a different but durable fabric for some of my at home activities—maybe cotton gabardine or corduroy.”

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Let's face it, we all fall victim to the "When

Syndrome" periodically.

THE “WHEN SYNDROME” But watch the way you word those resolutions or goals. Maybe you’ve heard of the “When Syndrome.” “I’ll get in shape when . . .” “I’ll straighten my clothes on their hangers when . . .” “I’ll mend that shirt when . . .” “ I’ll start saving for a new coat when . . .” Let’s face it, we all fall victim to the “When Syndrome” periodically. This year, break the habit of saying “when.” Here’s how: Magnify the importance of your goal. Allow it to seem even more important than it is, and then glue your mind on the good that will result from its completion. There is truth in the need for a positive self-image to help us through trying times. Achieving an improvement in personal appearance is one of the fastest, most effective ways there is to boost your self-confidence and sense of self-worth. Armed with the assurance that your goal is worthwhile, think your project through from start to finish. How much time will it take? What supplies will you need? Break overwhelmingly large projects into smaller and more manageable steps to be completed one by one. With each small goal achieved, you’ll feel the joy of victory. One such victory was won by a woman whose time and budget were devoted to her family. She dreamed of a total make-over for herself, but there never seemed enough private time or funds to work on such an enormous project. When broken down however, the first step was to tweeze her thick, heavy, dark eyebrows that appear to weigh down her face. With a couple of dollars spent on tweezers, the task was initially accomplished in the half-hour before the children

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were up one morning. The results were so rewarding, she was determined to maintain her brows and to complete the entire project little by little. For some people, there just doesn’t seem to be enough energy to get started, particularly at this time of year when many people suffer “energy blowouts.” All you need, however is enough energy to get started. You’ll be so delighted with the results of your efforts, that energy will be self-generating and will carry you through to completion. Look forward to the marvelous sense of accomplishment that awaits you. Think of how great you’ll feel when you can find your new shirt in your neater closet, or when offspring come to the dinner table with trimmed and dirt-free nails—well, almost dirt-free. We often allow ourselves to be undone by personal insecurities and the fear of failure. Regardless of whether you believe you can or if you believe you can’t, you’re right! So at this point, concentrate on the little train that could: “ . . .I think I can, I think I can, I think I can . . .” Believe me, you can! Commitment to the goal is vital. Put it on your calendar so it becomes a real part of your life. Many people are spurred to action when they’ve got a target date to aim for. “Today I am determined to improve my self-branding,” is the promise one busy client makes to himself. So I ask you, what one small improvement in your looks have you wanted or needed to make for a long time? The new year holds the promise for a more authentic, appropriate, attractive, and affordable appearance for those who have decided that “when” is NOW.

Judith Rasband MS AICI CIM is CEO of the Conselle Institute of Image Management (Conselle.com), residing in Orem, Utah. She works with the influence and expressive effects of dress and image on wellness and successful living. www.judith@conselle.com

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NO P LAC E L IK E HO ME

home sweet home After a long trip, there is no place like home. Of all the home amenities missed, your bathroom might be at the top of the list!

“Most people feel more comfortable going to the bathroom in familiar – and private – surroundings,” says Nick Haslam, a professor of psychology at the University of Melbourne. However, feeling more “comfortable” may not be the only reason why most people have increased bowel movements upon arrival of their home. The returners release is caused by your body’s response to its environment. When you’re at home, your body naturally responds to certain sensory stimuli. In the article There’s No Toilet Like Home, we learn that “the complex sensory stew of the home environment may in some way be physically moving the mail along.” Because your body has a lot of experience going to the bathroom in your home, your body strongly associates that behavior to your home. Just physically being in your own home can cause your body to trigger that response.

Deodorants Multiple Uses: If you’re only using deodorant for one reason, you’re missing out! Here are a few different ways you can put your deodorant to good use: STINKY FEET: Your armpits may not be the only place that smells. If your feet tend to get stinky and sweaty, rub a little deodorant on the bottom of your feet before putting on your shoes. SLIDING GLASSES: If your glasses tend to slide down your nose, swipe a little deodorant on and avoid the fuss. SWEATY SCALP: Having a bad hair day? Instead of hiding out with a hat, rub a little deodorant over the scalp and the deodorant will absorb the extra oil in your hair. SWEAT STAIN: If it’s hot out you’re bound to drip a little sweat on your back. Avoid the back sweat stain/mark by rubbing deodorant on your back before getting dressed.

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JEAN JUMP: Stop jumping and dancing into your jeans. Instead, roll some deodorant on your legs to make dressing quicker and easier. ACNE FIX: Deodorants with mineral salts or crystals might help dry out pimples and eliminate blackheads. NEW SHOES. Hate breaking in shoes? Rub deodorant on the area of your foot that will rub the shoe. The deodorant with protect against bruising and bleeding. T-ZONE. Use your fingers to apply deodorant to the T-zone of your face (across forehead, down the nose and chin). Applying deodorant to the T-zone will help control the oil prone area. NOISY DOORS. To stop your door from squeaking, apply some spray-on deodorant on the hardware.

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Adderall Alternatives Adderall is the medication used to treat Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Because Adderall is an FDA-approved drug, you may not realize the dangers associated with it. For example, it contains amphetamine and dextroampthetamine. Other research suggests it may lead to dependency, addictiveness, and cause deterioration of the central nervous system. So, before you introduce your body to an amphetamine-based stimulant and risk facing dangerous side effects, consider the following natural brain supplements: GINGKO BILOBA: Gingko Biloba is an herbal supplement that improves attention span and reduces impulsivity. Gingko Biloba is legal and easily attainable. BACOPA MONNIERI: Bacopa Monneiri comes from the plant water hyssop and has been used as a medicinal herb for centuries. Bacopa is used to enhance neuron communication and increase energy levels. CAFFEINE: Caffeine is considered a central nervous system stimulant. Caffeine is a vasoconstrictor, meaning that it reduces blood flow to overactive regions which causes the brain to communicate more predictably. L-THEANINE: L-Theanine is a natural amino acid found in green tea leaves and has proven to reduce stress and anxiety and improve attention span. RHODIOLA ROSEA: Rhodiola Rosea is a Scandinavian herb and has been linked to memory enhancement, mood stabilization, increased energy levels, and enhanced cognitive function. Rhodiola Rosea is legal for over-the-counter purchase. PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE: Phosphatidylserine is an essential phospholipid and aids in the formation and recollection of memories, reduces anxiety and depression and provides neuroprotection. OMEGA-3 FISH OIL: Fish oil contains two primary fatty acids that provide the mind and body both DHA and EPA omega-3s. DHA has been found to improve cognitive development, memory and attention span. ALPHA GPC: Alpha GPC works by increasing levels of acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is the most prominent neurotransmitter in the body for learning and memory. HUPERZINE A: Huperzine A is an herbal nootropic supplement that works in a similar fashion as Alpha GPC, increasing acetylcholine levels in the brain. L-TYROSINE: L-Tyrosine is an amino acid that produces neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenaline. A natural supplement, it reduces anxiety, improves memory and increases alertness and wakefulness. 5-HTP: 5-HTP is a natural amino acid and a chemical precursor to serotonin (“feel-good” transmitter). 5-HTP rejuvenates focus and concentration, enhances creativity and boosts mental energy. GABA: GABA is a neurotransmitter involved in regulating communication throughout the brain. GABA’s main responsibility is to help the brain maintain equilibrium.

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ORA L H E A LT H

BRUSH YOUR

TONGUE!

No matter your normal routine, forgetting to brush your tongue can lead to some weird side effects. Dental hygiene is supplemented by hundreds of products that aim to whiten, strengthen and clean your teeth. Some people brush their teeth back and forth, while others brush in circles - all to create that pictureperfect smile. But what’s lurking behind those pearly-whites may be more shocking than you might think. The tongue has a variety of purposes from tasting to swallowing, but is often overlooked in the cleaning process. Food particles and bacteria that pass through the mouth can become caught in the tiny nodes, called papillae, that cover the tongue. The tongue can function like a sponge if not cleaned regularly. The mouth has been found to contain hundreds of different species of bacteria, and there is a huge difference between a clean mouth and an unclean mouth. According to Sigmund Socransky, a dental researcher at the Forsyth Dental Center in Boston, Massachusetts, “In a clean mouth, 1,000 to 100,000 bacteria live on each tooth surface. A person who doesn’t have a terribly clean mouth can have 100 million to 1 billion bacteria growing on each tooth.”

Source: technologyreview.com

A CLEAN MOUTH

AN UNCLEAN MOUTH 44 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

1,000 100,000

BACTERIA ON EACH TOOTH

100 million - 1 billion

WHEN THAT BACTERIA IS ALLOWED TO GATHER ON THE TONGUE, HERE ARE SOME SIDE EFFECTS THAT CAN RANGE FROM HARMLESS TO DANGEROUS: HALITOSIS More commonly known as bad breath. When bacteria grows, a strong stench is sure to follow. Some bacteria that settle on the back of the tongue emit hydrogen sulfide, which leads to the most severe bad breath. So, despite the difficulty of reaching the back of your tongue without gagging, it's well worth the struggle to get your breath smelling fresh. DULLER TASTES BUDS There are 50 to 150 taste receptor cells inside each taste bud. But imagine you cover those buds with film, making it more difficult for the food to reach the receptors. Suddenly, that delicious meal you looked forward to eating all day looses a little of its savor. Old food particles and bacterial film dulls your taste, but cleaning your tongue can restore your flavorful meals. BLACK HAIRY TONGUE While harmless, your tongue can become blackened and fuzzy looking when food particles build up on your tongue. Gross, right? This especially occurs if you drink coffee or smoke tobacco. Black hairy tongue also leads to bad breath and a metallic taste in your mouth, according to the Mayo Clinic. ORAL THRUSH An unbalance of bacteria leads to overgrowth of yeast, leading to a yeast infection in the mouth, known as oral thrush. This causes white lesions on the tongue and cheeks, and can be treated with an antifungal medication. PERIODONTAL DISEASE While periodontal disease affects the gums by pulling away from the teeth and leading to infection in the space between, bacteria buildup on the tongue can sometimes be the culprit. While brushing your teeth and gums removes the main threat, the close proximity of the tongue to every surface of your mouth can lead to the spread of gingivitis-causing bacteria. Gingivitis causes swollen, red gums, and when left untreated, can lead to periodontal disease. This disease can cause teeth to fall out as well as chronic inflammation. Sources: technologyreview.com, womenshealthmag.com

What’s In the Tube? What is toothpaste? Is the toothpaste sold at the health store better than the Colgate or Crest sold at the grocery store? It can be confusing, but here’s what you need to know about toothpaste. There are four basic ingredients of toothpaste: abrasive, flavoring, humectants, and detergents. The fifth basic ingredient in toothpaste is fluoride – however, fluoride can be excluded because without it there is no noticeable difference in the toothpaste’s characteristics. The next thing you need to know is to buy toothpaste that is approved by the American Dental Association. If a toothpaste has the ADA seal, you can trust that it is safe and effective for two reasons: the ADA has higher standards than what is required by the law, and it forces manufacturers to demonstrate what they claim scientifically. Remember that the brand of toothpaste is secondary to brushing the teeth properly, and that all toothpastes contain the same four basic components.

BACTERIA ON EACH TOOTH

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NUTRITION

Healthy Eating ON A BUDGET W RIT T E N B Y C A I T L I N S CH I L L E, MP H

UNLESS MONEY IS NO OBJECT, EATING SMARTER OFTEN REQUIRES SHOPPING SMARTER Ask people what “eating healthy” means, and you’ll probably get varying answers. Some think a healthy diet involves lots of fancy, organic health food from expensive boutique grocery stores. However, it is very possible to eat a healthy diet on a smaller budget. Let me tell you how. Avoid pre-packaged foods, especially single-serving pre-packaged foods. While these products are convenient, they are not worth their high cost if you are trying to eat healthy on a budget. Cooking from scratch will save money. Do your grocery store research. Take some time to figure out what grocery store in your area has the most consistently low prices. This may take some effort and time, but the savings will pay off in the long run. Stores like Aldi and Wal-Mart often have lower prices than competitors. Organic is not the only way to eat healthy. Foods that are certified “organic” are perhaps ideal, but a non-organic apple is still a fantastic choice for your body. Organic foods are typically more expensive, so eat healthy for less by choosing non-organic fruits and veggies. Buy non-organic produce that is in-season. As you increase the fresh fruits and veggies you eat, you’ll start to notice “normal” prices for various things, so you’ll know that something is out of season when the price spikes. If you’re worried about fruits and veggies going bad, freeze them before they are unusable. For best results, chop frozen fruit and veggies into smaller pieces before freezing. Chopped frozen fruit works great for smoothies, and chopped frozen veggies work great for stir fry, steamed veggie sides, etc. Look for inexpensive staples. Frozen chicken, whole wheat pasta, inexpensive produce, beans, rice, eggs, etc. are nutritious and also won’t break the bank. Keep it simple! Always buy the store brand instead of the name brand. Odds are, you wouldn’t be able to tell a difference in a blind taste test. Store brands offer high-quality foods and ingredients for a lower price.

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FOOD

IT'S 2018

5 FOODS TO START EATING

Five Foods to Ditch, and Five to Embrace Teff Teff is an ancient grain from east Africa, Ethiopia to be specific. It has a mild, nutty flavor and is a good source of iron, calcium, magnesium, and zinc. Try teff in porridge or stew, or by itself.

Kefir This cultured, fermented milk drink has excellent probiotic qualities to improve your gut microbiome. It tastes sour and tart. Make it yourself, or find a variety with little added sugar.

Beet Greens Beet greens have some great mineral content, like calcium, magnesium and potassium. Use them in smoothies, salads or sautĂŠ them.

Swiss Chard

Lentil Pasta

A great source of vitamin A, C, and K, sautĂŠ up some swiss chard for a nutritious side dish.

Get your protein from nutritious legumes. Lentil pasta cooks and tastes like regular pasta.

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Sure it’s cheap and you’re used to it, but the wonky ingredients make flabby lunch meat something to avoid. Make sandwiches from real meat.

Sugar Heavy Granola Bars Many popular granola bars are pretty much candy bars, with sugary substances as the adhesive that holds the bar together. Go for bars with only a few ingredients.

5 FOODS TO STOP EATING

Processed Lunch Meat

Fat-Free or Low-Fat Milk Research shows that people who consume full-fat dairy are actually less likely to be overweight than those who consume low-fat dairy. This may be because dairy fat helps us feel full. Low-fat milk also sometimes has added sugar.

Frozen Diet Meals

Fruit On the Bottom Yogurt

They cost too much and aren’t that healthy.

Again, the problem here is sugar. Yogurt can be healthy, but most of it has a tremendous amount of added sugar.

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FOOD

SHEET PAN GARLIC & HERB CHICKEN AND VEGGIES This recipe is an easy, full of flavor dinner you’ll make again and again!

Prep Time Cook Time Total Time

10 MIN

50 MIN

40 MIN

4 SERVINGS

W RI T T EN B Y B RIT TA NY P O U L S O N

Ingredients

Instructions

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon Italian seasoning 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 lb new red potatoes 8 oz baby carrots 8 ounces green beans 1 small onion 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 lb boneless, skinless chicken breasts Optional: grated parmesan cheese Optional: Serve with cooked quinoa or brown rice, if desired

1. Preheat oven to 400° F. Prepare baking sheet with parchment paper, tin foil, or silicone mat (for easy clean-up); set aside. 2. Pour the olive oil into a small bowl. Whisk in the Italian seasoning, onion powder, salt and pepper; set aside. 3. Chop the potatoes in half, or in quarters if larger. Place on baking sheet, along with baby carrots. 4. Pour half of the oil/herb mixture on the potatoes and carrots. Set the remaining oil/herb mixture aside. Toss the potatoes and carrots until fully covered with the oil/herb mixture, then evenly distribute on the sheet pan. Place in oven and bake for 20 minutes. 5. Meanwhile, slice the onion and mince the garlic. Chop the chicken into 1/2-1 inch pieces.

Nutrition Facts Serving Size: 1/4 of recipe Calories: 350 Sugar: 6 g Sodium: 390 mg Fat: 17 g Saturated Fat: 3 g Unsaturated Fat: 13 g Trans Fat: 0 g Carbohydrates: 28 g Fiber: 5 g Protein: 26 g Cholesterol: 65 mg

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6. Remove the sheet pan from the oven and push the carrots and potatoes to one side. Add the onion, garlic and chicken to the other side. Drizzle the remaining oil/herb mixture on top and toss to coat the chicken and onions. Combine and mix with the carrots and potatoes; evenly distribute on the sheet pan. 7. Place back in the oven and bake an additional 15-20 minutes, or more depending on the size of your veggies and chicken. Make sure the chicken is fully cooked (reached an internal temperature of 165°F). 8. Optional: Sprinkle with parmesan cheese. Serve over cooked quinoa or brown rice, if desired.

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CARROT CAKE (SUGAR-FREE, VEGAN) W RIT T EN B Y A M A NDA J S L OAN FRE SH CU I S I NE R ECI P E BO O K

Ingredients

Instructions

2 cups GF Flour Mix (see sidebar) 1 cup almond flour ½ tsp sea salt 4 tsp cinnamon 4 tbs pea flour, mixed with 8 tbs water 3 cups grated carrot ¾ cup walnuts 1 cup extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp Homemade Vanilla Essence (see sidebar) 1 tsp each; baking powder & baking soda

1. Sift dry ingredients, add olive oil and stir well. Stir in pea flour mixture, and then add carrot. Mix well and add walnuts. Grease sides (with olive oil), of a decent sized cake tin. Pour in mixture and bake at 175ºC, for about an hour. Ice when cold. Use the Vegan Cream (see sidebar) as topping. You can try other fresh fruits too. Either sliced into the blender mixture or freshly juiced, (eg even fresh carrot juice!). This will give the Vegan Cream recipe, different flavours.

3 KEYS TO HEALTHIER DESSERTS GF Flour Mix Yield: 1kg Flour

Mix the following:

500 gms brown rice flour 200 gms sorghum flour 200 gms cornflour 100 gms pea flour

Vegan Cream Instructions

1. Soak 2 cups, raw walnuts OR cashews, (for 2 hrs previously), then drain. 2. Pour ¾ cup, freshly squeezed orange juice and 1 tbs homemade Vanilla Essence into a blender. 3.Add the nuts and blend well, until creamy.

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Homemade Vanilla Essence Ingredients

8 vanilla bean pods ¼ tsp sea salt 1 cup filtered water

Instructions

1. Cut the vanilla beans, so they can fit inside the bottle you are using. Slice the beans lengthwise, just enough so that you pierce through one side (you want to expose the tiny vanilla seeds but keep them attached to the bean). 2. Place the vanilla beans inside the bottle,add the salt and completely cover with the filtered water. Place the lid onto the bottle and shake vigorously. 3. Place the bottle in the fridge and shake once a day for 4 weeks (you can leave a note on the fridge). For the next 4 weeks you can shake it less often, like 2 – 3 times a week. The vanilla will be ready to use in 9 weeks (although, longer the better)! Shake before using. Note: Once the vanilla is done steeping, the vanilla extract will keep in fridge for 3 months.

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WELLNESS

6 Ways to Keep Your Brain Fit as You Age WRITTEN BY DR. ANDREA BRANDT, AUTHOR OF MINDFUL AGING

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Whether you want to keep working for as many years as possible or make the most of your retirement, you’ll need your brain in top shape. The best way to remain healthy and vibrant throughout your life is to stay active mentally and continue to learn and try new things. Over the decades I’ve spent working as a therapist in Los Angeles specializing in aging, I’ve developed many tools to help people live their best lives whether they’re 25 or 95. If you want to live your best possible life, try these seven ways to keep your brain fit as you age. 1. GET PHYSICAL You may think of your body and brain as separate. Your body does the literal heavy lifting and your brain the mental lifting and one has nothing to do with the other, right? Wrong! Scientists at the University of Illinois have shown a correlation between one’s level of physical fitness and performance on tests of mental activity. MRIs have even revealed that improved physical health also increased brain volume in areas vital to memory and cognitive skills. Evidence tells us that exercise can even slow the progress of dementia. Becoming and staying physically active isn’t about competing with others or with your younger self. It’s about doing what makes you feel good about you and raises your quality of life now.

2. STAY FIT WITH FRIENDS Loneliness is a quick route to mental decline. Why not combine your need for social interaction with your need for physical fitness? Exercise can be an excellent social activity. Instead of getting together for dinner with friends, go for a long walk or hike. Exercise classes are also a great way to meet new people. Try joining a dance, aerobics, or water aerobics class—especially one geared toward people your age and fitness level.

3. FEED YOUR BRAIN That adage “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks” might be true of dogs, but it’s definitely not true of humans. You definitely can—and should—learn new things for as long as possible. If you don’t use your brain, you’ll start to lose it. What you want to do is look for an activity that requires concentration and brainpower. Learning a new language is one great way to feed your brain. Are you taking a trip soon or do you have a dream destination in mind? There are many websites—some free—that offer language courses. Even if you don’t become fluent, knowing the basics can go a long way toward making your vacation memorable or give you the push you need to make your dream trip a reality.

4. GO BACK TO SCHOOL Maybe you never finished your education because life got in the way, or you wish you’d studied a different subject, or there’s a subject you didn’t develop an interest in until after you graduated. Whatever your reason, it’s never too late to go back to school. Many schools offer individual classes or entire programs for adults, some in person and some over the internet. You’re never too old to learn something new. In fact, the older you are, the more important it is to learn new things.

5. PLAY MORE What we call “play,” researchers call “brain training.” There are many cognitive benefits to playing games. Not only can play enhance your brain’s functioning it can change it for the better. So drop by a bingo night, start a weekly card game with your friends, or do the morning crossword in the newspaper. Who said keeping your brain fit had to feel like work?

6. WRITE YOUR STORY Because of digital media and technology, writing and sharing your writing has never been easier. You can experiment with fiction or poetry, research and write about a topic that’s always interested you, or tell the story of your life. Maybe 100,000 people read your memoir or maybe just one. Either way, writing it will benefit your brain. Whatever you chose to do with the later years of your life, you’ll need a healthy and resilient mind. To keep your brain fit as you age, continue to step into the territory of the new and unknown, day after day. Challenge yourself, stretch yourself, and never stop growing as a person.

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AUTHOR

Dr. Brandt is the author of 8 Keys to Eliminating Passive-Aggressiveness, Mindful Anger: A Pathway to Emotional Freedom and her newest book, Mindful Aging: Embracing Your Life After 50 to Find Fulfillment, Purpose, and Joy.

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BEAUT Y

Does Stress Age You?

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Beauty Problems: • Eyes: Have you ever found yourself up at night going through the list of to-dos for the next day? Unfortunately, making that to-do list may cause more harm than good, Sleep deprivation can cause fluid to pool in the under-eye area, leaving you with two puffy eye bags. • Acne: As if we’re already stressed enough acne appears. Stress releases cortisol, which can throw off the body’s hormones and lead to breakouts. • Hair: Stress can prevent melanin in the hair from producing normally. Lack of melanin production causes gray hair and could potentially cause hair to become thinner. HEART HEALTH: Stress hormones (adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol) primarily target the heart and blood vessels. During stress the heart rate increases, blood vessels dilate, and blood pressure rises. Exposure to persistent stress reduces your body’s capabilities to control the cardiovascular system. The lack of control of the cardiovascular system leads stress hormones to increase blood pressure, therefore aging the arteries. BRAIN HEALTH: Stress attacks cells in the hippocampus, the part of the brain that is responsible for memory storage and retrieval. Studies from Wisconsin University’s school of medicine have found that a substantial number of stressful events such as poverty, abuse or divorce are connected to a poorer cognitive function in later life. Stressful events can have a lasting impact on our memory and thinking abilities. Currently research is being done to determine whether stress is associated with dementia. CELLS: Telomeres are found in all our cells and are located at the end of chromosomes. Every time our cells divide, a part of a telomere is diminished. Cell division and telomere decreasing is a natural process. However, anxiety and stress have been found to increase the rate of diminishing telomeres. Shortage of telomeres have been linked to a shorter life span and several diseases. There are ways to manage stress and avoid early risks of aging. Incorporating healthy lifestyle choices such as exercising regularly, eating healthy and developing good sleeping habits can help concur stress.

Sources: dailysabah.com, stress.org, cosmopolitan.com

Unexpected events, life’s challenges, and unceasing obligations are just a few of the many things that give us stress. We all hate stress, and with research suggesting that it’s causing negative health effects such as weight gain and wrinkles there are plenty of reasons to dislike it. Stress is the body’s natural response to threat. When we feel stressed our bodies release a chemical in the brain. The stress chemical directs the body to go into fight or flight mode. Studies have shown that the stress chemical causes biological aging.

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WELLNESS

FAT SHAMING -

A NEW PERSPECTIVE

W RITTEN B Y C A I T L I N S CH I L L E, MP H

A

re you familiar with the relatively new term of “fat-shaming?” Fatshaming is when people try to make others who fall into the categories of overweight and obese feel badly about themselves and about their bodies. Those staunchly against fat-shaming promote overall body positivity— the idea that all people should feel comfortable in their own skin, be proud of their bodies, and feel confident in the way they look no matter their size. A recent CNN article on fat-shaming stated: “Because beauty matters in our culture, directing this message at children— that fat can’t be beautiful — encourages an understanding of fat people as less valuable than thin people and unworthy of our respect. This is not only a terrible lesson that can affect individual struggles with self esteem but also allows for justification of bias behaviors, such as bullying.” Certainly nobody could be against a movement that promotes self esteem and condemns bullying, right? As it turns out, there is a large contingent of people who do have a problem with the body positivity movement. These people point out that the body positivity movement may promote unhealthy habits, obesity, and obesity-caused health problems. They maintain that by promoting acceptance of your body at any size, you’re ignoring that being overweight and obese often comes with health consequences. As more and more are asking, is it responsible, in the face of this problem of prevalent obesity to normalize and even celebrate excessive weight? We know that obesity can cause many health consequences— diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer. The negative health effects of obesity go even further: “Excess weight, especially obesity, diminishes almost every aspect of health, from reproductive and respiratory

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function to memory and mood…Obesity decreases the quality and length of life, and increases individual, national, and global healthcare costs,” reads an article on the Harvard School of Public Health website. Looking at obesity from this perspective, it now seems wrong to not condemn it. So who is right? Where’s the line? As with many issues, the answer is…somewhere in the middle. People who criticize the body positivity movement in the name of health may be surprised to find that fat-shaming does not have the effect of spurring overweight or obese people into healthier habits. Many may not even realize that the comments they make qualify as fat-shaming. Asking a man if he really needs the second helping of dessert, or telling a woman she needs to lose thirty pounds before she wears a bikini are examples of fat-shaming. Instead of promoting healthy behavior, fat-shaming can backfire and lead to worse lifestyle habits. Dr. Scott Kahan of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health states that fat-shaming “….predisposes to unhelpful behaviours, so it increases the risk for binge eating. It increases the risk for emotional eating. It decreases motivation for exercise.” Fat-shaming is counterproductive, and it does not help promote health. From a public health perspective, we want people who are in a healthy mental space about their bodies, and we also want people who practice healthy lifestyle behaviors. How can we encourage both of these things? The answer lies in how we frame the issues. From a body positivity standpoint, focus on the things your body can do. Maybe your body can walk. Maybe your body is great at dancing! Maybe your body is doing a great job at growing another human. Remember that your body is just that— your body— it’s not you. There is so

much more to you than the way you look. From the standpoint of healthy behaviors, truly focus on the behavior, not on the size. Instead of monitoring your health by how you look in the mirror or by how much you weigh, try looking at your health by the things you do that make your body feel good.

Focus on doing things that make your body feel good, like moving around in whatever way you feel like— dancing, walking your dog, going for a bike ride— and by paying attention to what foods make your body feel good. If you are concerned about an overweight or obese friend of family member, try to keep the potentially fat-shaming comments inside. Keep in mind that they will not be helpful and may even backfire. Instead, encourage healthy habits by gently inviting this person to join you— invite them to go for a walk, sign up for a Zumba class, try a new healthy recipe, or plant a vegetable garden. Small changes add up! Sources: CNN.com, bostonglobe.com, hsph. harvard.edu, cbc.ca

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Healthy Magazine | Winter 2018  

Look up. Look ahead, down the road a bit in your life, and envision where and what you want to be. Draw a line to that destination and sta...

Healthy Magazine | Winter 2018  

Look up. Look ahead, down the road a bit in your life, and envision where and what you want to be. Draw a line to that destination and sta...