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November 2015

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Bounty O

ne thing is clear to me. Life is precious. And fleeting. And more valuable the older we grow. Still, life is only as valuable as we make it.

I recently met with my financial planner to review our retirement plan, consider a health savings plan, and talk life insurance. From a legal, life-insurance perspective, the value of life is interesting. Am I worth a few thousand dollars, or a few million? Depends on how much I want to pay each month, apparently! Insuring 'life' is an ironic concept. Any insurance agent can tell you what the no-fault payout for killing someone in a car accident is. But, ask a war casualty's widow or parents what they are paid when a military member is killed, and what they would pay to have them back. Monetizing the value of an irreplaceable life is an intriguing disparity. When I hold a baby, I marvel. An infant truly is a priceless miracle. A healthy infant, even more so. When you think of all the systems at play in making a human body function properly—eyes, ears, lungs, bone structure, brain, etc.—it truly is a wonder that any of it goes right at all. And yet, it does most of the time. Except, when it doesn't. Life comes and goes. We win, and we lose. We experience highs and lows, joys and sorrows, disappointment and fulfillment. Opposition in all things is clearly part of the mortal plan.

JOHN A. ANDERSON,

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF @JOHN_A_ANDERSON

Healthy

EDITOR'S NOTE

TM

NOVEMBER 2015 VOLUME XV, № 11

For any who have lived with, or cared for someone with some type of disability, you know and understand how difficult, and also how rewarding that can be. Not easy, yet enriching in peculiar ways. My oldest brother and his wife have cared for their beautiful, mentally disabled, though highly capable daughter, Candace, for over thirty years. She's brought so much unique joy to our entire family. I have a very active cousin who became completely disabled from the neck down within weeks of getting married in his 20's. It was tragic and unbearable. And amazing, as Jeremy Chatelain has gone on to become a father, a teacher, and a PhD. Through his extremity has come glorious capability and inspiration. I have another cousin who was highly intelligent, artistically inclined, with impressive scholarships to Stanford University. He suffered from mental illness and tragically took his very promising life. That was challenging to understand. I have witnessed and feebly consoled other close family members who have struggled to have children, and/or whom have lost children at birth. Infertility and child loss are two very heartbreaking issues that further highlight the fragile nature of life. As the saying goes, 'Whether it be a grain of sand or a rock, in water they sink the same.' No matter how big or small the trial, it's never easy to handle. But, it can be rewarding. Each of these personal life challenges I mention seemed to be offset by an increase of love and understanding, of closeness and caring that, perhaps, would not have been there without the pain and setback. Maybe, like the body itself, tragedy finds its own way of healing and harmonizing.

P H O T O B Y T I F F I N E E D AW N . C O M

So, this month, we turn our attention to life. To blessings. To gratitude, and to recognizing the bounty in life. Hopefully, the overall message is about joy, happiness, and hope for a better, more enriching life, whatever life opportunities you must embrace.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF John A. Anderson | john@healthy-mag.com PUBLISHER Kenneth J. Shepherd | ken@healthy-mag.com MEDICAL DIRECTORS Steven N. Gange, M.D. and Lane C. Childs, M.D. DESIGN EDITOR Phillip Chadwick | design@healthy-mag.com MANAGING EDITOR Michael Richardson | michael@healthy-mag.com PHOTOGRAPHER Ryan Chase | ryan@healthy-mag.com MAGAZINE EDITOR Kristen Soelberg | kristen@healthy-mag.com DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Lyn Timboe | lyn.timboe@healthy-mag.com CIRCULATION MANAGER Ron Fennell | distribution@healthy-mag.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Caitlin Schille, Angela Silva, Megan Moore, David Joachim, Mark Saunders, Derek Jacobs CIRCULATION

Healthy Utah® is distributed widely to more than 800 locations along the Wasatch Front. It is also direct mailed to doctors, dentists, practitioners, health clinics, banks and other businesses along the Wasatch Front.

Healthy Magazine www.healthy-magazines.com (801) 369-6139 l info@healthy-mag.com To be included in our free online directory, or to advertise or get content published please e-mail us at info@healthy-mag.com PLEASE NOTE: The content in this publication is meant to increase reader awareness of developments in the health and medical field and should not be construed as medical advice or instruction on individual health matters, which should be obtained directly from a health professional. The opinions expressed by the authors and advertisers are not necessarily those of the publisher. Call for reprint permission. All stock photography by Shutterstock.com, unless otherwise noted.

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Be there for all your baby’s firsts. At Intermountain Healthcare, we know how important it is for you to be at all the milestones in your baby’s life. That’s why when you give birth at one of our hospitals, your baby stays with you whenever possible. From first cry to first bath, mom is welcome every step of the way. Because the first face your baby wants to see is yours.

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November 2015

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FITNESS

mentally fit

DENISE AUSTIN SHARES HER TOP TIPS

Change your mindset and change your life. THERE ARE SO MANY THINGS WE CAN’T CHANGE IN LIFE, BUT WE CAN CHANGE THE WAY WE EAT, THE WAY WE MOVE AND ESPECIALLY THE WAY WE THINK. WAKE UP A FEW MINUTES EARLIER

and squeeze in 3 minutes of your favorite exercise. Do a 360 full body workout – upper body, abs and lower body – in your bedroom in just a few minutes! Place your feet on the floor and your hands on the bed and do 10-20 pushups. This version is a little less challenging than a standard pushup since it’s on the bed. To target your mid-section, get down and do 20 sit-ups. My favorite are bicycles because they are a 360 degree workout for your abs (upper, lower and obliques). And then for lower body, there’s nothing better than squats. I like to call them, butt taps. You squat down and tap a chair or the edge of your bed. This is really great for your butt and the lower half of your body. The 360 wakeup routine is a great way to start the day!

GET OUT OF YOUR JAMMIES AS FAST AS YOU CAN

and lace up those running shoes. By putting on your fitness attire right away you get psyched and motivated. Now that you’re all geared up in your workout clothes, you have to squeeze in some type of exercise. Even if it’s a quick walk!

MAKE EXERCISE ACCESSIBLE.

Your muscles don’t know if you’re at a fancy gym or sitting at home watching TV, so use that extra time at your office or while you’re on the telephone to lift some light weights.

SIGN UP FOR A FITNESS PLAN

to help get you started and keep you motivated. Find a great group or an online plan that gives you the tools you need to achieve your goals by combining exercise, nutrition and motivation.

PURCHASE BEAUTIFUL ACTIVEWEAR

that makes you feel great and will motivate you to get moving and keep moving. Find some inspiring activewear!

NEVER, NEVER, NEVER GIVE UP

on your goals or shaping your dreams. If you slip up, remember: Every day is a new beginning, take a deep breath and start again.

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the definition of fitness

\ \ / /

FITNESS

Knowing what you’re striving for is a good way to begin. This knowledge will also come in handy down the road when you’re setting goals, measuring your progress, and >> trying to get motivated again after a backslide.

T

here are several aspects to conditioning. One is cardiovascular fitness, which is measured by the maximum amount of oxygen your body can use (known as VO2 max). This indicates the body’s ultimate work capacity. But VO2 max cannot be measured by the average person, and it’s not all that relevant to daily life. Another aspect of conditioning that has greater relevance for most of us

is functional fitness, which takes into account your general level of health and ability to function. A healthy heart, lungs, muscles, and bones help make you functionally fit. Absence of illness and length of survival, as well as the ability to perform daily activities without noticeable discomfort or limitations, also factor into whether you are functionally fit.

focus on moderate activity Today, exercise recommendations focus on moderate activity levels aimed at achieving functional fitness and avoiding disease. This differs from guidelines set out in the 1970s and 1980s that emphasized high-intensity activity directed at achieving cardiovascular fitness. This shift took place for two reasons. First, subsequent research found that lower levels of activity offered substantial health benefits. Second, public health professionals believed that focusing on activity levels that are more manageable for the average person might help motivate an increasingly sedentary population. These guidelines aren’t meant to replace the old ones. They simply offer an alternative for people who prefer less intense workouts.

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Still, achieving cardiovascular fitness can make a real-life difference, too. Even though you rarely press your heart and lungs to the utmost, the physical changes that take place as you boost your maximum exercise capacity help you perform your regular activities with less effort. Why? Because the same amount of energy output necessary to perform a task—such as walking for a given amount of time at 4 miles per hour— now demands a smaller proportion of your overall ability. Hence, work that doesn’t push you to the max feels “easier” as your fitness level improves. Your health benefits also increase when you perform greater amounts of physical activity.

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exercise vs. physical activity >>

The terms exercise and physical activity are often used interchangeably, but there are important distinctions to be made. Physical activity refers to any movement that involves muscle contractions and an increase in metabolism. This broad definition includes both aerobic and anaerobic activities. Types of physical activity are further divided into groupings based on the reasons a person performs the activity—such as transportation, recreation, or household chores.

i

If time is a concern, try choosing activities that are more vigorous and shortening the length of your workout. Just be sure that you don’t have any health conditions that might make vigorous activity dangerous, and gradually work up to more intense exercise. Exercise or exercise training is technically a subcategory of physical activity. It refers to a structured program of activity for attaining physical fitness. For most people, fitness for health reasons is of greater concern than athletic performance, which demands skill, speed, and agility. The elements of health fitness include cardiorespiratory capacity, muscle strength and endurance, flexibility and balance, and weight management. A regular exercise program that incorporates all these elements is important for a healthy level of conditioning. Household activities such as sweeping or leisure pursuits like gardening can be a good way to get moving. But there’s no reason to stop there. Coupling this kind of activity with regular exercise will increase your total energy expenditure and improve your overall conditioning.

Runners just do it they run for the finish line even if someone else has reached it first.

-Reg Anderson

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From the Harvard Health Publications Special Health Report, Exercise: A Program You Can Live With. Copyright 2007 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. Illustrations by Harriet Greenfield and Michael Linkinhoker. All rights reserved. Written permission is required to reproduce, in any manner, in whole or in part, the material contained herein. To make a reprint request, contact Harvard Health Publications. Used with permission of StayWell.

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s s e n d t i F y aine k r i u Expl , s l Too

FITNESS

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TRUE STRETCH CAGE

If you ask me, this looks more like something you’d find in a zoo, but there is more to this big piece of metal than meets the eye. One stretch session with the True Stretch Cage after a body-crippling workout will have you coming back for more. Robinson says its complex design allows for more effective stretch positions. You know what this means; no more stretching on whatever area of floor your can find.

HOW TO USE IT:

Use the cage daily following any workout. There is an easy to follow diagram that shows how to stretch specific muscle groups. These stretches are designed to feel natural, yet help you improve muscle function and flexibility.

WE’VE ALL HEARD IT’S IMPORTANT TO SWITCH UP YOUR WORKOUT, BUT HOW DO YOU DO THAT WHEN SO MANY TOOLS AT THE GYM LOOK FOREIGN?

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AB WHEELS

The ab wheel looks like a large version of a training wheel. Not too intimidating right? Think again. This small and seemingly innocuous devise presents quite a challenge, according to Robinson. This is a simple way to achieve rock hard abs.

HOW TO USE IT:

Start standing with the wheel at your feet holding on to the handles. Roll the wheel out until you are laid out as far as you can go, all while maintaining control. Then pull back until your feet and hands come back together. You can also use the wheel in a pushup position, resting your feet on the handles.

Follow advice from Personal Trainer Blake Robinson, owner of Evolve Fitness in Salt Lake City, so the unfamiliar gym equipment doesn’t stop you from achieving amazing results. His tips will help you utilize these quirky fitness tools, and look good while doing it.

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BOSU BALL

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You may think this bubble shaped toy is only for those working on a balancing act, but it proves to be much more than that. The Bosu Ball has some very interesting strength training benefits. Robinson says trying to maintain proper form while doing simple exercises like pushups and squats can keep your body guessing. This pushes the difficulty to a whole new level, resulting in higher caloric burn and a stronger core.

HOW TO USE IT:

This is the perfect tool to use if you feel you’re workout routine is becoming too routine. Perform squats, lunges and holds on the Bosu. Your core muscles will work extra hard to keep you from falling off. A word of caution; make sure the Bosu ball you choose to stand on doesn’t say “no standing.” There are a few brands that are not made for standing.

VIBRATION PLATFORM

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This is what I like to call the “Jiggler.” Quirky, yes, but don’t be fooled by the machine’s shaky nature. There are lasting benefits from spending time on its platform. Will you lose weight? Not likely, but the physical benefits are there. By standing on the vibration platform, Robinson says you activate the fast twitch muscles in your legs. This no impact exercise can also help to strengthen bone density, improve muscles strength and help with balance. When recovering from an injury, the vibrating platform will increase your range of motion if you stretch.

PLYO BOXES

No, these boxes aren’t a place for lacing up your sneakers or resting. Jumping onto these metal boxes can turn up the calorie burn, sculpt your legs and butt and give your joints a break from the usual burpees and squat jumps, Robinson says.

HOW TO USE IT:

HOW TO USE IT:

The vibrating platform can be used before and after workouts for stretching. Start by placing one foot on the platform at a time and work your way up to standing on the platform with both feet while stretching. The platform can be used daily. A caution to women who may be pregnant: avoid the vibration machine all together.

Start with the smallest box available and work your way up to the biggest, slowly. Jumping both feet onto this box will torch calories and improve your ability to jump higher. Be sure to swing your arms up for momentum.

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HOPZ PRO

Vertical jump is a key component to athletic ability. Using the Hopz Pro, athletes will develop explosive leg drive and power increasing their vertical. With up to 80+ lbs of resistance this performance trainer pushes athletes to the next level.

HOPZ FEATURES

• Builds explosive jumping ability by training the lower body. • Portable unit includes heavy-duty belt, four resistance cords and foot attachments. • Resistance cords clip to belt and ankle straps easily with a carabiner.

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THE POWER OF

W R I T T E N B Y A S H L E Y E VA N S O N

RELIGION HAS LONG EMBRACED THE CONCEPT OF GRATITUDE, AND THE HAPPINESS AND HEALTH THAT FLOURISH AS A RESULT. BUT NOW SCIENCE HAS ACCEPTED AND PROVEN GRATITUDE TO BE A POSITIVE FORCE. SO WHEN IT GETS DOWN TO IT, THE REPETITIVE, TIME-CONSUMING TASK OF WRITING THANK-YOU LETTERS IS ACTUALLY GOOD FOR YOU! 20 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

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obert Emmons, professor of psychology at the University of California, Davis, and author of Thanks! How the New Science of Gratitude Can Make You Happier, is a forerunner in gratitude research. He conducts experiments that measure the physical and emotional results of gratitude and ingratitude—and they truly do have a direct effect on your body and spirit.

BENEFITS OF EXPRESSING GRATITUDE

For example, Emmons’ ground-breaking research has proven that people who are grateful have higher levels of positive emotions like love, optimism, joy, enthusiasm, and happiness. “The practice of gratitude as a discipline protects a person from the destructive impulses of envy, resentment, greed, and bitterness,” Emmons says. He also states that those who are grateful are able to cope better with stress, they sleep better and have more energy, and they even have more resilience toward illness and have greater physical health. “Gratitude works because, as a way of perceiving and interpreting life, it recruits other positive emotions—like joy, contentment, and hope—that have direct physical benefits, most likely through the immune system or endocrine system,” Emmons says. “We have also found that when people experience gratitude, they feel more loving, more forgiving, and closer to God.” On the flip side, ingratitude can have the opposite effect. Those who are ungrateful show signs of loneliness, increased depression, and lack of meaning in life. Like gratitude, it too has a direct effect on your body’s health. “If ingratitude is combined with hostility, resentment, or cynicism—as it often is—then the cardiovascular disease risk is increased,” Emmons says. “Ungrateful people may also be at greater risk from stress-related diseases because they handle stress more poorly than do the grateful people.” So how do you show gratitude? You can always “count your many blessings,” which has proven to be a great help. But here’s where the thank-you letter comes into play. Emmons says that by sharing gratitude, all of the above benefits are amplified. So expressing thanks to someone else doubles your joy.

Emmons recalls a study done in 2005 that examined what happened to people when they wrote a thank-you letter to someone they felt they had never properly thanked. They delivered the letter and personally read it to the person, nothing more. After having completed the assignment, the letter-givers were happier and more content. They went in for follow-ups one week, one month, and even three months later, and most still showed signs of increased happiness.

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EMMONS BELIEVES THE POWER OF A THANK-YOU NOTE IS INCREDIBLE, AND THAT THERE ARE THREE MAIN BENEFITS: 1. Expressing emotions magnifies the feeling, so expressing thanks makes our gratitude stronger. 2. Expressing thanks builds and strengthens relationships. Gratitude is the relationship-building emotion, so not only do we benefit on an individual level, but we create better bonds with others. 3. It humbles us. The natural man has a self-serving bias and the tendency to take sole credit for everything positive. Acknowledging that something good is a result of someone else provides us with a humbling experience.

THANK-YOU NOTE BASICS

So how does one write a proper thank-you letter, making sure to express sincere gratitude for another person? A lot of people don’t write thank-you notes because they either don’t know what to say, feel like they can only write generic, impersonal things, or they’ve forgotten and it’s too late to send one now. Don’t let these stop you. Remember, silent gratitude benefits no one. The key is to focus on the giver. What does the gift mean to you? How does it make you feel that the giver acknowledged you? Try to concentrate more on the person than the gift, although mentioning the specific gift is a must. OUTLINING A TYPICAL THANK-YOU LETTER: 1. Greeting: “Dear Johnny,” or more personal, “Hey Johnny!” 2. Thank them for the gift, and be specific: “Thank you so much for the lovely pearl bracelet.” 3. Mention something about the gift, why you like it, and/or how you are planning to use it: “It is absolutely stunning, and I feel so beautiful when I wear it.” 4. Express gratitude for the time, effort, and thought the giver put into the gift: “It was so nice of you to think of me, and you knew exactly what I would love.” 5. Mention a brief personal comment about the giver, like the next time you plan to see them, mention their family, or express feelings about your relationship: “You are such an amazing person, and I feel so lucky to be your friend.” 6. Sign off with “Love,”“Sincerely,”“Thanks again,” etc., and sign your name. It’s that simple! You can elaborate and, of course, add more than one sentence to any or all of these steps, making it as short or long as you feel appropriate. Writing an uncomplicated letter like this can mean the world to someone, and make a tremendous difference in your relationship with them. An easy way to get your thank-you notes written quickly is to have envelopes already

stamped and labeled with your return address, and to always have stationary on hand. Make it a goal to immediately sit down and write a quick note as soon as you receive a gift. Think of it as the quicker you write a thank-you, the more grateful you are. Also, you should never feel indebted. There is a crucial difference between indebtedness and gratitude. If you feel like you have to repay the debt or have a sense of obligation to the person, no good will come of your thank-you. True gratitude is where we are glad to be indebted to the person, truly happy to give thanks. Just remember in your thank-you writing endeavors, any letter is better than no letter, so despite tardiness or embarrassment of poor writing skills, or whatever is keeping you from the task. Just do it—your happiness depends on it!

THANK-YOU NOTE ETIQUETTE

The website thank-you-note-samples.com lists common mistakes made in thank-you notes. Make sure you don’t do one of the following: • Don’t talk about yourself—the point of the letter is the gift, not you. • When thanking someone for money, don’t mention the amount in the note. • Don’t print out a thank-you card. Take the time to write a hand-written letter. After all, they took the time (and money) to buy the gift. • Don’t include fewer than three sentences. • Don’t write a thank-you note for receiving a thankyou note. It gets too confusing and isn’t necessary. • Don’t wait more than two weeks to write a thankyou, and don’t wait a year to mail letters for wedding gifts. • Don’t get personal with a business letter. It’s best to just stick with thanking them. • Don’t email thank-you letters. Unless you know them really well and speak with them often, email is too impersonal.

Thank-you Writing for Kids

Getting your kids to be as enthusiastic about writing a thank-you letter as they were about receiving the gift can be a challenge. But it’s a good habit to develop early on and kids should know that gratitude is important. Here are some ways to get your kids excited about writing a thank-you note. • Make their own stationary: pull out the crafts and let them color, paint, sticker and design their own personal cards. They can even make a stockpile for the future. • Give them their own address book: help them fill out an address book of their own that they can take with them on vacations or to summer camp. • Take a picture thank-you card: if your child is too young to write a letter, take a picture of them with their gift and have them sign their name on it. Create a drawing thank-you letter: again, if they’re too young to write, have your kids draw a picture of themselves with their gift.

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OPINION

Find Joy by Leaving Facebook

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WRITTEN BY C AITLIN SC HILLE

n the span of about one decade, Facebook went from an entrepreneurial internet idea to a world-wide company worth hundreds of billions of dollars. It has fundamentally changed the way we interact and document our lives, and it paved the way for many social media spin-offs.

THE AVERAGE AMERICAN FACEBOOK USERS SPENDS....

40 min X 365 days= 14600 min. (243 hours) 243 hours = 10.1 days

And I’m here to tell you to get off Facebook. Why?

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IT IS A MASSIVE WASTE OF TIME

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According to Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s creator, the average American Facebook user spends approximately 40 minutes per day perusing the site. 40 minutes per day may not sound like a lot, especially in comparison to the hours spent working or commuting, but some quick math shows that after a year, 40 minutes a day adds up to 10 days on Facebook! Imagine what could have been accomplished in that enormous accumulation of hours. It is estimated that Facebook costs U.S. companies 28 billion dollars per year in lost productivity. Now, Facebook can be a very useful tool for connecting with far-away family and good friends. If quitting cold turkey affects real relationships, just cut out the Facebook excess instead. For example, don’t bother with the vacation pictures your 4th grade teacher posted. A good idea is to mute the feeds of acquaintances you don’t know well (high school peers, old neighbors, etc.).

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IT POSES SAFETY CONCERNS

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Facebook is a public website. Anyone can look up your profile, including predators. Not only can anyone look up your profile, but the name and picture you see on the profile do not necessarily reflect the person behind the account. A 50-year-old man can create a profile that makes him appear to be a 13 year old girl. If you do maintain a Facebook account, make sure your privacy controls are set to the maximum security, and never, ever communicate with anyone you do not know.

THE INTERNET IS FOREVER

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Things posted on Facebook can be deleted, but even if you delete something, someone else may have already taken a screen-shot or shared it, in which case, you now have no control over where your image or words can go. If you do maintain a Facebook account, consider carefully what you decide to share. Could your post be detrimental to your reputation or career? Avoid posting compromising photos or information.

IT MAKES YOU FEEL BAD ABOUT YOURSELF Actively using Facebook can adversely affect your mental health. A study done by the Department of Behavioral Science at Utah Valley University found that using Facebook regularly caused study participants to view their own lives more negatively. People generally present only the highlights of their lives on Facebook, which causes Facebook users to compare their lows with others’ highs. The study found that “those spending more time on Facebook each week agreed more that others were happier and had better lives.”

In the end, Zuckerberg does deserve some applause for creating such a great tool for connection and entertainment that we’ve all benefitted from (for free). However, the above points ought to be taken into serious consideration when deciding whether or not to keep your Facebook profile. Sources: Businessinsider.com. Bloomberg.com, money.cnn.com, mensjournal. com, entrepreneur.com

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HAPPY “THAN “Sometimes in order to be happy in the present moment, you have to be willing to give up all hopes for a better past.” - Robert Holden

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NKSFORGIVING” W RITTEN BY S H ERLY S UL AI M AN

For many of us, spending time with certain family members can reopen old emotional wounds, even if we thought the scar tissues had healed for good. The holidays seem to be a particularly vulnerable time for old scars and delicate hearts. It is during these times of joy and giving, that we need to also be generous when it comes to forgiving. Everyone has at least one person they still need to truly forgive. We may know intellectually that forgiving is ultimately better for us, but unfortunately we don’t always practice what we know to be better. While we’re constantly letting go when we excuse friends, colleagues or strangers for irritating or even offensive behaviors, when it comes to certain family members or loved ones, letting go may not come so easily. There is an aunt in my family (I’ll call her Wendy) who “means well” when she criticizes our appearance, our significant other, our work, or other things she finds counter to her strong opinions.

Her untimely remarks can feel like her pumpkin pies, presented as something sweet, but after several servings, we’re left with an ache and a heaviness in our belly that’s hard to digest. Many of us have an “Aunt Wendy” in our lives. Unfortunately, it can be the actual person or simply a reminder of them that can emotionally trigger us. During holiday gatherings, we’re often exposed to other people’s issues, as well as the dynamic of various relationships, and our own issues. Now that can be a LOT of issues in one room. It’s hardly surprising that people experience so much stress, anxiety and depression during the holidays. We need to access some mental and emotional tools to prepare us for these gatherings. Most of us know that we want to cultivate calmness, stability, detachment and healthy boundaries, especially with our families. Sometimes, we overlook that the key to unlocking the doors to these powerful tools is forgiveness. And other times, we simply resist it. Why?

THERE ARE SEVERAL POSSIBLE REASONS 1. We think it means condoning the “bad” behavior that hurt us. 2. We see it as a threat to our values. For example, forgiving someone for cheating on us may unconsciously represent a compromise to the value we place on loyalty or honesty. 3. We may feel forgiveness makes us appear weak or “the loser.” 4. We lose a form of protection that prevents us from being hurt in the same way again.

Sherly Sulaiman is an internationally renowned clinical hypnotherapist and NeuroLinguistic Programming (NLP) practitioner. She resides in Los Angeles and sees patients at her Santa Monica facility, New Stress Relief (www.NewStressRelief.com).

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None of these are true. Forgiveness sets us free emotionally and mentally. It allows us to see people for who they are and not who they were or who they remind us of. We can enjoy the present moment as it is, unburdened by fears of the past. This helps make gatherings with family and loved ones an enjoyable experience, from an authentic place. We can decide to let things go, the same way we do on a daily basis with friends, colleagues and strangers. During challenging “forgiveness crossroads,” I tell my clients to consider

these two questions: “Is my desire for happiness and harmony stronger than my attachment to my past suffering?” And, “Is it more important for me to have peace or to be right?” Forgiveness allows us to choose peace, happiness and harmony over resentment and fear. When we let things go from a space of love and compassion, it’s easier to understand that “Aunt Wendy” is who she is and is simply doing the best she can. We appreciate the time and effort she took to bake those pies…and we enjoy every bite.

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W R I T T E N B Y K AT H L E E N M . Z E L MAN, MPH , R D, L D

A THINNER THANKSG

Thanksgiving only comes around once a year, so why not go ahead and splurge? Because gaining weight during the holiday season is a national pastime. Year after year, most of us pack on at least a pound (some gain more) during the holidays — and keep the extra weight permanently. But Thanksgiving does not have to sabotage your weight, experts say. With a little know-how, you can satisfy your desire for traditional favorites and still enjoy a guilt-free Thanksgiving feast. After all, being stuffed is a good idea only if you are a turkey!

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GET ACTIVE

Make fitness a family adventure, recommends Susan Finn, PhD, RD, chair

Create a calorie deficit by exercising

of the American Council on Fitness

to burn off extra calories before you

and Nutrition: "Take a walk early in the

ever indulge in your favorite foods,

day and then again after dinner. It is a

suggests Connie Diekman, MEd, RD,

wonderful way for families to get physical

former president of the American

activity and enjoy the holiday together."

Dietetic Association (ADA).

EAT BREAKFAST

"'Eat less and exercise more' is the

While you might think it makes sense

winning formula to prevent weight

to save up calories for the big meal,

gain during the holidays," Diekman

experts say eating a small meal in the

says. "Increase your steps or lengthen

morning can give you more control

your fitness routine the weeks ahead

over your appetite. Start your day with

and especially the day of the feast."

a small but satisfying breakfast — such

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DIET & WEIGHT MANAGEMENT

IVING

"There is more sugar and fat in most recipes than is needed, and no one will

SLOWLY SAVOR

notice the difference if you skim calories

Eating slowly, putting your fork

by using lower calorie ingredients," says

down between bites, and tasting

Diekman.

each mouthful is one of the easiest ways to enjoy your meal and feel

Enjoy the holiday feast without the guilt—or the weight gain.

HER SUGGESTIONS:

satisfied with one plate full of food,

Use fat-free chicken broth to baste the

experts say. Choosing whole grains,

turkey and make gravy.

fruits, vegetables, broth-based soups,

Use sugar substitutes in place of sugar and/

salads, and other foods with lots of

or fruit purees instead of oil in baked goods.

water and fiber add to the feeling of

Reduce oil and butter wherever you can.

fullness.

Try plain yogurt or fat-free sour cream in creamy dips, mashed potatoes, and

Spread out the food and fun all day

casseroles.

long. At the Finn family Thanksgiving

POLICE YOUR PORTIONS Thanksgiving tables are bountiful and beautiful displays of traditional family favorites. Before you fill your plate, survey the buffet table and decide what you're going to choose. Then select reasonable-sized portions of foods you cannot live without. Don't waste your calories on foods that you can have all

after a walk, while watching a movie together. "We eat midday, and instead of another meal at dinnertime, we continue the feast with dessert a few hours after the main meal," Finn explains.

year long. Fill your plate with small

BE REALISTIC

portions of holiday favorites that only

The holiday season is a time for

come around once a year so you can

celebration. With busy schedules

enjoy desirable, traditional foods.

and so many extra temptations, this

SKIP THE SECONDS. Try to resist the temptation to go back for second helpings. Leftovers are much better the next day, and if you limit

as an egg with a slice of whole-wheat

yourself to one plate, you are less likely

toast, or a bowl of whole-grain cereal

to overeat and have more room for a

with low-fat milk -- so you won't

delectable dessert.

be starving when you arrive at the gathering. Eating a nutritious meal

gathering, they schedule dessert

is a good time to strive for weight maintenance instead of weight loss. "Shift from a mindset of weight loss to weight maintenance," says Finn. "You will be ahead of the game if you can avoid gaining any weight over the holidays."

FOCUS ON FAMILY AND FRIENDS

with protein and fiber before you arrive

CHOOSE THE BEST BUFFET BETS.

takes the edge off your appetite and

While each of us has our own favorites,

delicious bounty of food. It's a time

allows you to be more discriminating in

keep in mind that some holiday foods are

to celebrate relationships with family

your food and beverage choices.

better choices than others. White turkey

and friends.

LIGHTEN UP

Thanksgiving is not just about the

meat, plain vegetables, roasted sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, defatted

"The main event should be family

Whether you are hosting Thanksgiving

gravy, and pumpkin pie tend to be the

and friends socializing, spending

dinner or bringing a few dishes to

best bets because they are lower in fat and

quality time together, not just what

share, make your recipes healthier with

calories. But, if you keep your portions

is on the buffet," says Finn.

less fat, sugar, and calories.

small, you can enjoy whatever you like.

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November 2015

27


ORDEAL:(

THE MEAL

DIETARY NEEDS

HOLIDAY MEALS

The first Thanksgiving after Alice Bast learned she couldn’t eat gluten, she devised a strategy for the perfect family gathering—a color-coded Thanksgiving where one color of plate indicated glutenfree and another the remaining dishes.

T

BY E M M A P E N RO D

oday, when she hosts a holiday meal, everything served is free of gluten. But every family is different, she says.

What so many diverse families across America have in common, however, is a shared sense of holiday meal anxiety, the product of intense pressure to offer a picture-perfect family experience. Meal-centric holidays such as Thanksgiving can be especially frustrating for those with specific dietary needs—such as those who are diabetic or who don’t eat meat or gluten—but a little preparation can go a long way toward ensuring everyone enjoys family traditions to the fullest.

Boot the Gluten: But what

about Grandma’s stuffing?

Thanksgiving is a difficult holiday for the estimated three million Americans with Celiac Disease—a digestive condition that damages the intestine whenever gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye, is ingested—and to those

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who are otherwise avoiding gluten. “You want to eat—it’s tradition,” says Bast, who after being diagnosed founded the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness". But then you turn to the dinner table. Turkey with stuffing is out. Pumpkin pie is out. The mashed potatoes are probably ok, but not with gravy. “Gluten can be hidden,” Bast says. “Gravy may have flour in it. Serving spoons—you have to be sure they don’t get dipped in a gluten-containing dish and then back into a gluten free one.” Those planning to travel for Thanksgiving should bring a “signature dish,” Bast recommends. It doesn’t have to be complicated, but could be as simple as a platter with veggies and hummus, or an apple crisp. Similar rules apply for hosting gluten-free Thanksgiving meals, Bast says. Keep recipes simple, and practice cooking each dish in advance to avoid making something new for the first time. Focus on vegetable- and protein-based dishes, and consider getting a gluten-free pie crust and substituting gluten-free bread in the family’s favorite stuffing recipe. And in any situation, make family the priority. “Instead of focusing on the food you can’t have,” Bast says, “focus on making it a fun gathering for the family.”

A Diabetes Dilemma: Turkey

Thanksgiving without the Turkey? Move over, Meat. For those who do not or cannot eat meat, Thanksgiving’s celebrated turkey centerpiece is problematic. However, Thanksgiving is an otherwise vegetarian-friendly holiday, according to John Cunningham, a consumer research manager at the Vegetarian Resource Group. “Thanksgiving is one of the easy holidays because there are so many traditional side dishes,” Cunningham says. “One can focus on those side dishes and still enjoy the meal.” In some cases, it may be best to offer to bring a dish—that might help to take some pressure off of the host, Cunningham adds. If you’re a vegetarian host, pleasing a crowd that expects a traditional centerpiece can be more difficult, especially if the rest of the family’s not sold on tofurky. But it’s nothing a little creativity can’t remedy. “It doesn’t necessarily have to be a protein roast to bring the meal together,” Cunningham says. He suggests trying a stuffed pumpkin in the place of a stuffed turkey. “Pumpkin is an impressive vegetable, and it has a really mild flavor that most people won’t object to and that does a really good job of absorbing other flavors.” More important, Cunningham says, “you need to focus on the people, not the plate.”

and four sides of carbs

“One of the concerns for people with diabetes is the need to regulate their intake of carbohydrates,” says Sandy Kipp, a dietetics master’s candidate doing supervised work under registered dietician Rhonda O’Brien. The difficulty with Thanksgiving, she explains, is that most traditional components of the meal are loaded with carbs. Rather than eliminating entire categories of food, those with diabetes need to monitor their portion sizes and carbohydrate exchanges, Kipp says. The best strategy for the 25.8 million Americans with diabetes is to prioritize which dishes they most want to try and to balance carbs with protein and fiber. Be mindful, and select a few small sides with some turkey and non-starchy vegetables. “Observe what is in front of you, how hungry you are, and start light on the plate,” Kipp says. “Pick your very favorites, instead of having a serving of each.” For dessert, cooks can oftentimes cut the amount of sugar in recipes by up to half, or by substituting some applesauce instead, without negatively impacting the flavor, Kipp advises. Apple pie can always be made with juice concentrate instead of sugar. But the best plan might be a slice of oldfashioned pumpkin pie. “Pumpkin pie is actually a very healthy dessert that can be made light on sugar,” Kipp says.

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"Pumpkin pie is actually a very healthy dessert that can be made

light on sugar"

November 2015

29


confidential 30 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

HOLIDAY BATT

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HEALTH TLE PLAN HOW TO GET ON THE OFFENSIVE WHEN IT COMES TO OVEREATING Holiday memories are great—except for the ones that remain in your love handles. The holidays are about family, fun and food, and we shun anything that tries to take away from those joys. But we also worry about our weight during the festive time of the year, which can take the pleasure out of family meals. These meals should warm the heart, not make you feel guilty. The solution? Have a battle plan.

SCOUT IT OUT

Yes, soldier, the first step in winning any battle is to survey the field to know what you’re up against. Upon arriving at a dinner party, potluck or buffet, don’t immediately attack the deliciousness in front of you. Get a drink, chat it up and inspect the table. Reconnaissance will help you avoid eating foods you don’t like, which is a big-time holiday health nemesis. Besides, it’s a big downer to fill your stomach with things you don’t really want when so many other good foods are available. In addition, examining the table will help you avoid overloading your plate. The more we put on our plates, the more we eat. Pick and choose the foods you want in reasonable portions, remembering to be somewhat balanced nutritionally.

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WHERE ARE THE SNIPERS?

Festive foods aren’t necessarily unhealthy. Oftentimes it’s what’s on top that hurts. Gravy, cream sauce, whipped cream and things of this nature are especially unhealthy. But a family dinner without these things is certainly a drab idea, so we aren’t saying avoid them altogether. Just be aware of them and try to be reasonable. Remember that simply limiting calories may not be sufficient planning. The source of calories you get may be just as important.

SURPRISE ATTACK!

You just ate an hour ago, but that toffee on the table is looking irresistible. It’s a snack attack, and you aren’t ready. We love snacking, especially during the holidays when snacks are better than any other time of year. But snacking can lead to overeating. Sometimes if we snack too much then we skip meals, going all T-Rex when we finally eat again. Here are some solutions: • • •

Give away leftovers to friends and family. Chew gum in between meals Put it away. Easy access to food leads to snacking.

COUNTERATTACK: DESSERT

You’ve handled yourself well for the main course, but here comes dessert, and it has a power that may be invincible.

Some suggest eating dessert first, because it can lower the total calories taken in for the meal. It’s probably true, if you think about it. Usually we stuff our faces with the main meal, and then tack on dessert even though we’re already full. Eating dessert first can curb overeating. Lora Erickson, a professional fitness coach in northern Utah, recommends a 90/10 rule, where 90 percent of eating is smart, and 10 percent of eating is free. Why so strict? “It simply doesn't feel good to overindulge and the body usually rebels,” she said. “As always, it's about balance." As a side note, remember that “lite” holiday desserts aren’t much healthier than the real thing and often taste much worse.

ON YOUR FEET, SOLDIER

Holiday pounds often come not just from food, but from being sedentary. Whether it’s the football game or a long fireside chat, we spend extensive amounts of time on our bottoms. It’s a smart idea to get the family out the door after or before meals. Take a stroll to find the prettiest fall-colored trees, build a snowman, or do one of a hundred other things to counterbalance the diet that comes with festivities. At night, have a family dance or play an active game.

Maybe we will never call the holiday diet “healthy,” but with a little organization and planning, the longterm effects of holiday eating become insignificant, especially if the focus on good diet is year-round. November 2015

31


eat right new & easy

Chickpea & Rice Soup with a Little Kale SERVES 6 3⁄4  c up cashews, soaked in water for 2 hours or overnight 2 tablespoons olive oil 1

 edium-size yellow onion, thinly m sliced

3  cloves garlic, minced 1

teaspoon dried rosemary

3⁄4 teaspoon dried thyme 1

teaspoon salt Freshly ground black pepper

3⁄4 cup uncooked rice, rinsed 3

ribs celery, thinly sliced

1

cup carrot, diced chunky

5

cups vegan vegetable broth

1

( 24-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed (about 3 cups)

4

cups chopped kale Thinly sliced green onion, for garnish 1. Drain the cashews and place them in a blender or food processor with 1 cup of fresh water. Blend until completely smooth, scraping the sides with a spatula occasionally to make sure you get everything. This could take 1 to 5 minutes, depending on the strength of your blender. 2. Heat a stockpot over medium heat. Sauté the onion in the olive oil, with a pinch of salt, for about 5 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, rosemary, thyme, salt, and pepper and sauté for a minute more. 3. Add the rice, celery, and carrot and then pour in the broth. Cover and bring to a boil. Once boiling, bring the heat down to a simmer, add the chickpeas, and let cook for about 15 more minutes, until the rice is cooked and the carrot is tender. 4. Add the cashew cream and kale and simmer until the kale is wilted, 3 to 5 more minutes. You may need to add water to thin the soup if it seems too thick. Taste for salt and seasonings and let sit for 10 minutes or so to allow the flavors to marry. Serve topped with green onions.

This soup thickens as it cools, so if you have leftovers, just thin with a little water when you reheat.

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Invite a friend over, break some bread (olive sourdough spoken here), and inhale big bowlfuls of comfort like this one: chewy rice and succulent chickpeas, fragranced with rosemary, thyme, and celery, pulled together by luscious cashew cream. And, of course, I throw in a little kale at the end for good measure. Lacinato holds its bite, but you can use whatever kale tickles your fancy.

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These are really fast and yummy. The jalapeño and red pepper make the pancakes colorful and add just a little spice. Serve with salsa or as a breakfast side dish in place of potatoes. A cast-iron skillet works best for even frying.

Fresh Corn Fritters MAKES 15 FRITTERS 6 ounces extra-firm silken tofu (1⁄2 package of the vacuum-packed kind) 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup 2 tablespoons unsweetened almond milk (or preferred nondairy milk) 1⁄4 cup all-purpose flour 3 ears corn, kernels cut from the cob (about 11⁄2 cups) (see “Fizzle says”) 1⁄4 teaspoon salt A few dashes of freshly ground black pepper 1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and very finely chopped 1⁄4 cup red bell pepper, very finely chopped Refined coconut oil for frying

INSTRUCTIONS In a blender or food processor, whiz the tofu, maple syrup, milk, and flour, scraping down the sides often with a rubber spatula, until everything is smooth. Add half of the corn (3⁄4 cup) and pulse so that the mixture is blended but still a bit chunky. Transfer to a bowl and add the remaining corn, salt, black pepper, jalapeño, and bell pepper, and combine well. Heat a thin layer of oil in a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Drop the batter by tablespoonfuls into the skillet. Flatten a little with the back of the spoon (wet the spoon first to avoid sticking). Cook in batches, 21⁄2 to 3 minutes on each side, until lightly browned. When done, transfer to a brown paper bag or paper towels to drain the oil.

TIP

To cut the corn from the cob, place the shucked corn pointy side up on a kitchen or paper towel. Take a chef’s knife and cut downward, as close as you can to the cob. The towel will keep the corn kernels from bouncing everywhere and also makes a handy vehicle for transporting them to the mixing bowl. http://www.amazon.com/Vegan-Vengeance10th-Anniversary-Edition/dp/0738218332

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November 2015

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FOOD

5

Tips for Foolproof Fondue Fun THERE’S NOT MUCH TO DISLIKE ABOUT A VAT OF DELICIOUS MELTED CHEESE, UNLESS YOU’RE LACTOSE INTOLERANT. FONDUE HAS LONG BEEN A FAVORITE PARTY TREAT AND GREAT DATE NIGHT FUN. IF YOU’VE NEVER HAD FONDUE OR NEVER BEEN ABLE TO DO IT YOURSELF, HERE’S YOUR CHANCE TO LEARN ALL ABOUT HOW TO DO FONDUE RIGHT.

1. CHEESE

2. BASE

Not all cheese is created equal. Picking the right cheese is the first step to fondue success. Gruyère, Swiss, or Cheddar are all great options. These cheeses have a robust, but not overpowering, flavor that pairs well many different foods.

3. VARIETY

A good base goes a long way. Every fondue needs a good base to give it the right consistency. Acidic wines, such as white wines, pair very well with fondue. If you prefer to make yours without alcohol, substitute milk with 2-3 tbsp. of lemon juice for the added acidity.

There’s beauty in variety. Even though bread is the traditional dipping food of choice, don’t be afraid to branch out. Try vegetables like broccoli, carrots, cauliflower or cornichons, fruits like Granny Smith apples or pears, or different kinds of breads like pretzels.

4. CONSISTENCY Consistency is key. The consistency of your cheese fondue, as already mentioned, can make or break the dish. Achieving the right consistency requires more than just melting cheese in a pot. You’ll need to use a thickener to get your fondue just right. Shredding your cheese and tossing it lightly in some flour or cornstarch should give your fondue the consistency of warm honey when it’s ready.

5. PATIENCE PATIENCE IS A VIRTUE. Don’t add the cheese all at once. Adding the cheese gradually and monitoring the cheese as it’s melting will give your fondue a finer, smoother consistency. The amount of cheese you’ll use may differ slightly from the recipe. You might not need all the cheese or you might need more. Going slow is the best way to make sure you get just enough for the perfect dish.

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TRADITIONAL FOODS WORTH REVISITING YEAR-ROUND Turkey is a given. Not only is it great for Thanksgiving, but it’s great for your health, and as such it’s fortunate that turkey is part of America’s year-round cuisine. But some of turkey’s fruit and vegetable companions are often neglected, despite their healthy potential.

Here we’ve listed some of the best foods from holiday traditions all across America, along with their suggested uses, both traditional and year-round.

Pumpkin Pumpkin pie is far from the most sinful dessert available. On the contrary, pumpkin is one of the most nutritious foods available, being an excellent source of vitamins A, B, C and E, iron, potassium, thiamin, folate, and riboflavin, among other nutrients. And raw pumpkin offers all this for only 30 calories per each fat-free, cup-sized serving. Of course, pumpkin can be served without the added sugars and fats that come along with most pie recipes. Instead of pie, try serving it as an appetizer as a warm cup of pumpkin soup. At many grocery stores, small raw pumpkins are often sold alongside other varieties of winter squash, and they can be served the same way. Leftovers can be turned into a puree, which can in turn be used to fill ravioli, mixed into a soup, or added to breads. In Thai cuisine, it’s even served in curry.

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Plums Plums make an annual appearance around Christmas, usually in the shape of puddings, pies and pastries. But for less than 80 calories per cup-sized serving, plums bring vitamins A, C and K into your diet. They don’t have to be baked or sweetened, but serve can serve instead as a base for marinades on chicken or pork.

Turnips & Rutabagas Though the specific name for rutabaga varies from region to region, this peculiar, pale vegetable is a frequent—and remarkably healthy—addition to many holiday meals, particularly in the eastern United States. Here you will find vitamins B and C, Thiamin, Calcium and fiber, and less than 50 calories per cup. For Thanksgiving, turnips are generally served boiled and mashed, like potatoes, and mixed with apples and brown sugar for a sweeter dish or with other root vegetables, rosemary and butter. But they also make for wholesome, cheap ingredients year-round: in the fall, baked in a variety of gratins or added to potato soup, or sliced and served raw over salad for summer. Another under utilized root vegetable worth trying, to throw something new into the mix, is celeriac, also known as celery root for its similar taste to the more familiar vegetable. Both celery and celery root boast high quantities of vitamins C and K, fiber and potassium, for a minimal number of calories.

Sweet Potatoes Sweet potatoes are usually reserved for casseroles served Thanksgiving Day. Recently, however, they have begun making perennial appearances in popular American cuisine, and for good reason: sweet potatoes pack an extremely high amount of vitamin A—nearly 400% the average daily requirement—plus fiber and potassium. Traditionally, they’re served with brown sugar and butter, or, more recently, fried, though neither of these is the best option, since raw sweet potato alone is relatively high in calories, with more than 100 per cup serving. But sweet potatoes are just as good as russets when baked or mashed and served with a light topping like chives. Still more interesting combinations can be found if you’re willing to be creative. For example, ginger and soy will offer an unexpected Asian twist.

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Persimmons Here’s an unusual fruit for those looking to spice up their traditions with something new. The persimmon is more popular in Japan, but it has found a niche market in Indiana, where it is frequently served as persimmon pudding for Thanksgiving. High in both vitamin C and iron, with only 30 calories per cup, this is worth a second glance. It should be noted that there are two major categories of persimmons—a sweet kind, and another that is intensely bitter. Persimmons are best when soft, so plan on making time for them to ripen up. In fact, some unripe persimmons are inedible. In America, persimmons are used almost exclusively in baked goods such as cakes, cookies and pies, but in Japan, they are often eaten raw, or dried. In the case of the former, the top is cut off, and the insides scooped out with a spoon. A few modern salad recipes call for persimmon.

Cranberries If you avoid the sugary, jellied variety, the vitamin C content of cranberries alone makes these worthwhile. In addition to more than 14 mg of vitamin C per serving, cranberries also offer high quantities of fiber, plus vitamins E and K. But naturally, cranberries are exceptionally bitter, so they can be difficult to eat raw. Nonetheless, with a little sugar, they blend nicely with oranges, apples and pomegranate. Year round, try them baked into breads and muffins with orange or lemon zest.

Butternut Squash Like pumpkin—perhaps because they are so closely related—butternut squash offers a plethora of nutrients for minimal calories, only 63 per one-cup servings. This squash is packed with vitamins A, B, C and E, plus potassium, fiber, calcium and others. Around the holidays, it’s usually served pureed, with warm flavors such as brown sugar and nutmeg. But there’s no reason to avoid butternut squash year-round. In the summer, it can be served grilled, or cubed and served with Provençal flavors such as garlic, parsley and oil.

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Vegetable Paella This version of the traditional Spanish dish is quick and simple. 11⁄2 cups 1⁄2 tsp 1 tbsp 1⁄4 cup 1⁄2 cup 1⁄4 cup 1⁄4 cup 1⁄4 cup 1. 2.

3. 4.

water or homemade vegetable stock ground turmeric olive oil chopped onion medium-grain rice, rinsed chopped green bell pepper chopped red bell pepper frozen peas

In a measuring cup, whisk together water and turmeric. In a skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add onion and cook, stirring, until tender, about 3 minutes. Stir in rice, green pepper, red pepper, peas and stock mixture; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, until rice is tender and liquid is absorbed, about 15 minutes. Transfer to blender and purée on high speed to desired consistency. Makes about 2 cups (500 mL)

Tips Combining vitamin C–rich foods with iron-rich foods helps the body absorb more iron. Red peppers are rich in vitamin C, and enriched rice is a good source of iron.

Nutritional Info (per 1/4 cup): Calories: 74 Fiber: 1 g Carbs: 11 g Fat: 2 g Protein: 3 g Iron: 1 mg Vit. C: 15 mg Excerpted from The Smoothies Bible, 2nd Edition by Pat Crocker © 2011 Robert Rose Inc. www.robertrose.ca Reprinted with publisher permission. All rights reserved.

Squash Special Smoothie Serves 2 or 3 1⁄2 cup 1 cup potato 1⁄4 cup 1⁄4 tsp 1⁄4 tsp Pinch

apple juice cooked squash or sweet chopped apricots ground turmeric cayenne pepper ground cumin

In a blender, combine apple juice, squash, apricots, turmeric, cayenne and cumin. Secure lid and blend (from low to high if using a variable speed blender) until smooth.

Squash for Baby • • • • •

Cut squash in half Place cut squash side-by-side, cut side down in a baking dish, the dish filled with about half an inch of water. Bake at 350 degrees, until the flesh is soft when pierced with a knife. Scoop out flesh, puree. Mash with fork if flesh is soft enough. With leftover squash, freeze it into cubes with an ice cube tray. Put frozen cubes in a freezer bag, and use as needed.

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Excerpted from Blender Baby Food, Second Edition by Nicole Young © 2005, 2011 Robert Rose Inc. www.robertrose.ca Reprinted with publisher permission. All rights reserved.

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Udders or Almonds

COW’S MILK If you’re not allergic or lactose intolerant, cow’s milk is the most nutritious choice, says Trish. It’s high in protein, calcium and vitamin D and it’s a complete protein, meaning it contains all of the essential amino acids.

Things to consider:

Children under the age of two should drink whole milk or vitamin D because they need the extra fat to help their brains and bodies develop. Anyone above the age of two should opt for a lower fat milk, like one or two percent.

Which milk carton should we reach for?

“I recommend avoiding skim milk all together,” says Trish. “There is little to no nutritional benefit from drinking skim milk. People who drink low fat milk verses skim milk tend to maintain a lower body weight.”

WRITTEN BY H ALLI T IN T I

Got milk? Yes we do

and plenty of it! From cow’s milk to almond milk and everything in between, how do we know which carton to reach for at the grocery store? Registered Dietician Trish Brimhall with Nutritious Intent says it’s all in the milk’s label. Trish says you don’t have to drink milk, but you do need calcium and milk is the easiest way to get it. Let’s look at the five most common types of milk you see in your local dairy isle.

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nutrition

SOY MILK

ALMOND MILK

Soy milk comes in second best behind cow’s milk, says Trish. It provides a considerable amount of protein and is generally a great tasting option.

Almond milk is thicker in texture and better tasting than most other varieties of milk. It is naturally a great source of calcium, but contains less protein than soy milk.

Things to consider:

Make sure your check the soy milk label for at least a 25-percent daily value of vitamin D and calcium. Unless the label states “unsweetened” you can assume it has already been sweetened. Unsweetened soy milk will have a notso-sweet bean-like taste.

Things to consider:

Make sure that the almond milk you buy is fortified with vitamin D, although it will already be high in calcium.

HEMP MILK RICE MILK Rice milk is thinner in texture than other varieties of milk. It tastes great, but buyer beware: this milk does not contain enough protein to meet your daily needs and contains the highest amount of carbohydrates. While rice milk is no nutritional star, however, it is the closest milk to cow’s milk in both appearance and taste, says Trish.

Things to consider:

Make sure the rice milk in your grocery cart is fortified with at least 25-percent daily value of protein and calcium. Drinking rice milk is basically drinking fortified carbohydrates. You will not get the protein content that cow’s milk provides.

This newly popular drink provides a great source of protein, however, it is not a substitute for cow’s milk. It’s gritty and most people don’t love the plant-like taste.

Things to consider:

Be sure to check the label for protein, calcium and vitamin D content, all of which are common reasons for needing milk in our diet, says Trish.

GOAT’S MILK Goats rival cows, when it comes to milk. Goat’s milk has more calcium than skim cow’s milk, and more potassium. It is also a good source of phosphorous.

Things to consider:

Goat’s milk isn’t an alternative for anyone with more than a mild lactose intolerance. Furthermore, it carries more calories per cup than cow’s milk. The best advice may be to drink goat’s milk, but to drink it sparingly. At the end of the day, your choice of milk has to come down to what tastes good. Trish says, you won’t put in your mouth what you don’t like. Find a type of milk you like and stick with it, and don’t beat yourself up over that tablespoon of chocolate flavoring you know you love to add. The health benefits of drinking milk far outweigh the sugar content.

Harvard Researchers found in a study of 12,829 kids ages 9 to 14 from across the country that

"Contrary to our hypothesis, skim and 1% milk were associated with weight gain, but dairy fat was not." This is because fat helps you feel full and will curb your appetite and help you make better nutrition choices throughout the day.

For more tips on which milk is best for you, visit www.nutritiousintent.com

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November 2015

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HFCS:

The Super Sweetener in Everything I

t’s everywhere! If you check the food labels in your own grocery cart, chances are, many of the items there will contain high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). So why is HFCS so prevalent? The molecules in this sweetener are structured slightly differently than cane sugar molecules which make HFCS great to cook with because it gives foods a moist texture, beautifully browns baked goods, creates a lower freezing point for really cold drinks, and it makes foods taste sweeter because the sugars in HFCS more easily ferment than table sugar.

WHY IT’S WORSE THAN SUGAR

Proponents of HFCS argue that it is similar to table sugar so it is digested the same way. If it’s so similar, then why does it react differently in baking and taste different in drinks? The structures between cane or beet sugar and HFCS are very similar, but not identical. Scientists explain that “as a result of the manufacturing process for high-fructose corn syrup, the fructose molecules in the sweetener are free and unbound, ready for absorption and utilization,” as opposed to cane and beet sugar molecules which are all bound to other glucose molecules. This extra bond requires that sucrose (beet and cane sugar) must go through another metabolic step before it can be used by the body. This distinction might make all the difference if HFCS is all being immediately stored as fat. A Princeton University research team has demonstrated that all sweeteners are not equal when it comes to weight gain: Rats with access to high-fructose corn syrup gained significantly more weight than those with access to table sugar, even when their overall caloric intake was the same. In addition to causing significant weight gain in lab animals, long-term consumption of high-fructose corn syrup also led to abnormal increases

42 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

in body fat, especially in the abdomen, and a rise in circulating blood fats called triglycerides. The researchers say the work sheds light on the factors contributing to obesity trends in the United States. "Some people have claimed that highfructose corn syrup is no different than other sweeteners when it comes to weight gain and obesity, but our results make it clear that this just isn't true, at least under the conditions of our tests," said psychology professor Bart Hoebel, who specializes in the neuroscience of appetite, weight and sugar addiction at Princeton University. "When rats are drinking high-fructose corn syrup at levels well below those in soda pop, they're becoming obese—every single one, across the board. Even when rats are fed a high-fat diet, you don't see this; they don't all gain extra weight."

THE ECONOMICS OF OBESITY

HFCS is infiltrating so many foods because it is cheaper and sweeter: just what the food corporations want. “Beginning in the late 1970s, the U.S. instituted tariffs that drove up the price of sugar. By coincidence, a few years later, the corn subsidy started driving down the price of corn. The combination suddenly made HFCS a great deal for food producers. Beginning in the mid1980s, the sweetener started working its way into foods, and within a few years, it was showing up in thousands of products—contributing thousands of empty calories a week to the average American diet,” wrote Daily Finance journalist Bruce Wilson.

Foods to check for HFCS: Soda Fruit juice Cereal Bread Yogurt Peanut Butter Mayonnaise

According to the Center for Disease Control, today, about one-third of American adults are obese. HFCS may be contributing to this dangerous trend because it is in so many common foods that could use more natural sweeteners. Don’t end up like the lab rats and check the food you’re taking home!

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE

-------------------------------ADVISOR CLIENT CONTENT

Relocating? Here are some key things to consider IF YOU WERE OFFERED A JOB IN ANOTHER CITY—OR YOUR CURRENT EMPLOYER ASKED YOU TO RELOCATE—WOULD YOU MAKE THE MOVE? There are a lot of things to consider when you decide to relocate- cost to rent, new city, new friends, etc. In addition to all these, people with allergies and asthma have to also worry about the weather and pollen in the area. For example, if you were to move in late summer, ragweed season has started in some parts of the country. It usually starts in mid-August and peaks around early September. People with asthma and allergies, who are sensitive to ragweed, can start feeling the symptoms by late summer. Ragweed is most commonly found in Midwest and the eastern states. A single plant can produce up to 1 billion pollen grains. The pollen can travel up to 400 miles!!! Ragweed sensitive individuals notice increased sneezing, stuffy or runny nose, itchy eyes and scratchy throat, which can affect the quality of life tremendously. Asthma attacks, headaches, difficulty sleeping and chronic sinus infections can also be present in very sensitive individuals with uncontrolled allergic rhinitis patients. Obviously, there are many other seasonal allergies to be aware of when you move out of your area.

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CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING IF YOUR MOVE IS GOING TO TAKE YOU OUT OF STATE: •

Familiarize yourself to the pollen/allergens present in your new area of location. Then, identify your individual sensitivity to those environmental allergens by visiting a board-certified allergist in your area. Discuss a personalized action plan. The allergist can help identify and treat symptoms, and sometimes, suggest allergen immunotherapy – such as allergy shots or under-the-tongue sublingual tablets – and medication – either oral or nasal or both routes.

Packing and unpacking for the move can expose you to dust. Use a mask to prevent yourself the best you can. Try sinus rinse or use allergy medications (as suggested by your allergist) to help you with symptoms.

Find out if your newly rented or owned apartment or house had any cats or dogs from the previous tenants or house owners. If you are sensitive to animal dander, this could be serious trouble for you, especially if you have asthma. It takes 4-6 months to “de-cat” or “de-dog” a house. Discuss this with your allergist so a personalized plan can keep you free of symptoms.

When faced with the prospect of relocating, it is very easy to feel overwhelmed. However, if you make a plan, write your goals and determine a timeline, it could easier for you to work towards the move.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Neetu Talreja Dr. Neetu Talreja is a Board Certified Allergist/Immunologist with The Allergy Group, which has locations in Boise, Nampa and Meridian. Learn more from Dr. Talreja at www.theallergygroup.com or call 377-4000

November 2015

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Goodness grows

44 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

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here...

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odwalla.com

November 2015

45


WELLNESS

PERHAPS NOTHING CUTS DEEPER THAN WATCHING YOUR OWN FLESH AND BLOOD MAKE IRRATIONAL, DAMAGING DECISIONS, AND THEN WATCHING THEM SUFFER THE CONSEQUENCES.

There is a feeling of helplessness, mental exhaustion, and despair that mothers and fathers feel watching their adolescent drop into bad habits, academic decline, substance abuse, self-harm and rebellion. For many, advice, punishment, rewards and every other normal parenting tactic seem useless as the child sinks further into a downward spiral.

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Eventually, parents of these children will consider outside intervention. They’ll hear about some book, therapist, wilderness program or residential center for teens, and will begin to investigate. Sending adolescents to a residential treatment center or wilderness program should be a last resort for parents and professionals. Therapy, an accurate diagnosis, medication and less aggressive treatments should be the first approaches when a child is slipping out of control. Many parents haven’t considered that their child may be suffering from mental health problems or learning disabilities, and this is an important first step toward resolution and successful treatment, even if it is in a residential treatment center, according to Teri Brister, PhD, the Director of Programs for Young Families for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). “The reality is that mental health conditions in children usually present themselves as behavioral problems,” she says. “The majority of the time when you have the behavioral issues going on with kids where every intervention under the sun has been tried and it just doesn’t work, there

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SIGNS THAT AN INTERVENTION MIGHT BE NECESSARY

IDENTIFYING A GOOD PROGRAM Here lies one of the biggest problems with adolescent residential therapy and adolescent treatment in general. Reliable, informed advice is hard to come by, in part because the science and best practices are evolving, and because many who feel comfortable giving definitive advice aren’t actually qualified to do so. You’re probably familiar with a common scenario: a teen begins to use drugs, get in trouble with the law and try risky sexual behavior, and parents don’t know what to do. Their doctor throws out the name of a child therapist, a neighbor describes a wilderness therapy program that did wonders for someone else’s child, and the internet provides a fire-hydrant strength stream of choices.

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Old friends are replaced by friends your child doesn’t want you to meet.

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School performance worsens and apathy increases.

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Family conflicts become persistent and worsen.

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The child engages in selfdestructive behavior.

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There is trouble with law enforcement.

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Personal habits change, such as sleeping, eating, hygiene and mood.

The residential treatment program umbrella encompasses a wide variety of treatment options. Many are designed for a specific gender, others for a specific age range. Some programs are designed for specific problems, like drug abuse, depression, anxiety, etc. Others have a heavy outdoor element, and some emphasize education and relationships.

gg

Drug use.

“If you’ve seen one, you’ve seen one,” Brister explains, “and that’s so scary and frustrating for parents who are trying so desperately to find out what their child needs.”

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You fear for the child’s safety.

Asking a parent to choose the right program is like asking a 5-year-old to go find the right part for your car at the auto shop. It’s a new, particularly foreign world, one where a guide is vital for avoiding damaging consequences. The right program can do wonders. The wrong program can be damaging to both your child and your financial wellbeing.

almost always is an underlying mental illness.” When an accurate assessment is made, and less invasive interventions fail, many family health professionals will point to a wilderness or residential program that places a child in a therapeutic environment for an extended amount of time. “The primary deciding factors for families in making the decision about residential care are usually based on their feeling that they can’t provide for the child’s safety and/or the intense level of care necessary for them to remain at home,” Brister says. But for the majority of parents, sending a child out of the home was never in the game plan. Where to get information, where to send a child, and for how long, are questions that most parents don’t know how to answer.

Ou tpa tie nt Int ens ive out In Ho patie me nt Ho spi tal Wil der nes s Res ide nti a The l Trea t rap eut ment ic Bo ard ing Sch Aft ool er Ho me Car e

SPECTRUM OF CARE

INTENSITY STRUCTURE RESTRICTIVENESS Facebook.com/HealthyMag

The truth is that your doctor isn’t likely to know the range of options available for your child, and your neighbor less so. Do you go to your dermatologist for serious questions about your heart health? Likewise, your primary care physician shouldn’t be the primary source of advice about child behavioral or psychological problems and solutions. A family therapist is a better place to start for accurate assessment of what a child is experiencing, and what he or she needs. Therapists may refer you to an independent educational consultant. Educational consultants are familiar with a range of out-of-home treatment options for children, and are generally best equipped to match your child with the right program.

But, as parents and the right professionals collaborate to find the correct program, parents do have the right and the responsibility to ask certain questions.

QUESTIONS PARENTS SHOULD ASK ABOUT RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT OR WILDERNESS PROGRAMS gg What is the treatment regimen? How often does therapy occur? gg What is your success rate? How do you define success? gg How is the family involved, and how often? gg What kind of transition plan is there for children returning home? gg Is this program a member of NATSAP (National Association of Therapeutic Schools and Programs)?* gg How are staff members chosen? gg Can I talk to some previous students/families? *Go to www.natsap.org to see an overview of programs in your area. These questions are based around what research suggests is the most effective approach to residential or wilderness treatment.

A SUCCESSFUL EXPERIENCE Tim Thayne, PhD, founded a teen wilderness program and now leads an in-home therapy program focused on before and after care for those attending residential treatment. In his book Not by Chance: How Parents Boost Their Teen’s Success In and After Treatment, he explains the characteristics of a successful program. “A well-crafted therapeutic milieu (social environment) supercharges the environment to enhance the likelihood and speed of change. The foundation of such an environment is the creation of a safe, relationally warm place where a young person is protected from selfdestructive behavior, unburdened from the “overwhelm” of life, and immersed in a relational climate that invites introspection. Such a place enables young people to look at their choices, their personal limitations, and the outcomes of the strategies they are using, and to recognize their own contributions to their problems and unhappiness.”

CONTINUED ON PAGE 70 >>>>> November 2015

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WELLNESS ATION E IN A REL ’R U O Y S N SIG RCISSIST WITH A NA

SHIP

: terrupts HE OR SHE ation and in rs e v n co s te • Domina tled • Feels enti icism hurt by crit t • Is easily chievemen credit for a re a d by sh ’t n o so • W d is ab rbe n a s m le b our pro • Ignores y n w o their tands their ody unders b o n s k in h • T ’t problems at they don r having wh fo u o y ts n • Rese tes • Manipula

SE N CHA B Y R YA N E T W R IT

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W

e’ve all experienced the frustration of dealing with self-centered individuals, and sometimes we’re the guilty party. Narcissism, which can even reach the severity of a diagnosable personality disorder, takes selfishness to the next level: attention seeking becomes extreme, manipulation defines relationships, and empathy disappears. The term “narcissism” comes from the Greek myth about a warrior, Narcissus, who one day saw his reflection in the water and became so infatuated with himself that he died as a result (depending on the version) by either starvation or suicide. Either way, the myth finishes with the only remains of his presence being the growth of flowers, commonly referred to as the narcissus. Even though the term “narcissist” has evolved into something much greater than self-infatuation, the definition of a narcissist is “a condition characterized by self-preoccupation, lack of empathy, and unconscious deficits.” Ever heard of anyone like this? With approximately 6.2% of the general population having Narcissistic Personality Disorder (about 60% of those are male), everyone will likely encounter a narcissist at some point, or have some narcissistic qualities.

OF THE GENERAL % 6.2 POPULATION WILL

HAVE NARCISSISTIC PERSONALITY DISORDER IN THEIR LIFETIME.

Recognizing narcissism in our loved ones may be difficult, but these qualities are rampant in fairy tales and the intertwined moral lessons. The queen from Snow White and the Seven Dwarves is a great example of narcissism. Instead of trying to find out some viable ways to improve her kingdom, she asks her magical mirror to affirm her beauty. When she doesn’t receive the answer she anticipates, the queen goes to great lengths to kill the girl more beautiful than her just to be the “fairest one of all.” In the end, the queen dies with no avail and was far worse off than when she started. Out of the storybooks and into a real-life situation, Joan Crawford was a narcissist who was also famous on the silver screen. In the book and film, written by Crawford’s daughter Christina, titled “Mommy Dearest,” Christina depicted the respected film actress as a vain and manipulative person who felt as though nothing was enough for her. She consistently wanted perfection and paid no attention to the abuse she dealt to others. In the end, Joan left her daughter Christina with deep resentment, as evidenced by the book.

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Are You A Narcissist? Do you have a lot of friends, but slowly lose interest in them over time? Does everything have to be the way you want it no matter what? Do you frequently look at yourself in the mirror? Do you show off your body? Do you find yourself more capable than others? Would you prefer to be a leader?

If you said yes to any of these questions, find out exactly how narcissistic you are by taking this quiz: psychcentral.com/ quizzes/narcissistic.htm

Joan Crawford and the queen from Snow White shared some common character attributes that can enlighten one’s understanding of narcissism. First was how nothing was ever satisfactory to them, either personally or in their surroundings. Instead of trying to accept that some things are simply out of their control, these narcissists attempt to control them. That is a chief characteristic of a narcissist: control. Sure, they are infatuated with their physical traits, but the act of controlling and manipulating others boosts the narcissist’s self-esteem. Usually, those methods of control are similar to those of a psychopath, meaning they tend to manipulate others, are insecure about themselves, have impulsive behavior, and trivialize mortality. Narcissists will try to devalue you at any means, or attempt to diminish your self-esteem, in an effort to increase themselves theirs. Whether a narcissist is aware of this or not, they will try to make others dependent on them at first, and then remove themselves from supporting those once the link of dependence is established. They will lie and cause others to question themselves, in order to manipulate the situation to their advantage. Most of the time, a narcissist will try to destroy others’ relationships to make greater dependence on the narcissist. Another thing to realize about narcissists is how most of their friendships are fleeting. While watching the Disney rendition of Snow White, you will notice that the queen’s friends are vultures. When the queen fell off the cliff and died, her “friends” swooped down to pick at the remains. Still there are people out there who will love the narcissists, even though they may not like the narcissist. What are the overall effects on those affiliated with a narcissist? As many narcissists will begin to shower their “friends” with attention and care, for others to establish dependence on them, they will eventually take that away, but still want their friends to depend on them. When that happens, the friends may feel like an addict going cold turkey or may experience depression. Depending on the person, they may feel angry and/or hurt. No matter the feeling a friend gets, the narcissist doesn’t care. When addressing narcissism, you need to be able to look at yourself and address the facts. What kind of person are you? How do your actions affect others? Who are the people you find yourself with and what kind of people are they? Learn now if you are a narcissist, and make an effort to be a better person to your friends and loved ones.

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~ beauty

BEAUTY TIPS AS YOU AGE BE CAREFUL OF ADDING TEXTURE

Certain cosmetics add texture to the skin, which isn’t needed for people over 50, who generally already have some texture in their skin. For example, use cream-based cosmetics for the face versus powder, which adds texture. Foundation can also add texture. When picking foundation, seek for coverage rather than texture.

DON’T USE THE MAKEUP T E C H N I Q U E S O F 20 - Y E A R - O L D S

Many women in their 50s disregard the fact that their bodies have changed, and continue to apply makeup as if they were 20 again.This can in fact accentuate age, and cover up what could be a dignified, beautiful and natural appearance. One area in particular that older women make a big mistake is by recreating eyebrows. Don’t try to give yourself the eyebrows of a younger you. As a general rule, the older you get, the less makeup you should wear.This applies especially to blush.

50 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

BE CAREFUL WITH SHADES

With lipstick, eye makeup and more, older people often choose the wrong shade. For example, find a lipstick that matches the shade of your inner lip or gums, or use lip gloss instead of lipstick. Avoid dark lipstick. Don’t use tinted moisturizers. Remember that less is more when it comes to makeup. On this note, those over 50 should consider leaving off eyeshadow altogether, as it can accentuate creases rather than softening them.

P R OT E C T YO U R S E L F

The elements are harsh on those who have a handful of decades under their belt. Avoid too much sun exposure, and wear sunscreen even if it isn’t hot. Use gloves in cold weather to protect the texture and moisture of your hands. Also wear gloves when doing household chores. Dishwashing liquids, for example, can be hard on hands. Moisturize every day. Exercise is also important for healthy appearance and skin.

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LOOK & FEEL YOUR

BEST

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon American Society of Plastic Surgeons ÂŽ

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11762 South State Street, Suite 260 Draper, Utah 84020 November 2015

51


~ beauty

B

reast enhancement has been sought throughout the ages. Not until the modern era and the introduction of the silicone implant have we been able to produce such beautifully enhanced breasts. In fact, some attempts at early breast enlargement include woodcarvings, sponges, injections and so forth. Today, implants have come a long way and are very effective at achieving a beautiful breast. Many new implants have come to market but most recently a unique implant was introduced into the U.S. market by Allergan, the Inspira implant. Inspira is a revolutionary new implant filled with a more cohesive yet softer gel known as Truform. In addition, the implant has a higher fill volume, resulting in a more natural look and feel.

BREAST AUGMENTAT 52 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

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WHO SHOULD CONSIDER BREAST IMPLANTS? I first learned about Inspira impants in the spring of 2013 while attending an international plastic surgery meeting in Eilat, Israel. The Inspira implants have been used in other countries since 1994, and were finally approved by the FDA for use in the U.S. this year. In many ways, they represent a progression in the field of breast enhancement. Since the average fill in every Inspira implant is greater, there is less chance that the implant will ripple or fold. More importantly, a fuller implant yields a more natural look and feel. Inspira implants are designed to be very customizable to the patient. They offer multiple shell and projection options as well as sizes to accommodate virtually every body type, achieving a desirable result. Patients should consult with their plastic surgeon about their options and what is best for them.

Breast implant surgery enhances a woman’s sense of femininity and beauty. Augmentation works to restore lost breast volume once enjoyed or to give a woman the fullness and contour never experienced.

O PT I O NS

Inspira is an excellent option for women looking to replace or revise saline or silicone implants that were placed in the past. Millions of women fall under this category. Cosmetic breast reconstruction done by a trained and experienced plastic surgeon can correct problematic implants and improve appearance drastically.

ST Y LES

Most women are very happy with their breast implants. It has been shown that breast enhancement can positively affect everything from selfimage to social relations to attractiveness. Inspira implants offer an improved option for fullness and natural beauty that previous generations of breast implants have not provided. Inspira breast implants as well as other brands are available at Aesthetica. There are many good options suitable to the needs of all patients. Come visit us at Aesthetica and learn about which options are available to help you achieve your ideal.

TION TODAY Facebook.com/HealthyMag

Breast augmentation should be individualized to each and every patient. With varying gels, projection types and shell textures, every woman can achieve the natural look and feel that she desires.

Inspira breast implants come in a variety of styles, from low and wide to high and narrow in projection. This is important for helping achieve the most natural look possible.

SHELLS The outside SHELL of an implant comes in different varieties. Women can get either smooth or textured implants depending upon the individual needs of the patient. Textured implants may be recommended to reduce potential movement of the implant, which is important with contoured or shaped implants or in subglandular placement to reduce the risk of capsular contracture (scar formation). Smooth implants on the other hand are the most commonly used implants in the U.S. and are typically placed submuscularly to give a more natural feel to the breast.

GELS There are multiple generations of cohesive gels available (e.g. gummy bear). Inspira introduces a new silicone gel that creates a more cohesive implant that remains soft and natural, Truform2.

Kimball M. Crofts, MD

385 West 600 North, #250 Lindon, UT 84042 Phone: 801.785.8825 As a plastic surgeon, my goal is to afford patients with the chance to achieve whatever they want. Whether it’s restoring something they’ve lost or providing them something they’ve never had, I want people to meet the cosmetic needs for every stage of life.

November 2015

53


WELLNESS

Mind the Children MENTAL ILLNESS AMONG CHILDREN IS MORE COMMON THAN WE TREAT IT WRITTEN BY MICHAEL RICHARDSON

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CHILDREN, LIKE ADULTS, HAVE HEART PROBLEMS. THEY HAVE LUNG PROBLEMS. THEY HAVE DIGESTIVE PROBLEMS. IT SHOULD COME AS NO SURPRISE THEN, THAT CHILDREN ALSO EXPERIENCE MENTAL PROBLEMS. Unfortunately, a myth persists that children are largely immune from problems of the mind, a myth that results in lack of needed treatment and the escalation of problems into adulthood.

SCOPE OF THE ISSUE For the first time in thirty years, mental health conditions have displaced physical illnesses as the top 5 disabilities in US children, according to a recent report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). These disabilities include problems with speech, learning, attention, emotion, behavior and development. Clair Mellenthin, a psychotherapist at Wasatch Family Therapy who works primarily with children, says that children often experience the same mental illness as adults, but the illness is just expressed in a different way. She says she’s seen a huge increase in the last few years of little kids with anxiety and attachment issues. Certain children have a biological disposition to develop certain mental problems, such as anxiety or negativity. But the majority of children in her experience, Mellenthin explains, are dealing with issues from outside events. Adoption, divorce, abuse, witnessing a traumatic event and many other things can be the root of mood disorders, anxiety disorders and more.

NO HELP? The disaster is that most mentally ill children don’t actually receive treatment, according to the American Psychological Association (APA). Part of the reason for this is the stigma and misperception that

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“Everyone is going to have a bad day now and then, but if you notice that extreme emotions or behavior are lasting for days or weeks, it is time to seek advice.” comes with mental illness. Incorrect beliefs associating mental illness with violent behavior, incurability and character flaws have caused mental illness to be an especially negative health issue, making parents and their children understandably hesitant to admit that mental illness exists in their family and to seek help. But stigma aside, it’s simply difficult for parents to determine whether their child’s behavior is problematic or just typical childish behavior, according to Teri Brister, PhD, who serves as the Director of Content Integrity and the NAMI Basics Education at NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness. “Some parents mistakenly think they are just dealing with what other parents deal with, because they have no point of comparison,” she says.

CONSEQUENCES Whatever the cause for not seeking treatment, untreated mental illness carries far reaching consequences. It can be compared to a broken bone, Brister says. If you wait to set a broken bone, the problem becomes much more complicated than if you set it immediately. Research shows that untreated mental illness during childhood may be a risk factor for suicide, substance abuse, involvement in the correctional system, failure to complete high school and adult psychopathology, according to the APA. As schools and government try to work out some kind of solution, more and more mentally ill juveniles are finding themselves in the justice system.

>>>>>>continued Seven out of ten youth involved in state and local juvenile justice systems throughout the country suffer from mental health disorders, according to the National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice. In more than 20 percent of these youths, symptoms are severe enough to significantly impair function.

>>>>>>continued page 46 November 2015

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FIXING THE PROBLEM

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan in a press release.

A shortage of child psychologists and counselors is part of the reason why kids aren’t getting the needed help. Mental health treatment for the young is difficult to provide, Mellenthin explains, which may be why some health professionals shy away from it. Traditional talk therapy doesn’t really work with the younger group, she says, because they are still learning how to express themselves and interpret their feelings. Mellenthin says her patients often come in from hours away to get treatment. The shortage is national in scope. In 2009 the US Congress introduced a bill for the Child Health Care Crisis Relief Act, which would “increase the number of well-trained mental health service professionals providing clinical mental health care to children and adolescents.” The bill cited reports by the Center for Mental Health Services estimating that “20 percent or 13,700,000 of the Nation’s children and adolescents have a diagnosable mental disorder, and about 2/3 of these children and adolescents do not receive mental health care.” Despite this enormous need, there were only about 7,000 child and adolescent psychiatrists in the US in 2009, the bill reads, with only 300 new psychiatrists in this field each year. The Department of Education reported that there were 479 students for each school counselor; almost double the recommended ratio of 250 to 1.

The Early Light Academy and the Cache County School District both received more than $330,000 in grants. Most recently, President Obama proposed action that would provide 5,000 additional mental health professionals to serve younger people. "We've got to do a better job of recognizing mental health [problems] in our children," he said in a recent address. He has also called for increased dialogue on the subject of mental health.

PARENTS’ ROLE While it is vital that institutions attempt to find ways of coping with mental illness in youth, Mellenthin says what happens at home is critical in determining if a child gets needed care. How can parents recognize mental illness in their children? Brister says the key is to recognize changes in patterns of behavior. “Everyone is going to have a bad day now and then,” she says, “but if you notice that extreme emotions or behavior are lasting for days or weeks, it is time to seek advice.”

Another act, the Mental Health in Schools Act of 2011, aimed to assist local school districts in implementing mental health programs and counseling. Both bills died. But some action has been taken. In 2011, the US Department of Education awarded $15.2 million in grants to 43 school districts in 19 states to establish or improve counseling programs. "We believe that school-based counseling programs offer great promise for improving the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of students with mental-health issues," said US

The choice to seek treatment is difficult, but finding the appropriate treatment is often equally or even more difficult. Brister says that the mental health field is still evolving to accept and understand mental illness in children and adolescents. “I frequently run into parents who are seeing mental health professionals who won’t diagnose their child with mental illness,” she says. This can be due to a reluctance to label a child, or even a belief on the part of the professional that mental illness cannot actually be present until the age of 18 years. For this reason, parents should be tuned in to the emotional and mental state of their children. Emotional suffering and uncommon behavior should be taken seriously, and action should be taken without regard to outside perception. “The culture of your family system really influences whether a person will seek out treatment or whether a parent will seek out treatment for their child,” Mellenthin says.

Brister says that it is important for parents to become familiar with how a child behaves in a variety of settings.

The Act called for loan repayment and scholarships for child mental health professionals to help pay back educational loans, and for grants promoting the training of these professionals.

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Find out how behavior at home may differ from behavior at school. If you suspect a problem, you don’t have to start with a psychiatrist, she says. A pediatrician can provide direction as to what action should be taken.

“I frequently run into parents who are seeing mental health professionals who won’t diagnose their child with mental illness” -Teri Brister, PhD

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3300 North Running Creek Way, Bldg. F #102 (Across from Micron / IM Flash in Highland November 2015 57


WELLNESS

New Trends in

Suicide

38,364 suicides in US, 2010

Suicide deaths surpass deaths from motor vehicle crashes WRITTEN BY MICHAEL RICHARDSON

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SUICIDE IS INCREASINGLY BECOMING A NATIONAL CONCERN, AS DEATHS FROM SUICIDE CONTINUE TO RISE. Health professionals are beginning to recognize new suicide trends in recent years, and have highlighted the need for a new approach to suicide prevention. First, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the age groups that traditionally are at highest risk for suicide are changing. “Traditionally, suicide prevention efforts have been focused mostly on youths and older adults,” the CDC writes, “but recent evidence suggests that there have been substantial increases in suicide rates among middle-aged adults in the United States.” Statistics show that over the last ten years, suicide in the 35-64 year-old age group increased by nearly 30 percent. Among white people of that age, the increase was more than 40 percent. Men in their 50s and women in their early 60s were the age groups with the most pronounced increases in suicide rates. In the younger age group (10-34), suicide rates also increased, but not nearly as dramatically. The same is true for the oldest age group (>65). So why is the middle-age group of Americans suddenly more prone to suicide? The CDC offers a possible explanation: the recent economic downturn. “Historically, suicide rates tend to correlate with business cycles, with higher rates observed during times of economic hardship,” the CDC writes. In a comment on a recent New York Times article about the rise in suicide rates, one

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person blamed economic hopelessness for her brother’s suicide. “My brother committed suicide last July. He had just turned 60. He lost his IT job in the Great Recession in 2008. Despite hundreds of resumes being sent out, and a lifetime of IT experience, he got few interviews and no job offers. He spent down his 401(k) and when he died the only thing he owned was a beat-up car. We later found out he had a lot of credit card debt, with which he had tried to keep himself afloat. After four years of no job offers, unemployment running out, having no health insurance, etc., his dignity was shot. He had lost hope of ever working again. How I wish he had not committed suicide; how I would give anything and everything to have him back.” But economics cannot fully explain the increase, researchers explain, and more study is needed to understand the underlying causes. And health professionals are feeling the pressure to find effective prevention measures, as suicide rates are beginning to pass other historically more common causes of death. In 2010, for example, there were 33,687 deaths from motor vehicle crashes, and 38,364 suicides. Suicide remains an incredibly complex issue. Communities and community leaders should be aware of the problem, and seek effective prevention methods.

TWO FACTS ABOUT SUICIDE 1. The West Coast has the highest suicide rates. 2. The three most common methods for suicide are to use a firearm, poisoning (often from drug overdose), and suffocation.

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Present Perfect

HEALTHY HOLIDAY

This year, give the gift of health. Now that you’re making healthy living a part of your life, why not make it part of your gift giving — and getting — as well? Share your new lifestyle with others by giving gifts that will encourage them to adopt the same kinds of healthy habits you’ve adopted. If your friends or loved ones solicit ideas for holiday or birthday gifts for you, suggest items that will help you reach your goals. You’ll have more incentive to keep up with the healthy changes you’ve been making — without the challenges presented by traditional offerings like chocolates, cakes, and other high-calorie foods.

AS

GIFT IDE

HEALTHY GIFTS TO GIVE

1Exercise videos 2 A meditation CD 3 Workout clothing 4 An assortment of herbal teas 5 Concert or play tickets 6 A sports watch with a stopwatch 7 A pedometer 8 A colorful water bottle 9 A yoga mat with a gift certificate to a yoga class

10 A countertop grill or steamer 11 A juicer 12 A backpack or gym bag 13 A basket of fresh fruit 14 A portable music player 15 A soothing tabletop fountain 16 Aromatherapy products 17 A cookbookabout healthy fare 18 An all-weather jacket 19 Sunglasses

Healthy gifts include those that make it easier to eat well, exercise regularly (whether indoors or outdoors), or reduce stress. Consider these ideas:

28 Great Gifts

There are many options for gifts that promote health and wellness. Treat yourself or your loved ones with more of these healthy, holiday gifts.

21

More gift ideas can be found at Healthy-Utah.com.

Free-weights are the perfect go-to gear.

22 Photo calendar 23 Homemade treats 24 Music gift cards 25 A subscription to

Healthy Utah Magazine

26 Gift certificates to a spa 27 A hand-written Letter 28 Maps of hiking trails, or

When shopping for good running shoes, make sure they breathe easy and are well ventilated.

20 60 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

guidebooks to the outdoors

©Woogies1, Photog2112 | Dreamstime.com

LAST-MINUTE GIFTS

Healthy-Magazine.com


HEALTHY MAGAZINE | Advisor Client Content

Allergy Safe

HOLIDAYS A number of holiday-related triggers can make people sneeze, wheeze or, in the case of food allergies, have a more serious reaction. But by planning ahead, the day can be misery-free. You already have to deal with in-laws, you certainly don’t want allergy and asthma issues on top of this. Here are a few suggestions to help those with food allergies, environmental allergies or asthma avoid unnecessary suffering. For guests with food allergies, the holiday feast often includes common food allergens such as wheat, soy, dairy and nuts: •

TALKING TURKEY – The centerpiece of the Thanksgiving meal may seem safe, but self-basting turkeys can include soy, wheat and dairy. A natural turkey is your best bet since by law it must contain nothing but turkey and water. Also, be sure the stuffing is made from wheat-free bread.

ON THE SIDE – For allergen-free mashed potatoes, swap the milk and butter for chicken broth and margarine. Use corn starch to thicken the gravy instead of wheat flour. And forget about topping the green bean casserole with slivered almonds.

NOW FOR DESSERT – Even though pumpkin allergies are rare, America’s favorite Thanksgiving pie can cause problems. Be sure to offer alternative desserts. To be on the safe side, suggest guests with serious food allergies bring their own sweet treats.

Watch out for environmental triggers, as well: •

WASH-UP WOES – Aunt Sophie’s fancy guest soap may contain fragrance that can cause allergic contact dermatitis. Use the regular soap or bring your own.

PROBLEM PETS – If you’re allergic to furry animals, asking grandma to lock her cat in the basement during your visit will do little if anything to ease your misery. That’s because pet dander gets everywhere and is difficult to eradicate. However, you can help yourself by taking symptom-easing medications prior to your visit. An allergist can recommend treatments for your pet allergy, such as antihistamines, nasal sprays, decongestants or appropriate asthma medications.

NO REST FOR THE ALLERGIC – Dust mites are one of the most common allergy and asthma triggers. To prevent your allergic guests from sneezing all night long, thoroughly dust the extra bedroom and wash bedding in hot water. If you have allergies and are doing the visiting, pack your own pillow or allergen-proof pillow cover.

Think you may have allergies or asthma, but aren’t sure of the cause? Visit RockyMountainAllergy.com. We now have locations in Murray and Layton. Also, you should check out our innovative food allergy treatment program where we actually treat the allergy instead of just telling you to avoid. Through this program, you or your child can consume the foods that are currently life-threatening to them. Don’t wait, call 801775-9800. Visit our website above and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Douglas H. Jones, MD

Rocky Mountain Allergy, Asthma & Immunology rockymountainallergy.com Dr. Jones specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of all conditions relating to allergies, asthma and immune system disorders. He is board certified by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology and the American Board of Internal Medicine. He earned his MD from Penn State University and completed his specialty training at Creighton University.

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.

>> Advisor Diabetes

Diabetes, The Sneaky Disease THAT MUST BE STOPPED QUESTION: What do you get when you combine pre-diabetes, type 1, and type 2 diabetes? ANSWER: Three powerhouse organizations (and three fantastically passionate women) dedicated to raising diabetes awareness, helping those in the community impacted by this disease, and finding a cure for an illness that affects approximately 235,000 people in the great Beehive State. Laura Western, executive director, JDRF; Beverly Bartel, manager of mission delivery, American Diabetes Association (ADA) Utah Chapter; and Brenda Ralls, epidemiologist, Healthy Living through Environment, Policy and Improved Clinical Care Program (EPICC), Utah Department of Health, are collaborating for November National Diabetes Month and holding a press conference on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2013, at the Capitol in Salt Lake City to address the public on this pandemic. “Many of our young people struggle with obesity and sedentary lifestyles, putting them at risk for developing pre-diabetes,” said Brenda Ralls. “With pre-diabetes, blood sugars are elevated but not high enough to meet the threshold for a diabetes diagnosis. Pre-diabetes usually precedes type 2 but can be prevented or delayed through simple lifestyle changes.” While type 2 individuals make insulin, their body cannot use it properly. But by eating healthier, increasing physical activity, and losing weight, people can achieve normal body function again. With type 1 (T1D), individuals do not make any insulin – their pancreas has stopped working and they must manually give

62 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

themselves insulin to live. “I see firsthand the challenges of T1D for Utah families who live every day with this difficult disease,” said Laura Western. “With November being Diabetes Awareness Month, we are partnering with two powerful organizations to bring awareness and attention to this disease. It’s important for the community to know its propensity so we may rally to find a cure.” Beverly Bartel wants Utah to know that “Diabetes doesn’t stop… ever! It’s a 24/7, 365- days-a-year disease. It takes extraordinary effort to live with this, day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year.” WHAT THEY ALL WANT UTAH TO KNOW: Diabetes is a sneaky disease that claims lives and robs health. Don't wait. Ask your doctor for a diabetes screening today! • More than 135,000 Utah adults (about 6.9%) have been diagnosed with diabetes, and approximately 100,000 with pre-diabetes. • If not well controlled, diabetes can lead to serious complications, including blindness, amputation, cardiovascular disease and kidney failure. • In many cases, progression from prediabetes to type 2 can be prevented or delayed through simple lifestyle changes. • If you are a Pacific Islander, Hispanic, Native American, Asian or African American, you are at a much higher risk.

Laura concludes “I dedicate this month to every Mom and Dad with a T1D child, to every doctor who holds the hand of a newly diagnosed, to every person affected by diabetes, and to every researcher with a laser focus on solving this problem. We are forever grateful for your dedication, passion, and commitment to find a cure.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Aimee Greenholtz JDRF - Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation jdrf.org

Aimee is a content editor for healthfuldiabetes.com, affordablediabetes.com and dollardiabetesclub.com. Having this disease for more than 20 years and being a pastry chef, Ms. Greenholtz knows the importance of living healthfully and enjoying life. She can be reached at agreenholtz@keyvive.com.

(from left to right) Beverly Bartel, ADA, Brenda Ralls, UDOH, and Laura Western, JDRF join forces to bring diabetes awareness to Utah during National Diabetes Month in November.

Healthy-Magazine.com


7th

371million

leading cause of death in the United States.

Diabetes affects: • 25.8 million people in the US, 371 million globally. • 8.3 percent of the US population (diagnosed:18.8 million, undiagnosed: 7 million)

Half of people with diabetes worldwide don’t know they have it.

2012:

4.8 million

people died worldwide due to diabetes. Source: IDF

Source: International Diabetes Federation (IDF)

Diabetes at a Glance

It is the

THE AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION (ADA) released

new dietary guidelines for diabetic individuals, including new regulations for sugary drinks and sodium consumption. The ADA says diabetic patients should choose nutrient-dense, high-fiber foods, and should avoid processed foods with added sodium, fat and sugars, which isn’t all that different from dietary recommendations for the general population.

NEW TO THE ADA

WHAT DAMAGE DOES DIABETES CAUSE? • Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20-74. • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure. • About 60% to 70 % of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nervous system damage. This can mean impaired sensation or pain in the feet or hands, slowed digestion of food, carpal tunnel syndrome and more. • More than 60% of nontraumatic lower-limb amputations occur in people with diabetes. In 2006, there were nearly 66,000 such amputations performed in diabetic patients in the United States. • Diabetic adults are twice as likely to have periodontal gum disease than those without diabetes. • Diabetic individuals are twice as likely to have depression.

recommendations is a warning against sugar-sweetened beverages. Also, the previous recommended limit of 2000 mg/day of sodium for diabetic patients is raised to 2300 mg/day, which is the same as the general population. Research, the ADA says, doesn’t support a lower sodium consumption for these patients. The new guidelines also advise patients against using vitamin or mineral supplements, or herbs. Furthermore, the document states, omega-3 supplements aren’t proven to prevent cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes. It is hoped that a nutritional focus for treating diabetes will receive the priority it deserves. Diet is a crucial factor in dealing with diabetes.

NOTABLE PEOPLE WHO HAVE DIABETES

Tom Hanks, actor Halle Berry, actress Jay Cutler, NFL quarterback Brad Wilk, drummer, Rage Against the Machine Sonia Sotomayor, Supreme Court Justice Nick Jonas, singer, Jonas Brothers

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE | Advisor Client Content

WASTE NOT WANT NOT Utilizing your available healthcare benefits for dental work.

I

f dental insurance, flex spending and HSAs have your head spinning, you are not alone. The healthcare payment world can be a little confusing and frustrating, especially when you found out you’ve lost money that could have been yours if you’d have used it earlier. This is the case with certain dental benefit plans and spending accounts. Savings through certain plans are only available for a certain amount of time, often through the end of the year, meaning that if you wait until January to get your dental work done, you might be spending more money than needed. For example:

UNUSED DENTAL BENEFITS

Many dental insurance plans offer a certain amount of coverage until the end of the year. Don’t wait to use these benefits! Even if all you do is get a cleaning, take advantage of the healthcare available to you.

FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNT

Many people have Flexible Spending Accounts, which represent a great way to save money on medical and dental expenses. These funds are set aside pre-taxes, meaning savings of up to 30 percent for individuals who use them. There is generally a designated time frame to use these funds, usually ending at the close of the year. You either use it, or you lose it.

HEALTH SAVINGS ACCOUNTS (HSAS)

Many employers offer these accounts to employees. They are great for saving money for medical expenses, and many use them as a form of investment. While they don’t generally expire, many people aren’t aware they have funds available for needed dental procedures. Some put off important dental work because they don’t think they have the funds necessary, when in fact they might. If you have a HSA, learn how you can use those funds. Putting off dental procedures can result in the need for more serious procedures later on.

HOW TO MAXIMIZE YOUR BENEFITS

Sometimes it can be difficult to budget for more extensive treatments, such as dental implants or other cosmetic treatment options, especially when dental insurance maximums only cover a portion of the procedure cost. However, because most insurance benefits reset at the beginning of the year, there is an easy way to maximize your benefits. Many people who are about to undergo extensive dental treatment choose to use their benefits toward the end of the year on part of their treatment, and then complete treatment at the beginning of the following year after their benefits have reset. This allows them to get the most out of their insurance benefits and receive the treatment they need. At Apex we always offer new patients free consultations for dental implants and other cosmetic cases, so you are fully aware of exactly how much to set aside for such large procedures.

64 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

Joseph S. Maio D.D.S.

Apex Family & Cosmetic Dentistry apexfamilydental.com

DENTAL

Dr. Maio received his undergraduate education in Denver, Colorado at the prestigious private institution, Regis University, where he graduated Magna Cum Laude. He has been recognized as an American Top Dentist for 4 consecutive years, as chosen by the Consumers Research Council of America.

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE | Advisor Client Content

DIABETES

Your Mouth Matters Maintaining good oral health and seeing a dentist regularly can reduce the risk of developing or exacerbating diabetes You know that things like diet and exercise can impact your health, but did you know that what happens in your mouth can also have a significant effect on your whole body, including your risk of developing or exacerbating conditions like diabetes? Diabetes is quickly becoming one of the largest health crises in America. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), 29.1 million Americans had diabetes in 2012, nearly 10 percent of the population. Additionally, the ADA estimates that there are 86 million Americans with pre-diabetes. The annual cost of this disease is also staggering—$245 billion per year in 2012, a 41 percent increase over just a five-year span. About $176 million of that is attributed to direct medical costs, with another $69 million in reduced productivity.

DIABETES & ORAL HEALTH – A TWO-WAY STREET

Diabetes is a chronic condition, requiring patients to maintain discipline and strict self-management to prevent complications. Care providers often prescribe diet and exercise changes that can help a patient manage diabetes, and now many are also adding proper oral health care to that list as well. Many researchers have examined whether a lack of good oral health care puts a person at higher risk for developing diabetes, or whether having diabetes contributes to poor oral health. As it turns out, it goes both ways—individuals with diabetes are more prone to develop periodontal disease, and the existence of periodontal disease can also cause problems in managing diabetes.

THE ROLE OF INFLAMMATION

Inflammation is our body’s natural response to harmful pathogens or outside stimuli. When our body senses something harmful, it summons our vascular and immune system to the area, releasing toxins through the blood to remove the harmful pathogens, which allows the body to begin healing. This is known as acute inflammation. When inflammation persists over a long period of time it is called chronic inflammation. The cells sent to fight inflammation are powerful defenders of the body, but they also release toxins (commonly referred to as cytokines) that can accumulate and become harmful to the body. Research has shown that high levels of these toxins reduce the body’s response to insulin and increase the risk of developing diabetes. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease, and the most common form is gingivitis. In fact, as much as 50 percent of the U.S. population suffers from gum disease and, like any inflammatory condition, this causes an increase in cytokines, which is linked to insulin resistance and other risk factors for diabetes and coronary heart disease. For patients who already have diabetes, periodontal diseases make it harder for the body to maintain metabolic control, which increases the risk of complications, according to research studies.

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MITIGATING RISK WITH PROPER ORAL CARE

Poor oral health makes it more difficult to control glucose levels, which can lead to major complications for people with diabetes. Diseases like gingivitis can cause dry mouth and decreased salivary flow, creating favorable conditions for bacteria. The existence of bacteria results in periodontal disease, and the cycle of inflammation and the body’s response ensues, along with all its harmful effects. But there are ways to mitigate the risk of chronic inflammation. One of the best ways is to visit your dentist regularly. “If you visit the same dentist regularly at the recommended sixmonth intervals, he or she can identify subtle changes that may indicate a potential problem,” said Dr. Kenneth King, Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs and Patient Care at Roseman University College of Dental Medicine in South Jordan, Utah. “Things like gingivitis, recession of the gums, tender tissues, bone loss, calculus build-up, and increased number of cavities can all be indicators of a larger systemic problem,” said King. But since the changes are subtle, a dentist may have a difficult time diagnosing it for someone who comes infrequently for check-ups, or someone who gets a new dentist every couple of years. “Seeing the same dentist at regular intervals over a number of years is ideal, so he or she knows your history and can identify the more subtle indicators.” If you already have diabetes, seeing a dentist regularly is equally important. A study by Drs. David Mosen, Daniel Pihlstrom and John Snyder published in the January 2012 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association showed that receipt of regular dental care reduces diabetes-specific medical care utilization. Specifically, study participants (all of whom had diabetes) who saw a dentist at least twice a year over a three-year period had better glycemic control, or the ability to keep blood sugar at a safe level. Regular-dental-care patients were also less likely to have diabetes-related hospital and emergency department admissions. As with any condition, it is important to meet regularly with your healthcare provider to ensure that you are doing what you can to manage the disease. In the case of diabetes, be sure to schedule regular dental visits as well. Your mouth, and your body, will thank you.

William Carroll, DDS

Roseman University of Health Sciences South Jordan Campus rosemandental.com Dr. Carroll is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor at Roseman University College of Dental Medicine. He graduated from the UCSF School of Dentistry, completed a two-year AEGD residency at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, MD and recently retired from the US Navy after more than 30 years of service.

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE | Advisor Client Content

new options for

GUM RECESSION Dr. Ryan McNeil, at Midvale Family Dental, offers a new procedure called the Pinhole Gum Rejuvenation™, the latest treatment to correct gum recession. Gum recession can cause discomfort, sensitivity, an increased risk of root cavities, and a noticeably less attractive smile. Recessed gums have the potential to wreak havoc on your smile and overall well-being, but patients frequently reject the traditional treatment for gum recession because the extent of traditional corrective surgery and the often painful downtime and recovery. Traditionally, the procedure recommended to treat gum recession is called a gum graft - a technique where gum tissue is cut from the roof of your mouth and then stitched over the teeth with recession. This surgical technique often requires a lengthy recovery, and if more than 2 or 3 teeth are in need of treatment, multiple surgeries may be required to repair extensive gum recession. Now, at Midvale Family Dental Dr. McNeil offers Pinhole Gum Rejuvenation™, a no-stitch, no-scalpel, downtime-free technique to treat gum recession. Performed with a pin-like instrument, the pinhole surgical technique takes just a few minutes per tooth. Using a single pinsized entry point to treat multiple teeth, the specially designed tool loosens the gum tissue, moving the gum on top of the exposed roots. Collagen strips are then placed through the entry point to keep the gums in place during the healing process. Results are immediate and the pinpoint-sized entry heals within 24 hours without the need for stitching. Post-op, patients report only mild swelling and very little downtime is needed with most returning to work the next day.

BEFORE

BEFORE

BEFORE

AFTER

AFTER

AFTER

Grafting vs. Pinhole Technique GUM GRAFTING

ABOUT THE DR. MCNEIL

Surgical Procedure

Dr. Ryan S. McNeil, D.D.S Midvale Family Dental PC MidvaleFamilyDental.com

Dr. McNeil is trained and certified to perform the Pinhole Gum Rejuvenation™ procedure. If you would like to learn more about this procedure or find out if you are a candidate, please visit his website midvalefamilydental.com or call to schedule a Free Consultation at 801-255-4555.  

66 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

PINHOLE SURGICAL TECHNIQUE

Usually an incision is made on roof of your mouth to extract gum tissue, sometimes an alternative donor source will be used.

Small, pinhole sized entry point is used to glide gums over area of exposed roots. Collagen strips are placed to keep gums in place.

Amount of Teeth Treated

Only a few teeth can be treated at a time.

Up to twelve teeth can be treated in one visit.

Length of Surgery

90+ minutes

Less than an hour

Recovery Time

Up to 10 days for stitches

Virtually no recovery time

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE | Advisor Client Content

It Works! STUDIES SHOW LAP-BAND IS A SAFE AND LASTING WEIGHT LOSS SOLUTION A

medical study published in Annals of Surgery document that laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (Lap-Band) is both a safe and effective 15 years after surgery. It is the longest Lap-Band follow-up study ever reported.  Researchers from Monash University reviewed the results of gastric banding in more than 3200 patients who underwent the procedure between 1994 (when the procedure was first introduced), and 2011. Through his findings, Dr. O’Brien concluded that:

“LAPAROSCOPIC ADJUSTABLE GASTRIC BANDING IS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE, AND HAS LASTING BENEFITS. SIGNIFICANT WEIGHT LOSS CAN IMPROVE THE LIVES OF PEOPLE WHO ARE OBESE AND THEY CAN BE HEALTHIER AND LIVE LONGER.”  Finally, he noted that weight loss induced by Lap-Band surgery can effectively control diabetes symptoms without the need for medication in about three-quarters of cases.  They also looked at all published studies of long term weight loss for the most common bariatric surgeries. O’Brien noted that laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding differs from gastric-bypass procedures in that weight loss with the bypass procedure occurs primarily in the first year. With gastric banding, two to three years are required for peak weight loss. However, at the end of three years, the weight loss curves for both are flat and superimposed on each other. I set up the first outpatient Lap-Band program in the state of Utah, and am currently a Lap-Band Proctor who certifies new surgeons who are starting to use the

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Allergan Lap-Band devise to insure safe and correct techniques for successful outcomes. At my clinic I have seen similar results as the studies mentioned above in the nearly 1000 patients I’ve worked with over the past 10 years I have been performing the procedure.

Darrin F. Hansen, MD, FACS Premier Lap-Band DrDhansen.com

Dr. Hansen is a Center of Excellence surgeon for the LAP-BAND procedure. This credential is given to surgeons who maintain the highest standards for bariatric patient care. With over ten years of weight loss surgery experience and over 1000 LAP-BAND procedures combined with ongoing advanced training and techniques, patients have the best chance for excellent results.

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Arches Arches

| |Wellness WellnessTips Tips

Visit Visit ArchesHealth.org/HealthyLife ArchesHealth.org/HealthyLife toto check check out out our our wellness wellness segments segments with with Tyson Tyson Pace, Pace, REAL REAL Salt Salt Lake’s Lake’s Head Head Athletic Athletic Trainer Trainer featured featured onon FOX FOX 13’s 13’s The The Place. Place. 68 HEALTHY MAGAZINE

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Arches takes a different approach to health care. One that’s based on community and cooperation. Where you have a voice. And more control over your own health. Where medicine and members share the same goals. And people are placed before profits.

Contact your broker, call (877) 334-4873 or visit ArchesHealth.org

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE M E D I C A L A D V I S O R S AESTHETICS & LASER

JEFFREY AYERS, MD MEDICAL DIRECTOR

Elase Medical Spa

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ALLERGY & ASTHMA

EYE CARE

PHILLIP C. HOOPES ,MD

Hoopes Vision Correction Center Healthy-Mag.com/Hoopes

ORTHOPEDICS/SPORTS MED

TREVOR MAGEE, MD

Salt Lake Regional, The Center for Precision Joint Replacement

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FUNC TIONAL MEDICINE

SPINE CARE / SURGERY

Rocky Mountain Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

RedRiver Health and Wellness Center

The SMART Clinic

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Healthy-Mag.com/Redd

Healthy-Mag.com/SmartClinic

B A R I AT R I C M E D I C I N E

HORMONE THERAPY

SPINE CARE / SURGERY

Utah Wellness Institute

The SMART Clinic

South Valley Surgical

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B A R I AT R I C M E D I C I N E

INFERTILIT Y

DOUGLAS H. JONES, MD

O. LAYTON ALLDREDGE MD, FACS

JOSHUA JAMES REDD, DC

ROBERT JONES, DC

SCOTT ADELMAN, MD

MICHAEL GIOVANNIELLO, MD

Healthy-Mag.com/SmartClinic

Healthy-Mag.com/Alldredge

DARRIN F. HANSEN MD, FACS

The Lap Band Center

RUSSELL A. FOULK, MD

The Fertility Center

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S PA

AUTUMN SPENCER COSMETOLOGIST, OWNER

Seasons Salon and Day Spa

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INSURANCE C A R D I O LO G Y

AMANDA DONOHUE, DO

Jordan Valley Medical Center

801-263-2370 Healthy-Mag.com/Donohue

COSME TIC SURGERY

BENJAMIN DUNKLEY, DO

Envision Cosmetic Surgery

See online: envisionsurgery.com

D E N TA L : C O S M E T I C

WALTER MEDEN, DDS

Elite Smiles

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STEPHEN L. BARLOW MD, VICE PRESIDENT

SelectHealth

DON BIGELOW, DDS, PC

K. Don Dental

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DOUGLASS FORSHA, MD

South Valley Dermatology

southvalleydermatology.com

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INSURANCE

DENNIS HARSTON MD, MBA, CMO

Altius Health Plans

V E I N T R E AT M E N T

HARRISON LAZARUS, MD, FACS

21st Century Vein Clinic

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M E N ’ S H E A LT H

LANE C. CHILDS, MD, FACS

Western Urological Clinic

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D E N TA L : G E N E R A L

SKIN CARE

W E I G H T LO S S

STEVEN E. WARREN, MD

Align Wellness

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M E N ’ S H E A LT H

STEVEN N. GANGE, MD, FACS

Western Urological Clinic

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H E A LT H Y M A G A Z I N E

E X P E R T PA N E L D E N TA L : G E N E R A L

ORTHOPEDICS/SPORTS MED

CLINICAL RESEARCH Lynn R. Webster, MD, FACPM, FASAM | LifeTreeResearch.com

Roseman University of Health Sciences

Precision Joint Replacement Center

COSME TIC SURGERY Kirk Moore, MD | Just The Right Curves

WILLIAM CARROLL, DDS

www.roseman.edu

AARON HOFMANN, MD

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DIABETES

M E N ’ S H E A LT H

JDRF - Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

Men’s Health Center

LAURA WESTERN

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D E N TA L : FA M I LY Joe Maio, DDS | Apex Family Dental w

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PERSONAL TRAINERS Nick & Preston Rainey | Body4Change, LLC

OBSTETRICS & OBGYN

Treehouse Athletic Club

Obstetrics & Gynecology Personal Care

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D E N TA L : C O S M E T I C Rodney S. Gleave, DMD | Cosmetic & Implant Dental Arts

ANDREW PEIFFER, MD, PHD

FITNESS

BROOKE KITTEL

COSME TIC SURGERY Trenton C. Jones, MD | Cascade Cosmetic Surgery Center

PREGNANCY/BABY Eliott Spencer, PhD, Co-Owner | Utah Cord Bank

MARK SAUNDERS, MD

W O M E N ’ S H E A LT H Mark Saunders , MD | Dr. Saunders OB/GYN

drsaundersobgyn.com

V E I N T R E AT M E N T Mountain Medical Vein Center and Medspa YO G A JT, Studio Manager | BE HOT Yoga & Pilates Studio

EYE CARE

PHILLIP C. HOOPES, JR., MD

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