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Your Monthly Guide to Healthy Lifestyles

He lthy Li ing News July 2017 • FREE

Also available at hlntoledo.com

The Marathon Classic is back!

As well as: • Shape up and wake up your skin • Beat summer's heat • Tools to assist senior independence • Do you have hidden hearing loss? • St. Luke's named 5-star Maternity Center

You can’t plan for an emergency, but you can have an emergency plan. 24/7 EMERGENCY SERVICES in Perrysburg and Sylvania


Shape up and wake up your skin H

ello, “Millennials”! Are the skin changes related to stress, pollution, smoking, and prior sun damage and tanning booth visits starting to show on your facial, neck, and chest skin? Are your jowls and neck starting to sag, and are you noticing that darkening is developing around and under your eyes, your pores are enlarging, or “age spots” are appearing? Do your friends question why you look tired all the time when you are not? While these changes are mild and just starting, now is the time to start engaging in a skin-care program tailored specifically for you to improve and reduce these signs of aging. Dr. Handler will personally recommend and explain a skin-rejuvenation program designed specifically for you to reduce the visible signs of aging. The anti-aging treatments performed by Dr. Handler are “non-invasive,” with minimal discomfort or downtime. Minimize under-eye darkening, raise those droopy eyelids, shrink pores, lift sagging jowl areas, and appear as youthful as you feel. Call Dr. Handler’s office for a personal evaluation with treatment recommendations for your aging skin. Remember, 80% of the signs of aging are due to prior sun exposure and subsequent skin damage. All the brown spots (“age spots”), broken blood vessels on the face, fine lines, and sagging skin are caused almost entirely by sun! This is something young people should be aware of since we get 80% of our lifetime sun exposure by the time we are 18-20 years of age. What about the “worry lines” between your eyes, deep smile lines, upper lip lines (lipstick runs uphill), and your sagging jowls and neck? These unfortunate changes caused by prior sun exposure can be improved dramatically with pain-free, non-invasive cosmetic procedures performed by Dr. Handler. The NEW Thermage CPT Deep Tip procedure painlessly heats damaged collagen under your skin to tighten and lift sagging areas of the neck, jowls, upper arms, and abdomen. The NEW Thermage CPT Deep Tip procedure utilizes radiofrequency energy (not laser) to uniformly heat the dermis (deeper layer) while the epidermis (top layer) is cooled and protected. This heating of the dermis causes immediate collagen contraction and tightening followed by new collagen production over a period of time. This procedure also encourages a natural repair process that results in further tightening, lifting, and younger-looking skin. With only ONE treatment, results are seen before leaving the office. Continued tightening and lifting of sagging skin occurs over a 6-month time period with results lasting 3-4 years! There is NO downtime and NO pain. The NEW Thermage CPT Deep Tip system has been utilized by Dr. Handler for many years with excellent results and very satisfied patients. For lines between the eyes (worry lines), crow’s feet, and the “sleepy and tired look with droopy eyelids,” the use of Botox or Dysport works well to improve these areas. The results are diminished lines and a more “wide awake” and less tired appearance. These products are also fantastic to reduce anxiety-induced underarm sweating for months after injections. This is performed entirely by Dr. Handler with minimal pain with results of decreased sweating lasting 5-7 months and longer. The use of fillers, such as Restylane, Perlane, Juvederm, Radiesse, and others, to “fill” deep smile lines and the marionette lines (the sad look) from the corners of the mouth produces immediate results lasting 12-15 months! Don’t look tired or sad! Since these products are combined

with a numbing agent, the pain is minimal. Now, Dr. Handler utilizes the injection of a new filler called “Restylane Silk.” This product markedly improves upper and lower lip lines (lipstick lines). Restylane Silk also volumizes your lips and restores their natural curve while looking attractive and natural. Restylane Silk also can be utilized to minimize the “worry lines” between your eyes. There is no downtime with these non-invasive procedures. For fine lines, large pores, and brown (age) spots, the Clear and Brilliant laser produces awesome visual results after 3-5 treatments. This is a painless procedure whereby Dr. Handler utilizes a laser to produce thousands of small columns of empty space in your dermis, which your body fills with its own collagen. This results in softer, smoother, and diminished facial lines and smaller pores. There is NO downtime with this procedure. When the Clear and Brilliant laser is combined with Thermage CPT Deep Tip, the results are ideal for patients who desire no downtime or pain and predictable results of lifting sagging skin and smoothing fine lines. Dr. Handler is the only dermatologist performing this procedure in Northwest Ohio. Are you aware that Dr. Handler personally performs laser procedures for removal of body hair anywhere hair grows? Yes, this minimally painful laser destroys hairs around the chin, jawline, upper lip, underarms, ears, nose, bikini line, etc. And this laser is not just for women. Many men have this laser performed to permanently remove chest and back hair as well as beard hair that grows down onto the neck. Dr. Handler also utilizes the latest in lasers for removal of “age spots” (sun spots really) anywhere on the body. This laser works especially well for the tops of hands covered with those “age spots.” Finally, Dr. Handler also performs laser removal of unwanted blood vessels that grow on your face and enlarge with heat, stress, and the intake of alcohol. Again, pain and downtime are minimal with this laser. Dr. Handler has performed these procedures for many years with very gratifying results and very satisfied patients. All of these cosmetic

enhancements are performed entirely by Dr. Handler. To view before-and-after photographs of patients who have had these procedures performed by Dr. Handler, visit www.drharveyhandler.com. For more detailed information about the abovementioned procedures or products, please call Dr. Handler’s office at 419-885-3400. Also, remember to inquire about specials available on many cosmetic procedures and products to diminish the signs of aging and obtain a more vibrant and youthful appearance of your skin.

Hair loss in men and women

Are you losing hair from surgery, anesthesia, illnesses, pregnancy, medications, stress, genetics, or “normal” hair loss secondary to aging or low blood levels of nutrients? There are many causes of hair loss in men and women. Most are not simply due to age or family history, and most are treatable. Now these problems of hair loss can be evaluated and there is hope for reducing your hair loss and stimulating new growth. Dr. Harvey Handler, board-certified dermatologist of Sylvania, Ohio, has a medical treatment for decreasing your hair loss and increasing growth in many patients! After appropriate examination of your scalp hair and blood testing is performed by Dr. Handler to rule out treatable medical causes, Dr. Handler will discuss a program to decrease your hair loss, increase growth, and cause the hair you have be fuller and thicker. This is not a product that is forever. This new treatment works with or without Rogaine (minoxidil, which is forever) for reducing loss and promoting growth. Call Dr. Handler’s office to set up an appointment for a thorough evaluation and discussion of your particular hair loss and the therapy that will be individualized for you. Don’t assume because it “runs in the family” that you can do nothing to minimize your hair loss. Most patients notice a decrease of loss in 30-60 days! Also, everyone should have a yearly full body exam to check for skin cancer conducted only by a board-certified dermatologist. ❦

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Mission Statement Healthy Living News offers the residents of northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan a monthly guide to news and information about healthy life styles, health care, sports and fitness, and other issues related to physical, mental and emotional quality of life. The publication promises to be an attractive, interesting and entertaining source of valuable information for all ages, especially those 35 to 50. Healthy Living News is locally owned, committed to quality, and dedicated to serving our great community. Healthy Living News is published the first of each month. The opinions expressed by contributing writers do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publisher. Distribution of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of any kind. While HLN makes every attempt to present accurate, timely information, the publication and its publisher and/or advertisers will not be held responsible for misinformation, typographical errors, omissions, etc.

CONTACTS Business office: To advertise: Healthy Living News, 3758 Rose Glenn Drive, Toledo, OH 43615. Phone: 419-367-0966 or email Kevin O’Connell at sfstennis76@bex.net. Ad reservation deadline is the 15th of the month preceding publication. HLN reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and does not accept advertising promoting the use of tobacco. Editorial office: Deadline for editorial submissions is the 10th of the month preceding publication. To contact the editor or send submissions, please email editorhln@bex.net.

Publisher: Kevin O’Connell

e lthy l ng ews 

July 2017 • Vol. 22, Issue 7



Your Monthly Guide to Healthy Living

HEALTH, BEAUTY & FOOD

TAKING CARE OF YOUR LIFE

2 Shape up and wake up your skin 5 Keep your cool and beat the heat, by Dr. Tere Koenig 9 Cancer clinical trials are key to better outcomes and patient quality of life 11 TriggerPoint program yields maximum fitness results with minimal time investment 13 Health Crossword by Myles Mellor 14 Sound Advice from Northwest Ohio Hearing Clinic by Randa Mansour-Shousher, AuD, CCC-A 16 Walt's Corner Caribbean Ribeye Steaks with Grilled Pineapple Salad 20 Hidden hearing loss, by Dianna Randolph, AuD, CCC-A 24 Expanding benefits for veterans and Medicaid patients, by Douglas A. Schwan, DC, Dip ac 26 Eating Well Support your local farmers market by Laurie Syring, RD/LD 27 Have you established your summertime skin-care routine? 34 Asthma sufferers: Put a stop to summer wheezing 39 Spiritually Speaking What makes you different? by Sister Mary Thill 45 Annual wellness visits put focus on prevention for seniors

12 Assistive devices help seniors stay safe and independent 15 Toledo area is rich with opportunities to get a move on, by Jim Berger 18 Nobody’s Perfect Watch where you’re going! by Sister Karen Zielinski, OSF 30 Athletes: Are you drinking the right fluids? by Amanda Manthey 35 Grilling safety: Don’t let your summer fun go up in smoke 40 A Walk in the Park Detour ahead by LeMoyne Mercer 45 Personal-safety tips for outdoor runners

CHILDREN & PARENTING 28 Sports physicals help young athletes practice and compete safely 31 Single parents, follow these steps to help protect your children, by Scott D. Brown 38 Is there a secret to development? by Mark S. Faber, USPTA Elite Professional 43 Is water the beverage of choice for your kids? by Cindy Pisano, LSW

Travel Editor: LeMoyne Mercer

Print Designer: Jan Sharkey Web Designer: Strategically Digital LLC Social Media Specialist: Kelly Rickey Distribution: Jim Welsh • Alison Foster Dominion Distribution Distributech–Toledo Copyright © 2017 Healthy Living News Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. Healthy Living News is published for the purpose of disseminating health-related information for the well being of the general public and its subscribers. The information published in Healthy Living News is not intended to diagnose or prescribe. Please consult your physician or health care professional before undertaking any form of medical treatment and/or adopting any exercise program or dietary guidelines.

7 Marathon Classic returns to Highland Meadows in support of children’s charities 10 Otterbein receives UMA “Eagle” Awards 17 Join the High Street Hunger Fighters by Deborah Vas 22 Senior Living Guide 23 Short-term respite care offers options for seniors and their families 29 St. Luke’s Family Birthing Center is first in area to be listed as a 5-star Maternity Center 32 Adaptive gardening for the elderly 36 Renovated Sunset House blends historic charm with modern updates and vibrant living 44 Laurels of Toledo earns 2017 Bronze National Quality Award 46 Serenity Farm presents Benefit for the Barn— Tickets on sale now!

Connect with Friends who Like Healthy Living News!

Editor: Jeff Kurtz Sales: Robin Buckey Molly O'Connell

OUR COMMUNITY

Dear Readers, Thank you for picking up the July issue of Healthy Living News. As you can tell from the image on our cover, the buzz is starting to build around the 32nd Annual Marathon Classic LPGA Tournament, which returns to Highland Meadows Golf Club from Thursday, July 20 through Sunday, July 23. Here at HLN, we’re celebrating our 21st year of promoting this exciting event, which has raised millions of dollars for local children’s charities since its founding. Kudos to tournament Director Judd Silverman and his staff for making this one of our region’s premier sports attractions year after year! See page 7 for full details. Seniors who may be experiencing some loss of function and mobility won’t want to miss the article on page 12. In it they’ll

find all kinds of suggestions for assistive or adaptive tools and devices that make it possible to continue living safely and independently at home despite physical limitations. Readers of all ages who are looking for some simple ways to get up, get out, and get moving are highly encouraged to read Jim Berger’s article on page 15, which explores several healthy activities close at hand here in the Toledo area. Naturally, I’m pleased to see that my favorite activity—tennis—made Jim’s list, and I’m sure you’ll find a suggestion that appeals to you as well. This month’s issue also features timely tips on how to avoid asthma issues in summer from Mercy Health pulmonologist Dr. James Tita (p. 34), ideas for encouraging kids to drink more

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water instead of sugary beverages from Cindy Pisano of Mercy Health Children’s Hospital (p. 43), insights on establishing a summer skin-care routine from Dr. Wade Banker of Luxe Laser Vein & Body Center (p. 27), an expert perspective on the importance of annual wellness visits from ProMedica family physician Dr. Dee Bialecki-Haase (p. 45), a discussion of kids’ sports physicals with UTMC family and sports medicine physician Dr. David Weldy (p. 28), and last but certainly not least, a delicious recipe for Caribbean Ribeye Steaks with Grilled Pineapple Salad from Walt Churchill’s Market (p. 16). Until next month, stay safe, active, and healthy!


I Choose The Toledo Clinic

I want a doctor who treats me like a person, not a number. That’s why I choose The Toledo Clinic. The Toledo Clinic is the only physician-owned, physician-led healthcare organization in the region, which gives my doctor a greater say in my care. Plus, with 185 physicians practicing in over 40 different specialties in more than 60 locations, my whole family has access to expert care when and where they need it. The Toledo Clinic. When you choose well, you just feel better.

ToledoClinic.com | 419.473.3561

4  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

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Keep your cool and beat the heat by Dr. Tere Koenig

Know the signs Heat cramps are muscle spasms that usually affect the legs or abdominal muscles due to excessive sweating, often after physical activity. When the body loses an extreme amount of salt and water, heat exhaustion can set in. Heat exhaustion symptoms are similar to flu symptoms and can include severe thirst, fatigue, headache, nausea, vomiting, and, sometimes, diarrhea. Other symptoms include clammy or pale skin, dizziness, rapid pulse, and normal or slightly elevated body temperature. If you’re not careful, uncontrolled heat exhaustion can evolve into heatstroke. Heatstroke is a condition caused by your body overheating. This most serious form of heat injury can occur if your body temperature rises to 104°F (40°C) or higher.

Risk factors Those at greatest risk for heat-related illness include children up to four years of age, people 65 years of age and older, people who are overweight, and people who are ill or on certain medications. Those who work outdoors and athletes are also particularly susceptible. Nonexertional or classic heatstroke typically occurs after exposure to hot, humid weather, especially for prolonged periods, such as two or three days. Exertional heatstroke is caused by an increase in body temperature brought on by intense

physical activity in hot weather. People can even suffer from heat exhaustion or heatstroke if they are dehydrated or spend too much time indoors without air conditioning in extremely hot weather.

Free 4-day bereavement camp for kids ages 6 – 16

Treatment If you notice signs of heat-related illness, you need to lower your body temperature and prevent your condition from progressing to heatstroke. Sit or lie down in a shady or air-conditioned place and drink fluids. If you don’t have air conditioning at home, go someplace that does, such as a mall, movie theater, or public library. You can also take a cool shower or bath or cool off with damp sheets and a fan. If you have muscle pain, try to stretch. If your symptoms don’t subside within an hour, seek medical attention. If you’re with someone who may be experiencing heatstroke, seek immediate medical help. Call 911 or your local emergency services number. Then take immediate action to cool the overheated person while waiting for emergency treatment. Try to get the person into shade or indoors and remove excess clothing. Cool the person any way you can with cold water or ice packs.

Prevention There are steps you can take to protect yourself. Start by wearing lightweight clothing, a hat, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Drink plenty of fluids to help your body sweat and maintain a normal body temperature. Take it easy during the hottest parts of the day. Try to schedule exercise or physical labor in the early morning or evening. Be extra cautious if you take certain medications that can affect your body’s ability to stay hydrated and dissipate heat. The summer weather can be very enjoyable as long as you try to limit your time in the heat. Give your body the chance to cool down and you’ll have it made in the shade. ❦

© 2017 ProMedica

S

ummertime means sunshine, hot weather, and spending more time outside. It also means you need to take precautions to protect your body from overheating. You’re most likely not aware of it, but your body is in a constant struggle to disperse the heat it produces. If your body is exposed to more heat than it can handle, you could suffer from heat exhaustion, heat cramps, or heatstroke. These are illnesses that can escalate rapidly if your body is unable to cool down.

Kids will explore issues related to loss with therapeutic activities, arts and crafts, team building and fun in a safe and supportive environment. Camps held daily from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. June 20 – 23 in Clyde, Ohio July 11 – 14 in Fremont, Ohio July 18 – 21 in Monroe, Michigan July 25 – 28 in Sylvania, Ohio Registration is required. For more information or to register, visit promedica.org/campfearless or contact ProMedica Hospice at 419-824-7400.

Dr. Tere Koenig is Chief Medical Officer for Medical Mutual.

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Welcome Dr. Matt Syrek to the practice

Dr. Mickey Frame ... serving patients for over 25 years

Serving Toledo with Top Chiropractic Care Since 1988 ChiropraCtiC Care We provide skillful adjustments to the spine’s vertebrae to improve spinal health and allow you to function at your highest level and perform at your peak.

aCupunCture Stimulate specific points in the body to relieve pain, reduce stress and improve overall well being. It can be effective in treating illnesses, injuries, chronic pain, addictions, anxiety, insomnia and more.

Go where the Pros go! Official Chiropractor for the Marathon Classic LPGA, the Toledo Walleye Hockey Team, and the Toledo Villa FC Soccer Teams.

Spinal DeCompreSSion Spinal Decompression is an innovative, non-invasive therapy with proven success to help chronic and acute neck and back pain along with disc conditions.

phyiSotherapy Physical Rehabiliation therapies including electrical muscle stimulation, ultrasound therapy and custom exercise programs. It can help to alleviate pain by improving your muscle strength and flexibility. Call to schedule an appointment today.

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www.GetWellToledo.com 6  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

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Marathon Classic returns to Highland Meadows in support of children’s charities

F

rom Thursday July 20 to Sunday, July 23, our region’s premier summer sports event—the 32nd annual Marathon Classic, presented by Owens Corning and O-I—returns to Sylvania’s Highland Meadows Golf Club. This year’s tournament, featuring all the brightest stars of the LPGA, promises more family fun than ever before and will benefit 23 area children’s charities.

Pressel, and Michelle Wie. “With these exciting commitments, this year’s field is shaping up to be one of our best ever,” states Silverman. “It’s going to be another great shootout between the greatest women golfers in the world. Of course, the real winners are the 23 local children’s charities that will benefit from this year’s tournament.”

An epic wrap-up in 2016

The course will provide a new look for the LPGA players with the recent renovation of the 18th hole and driving range. Sixty yards were added to the driving range, which now features seven target greens. The practice putting green and the first tee positions were shifted. Also, eight yards were added to hole one and hole 18 was reduced by 40 yards, with revisions to the fairway and a new green complex. In addition, new curb and cart paths and a new clock have been installed next to the putting green. The new design will offer the LPGA professionals a stateof-the-art driving-range facility and new challenges to the par-5 18th hole.

The 2016 Marathon Classic had an exciting finish and became an instant classic with three LPGA stars—Lydia Ko, Mirim Lee, and Ariya Jutanugarn— battling to determine the winner after four playoff holes! Ko had a chance to win it on the last hole, but the putt did not fall, so Ko, Lee, and Jutanugarn headed back to the tee on 18 for a playoff—for three extra holes! There were putts to win it, but none fell. Finally, with a great approach shot to five feet from the hole, Ko stepped up to her ball and sank the winning putt. The win was Ko’s 14th LPGA victory!

An epic lineup for 2017 Tournament Director Judd Silverman is confident this year ’s competitors won’t disappoint either. Atop the stellar list of players who have already committed to participate in the 2017 Marathon Classic is, of course, defending champion Lydia Ko, the #1 ranked player in the world. Other commitments include Lexi Thompson, who is currently 4th in the world rankings and is the highest ranking American player, Toledo native Stacy Lewis, 2016 U.S. Women’s Open Champion Brittany Lang, 2017 tournament winner Brittany Lincicome, 2015 U.S. Solheim Cup star Gerina Piller, Brooke Henderson, Morgan

Renovated course

Make your

BIRTH DAY

Kids activities galore The 2017 Marathon Classic promises much more than world-class golf. Back by popular demand is the Kids Zone presented by Valpak of Northwest Ohio, Thursday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Not only will children ages 17 and under enjoy free admission to the tournament, but they ’ll also have access to a host of exciting, kid-friendly activities, including a tournament-long scavenger hunt that kicks off on Thursday, July 20. Vito’s Pizza will be available for kids on Saturday and Sunday between 11:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Friday, July

WITH

FUN From custom cakes to special animal meet and greets, birthday parties at the Zoo are wildly fun! Our party package includes food, cake, decorations and entertainment, so you can focus on the fun! To book your party please visit toledozoo.org/birthday

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21 is Mascot Day (10:30 to 11:30 a.m. and 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.) and will feature Michigan State’s Sparty, the Detroit Lions’ Roary, and the Cleveland Browns’ Chomps as well as local mascots! The Kids Zone will also have a visit from Imagination Station and an opportunity for kids to take their picture and tweet the photo to @MarathonLPGA. On Saturday, July 22, kids will have an opportunity to meet their favorite Laurel’s Princess Parties characters, including Spiderman, Belle, and more, and have close-up encounters with animals brought by the Toledo Zoo. Last but not least, on Sunday, July 23, the Laurel’s characters will be back in the Kids Zone and the First Tee will be working with young tournament attendees to help them learn the great game of golf.

Women’s Summit New this year, the 2017 Marathon Classic is excited to announce the first-ever Women’s Summit. The event will feature keynote speaker Amy Robach, Anchor on ABC’s Good Morning America and a regular contributor on 20/20, as well as U.S. Army

veteran and motivational speaker Dan Nevins. The event theme, “Driving Fore Balance,” will touch on leading an intentional, purpose-driven life and will include a yoga class led by Nevins.

Friday, July 21 Second Round High School Girls Golf Luncheon, lunch provided by Magic Wok “Friday at Club 14” Business Networking Party

2017 schedule of events

Saturday, July 22 Third Round, The Blade Day

Tournament week events include: Monday, July 17 PNC Pro-Am, Highland Meadows, 7:30 a.m. shotgun start ProMedica/Hylant Pro-Am, Highland Meadows, 1:30 p.m. shotgun start Tuesday, July 18 Pro Practice Round KeyBank Putting Pro-Am, 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Main Putting Green, Highland Meadows Huntington Gala Dinner & Show at SeaGate Centre, 6:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 19 Buckeye Broadband Celebrity ProAm, Highland Meadows, all day (top 58 LPGA pros participate) Thursday, July 20 First Round, Kroger Senior Day – Seniors 55 and over admitted free and park for free

Sunday, July 23 Final Round, The Toledo Clinic’s Championship Sunday 18th Green Closing Ceremony

2017 Benefitting charities Since the tournament’s founding in1984, the Marathon Classic has raised over $9.8 million for 170 northwest Ohio children’s charities. In fact, last year alone, the tournament donated $543,000 to 19 northwest Ohio children’s charities. “We’re grateful to all of our sponsors for their continued support of the Marathon Classic,” states Silverman. “Last year’s contribution of $543,000 takes us close to the $10 million mark in charitable donations over the past 32 years. This kind of sustained effort would not have been possible without the loyal support of the business community!” This year’s benefitting charities

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include Autism Model School, Cancer Connection of NW Ohio, Century Health, Challenged Champions Equestrian Center, Dental Center of NW Ohio – Findlay Smiles, Double ARC, Epilepsy Center of NW Ohio, Family and Child Abuse Prevention, First Step (Sandusky Valley Domestic Violence Shelter), First Tee of Hancock Co., Good Grief of NW Ohio, Hancock County ADAMHS, Miracle League of NW Ohio, Open Arms – Council on Domestic Violence, Serenity Farm Equestrian Center, Sylvania Area Family Services, Tiffin Seneca Public Library, Tiffin Seneca United Way, Together We Can Make A Difference, Toledo Science Center (Imagination Station), Toledo Seagate Food Bank, Ronald McDonald House Charities, and the Jamie Farr Scholarship Fund of the Toledo Community Foundation.

Tickets and parking Tickets for the Marathon Classic can be purchased at area Kroger stores and online at www.marathonclassic. com. Prices are as follows: Weekly Grounds Pass (buy one, get one free online or at Kroger)—$60 Weekly Clubhouse Ticket (online

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only, access to grounds and clubhouse)—$120 Daily Grounds Ticket (available at gate only)—$15 Monday through Friday, $20 Saturday through Sunday LaBatt Blue Light Party Deck—$60 per day (Thursday through Sunday) Kids 17 and under—free (with paid adult) Active and retired military, police officers, and firefighters (plus one guest)—free grounds admission with valid ID Seniors (55+) get free parking and grounds passes on Thursday, July 20th for Kroger Senior Day! Seniors can purchase a Weekly Grounds

Pass for half price, $30. With both of the weekly options above, you can designate a charity to receive 100% of your sales price! Visit marathonclassic.com/ticket-information for a list of eligible charities. Parking, available in Lot B at Centennial and Brint, is $10 for a weekly pass (available online or at Lot B entrance) and $5 for a daily pass (available at Lot B only). ❦ For more information on the 2017 Marathon Classic, please visit marathonclassic.com or call 419531-3277. Follow the tournament on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!

Cancer clinical trials are key to better outcomes and patient quality of life

A

nyone who receives a diagnosis of cancer is hopeful that advanced therapies are available to not only fight their disease effectively, but also to maximize their quality of life throughout treatment and beyond. The good news is, today’s cancer patients have more cause for optimism than ever before. Across the spectrum of cancers, more and more patients are either being cured or living longer, fuller lives—all thanks to advances in diagnosis and treatment options. Of course, advances in cancer care—or any area of health care for that matter—wouldn’t be possible without clinical trials and the patients who willingly participate in them. According to Rex Mowat, MD, of The Toledo Clinic Cancer Centers, “Oncology has come a long way, but there’s still a lot of room for improvement and we always need more options for patients. Clinical trials help us devise new, innovative therapies and diagnostics, establish best practices and standards of care, improve outcomes, reduce side effects such as nausea and nerve damage, lower costs, and improve many different aspects of patients’ quality of life.” Another important focus of cancer clinical trials today is identifying unique characteristics or abnormalities of different cancer cells, which

can lead to the development of more targeted medications as well as help doctors determine which patients will likely respond to particular treatments and which won’t. While it’s impossible to predict the benefits of a clinical trial to any individual, participants sometimes get access (free of charge) to drugs that aren’t available on the market and their health status is monitored very closely by multiple professionals involved in the clinical trial process. And even if participants don’t benefit directly from the study beyond what they can expect from the standard of care, they are still making a vital contribution to research that might revolutionize the care for future patients with the same diagnosis. Perhaps not surprisingly, people are sometimes reluctant to participate in clinical trials out of concern they’ll be treated like a “guinea pig.” However, Dr. Mowat assures patients that with any clinical trial, stringent protections are in place to ensure this doesn’t happen. Among these safeguards is an institutional review board, or IRB, whose responsibility is to review the clinical trial to ensure it follows approved ethical guidelines for the protection of participants and the integrity of the science. Furthermore, through the ongoing

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process of informed consent, study participants are kept apprised of what the treatment will entail, their rights as a participant (including the freedom to decline further participation at any point), potential risks and benefits, alternative treatments that are available, etc. They are never subjected to any treatment or test that wasn’t fully disclosed and discussed in the informed consent process. Eligibility to participate in cancer clinical trials is based on the tumor type and stage of the cancer along with many additional entry criteria. Patients who wish to learn more are encouraged to discuss available studies with their oncologist. Dr. Mowat notes that The Toledo Clinic Cancer Centers participates in cancer clinical trials through the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, a national NCI-sponsored research group, as well as through pharmaceutical trials. “We’re currently involved in around 80 active studies across the breadth of cancers,” he says. “Plus, we offer these studies right here at The Toledo Clinic Cancer Centers, so our patients don’t have to travel to places like the Mayo Clinic, University of Michigan, or University of Chicago to participate. We believe

10  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

offering clinical trials is a marker of a quality oncology group.” ❦ Toledo Clinic Cancer Centers, located at 4126 N. Holland Sylvania Road, Suite 105, has 12 board-certified hematologists/oncologists and 7 nurse practitioners on staff and can provide

imaging and laboratory diagnostic services, chemotherapy services, and IV services. TCCC also has satellite centers in Maumee, Bowling Green, Adrian, and Monroe for the convenience of the patient. For more information, please call the Toledo Clinic Cancer Centers at 419-479-5605.

News from

OTTERBEIN

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Otterbein receives UMA “Eagle” Awards

tterbein Senior Lifestyle Choices won two of the three “Eagle” Awards presented in 2017 by the United Methodist Association. Otterbein’s wins came in a category defined as Best Practices and a second category defined as Innovation. In the category of Best Practices, The Otterbein Lebanon Senior Lifestyle Community received the award for their community partnership to provide a state tested nursing assistant (STNA) training program. In this program, Otterbein collaborates with the Warren County Career Center and

the Warren County Ohio Means Jobs organization to provide an intensive STNA training program inclusive of a training wage for those individuals taking the classes. The inaugural STNA class began in April 2016, and the results have been amazing. The fifteen participants excelled in the classroom and with associated lab work and displayed improved test scores and successful achievement of their certificate of completion. It is expected many of the graduates will enjoy a long career, hopefully much of it in the employ of Otterbein.

In the category of Innovation, Otterbein received the award for the Be bOLD Adventure Group. The program is designed to provide the young-at-heart with the opportunity to experience bold, new experiences. Their first adventure: zip lining! Other Be bOLD Adventures (so far) have included go-cart racing, river rafting, distance hikes, and multiple trips to the zip lines—can skydiving or beyond be much further down the line? Many of the Be bOLD participants trained, competed, and won medals at the Ohio Senior Olympics (17 in all in 2017)! Be bOLD is a resident-driven program, with assistance from the Otterbein activities teams, and has the goal of proving participants place bOLD way ahead of old! Otterbein partners (employees) who join the seniors on their adventures witness renewed energy, excitement, smiles, and fellowship. The adventure group loves to share their experiences with family and friends—especially their grandkids who think their adventuresome grandparents are pretty cool. The Be bOLD Adventure Group is becoming integral to life on every Otterbein Lifestyle Community campus. ❦

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TriggerPoint program yields maximum fitness results with minimal time investment

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o you think you don’t have time “I have been doing high-intensity to exercise? Or perhaps you have workout for years at regular gyms, been exercising regularly for years but it is more efficient if you have the but can’t see where you have made correct equipment,” he explained. any progress. Well, how about trying “Don’t let the fact that it is high-insomething new? tensity put you off. It is perfect for The hottest trend in exercise is everyone and all ages, including ‘Type the high-intensity, 30-minute, once- A’ personalities and even pregnant a-week (yes, we said once a week) women.” This workout is not only exercise method, often referred to efficient, but also safe because it is as Super Slow Training. Though it totally one-on-one with Wakefield goes contrary to what monitoring and adjustmost of us have heard, ing your every move. believed, or practiced, While anyone can it is now the most-disfit a 30-minute workcussed form of exercise, out into their schedwith everyone from ule, skeptics will ask celebrities to CEOs how it is possible for and even pregnant this to actually work. women welcoming the There are two main once-a-week opportunity to free up reasons for the results: their time and still, or even finally, get Moving slowly keeps the tension on results. What do you have to lose? the working muscle throughout the It can be done on your lunch hour, whole movement. There is none of and you don’t even have to change that fast momentum that helps you work while lifting weights. This is and shower. Super Slow Training seems to be done very, very slowly, really working particularly popular among women those muscles. The high intensity of all kinds—from young students to causes the body to adapt. The exerwomen in their 90’s. But according cise is a stimulus, and the body uses to Russ Wakefield, an experienced seven days to recover, producing the personal trainer and owner of Trig- desired results. gerPoint, “The type of woman we see According to Wakefield, any admost frequently is one who is very ditional exercise can prevent the busy with her career and family and body’s building of strength and helps out in the community. She does fat-burning muscle mass. He added yoga and knows she needs strength that lower-intensity activities, such as training but believes she doesn’t have running, stair stepping, and treadmills, the time—that is, until one of her really don’t burn that many calories friends tells her about TriggerPoint.” and can cause injuries to the knees A TriggerPoint client named Mary and hips. fits this description perfectly. “I do We had the opportunity to oblow-force, intense exercise at Trig- serve Eric Bueter, a client, during his gerPoint because, as a lawyer, I have workout. Arriving and remaining in limited time but know that I need to street clothes, with fans turned on strengthen my muscles and bones. to keep the room cool, Bueter slowly The workout takes about 20 minutes and efficiently went through his once or twice a week. Even I can make routine under Wakefield’s tutelage time for that. It’s demanding, but they with weights and on the Super Slow supervise you every step of the way. exercise machines before returning to Plus, the amazing technology makes work. Wakefield added that Bueter it easier to focus on the work to be has been working with him for a done. It’s all business. I zip in, they number of years, and during that take me through my paces, and I’m time the weights have been gradually out the door. I can’t recommend it increased under his supervision.❦ enough!” she said. If there is a good advertisement for Four free trial sessions are offered. For an this workout, it is Wakefield himself, appointment, call Russ Wakefield at 419who has been an advocate of high-in- 536-0408. TriggerPoint, located at 2449 tensity workouts for over 25 years. N. Reynolds Rd., is also on Facebook.

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Assistive devices help seniors stay safe and independent

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s people age, they undergo various physiological changes that can have an adverse impact on muscle mass, bone density, flexibility, dexterity, vision, hearing, balance, and a host of other bodily processes and systems. As a result, seniors often face function and mobility limitations that not only make it more difficult for them to manage activities of daily living, but also significantly increase their risk of experiencing a debilitating fall or other injury. These changes and challenges notwithstanding, seniors as a rule wish to live their

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lives independently for as long as possible. The good news is, thanks to the wide variety of assistive/adaptive products and tools available today, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never been easier for seniors to maintain an independent lifestyle in the comfort of their own homeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or at least minimize their reliance upon loved ones or outside caregivers. In fact, there are very few functional challenges confronting seniors or their at-home caregivers that canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be overcome with the latest assistive/ adaptive devices. What follows is just a sampling of the products and technology available:

reaching the bathroom, especially when awakening at night. Daily grooming and hygiene activities, such as shaving, brushing and combing hair, brushing teeth, flossing, and wiping after toileting, can become particularly challenging for seniors with limited dexterity, flexibility, and range of motion. However, a broad selection of adaptive tools is available to make these activities more manageable, such as long-handled brushes, combs, and sponges; flossing tools; electric razors and toothbrushes with wide, easy-to-grip handles; and various personal wiping aids.

For mobility

For dressing

Seniors who have difficulty standing up from a seated position will find itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much easier to get on their feet and moving with chair leg extenders or an electric lift chair. Once on their feet, they can choose from a wide range of devices that will assist their mobility around the house or anywhere in the community, ranging from simple canes and walkers to powered wheelchairs, scooters, and stair lifts. To facilitate easy wheelchair or scooter access to the home, ramp systems of many different configurations are availableâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even portable ones that can be placed or removed as needed.

The seemingly simple act of getting dressed each dayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with all the reaching, bending, twisting, and pulling it demandsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;can present special challenges to seniors with limited strength, dexterity, and range of motion. But as with bathing, grooming, and hygiene, there are ample assistive tools to help in this process as well. Examples include sock aids to help seniors pull on their socks without needing to bend over, various styles of buttoning aids and zipper pulls that make those tiny buttons and zippers easier to grasp and manipulate, long-handled shoehorns, and elastic shoelaces that allow you to slip shoes on and off without tying.

For the bathroom Perhaps more than any other room in the house, the bathroom presents special challenges related to function and safety. The strategic placement of grab bars and the use of non-slip bath and shower mats are a few obvious ways to address the safety aspect, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the beginning. Seniors can also take advantage of a tub bench or shower seat to facilitate safe transfer in and out of the tub or shower as well as limit standing, bending, and leaning. Converting a standard wall-mounted shower head to a handheld version also enhances safety and convenience. To make it easier to get on and off the commode, the use of a toilet seat riser or toilet safety frame with adjustable arm rests can make a tremendous difference. Of course, portable commodes are an excellent option for seniors with limited mobility who may have difficulty

For the kitchen Cooking and meal preparation is another activity of daily living that tends to get more and more complicated as we age. Fortunately, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no shortage of assistive devices that are handy for the kitchen. A good starting point is a portable, lightweight step stool with a long handle and non-skid surface, which will make it much easier and safer to reach items stored in upper cabinets or on high shelves. Other examples include special adaptive eating utensils (e.g., large-grip or angled utensils, finger-loop or wrist-strap utensils, and rocker knives), double-handled pots, spill-proof drinking cups, jar and bottle openers, and milk carton holders.

For anywhere in the house In any room of the house, seniors can

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keeping track of other important items, such as pill organizers and dispensers, wheelchair or walker caddies and side bags, and various books and journals for keeping track of medical records, doctor appointments, etc. Again, this listing merely scratches the surface of the assistive/adaptive tools that can help seniors remain independent at home and enjoy the highest possible quality of life. For more ideas, see your local medical-supply or assistive-product retailer.  ❦

HEALTH CROSSWORD by Myles Mellor • ilovecrosswords.com • Answers on page 21

Across 1 They make up for mineral deficiencies 8 __ ___ roll (doing well) 10 Physical activity good for health 11 Quick swim 12 Genetic code 14 Cost 15 Removal of tissue for testing 17 Bustle of activity 18 Subject of many government health warnings, for short 19 Breathing organ 20 Where peas grow

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5 Bismarck state 6 Sugary drink regarded by many as unhealthy, 2 words 7 In good spirits 9 Nickel, for short 12 Relating to identifying the cause of a disease 13 Go to sleep very briefly 16 Salad ingredient 18 They’re nuts 21 One who looks to the future and makes goals Down 22 Asparagus pieces 1 A good night’s rest 2 Result of too long in the 24 Hipbone-related 26 Green field sun 31 Thanksgiving’s mo. 3 Chinese fruit 33 Compass point 4 Japanese soup 23 Japanese massage technique 25 Type of oil 27 Inspiration, maybe 28 The NY Manning 29 Place where blood tests are carried out 30 Beach basking result 32 Single 34 Potato amounts 35 Get better

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• Scooters

• Vehicle lifts

• Power chairs

• Ramps/ramping systems

• Patient lifts • Hospital Beds

We also offer: equipment • In-home assessments and demonstrations

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• Stair lifts

Repair services by highly trained technicians

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• Short-term rentals for scooters, wheelchairs and stair lifts

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© 2017 ProMedica

make their lives a lot easier by replacing knobs, handles, and pulls on cabinets, doors, drawers, etc. with versions that are larger or have specialized grips. To achieve good lighting in living areas without having to fumble for switches, touch-sensitive lamps can be substituted for conventional ones. For reaching and retrieving items without having to bend over and risk falling, a long-handled grabber presents a simple solution. What’s more, seniors have all kinds of tools at their disposal for managing medications and

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Visit our website or stop by our showroom to learn more! 5702 Opportunity Dr., Toledo | 800-544-7460 promedica.org/activemobility

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: I just returned from a weekend in New York City and have a new appreciation for the calm and quiet surroundings in our community. I feel sad for those individuals who live in such a noisy environment because it is so overwhelming. How do they live through the constant noise stimulation every day? Isn’t it draining on their bodies and minds?

A

: New York City and many other metropolises have a lot to offer. However, you’re correct: noise pollution is not something to envy! First of all, it’s important to understand the difference between sound and noise. Sounds are a part of life. There are speech sounds, which we use to communicate. Music when used cor-

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rectly can be quite enjoyable. Noise, however, does not necessarily need to be part of our daily life. Noise can be described as an unwanted sound, which causes discomfort to the ear. It becomes annoying when it interferes with our work, sleep habits, conversations, and work or school. Noise essentially diminishes the quality of our day. Noise is measured in decibels. There are limitations on how long you are able to work under excessively loud conditions, according to the World Health Organization and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The permissible decibel level is 90 dBA for an eight-hour workday. Those working in louder environments should only be exposed to 115 dBA for 15 minutes. This is to prevent potential hearing loss and/or tinnitus. To relate to everyday life, typical conversational speech is between 50 and 65 decibels. If you are surrounded by levels much higher than that, you won’t be able to effectively hear or understand the people around you. As a result, everyone will try to resolve the situation by talking over each other. This is definitely not a calm environment. Several years ago, Michael Bloomberg, former mayor of New York City, was concerned about the noise in the city. Studies

found that typical traffic in midtown Manhattan registered around 79 decibels. Once horns started going off, levels easily reached 90 decibels. Noise pollution is a concern because it may not just affect hearing. In the long term, it can cause tinnitus, high stress levels, sleep disturbance, and other harmful effects. Studies have shown that prolonged exposure to noise may increase the risk of heart disease such as high blood pressure and an irregular heart rate (L. Barregard 2009). Restless nights can cause poor heart health, exhaustion, depression, and poor performance at work and home. This doesn’t ensure you sleep well at night either; increased movement means your body can’t relax. Excessive noise exposure can affect you psychologically as well. If you are already at risk of mental illness, noise pollution can increase the symptoms, contributing to increased anxiety, emotional instability, moodiness, and loss of concentration (Sciencing 2017). I hope I’ve answered your question on noise pollution and how it can affect the human body. Of course, we all want to be able to travel and experience adventures around the world. We also need to be able to work in potentially noisy environments. Now you know to be cautious and protect your hearing when excessive noise is present for prolonged periods of time. Take caution and protect your health by decreasing time in excessive noise and utilize ear protection when warranted. We hope you have a great summer! Randa Mansour-Shousher, AuD, CCC-A, is a Doctor of Audiology with Northwest Ohio Hearing Clinic, located at 1125 Hospital Dr., Suite 50 in Toledo (419-383-4012) and 1601 Brigham Dr., Suite 160 in Perrysburg (419-873-4327).

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Toledo area is rich with opportunities to get a move on, by Jim Berger

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a great way to burn those calories. In fact, the AHA also notes that a person weighing 150 pounds and walking a comfortable speed of two miles per hour will burn 240 calories in one hour! Walking also stimulates the release of endorphins, the body’s natural pain killers and mood lifters, while dissipating adrenaline, the “fightor-flight” hormone that can cause Take a walk or hike nervousness and anxiety if it is not in September and October! There’s no time like the present to take released from the body. So take a hike FREE every Tuesday–plus activities, a walk oradmission a hike—literally! WhetherFREEand watch your sense of well-being live music and tours for our friends 60+. your walk or hike leads you through soar and your stress level plummet. the On neighborhood, your and favorite weekdays in September October, you’ll also get Toledo Metroparks localFREE metropark (Toledo is blessed coffee and mini muffin from 10 am until 2 pm to have so many), or even a state Are you aware that we have 15 metat Timberline Bakery, plus 20% off or national it will help tone up roparks, offering vast opportunities at our park, gift shops. your cardiovascular system, reduce your stress level, boost your mood, and Visit simply help you reconnect with toledozoo.org/seniors nature. No further discounts will be Many allowedpeople — cannot make the erroneous be combined with assumption thatanyexercise won’t do discounts or offers. any other good unless they commit to several agonizing hours a day. But according to the American Heart presented by Association (AHA), just 30 to 60 minutes of walking three to four times a week is ample. Walking is ummer has started, and as we have seen so far this year, that time seems to be going by quickly. As I have shared over the® last two months, it is so important for us to get up and go. Why not take full advantage of the weather that summer offers and enjoy all the jewels in the Toledo area as you keep focused on your health and wellness?

to enjoy outdoor and indoor activities and events? Besides walking trails and bike paths, our metroparks offer horseback riding, fishing, canoeing, kayaking, paddle boarding, archery, birding, picnic shelters, winter activities (yes it is July), plus a Canal Experience that takes you back in time to 1876. In addition to these activities, they offer educational camps along with preschool and family programs. To find out more about the many activities go to https://metroparkstoledo.com/.

Toledo Botanical Gardens (TBG) This is another wonderful place for walking and taking in all of nature’s beauty. Plus you can learn so much

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more about gardening and plants. TBG also offers special events such as the Crosby Festival of Arts, Jazz in the Garden, and Heritage Festival Weekend. Visit http://www.toledo garden.org for information on events.

The Toledo Zoo What about the zoo? If you haven’t been to the zoo recently, you need to go! The zoo has added a number of exhibits along with the Aerial Adventure Course, which includes a Sky Bridge, Zip Line, Flight Line, and a Quick Jump. The zoo also has evening concerts throughout the summer. For more information, visit https://www.toledozoo.org.

Ride a bike Bike riding is another wonderful way to enjoy the outdoors. If you have been riding, ask someone else to go with you and don’t forget to wear a helmet. If you haven’t been riding in a long time, don’t be hesitant. You can still do it! You may be a little wobbly at first, but the balance and ease all will come back. Just start out slowly and don’t overdo it by pushing yourself to go

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five miles (you will feel it the next day).

Tennis Tennis is an activity that you can enjoy whether you’re young or in your mature years. With tennis and other sports, be sure to warm up before the game. If you aren’t sure how to warm up or what to do, work with a trained sports medicine specialist or therapist to find out the best warmup exercises and stretches for your sport. Make sure that you are using the proper technique for your swing. Work with a tennis instructor or tennis pro to insure that you are using a swing that is both safe and effective. If you have an injury that sidelines you, don’t try to come back too soon. Otherwise, you run the risk of re-injuring yourself, possibly even more severely than before.

Golf Golf is another game that you can continue to play into later years. It is

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another way to be outdoors and to enjoy the environment and company around you. To help prevent some injuries, especially to the shoulder due to repetitive overuse syndromes of the rotator cuff muscles, listen to your body. If you start to feel aches and pains, then call it a day. Always warm up—do a 10-minute warmup before the game followed by some simple neck rolls and stretches. Shorten the backswing slightly—you should end with the club head at 1:00 rather than at 3:00. Make sure that you are using the proper grip. If you are not sure, then check with a golf pro or instructor.

Hens When was the last time you were downtown for a Mudhen’s game? This is another great opportunity to get out with family and friends and enjoy an evening or afternoon of fun. Hensville and all the restaurants downtown make it an enjoyable experience to go along with America’s favorite pastime of baseball. Go to http://www.milb.com/index. jsp?sid=t512 for tickets.

Walt’s Corner

It’s 4 o’clock, what’s for dinner?

Turn to this tantalizing column each month for a healthy, flavorful recipe from Walt Churchill’s Market—like this one for Caribbean Ribeye Steaks with Grilled Pineapple Salad.

Not a problem at Walt Churchill’s Market.

Caribbean Ribeye Steaks with Grilled Pineapple Salad Total recipe time: 25 to 35 minutes. Makes 4 servings. Ingredients:

2 beef ribeye steaks, boneless, cut 1 inch thick (about 12 ounces each) 3 Tbs. chopped fresh cilantro, divided 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/4 to 1/2 tsp. ground red pepper 4 fresh pineapple slices, cut 1/2 inch thick 1 medium red bell pepper, cut in half lengthwise 1 medium lime Salt Instructions:

WaltChurchillsMarket.com Maumee 419.794.4000 | Perrysburg 419.872.6900 16  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

Combine 2 tablespoons cilantro, cumin, and ground red pepper, as desired; press evenly onto beef steaks. Place steaks on grid over medium, ash-covered coals; arrange pineapple slices and bell pepper halves around steaks. Grill steaks, covered, 10 to 14

minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, 9 to 14 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Grill pineapple 8 minutes or until heated through, turning once. Grill bell pepper 6 to 8 minutes or until tender, turning occasionally. Meanwhile, grate 2 teaspoons peel and squeeze juice from lime. Set aside. Chop pineapple and bell pepper into 1-inch pieces. Combine remaining 1 tablespoon cilantro, 2 teaspoons lime peel, and lime juice in medium bowl; stir in pineapple and bell pepper. Season with salt, as desired. Carve steaks into slices; season with salt, as desired. Serve with salad. Cook’s tip: Four to six canned pineapple slices may be substituted for fresh pineapple.

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Hydrate—but how much? While you are out and enjoying all these wonderful activities, don’t forget hydration is important. How much? This is an easy question with no easy answer. Each person is different and needs to drink a different amount of water every day. If you’re looking for a ballpark figure, it is often recommended that you drink eight or nine, eight-ounce cups of water a day. Here is some information to keep in mind: • If you start to get thirsty, this means you’re already on your way to being dehydrated. Dehydration can lead to headaches, lack of energy, dizziness, and much worse symptoms if you let it get too far. • Exercise impacts your hydration needs. How much water you need varies by how much water you expel. It’s a good idea to drink a glass of

water before and after you exercise. • Even if you aren’t exercising, the heat and humidity can zap much of the water you need. So pour a glass before sitting outside. It’s refreshing, and when the sun’s on your face, you’ll be glad you did. Now, it’s no secret that water is essential to our bodies. It helps us function and keeps us going. So, especially during these hot days of summer, keep cool, drink up, and stay hydrated! ❦ It is the goal of Heartland Rehabilitation Services to assist you in focusing on your health and wellness for life. If you have any questions about Heartland Rehabilitation Services or how physical and occupational therapy can benefit you, please feel free to contact Jim Berger at 419-787-6741 or visit us at www.heartlandrehab.com. Heartland Rehabilitation Services has five outpatient physical therapy clinics in the greater Toledo area.

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH Life is Waiting...

Mental Health and Substance Use Treatment

Join the High Street Hunger Fighters™ by Deborah Vas

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k, so there’s nothing particularly exciting or fun about hunger, but after 37+ years, SeaGate Food Bank has learned a lot about what it takes to meet the ongoing challenge of hunger. As a major food distributor, we provide food free of charge to over 430 food pantries in northwest Ohio each month. Many hundreds of volunteers work with us each week to pack boxes and facilitate that distribution, and we love and appreciate them all. But you should know that while SeaGate Food Bank provides food to about 127,000 people each month, our full-time staff is only 10. Yes, we are a very lean machine. We also realize that the concept of “food bank” sounds a little boring and static,

when our work is anything but. It’s no surprise that our staff gets stretched a little thin with three or four important fundraisers each year, plus ongoing programs like our Eat Right Academy, Project PJ, Veterans Marketplace, Help Me Grow, Hi Rise Garden, Alice’s Mobile Market, and many more. Great news for us (and maybe you) is that an exciting new “task force” is forming that promises to bring “hunger” a little more mainstream—the “High Street Hunger Fighters.™” A volunteer suggested that a group of about 20 outgoing, caring citizens could extend the efforts of in-house staff and help tell our unique story. We’d like you to consider becoming a part of it. The High Street Hunger Fighters’ main role will be to function as educated ambassadors for SeaGate

Inpatient, outpatient and partial hospitalization programs Inpatient: • Acute psychiatric hospitalization • Rehabilitation • Detoxification • Dual diagnosis • Chemical dependency Outpatient: • Intensive outpatient • Partial hospitalization

Assessments 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call 800-547-5695. Arrowhead Behavioral Health 1725 Timber Line Road Maumee, OH 43537 www.arrowheadbehavioral.com With limited exceptions, physicians are not employees or agents of this hospital. Model representations of real patients are shown. Actual patients cannot be divulged due to HIPAA regulations.

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17


Food Bank. As a dedicated hunger fighter, you will learn the facts about hunger in our regional community as well as exactly what we do. We will count on your “people skills” to support our fundraising events and programs, and you can expect to have a lot of fun along the way. Our goal is to recruit community-minded, high-energy professionals like you willing to devote about 10 hours a month to make some phone calls, perhaps do a few presentations, and contact organizations, businesses, and individuals to tell the SeaGate Food Bank story. High Street Hunger Fighters is so named since SeaGate Food Bank is located on High Street in the Old South End. We’d love to hear your ideas, and you could even help plan new friend-raising and fundraising events if you’re interested. Naturally, you may also want to recommend friends who would make great goodwill ambassadors to work with you. That would be great. We promise you will never be bored, and with a 10-hour-per-month commitment, we won’t take up much of your time. Interested in learning more? Join us for a brief no-obligation organizational meeting on Tuesday, August 1 at 5:30 p.m. at SeaGate Food Bank, 526 High Street, Toledo, Ohio 43609. Confirm your attendance by calling Angi at 419-244-6996 or emailing volunteer@seagatefoodbank.org. Learn more about us at SeaGateFoodBank. org. Thanks and we look forward to meeting you! ❦ Deborah Vas is the Executive Director of SeaGate Food Bank Inc.

nobody’s perfect Sister Karen Zielinski, OSF

Watch where you’re going!

I

have run over my foot and my sister Judy’s foot. I have tipped over in my electric cart outside my house because I carelessly rode over a rounded curb. I sometimes use my cell phone when I travel outside on secluded sidewalks. I’ve also been known to drink (coffee) and drive, too. Although I do these little electric cart transgressions, I take very seriously using my electric cart safely. I try to pay attention to my surroundings and any pedestrian traffic. I slow down when I am in a busy area. Believe it or not, my office doorway is a problem. Walkers often tailgate me. I remind them that in order to get into my office I need to make a sharp turn. “Please back up. I need to back up to turn in now.” When I am in a grocery store using one of the store’s scooters with a basket, I sometimes tell people who are standing in the middle of an aisle, “I am going to pass you to get over there.” I smile but make my

intentions very clear.

Basic safety When I drive inside buildings, I try to follow basic, common driving procedures: I always drive my cart on the right side of the corridor; I check both ways before I cross or make a turn in a corridor; I use any indoor backup mirrors, which are placed in the elevators or hidden corners, before I move; I use a sensible speed when I ride; and I make it a point to tell people when I am passing them in the corridor (“I’m coming on your left side, just so you know!”). A wheelchair or motorized cart is an extension of the user’s body, and it is a device that needs to be run safely. I searched for hours trying to locate any safety guidelines for using wheelchairs, electric wheelchairs, or scooters inside or outside a building. I found many items on wheelchair

courtesy—but that related to how we speak to a person using a wheelchair or electric cart, not the safe operation of these devices. Years ago, a friend who is an occupational therapy assistant (OTA) told me, “People who use wheelchairs or scooters need to remember that, just like in outdoor traffic with automobiles, the pedestrian has the right of way. Persons using electronic devices need to be courteous and careful of those walking without these devices.” Beth says that her wheelchair users take a Powered Mobility Device Evaluation Test. This is a basic inventory of skills needed to operate devices safely for both the operator and others around. The drivers are evaluated by an occupational therapist and/ or physical therapist. After listing information about the type and model of the device, there is a skills evaluation for indoor use. The driver is evaluated on such skills as:

Indoor test Task 1: Transfer out of and into mobility device Task 2: Mobility device components (can demonstrate successful use of wheel locks, brakes, seat locks, seat belts, footrests, etc.) Task 3: Control operation (can adjust steering controls, forward and reverse functions, raise or lower speed, demonstrate left and right direction, connect and disengage the battery) Task 4: Drive in a corridor (moves through a corridor, moves with pedestrians, stays straight, avoids obstacles, stops or slows at intersections, stops

Dementia creates big challenges, especially during life’s final months.

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can hospice help at home?

We can help you make the right care choices. Call 419.661.4001.

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immediately on command) Task 5: Controlled turning (adjusts speed for maneuvering, turns through doorway, turns around 180 degrees to the right/clockwise, turns 180 degrees to the left/counter clockwise) Task 6: Turn around with backing maneuver (initiates turn by driving forward, avoids hitting the wall, looks behind or uses a mirror during the backing, proceeds in opposite direction) Task 7: Maneuvering in a congested area (stays at the speed of pedestrians, does not tailgate pedestrians, passes pedestrians in a close area, yields to the person or passes on left, gives right of way to pedestrians or other scooters, does not stop too close to a pedestrian) Task 8: Maneuvering in a tight area (maneuvers through safely, avoids contact with stationary objects, positions mobility device next to toilet, dresser, etc., exits area without contacting stationary items) Task 9: Approach/depart table (approaches the table, positions scooter/ device at table without contacting other chairs or obstacles, turns off device before eating, no collision with table or people, moves away

from table) Task 10: Operate door that pulls open (position device to pull/open door, backs up holding door open) Task 11: Operate door that pushes open (does not ram door, pressed door opens slowly, uses correct push angle) Task 12: Operate fire door with release bar (uses one hand to release door, does not ram the door, pressed door opens slowly, uses correct pushing angle) Task 13: Operate switch-activated automatic door (positions mobility device to activate door, drives through door without hitting wall, able to activate automatic door from the outside door opener and get into the building without hitting door or wall)

skills, too, such as decision-making, quick judgments, depth perception, and common sense. AGIS (Assist Guide Information Services, www.agis.com) offers an online publication, Mobility Training for User and Public Safety (with Motorized Wheelchairs and Scooters) so that users and pedestrians “will enjoy more, better, and safer mobility.” Persons using mobility devices need to be careful drivers. Their health and lives, as well as those of their friends (pedestrians), deserve a safe and secure environment. Just like driving a car, any motorized de-

vice needs to be run by drivers who possess the skills to operate them, and with the courtesy they would want people to give them in their cars or carts.  ❦ Sister Karen Zielinski is the Director of Canticle Studio. Canticle Studio is a part of the Sisters of St. Francis of Sylvania, OH’s overall advancement effort and has a mission of being a creative center where artists generate works, products, and services in harmony with the mission of the Sisters St. Francis. She can be reached at kzielins@sistersosf.org or 419-824-3543.

Outdoor test Task 1: Negotiate sidewalk environment Task 2: Negotiate street crossing environment If a person fails the test, they are given more training and can test again. Just like in driving a car, there are basic skills needed for everyone’s safety. Driving a wheelchair or electric cart demands cognitive

James D. Diethelm, MD Ryan Szenderski, PA-C Same day appointments available with our physician assistant

419.473.2273 7640 W. Sylvania Ave., Suite C2 Sylvania, Ohio 43560

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When nursing care is needed, the Health Care Center at Ohio Living Swan Creek offers compassionate long-term care. We provide short-termrehabilitation after hospitalization for neurological diseases, orthopedic surgery, cardiovascular events or other debilitating conditions. Our patients enjoy private suites, experienced staff, and chef-prepared meals. Medicare, Medicaid and most insurances are accepted.

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Hidden hearing loss by Dianna Randolph, AuD, CCC-A

A

hidden hearing loss is a type that cannot be measured by the most common hearing test. On suspicion of a hearing loss, the first step is to visit an audiologist and have a full audiological evaluation, but for people with hidden hearing loss, the audiogram looks as it does for someone with normal hearing. In the normal ear, the sound waves are transmitted through the middle ear bones to the inner ear, where they cause vibrations in the hair cells. These vibrations in the hair cells then transform the signals via the nerve cells into electrical pulses, which are sent to the brain.

Cause of hidden hearing loss

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pushing beyond limitations 20  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

Loud noise can damage hair cells in your inner ear as well as the ear’s nerve cells. When the nerve cells are damaged, it is normally harder to pick out specific sounds in noisy places. With a hidden hearing loss, the damage caused by noise is located in nerve cells that connect the cochlea in the inner ear to the brain. The nerve cells lose their connections (synapse) with the hair cells, so they cannot send information to the brain. As a result, the brain receives lesser and poorer information from the ear and, therefore, struggles to interpret the information correctly (hearit.org/hidden-hearing-loss). It’s like looking at a Jumbotron and having the light bulbs gradually go out, making it harder to distinguish what the picture is. Previous research has found signs of such hidden hearing loss in mice, guinea pigs, chinchillas, and postmortem human ear tissue. Now auditory physiologist and study co-author Stéphane Maison and his colleagues have taken the next logical step: investigating hidden hearing loss in human patients. “In the end, the main goal is to have a measure of hidden hearing loss that is currently not available in [the] clinic,” Maison says. To test the tools they developed, the researchers divided 34 volunteers, ranging from ages 18 to 41, into two groups: a low-risk one composed of college students studying “quiet subjects” (such as communication science) and a high-risk group mostly

consisting of music students exposed to loud sounds for four to six hours per day. Both groups passed their audiograms with flying colors. When the researchers extended the test to include higher frequencies than are normally evaluated, however, the high-risk group had trouble hearing the sounds at low volumes. The researchers also outfitted subjects with electrodes to measure how each volunteer’s auditory nerve responds to sound (which they compared with the response of the hair cells for each individual to reduce variability). The auditory nerves of subjects in the high-risk group did not respond to sound as robustly as those of subjects in the low-risk group. Perhaps most striking, when subjects were asked to listen to words and repeat them back while noise played in the background, the high-risk group performed significantly worse than the low-risk group. The same was true when the words were sped up and played with a background echo. On a questionnaire that accompanied the tests, the high-risk group indicated they were more “bothered” by everyday sounds like a dog barking or a baby crying than the low-

risk group was. Cumulatively, these results reveal not only that hidden hearing loss can start at a young age, but also that it is not so hidden after all—it adversely affects our hearing in numerous ways, including the ability to detect high-frequency sounds and hear in noisy settings. In a quiet place, Maison says, “you’re not going to notice it, but when you’re going to go to a bar or a restaurant, and there’s a lot of background noise, you’re going to struggle.” (Scientific American, Sept. 15, 2016)

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Signs of hidden hearing loss

nerves or damaged nerve synapses. Hidden hearing loss could be A hidden hearing loss doesn’t norsignificantly under-diagnosed. It is mally affect a person’s ability to hear likely to affect youngquiet sounds, but it Hidden hearing loss er people who go to makes it harder to loud music concerts or is like looking at a hear sounds when there is competing Jumbotron and having spend time listening to loud music through background noise. A hidden hearing loss the light bulbs gradually headphones. People cannot be measured go out, making it harder who have a hidden hearing loss when with standard hearing to distinguish what they are younger tests. the picture is. may suffer from more At Northwest Ohio severe hearing loss, Hearing Clinic, when tinnitus, or sound sensitivity when a patient presents with hidden hearthey get older. ing loss, other tests we have in our arsenal are required. One is called an Otoacoustic Emission test. This test evaluates the integrity of the outer hair cells in the inner ear. Another test is called a QuickSIN, or Speech in Noise, test. This test can evaluate a person’s ability to hear and understand speech in the presence of background noise. Finally, we also have an Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) test. This is a test for neural synchrony and basically follows a click tone that is presented to the ear through the auditory pathway to the brainstem. Results of this test could reveal a lower number of auditory

Treatment of hidden hearing loss If you think you might have a hidden hearing loss, you should make an appointment with an audiologist and tell them about your hearing problems. He or she can help to identify any hearing problems and help you treat your hearing loss. Treatment would help improve the speech signal when in background noise and other listening strategies (hear-it.org/hidden-hearing-loss). If you are having difficulty hearing or your family/friends say you are

missing conversation, it is very important to have your hearing checked by an audiologist. We can diagnose your hearing problem and give you recommendations. Please call one of our offices at 419-303-4012 in Toledo and 419-873-4327 in Perrysburg to schedule your appointment.  ❦

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Toledo Office 1125 Hospital Dr Ste 50 Toldeo, OH 43614

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Perrysburg Office 1601 Bringham Dr Ste 160 Perrysburg, OH 43551

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Dianna Randolph, AuD, CCC-A, is a Doctor of Audiology with Northwest Ohio Hearing Clinic, located at 1125 Hospital Dr., Suite 50 in Toledo (419383-4012) and 1601 Brigham Dr., Suite 160 in Perrysburg (419-873-4327).

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Ask us how yo can ge u t you COMP LIMEN r T Hearin ARY g Screen ing Today !

Let’s talk about getting you more from Medicare. Talk with your local licensed Humana sales agent today. James Hunt (419) 490-7618 (TTY: 711) 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday - Friday

Carolyn Ferris (419) 490-4355 (TTY: 711) 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday - Friday

No obligation to enroll. Humana is a Medicare Advantage HMO, PPO and PFFS organization and a stand-alone prescription drug plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in any Humana plan depends on contract renewal. This information is available for free in other languages. Please contact a licensed Humana sales agent at 1-800-336-6801 (TTY: 711), 8 a.m. – 8 p.m., Monday – Friday. English: ATTENTION: If you do not speak English, language assistance services, free of charge, are available to you. Call 1-800-281-6918 (TTY: 711), 8 a.m. – 8 p.m., Monday – Friday. Y0040_GHHHXDEEN17 Accepted 17HUMO8835v1.indd 11:0421 AM Connect with our1 advertisers via our online issue at www.hlntoledo.com  |  Healthy Living News  |  July4/28/17 2017 


Elizabeth Scott Community 2720 Albon Road Maumee, OH 43537 419-865-3002 www.elizabethscott.org

Lutheran Memorial Home 795 Bardshar Rd. Sandusky, OH 44870 419-502-5700 www.GenacrossLutheranServices.org

Sunrise Senior Care 3710 Talmadge Rd. Toledo, OH 43606 419-704-5335 www.sunrise-senior-care.com

Genacross Lutheran Services Wolf Creek Campus

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Reynolds Senior Village

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Toledo, Ohio 43615

419-861-2233

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   Senior Living Guide Choosing a senior living community that’s right for you or a loved one is among the most important—and challenging— decisions you’ll make in your lifetime. We’re fortunate here in Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan to have a wide variety of high-quality senior living options, including independent living, assisted living, continuing-care, and subsidized low-income housing communities. To make your decision a bit easier, we’ve assembled this guide to all the senior living properties that regularly support Healthy Living News through advertising. In addition to referencing this page for each organization’s contact information, we urge you to see their ads in the pages of this issue, check out their websites, and give them a call to schedule a tour if you are interested in hearing more about all the services and amenities they offer.

St. Clare Commons

The Manor at Perrysburg

12469 Five Point Road Perrysburg, OH 43551

250 Manor Drive Perrysburg, OH 43551

419-931-0050

419-874-0306

www.homeishere.org

www.ManorAtPerrysburg.com

Sunset House

Swan Creek Retirement Village

4030 Indian Rd. Ottawa Hills, OH 43606 419-536-4645 www.sunset-communities.org

The Woodlands 4030 Indian Rd. Ottawa Hills, OH 43606 419-724-1220 www.sunset-communities.org

5916 Cresthaven Lane Toledo, OH 43614 419-865-4445 www.swancreekohio.org

Otterbein Skilled Nursing and Rehab Neighborhoods Monclova/Perrysburg 3529 Rivers Edge Drive Perrysburg, OH 43551 Ryanna Redmon • 419-308-0585 Ryanna.Redmon@Otterbein.org

Sunset Village

Otterbein Portage Valley Senior Lifestyle Community

9640 Sylvania-Metamora Rd. Sylvania, OH 43560

20311 Pemberville Rd. Pemberville, OH 43450

419-724-1200

Geri Ricker • 419-833-8917 gricker@otterbein.org

www.sunset-communities.org

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22  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

Foundation Park Alzheimer's Care Center 1621 S. Byrne Rd. Toledo, OH 43614 419-385-3958 www.foundationpark.com

961 S. Reynolds Road 419-389-1412 www.ReynoldsSeniorVillage.com

Parkcliffe Community 4226 Parkcliffe Lane Toledo, OH 43615 419-381-9447 www.parkcliffe.com

Pelham Manor 2700 Pelham Rd Toledo, OH 43606 419-537-1515 www.jewishtoledo.org

Fieldstone Villas 9640 Sylvania-Metamora Rd. Sylvania, OH 43560 419-386-2686 www.sunset-communities.org

Franciscan Care Center

Glendale Assisted Living

4111 N. Holland-Sylvania Rd. Toledo, Ohio 43623

5020 Ryan Road Toledo, OH 43614

419-882-6582

419-389-0800

www.homeishere.org

www.glendaleassistedliving.com

The Laurels of Toledo

Bowling Green Manor

1011 Byrne Road Toledo, OH 43607

1021 West Poe Road Bowling Green, OH 43402

419-536-7600

419-352-4694

www.laurelsoftoledo.com

www.BowlingGreenManor.com

Genacross Lutheran Services Toledo Campus

Bowling Green Care Center

131 Wheeling St. Toledo, OH 43605

Bowling Green, OH 43402

419-724-1414 www.GenacrossLutheranServices.org

850 West Poe Road 419-352-7558 www.BGCareCenter.com

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Short-term respite care offers options for seniors and their families

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ummer and fall are the perfect time for a vacation to get away and recharge your batteries, but you care for your elderly parents, what can you do? Perhaps you or your loved one is having an outpatient procedure and isn't comfortable returning home. Where can you go? Well, CHI Living Communities St. Clare Commons in Perrysburg, just minutes from Levis Commons shopping and entertainment center, may have the answer with their short-term respite care for seniors. Offered in their assisted living senior community, guests can utilize as little or as much physical and medical assistance as they need. As a respite-care guest, one can take full advantage of all the services and amenities that St. Clare Commons has to offer, including executive chef-prepared choice dining, barber/ beauty salon, StarbucksTM coffee shop, relaxing on the patio, and plenty of activities. “What our guests really appreciate are the social, recreational, spiritual, and cultural activities we offer. You can take an art class, join us for drinks

at Happy Hour, enjoy entertainment throughout the week, take an exercise class, go to Mass, or attend a prayer service. There is so much for our seniors to do,” explained Michael Freeman, Executive Director for St. Clare Commons. Respite care can be for seven to 30 days. “Often a senior will have an outpatient procedure and is not comfortable with returning home. Their adult child’s work schedule may not

Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for Nursing Care Center Accreditation by demonstrating continuous compliance with its performance standards. The Gold Seal of Approval is a symbol of quality that reflects an organization’s commitment to providing safe and effective patient and resident care. “The Gold Seal of Approval is not mandatory for nursing homes.

permit them to be with them 24/7. We can provide the assistance they need in one of our respite apartments. Also, if their recovery requires rehab, we have rehabilitation services on our premises, seven days a week,” said Freeman. St. Clare Commons earned The

Rather it shows St. Clare Commons is committed to quality care that goes beyond what is mandated. That’s why our respite guests are in the best of hands,” explained Freeman. Respite care can provide more than just assistance; it also encourages socialization for seniors—a chance to

make new friends and spend time with people their own age in a safe, supportive environment. Seniors can participate in activities designed to match their personal interests and hobbies. For some adult children it is the perfect opportunity to show Mom and/or Dad exactly what a senior living community has to offer. “Several of our residents at St. Clare Commons started as respite guests. It provided them the chance to see what it was like, to make some friends, and realize all the socialization they were missing,” added Freeman. St. Clare Commons nurtures the healing ministry of the Church through comprehensive and spiritually enriching services for seniors of all faiths including Masses, sacraments, and Protestant prayer services. They are committed to creating an environment where home is truly here for all who enter. Located at 12469 Five Point Road in Perrysburg, the 55-acre St. Clare Commons campus is adjacent to the St. John XXIII Catholic Community. Close to shopping, dining, and

St. Clare Commons earns accreditation from The Joint Commission Accreditation by The Joint Commission is a voluntary process that is above and beyond what is required by federal and state mandates, and demonstrates St. Clare Commons’ commitment to the highest level of care.

The Gold Seal of Approval® is a symbol of quality that reflects commitment to providing safe and effective patient and resident care.

Offering a continuum of care that includes assisted living, memory care, skilled nursing and rehabilitation services, St. Clare Commons makes every person feel that home is here. To learn more about call 419.931.0050 or visit homeishere.org. Follow us on Facebook.

Assisted Living Memory Care Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation

12469 Five Point Road Perrysburg, Ohio 43551 419.931.0050 homeishere.org

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23


entertainment, St. Clare Commons offers a continuum of care including assisted living, memory care, skilled nursing, and rehabilitation services.

To learn more about St. Clare Commons, call 419-931-0050 for a tour or go to homeishere.org. Follow them on Facebook. ❦

by Douglas A. Schwan, DC, Dip ac

Expanding benefits for veterans and Medicaid patients

A

Are You Suffering? Try Acupuncture! AcupuncTure cAn help. • Migraines, Fibromyalgia & Arthritis • Infertility, Menopause & PMS • Bell’s Palsy, Carpal Tunnel & Sciatica • Pinched Nerve, Allergy & Sinusitis • Smoking, Weight & Stress Control

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“My husband and I had a two pack a day cigarette habit. We tried patches, gum and drugs but nothing worked. A friend reccomended Dr. Schwan to us for acupuncture. After our treatments my husband and I have both been smoke-free for eight months now! I tell all my friends about how Dr Schwan gave us back a healthy lifestyle!” ... Kristin & Tyler

Dr. Douglas Schwan, Licensed Chiropractor & Acupuncturist Over 32 Years experience with holistic health care Educated: Palmer College & International Academy Medical Acupuncture

Schwan Chiropractic and Acupuncture is dedicated to promoting health and wellness through the traditional Eastern techniques of acupuncture, nutrition, chiropractic and lifestyle choices.

Schwan chiropractic & Acupuncture center

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24  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

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s more and more research demonstrates the benefits of acupuncture for treating global pain, old surgical pain, PTSD, anxiety, depression, and substance abuse, insurance companies such as the Veterans Administration and Medicaid are adding acupuncture services as a covered procedure. Acupuncture in the Western world is a relatively innovative approach to treatment. While Traditional Eastern medicine has been incorporating acupuncture for over two thousand years, only since the 1960s has the West taken a serious interest. During the Vietnam conflict, many Western doctors practiced alongside Vietnamese physicians treating injured soldiers. The Western doctors were impressed by what they saw, and many then learned these ancient treatment techniques and began writing about and, more importantly, practicing them when they returned to the United States. While alternative treatments such as chiropractic have long been included as covered benefits for veterans and Medicaid patients, veterans have been covered for acupuncture only since January of 2016. Starting in October of 2017, Ohio Medicaid patients will now find that acupuncture services are a covered procedure. This is wonderful news since, up to now, Medicaid patients have had to scrape together funds to pay for services themselves. Acupuncture treatments involve the painless insertion of very fine needles at specific points on the body. These points are found along 32 individual channels that are referred to as Meridians by Eastern practitioners. These Meridians carry a form of energy referred to as “qi” (pronounced “chi”). Eastern practitioners believe issues with the qi energy flow can interfere with the body’s ability to heal and can exacerbate pain. Other disciplines have described this energy differently.

For example, doctors of chiropractic typically refer to the “Innate” healing energy of the body while allopathic doctors talk about the “Vitalistic” energy that maintains homeostasis within the body. It doesn’t matter what you call it, only that you have enough and proper flow to maintain optimum health. Today, patients may walk into a clinic seeking acupuncture for a wide spectrum of complaints. We are treating patients for arthritic pain, failed back surgery, global pain from conditions such as fibromyalgia, addiction treatment for smoking or alcohol/drug use, and treatment for PTSD, depression, and anxiety. Treatment for fertility, weight loss, and even cosmetic facial rejuvenation with acupuncture are also seeing a surge in demand. In Ohio, acupuncturists must be licensed by the state to practice. By far, most of the practitioners are chiropractic or medical physicians who have received advanced training in this complex specialty. A practitioner may also graduate from a specialized school and be noted as an LAC (licensed acupuncturist). Most doctors that practice acupuncture understand that a new patient will have many questions, and most clinics will provide an initial free consultation to discuss your issues and determine the benefits an Eastern Medicine approach may provide. If you have been suffering from chronic pain for a while and are tired of taking strong drugs, a more natural treatment with virtually no side effects may be a source of help.❦ Dr. Schwan is available to speak with your group on a wide range of holistic topics. Just drop him a line at FAQ@ AcupunctureToledo.com. For more information about TCM, acupuncture, or Schwan Chiropractic & Acupuncture Center, please visit us at www. AcupunctureToledo.com.

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Parkinson Foundation of Northwest Ohio

Dedicated to Educate, Comfort and Raise Awareness

SAVE THE DATE

THURSDAY

AUG 24 2017

GAME STARTS AT

6:35 pm

SPONSORED BY THE PaRkiNSON FOuNDaTiON OF NORTHwEST OHiO

Fun Night with the

Mud Hens!

we have reserved the Nest at 5:30 for dinner and the game starts at 6:35! Reservations will be capped at 100 people, please make your reservations early! Reservations can be made at www.pfnwo.org or call us at 800-438-5584

FRiDaY

OCT 6 2017 You are invited to the PaRkiNSON FOuNDaTiON OF NORTHwEST OHiO

Gala

Dinner, Dancing & Silent auction

Pacing for Parkinson’s

6:00 - 10:00 pm The Pinnacle, Maumee, Ohio

10:00 am – Registration • 10:30 am – Kids Scavenger Hunt 11:00 am – Parkinson’s Walk • Noon – Pasta Dinner

$30 per person / Cash Bar

SATURDAY

SEPT 16 2017

Buehner Center at Oak Openings Sign up will be available closer to date.

Reservations at www.pfnwo.org Proceeds from the evening will be donated to the Parkinson Foundation of Northwest Ohio for Parkinson awareness, education and assistance programs.

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25


one special food you can take home and make a mundane meal really great. If you love to cook, the farmers market is the place to be!

EATING WELL

Seasonal eating

by Laurie Syring, RD/LD

Support your local farmers market

I

t’s that time of year again—early summer when we all get excited about good weather, vacations, etc. For healthy food aficionados like me, farmers markets are another cause for excitement at this time of year. For my money, there’s no better place to buy fruits and vegetables. The freshness and flavor of their wares are inarguable, plus patronizing these markets—more than 10,000 strong nationwide, representing over 50,000 farmers—is a great way to get to “know your food” as well as your local small-scale farmer, who just might happen to be your neighbor. Here are more good reasons to support your local farmers market:

The freshness factor When it comes to freshness, there’s simply no comparing the produce

sold at the supermarket with that available at your local farmers market. In fact, most farmers market fruits and veggies will last two to three times longer than those sold in stores.

Tasty inspiration Not only do farmers markets offer the freshest, tastiest produce possible (short of growing your own), but they also introduce their customers to new foods they may have never seen before, opening up all kinds of possibilities for fun and experimentation in the kitchen. Plus, the farmers often have simple recipe ideas that they’re happy to share. You might just find that

The farmers market follows the seasons, so it’s worth coming back week after week to see what’s been harvested recently—asparagus in spring followed by strawberries, tomatoes, and corn, then the squash and peppers of fall.

Healthy eating The health benefits of a plant-based diet abound, and as regular readers of this column know, I often emphasize the importance of developing a healthy eating pattern and filling half your plate with fruits and vegetables. There is no better way to achieve that than to visit the farmers market and load up your basket with produce. Be sure to put some fresh fruit in a bowl on the counter so it’s convenient for the whole family. The colors, textures, and delicious flavors

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26  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

Community support The benefits of the farmers market go way beyond your health to something larger for the entire community. Small growers thrive on the local market. Your support helps ensure the farmer is economically viable and will remain in business year after year.

Sustainable agriculture Small farmers have been instrumental in reviving growing techniques that are safer for our environment, often using very few fertilizers and pesticides. Their hard work helps prevent contamination of rivers, streams, lakes, etc., which is something very near and dear to our hearts here in Toledo. We are just beginning to understand the important role small farmers play in finding solutions to our environmental challenges.

Just for the fun of it! Last but not least, the farmers market is just a fun place to be! It’s a place where people come together to shop, talk, eat, and discover new foods—often seeing friends as well as making new ones in the process. As a dietitian, I know that a diet built around fresh seasonal fruits

When people reach points in their lives when they depend on others, our compassionate caregivers create a place to live, providing care for our patients like family, not because it’s their job, but because it’s their calling.

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of fresh fruits and vegetables far outweigh anything you can find in pill or smoothie form. Not to mention, when you buy and cook with farmers market foods, you can control exactly what (and how much of it) you put in your meals, such as salt.

Oven-Roasted Asparagus

We are committed to our mission of

Providing Service With Our

Hearts

and

Hands”

and as such, our employees take the extra measures to create the comforts of home during a critical time.

1 bunch of asparagus spears, trimmed 3 Tbs. olive oil 1½ Tbs. grated Parmesan cheese (optional) 1 clove garlic 1 tsp. sea salt (optional) ½ tsp. fresh ground pepper 1 Tbs. lemon juice Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Place asparagus in plastic freezer bag or mixing bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, toss to coat, then add cheese, garlic, salt, and pepper. Arrange in baking dish or baking sheet in a single layer. Bake for 12-15 minutes until just tender. Sprinkle with lemon juice just before serving.

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and vegetables is the cornerstone to prevention. Chances are, there is a terrific farmers market or community-supported agricultural program nearby where you can buy a certain amount of produce from a local farmer each week. You can also learn something new about foods each time you shop there–where they came from, how they were grown,

how to prepare them, etc. So what are you waiting for? Stop at a farmers market, cook something healthy—like the recipe for oven-roasted asparagus on the previous page—and enjoy the taste of eating right! ❦ Laurie Syring, RD/LD, is chief clinical dietitian at ProMedica Flower Hospital.

Have you established your summertime skin-care routine?

W

e often think of the cold, dry winter months as being particularly harsh on the skin, but the fact of the matter is, skin health tends to suffer much more in summer when we’re exposed to higher levels of sunlight, salt water, airborne pollen and dust, and a host of other irritants. Does this mean you should hide under a blanket at the beach, take a pass on that boating excursion, forego fishing, or stay indoors during daylight hours all summer long? Absolutely not! According to Dr. Wade Banker of Luxe Laser Vein & Body

Center, if you establish a commonsense skin-care regimen now, you can enjoy everything that summer has to offer without compromising the health and beauty of your skin. Here are just some skin-care products and services that would be appropriate for your new regimen:

Sunscreen When you’re planning to enjoy a little outdoor summer fun, the first thing any doctor will

tell you is to apply sunscreen to your skin. “We know we can’t stop people from spending time in the sun, so our approach is to encourage intelligent sun exposure,” says Dr. Banker. “A lot of the skin problems we fix here at Luxe Laser can actually be prevented with proper skin care, and that includes protecting your skin from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays with sunscreen. So find a product that works for you, use it routinely, and remember that you’ll need to reapply it after swimming or perspiring.”

Cleanser/moisturizer Again, when you’re outside perspiring, getting in and out of the water, and being exposed to a host of airborne irritants, your skin can really take a beating. To wash away contaminants while maintaining a proper fluid balance in your skin, be sure to establish and stick with a proper cleansing and moisturizing routine—especially when you’re

around salt water.

Retinol Available in a variety of forms, retinol can be a very important component of any skincare regimen. “Retinol helps exfoliate the skin and shortens the time that it takes the body to replace the skin cells. We offer several over-the-counter forms of retinol that are strong enough to provide the desired results,” says Dr. Banker.

SkinMedica® products Dr. Banker also reminds HLN readers that Luxe Laser sells physician-grade SkinMedica skin-care products at 30 percent off all summer long, noting, “We want our clients to have access to all the preventive skin-care products they need at an affordable price so they can be proactive when it comes to skin health.”

Botox Not necessarily a product most people associate with summertime, Botox is a great option for treating certain facial VEIN & BODY CENTER lines that tend to be more problematic

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in summer. As Dr. Banker explains, “Botox works by preventing muscle from flexing and causing lines, so it’s perfect for treating those boater’s lines, or squint lines. When you’re out on the water, even if you’re wearing sunglasses, you squint nearly constantly, which leads to the development of fine lines at the corners of the eyes. Treating those areas with a few units of Botox will prevent those lines from setting in and becoming permanent. Of course, the same applies to any other facial lines associated with muscle movement.” What’s more, Luxe Laser is now offering Botox parties to area groups and salons. These fun, social events— perfect for summertime—can be held in the facility’s new state-of-the-art gathering space or covered outdoor patio. Luxe provides everything, including setup and cleanup. The only cost to the group is for the Botox.

finishing touch. If you have this done now, your face will be at its peak for the rest of the summer,” he says.

Fillers

For more information on any products, services, or procedures offered at Luxe Laser Vein & Body Center, please visit their website at luxe-laser.com. In addition to comprehensive written information, the site features a wide variety of educational videos, including a 3D video tour of the facility.

Dr. Banker notes that fillers are also highly popular in summertime, especially for the purpose of plumping the lips. “Many of our clients invest a lot of time and effort in looking and feeling their best for summer, so they view plumping with fillers as a nice

28  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

Cosmetic surgery Perhaps also surprising is the fact that cosmetic surgery is highly sought after in summer—likely because many people take advantage of vacation time to get procedures done. Even many stay-at-home moms and dads find it more convenient to get cosmetic surgery in summer because they don’t have to worry about shuttling kids to and from school every day. “There’s something of a trade off when you get surgery in summer because you may have to deal with a little downtime, but the recovery times for most procedures are much shorter than people think. Even with breast augmentation, you’ll be back in a swimsuit within a couple weeks,” Dr. Banker says.  ❦❦

Sports physicals help young athletes practice ly and compete safe

I

nvolvement in sports provides a host of benefits to kids—not only in the form of healthy exercise, but also important life lessons and social skills that will help shape them into productive, well-adjusted adults. However, sports at any level can be rigorous, so before they get in the game, kids need to undergo a physical examination to evaluate whether they can meet the demands of practice and play as well as whether they have any pre-existing conditions or illnesses that might put them at risk when they participate. As UTMC family and sports medicine physician Dr. David Weldy states, “The primary purpose of sports physicals is to make sure it’s safe for young athletes to participate in their chosen activity. That’s the bottom line. There are a lot of ways to achieve that goal, but it’s ideal for kids to see their family physician for the evaluation.” Schools commonly provide pre-participation sports physicals to their young athletes. Many high schools, for example, will perform them using multiple physicians and different stations. While these physicals can be effective, they shouldn’t be considered a substitute for a comprehensive exam performed by a primary care physician who knows the young athlete and is familiar with his or her medical history. Weldy notes that family and sports medicine physicians today have a much broader knowledge base than they did in the past with respect to health problems that might affect athletes. “We really want to evaluate thoroughly for problems or conditions that are likely to put athletes’ health in jeopardy, such as the risk of sudden cardiac arrhythmia, history of concussion, or other abnormalities that put them at risk of injury,” he says. Weldy further explains that to rule

out potential heart-related issues, it’s important for the examining physician to get a thorough family history of cardiac problems, especially in anyone under the age of 50, and to look closely at any symptoms the young athlete may have had in the past that could indicate a heart problem, such as fainting, feeling lightheaded or dizzy, or experiencing shortness of breath while exercising. “Also, if the patient has a history of concussion, we do a special evaluation in that regard, and we try to assess the patient for risk of heat illness,” he adds. Furthermore, expectations of what should be achieved during sports physicals are getting higher and higher. Many school-aged athletes, especially in high school, never see a provider for routine healthcare, so there’s growing advocacy to make sports physicals comprehensive wellness visits. In addition, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) is interested in the role of depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses in athletics and is requesting that sports physicals include further evaluation in that area. These rising expectations are difficult to meet effectively within the context of school-based sports physicals when you factor in the amount of time necessary, the increased cost, and the lack of patient records. “On the other hand, if done in a physician’s office, the doctor can take more time to do a comprehensive evaluation and has access to the young athlete’s records and health history,” says Weldy. “It’s my hope that every child gets a comprehensive evaluation by a primary care physician on a regular basis to ensure proper continuity of care.” Weldy is a strong advocate of kids’ participation in sports, noting that all the training in preparation for the season gives young athletes a significant edge when it comes to fitness. What

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concerns him, however, are all the kids among the general population who are getting little to no exercise. “More and more data shows that

exercise—especially high-intensity interval training—is important not only for physical conditioning, but it also positively affects how the body

processes glucose and its sensitivity to insulin, both of which have implications for people with diabetes. So I’d love all students to be as active

as their athletic peers and to have a comprehensive evaluation in a physician’s office to assess their ability to exercise at an intense level,” he says.❦

St. Luke’s Family Birthing Center is first in area to be listed as a 5-star Maternity Center

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major change in the life of infants in the United States over the past quarter-century has been increased rates of breastfeeding. For example, the CDC reports that since 1990, the percentage of children who were ever breastfed increased from around 50 to over 81% in 2016. Those rates continue to rise, in part due to initiatives like “First Steps for Healthy Babies,” led by the Ohio Hospital Association and the Ohio Department of Health. Recently, those organizations named St. Luke’s Hospital—and its Family Birthing Center—as a “5-star Maternity Center.” St. Luke’s is the only hospital in the area to receive this honor. “This has been an important initiative at St. Luke’s,” said Sharon Bryson, BSN, RNC, manager of the Family

Birthing Center. “Breastfeeding has many proven health benefits, and we promote it as part of our mission to improve the health of our patients.” The “First Steps for Healthy Babies” awards one star for the completion of every two steps in the “Ten Steps for Successful Breastfeeding,” which is adopted from the World Health Organization and Baby-Friendly USA. To earn five stars, St. Luke’s implemented each of the steps below: 1. Have a written breastfeeding policy that is routinely communicated to all health care staff. 2. Train all health care staff in the skills necessary to implement this policy. 3. Inform all pregnant women about the benefits and management of breastfeeding.

4. Help mothers initiate breastfeeding within one hour of birth. 5. Show mothers how to breastfeed and how to maintain lactation, even if they are separated from their infants. 6. Give infants no food or drink other than breast-milk, unless medically indicated. 7. Practice rooming in: allow mothers and infants to remain together 24 hours a day. 8. Encourage breastfeeding on demand. 9. Give no pacifiers or artificial nipples to breastfeeding infants. 10. Foster the establishment of breastfeeding support groups and refer mothers to them on discharge from the hospital or birth center.

“First Steps for Healthy Babies” supports Ohio’s Healthy People 2020 goals and aligns with Ohio’s Plan to Prevent and Reduce Chronic Disease: 2014-2018. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that infants are breastfed exclusively for about the first six months of life and that breastfeeding continue for at least 12 months, and thereafter for as long as mother and baby desire. “Our Family Birthing Center turned 20 years old this year,” said Dan Wakeman, President and CEO of St. Luke’s Hospital. “This recognition tells families that we provide the highest quality of care and continually strive for the best health outcomes.” ❦

Northwest Ohio’s only Five-Star Maternity Center

St. Luke’s Family Birthing Center is the only northwest Ohio hospital named as a Five-Star Maternity Center by the Ohio Hospital Association and Ohio Department of Health.

©2017 St. Luke’s Hospital

5901 Monclova Rd. Maumee, OH 43537 | 419.893.5911

Visit StLukesHospital.com

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29


Add Kids FREE on all NEW 12, 24, and 36-month memberships Offer epires July 31, 2017

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30  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

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Athletes: Are you drinking the right fluids? by Amanda Manthey

I

f you are a runner or other type of athlete, you have probably heard the saying “Drink up” a thousand times— and with good reason. “Drink up” is the most important instruction that athletes of all ages should remember when participating in activities that sap their bodies of important fluids and electrolytes. (Electrolytes are minerals in your blood and other body fluids that affect the amount of water in your body, blood pH, muscle action, and other important processes.) You should drink fluids before you become thirsty. If you wait until you are thirsty, then it’s too late. Here are some guidelines for choosing the “right” fluids: • Avoid caffeinated beverages, such as soft drinks, coffee, tea, and even energy drinks. Caffeine is a diuretic, which pulls moisture from the body instead of replenishing it. In essence, caffeine drains the body of liquids. • Next, avoid carbonated products, such as soda pop. They increase the acid reaction in the stomach, which leads to the buildup of gas, discomfort, and the potential for nausea during athletic activities. • Finally, avoid drinks with a high sugar content, such as fruit juice. Your body will pull water out of your bloodstream to help dilute the sugar, which actually dehydrates the body instead of hydrating it. As for the best choice of liquid, drink lots of water. You should consume water before, during, and after competition to keep your body properly hydrated. Drinking enough water before and during your run will help your endurance and give you a better workout. Water cools the body and lubricates the joints. You should drink two cups of water two hours before your run and then nine ounces every 15 minutes during your run or race. Sports drinks, such as Gatorade or Powerade, help the body replenish sodium and potassium quicker. These drinks were designed for the endurance athlete who is working

out longer than one hour. Keeping your body properly hydrated with the right fluids is essential to your safety and your fitness performance. When you hear the phrase “Drink up,” make sure you consume the right fluid on your next athletic journey. ❦ Amanda Manthey is a former collegiate runner at Eastern Michigan University. She writes about running and fitness on behalf of Dave’s Performance Footgear.

Don’t miss Dave’s Races

Runners, get ready to “take your mark” in these exciting community events coming in July and sponsored by Dave’s Performance Footgear. For full details on events (including information on registration and any applicable fees), please visit www. davesrunning.com.

Bascom Fire Bad Axe 5K Run/Walk— Friday, July 7 to Saturday, July 8, 2017, 7:00 p.m. at Meadowbrook Park, 5430 W. Tiffin St., Bascom, Ohio.

Cridersville Fireman’s Jamboree 5K— Saturday, July 8, 2017, 8:00 a.m. at 100 E. Main St., Cridersville, Ohio. Run for Love @ Hensville—Saturday, July 8, 2017, 9:00 a.m. at 9 N. St. Clair St., Toledo, OH. Kaleb’s Donor Dash—Saturday, July 8, 2017, 8:00 a.m. at the Pioneer American Legion, 102 First St., Pioneer, Ohio. Delta Chicken Run 5K—Saturday, July 8, 2017, 5:00 p.m. at Delta Municipal Park in Delta, Ohio. Maumee Rec 5K—Saturday, July 8, 2017, 9:00 a.m. at Maumee High School, 1147 Saco St., Maumee, Ohio. Ohio/Michigan 8K/5K—Thursday, July 13, 2017 at Centennial Terrace and Quarry, 5773 Centennial Rd., Sylvania, Ohio. 8K Run at 7:30 p.m. 5K Walk at 7:15 p.m. Party at 7:00 p.m. Toledo Police K9 Falko Memorial 5K—

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Saturday, July 15, 2017, 9:00 a.m. at Ottawa Park by the shelter house, 2145 N. Cove, Toledo, Ohio. Clark Lake Triathlon & Duathlon— Sunday, July 16, 2017, 8:00 a.m. at Clarklake Beach & Boat Club, 5100 Grand Blvd., Clarklake, Michigan. Bedford Kicking Mule 10K—Saturday, July 22, 2017, 9:00 a.m. (1-mile walk at 9:05 a.m.) at 8405 Jackman Rd., Temperance, Michigan. Fayette Athletic Boosters 5K Run/ Walk & 1-Mile Fun Run—Saturday, July 22, 2017, 8:30 a.m. (1-mile Fun Run at 8:00 a.m.) at Harrison Lake State Park, 26246 Harrison Lake Road, Fayette, Ohio. Trillium: A Women-Only Triathlon & Duathlon—Sunday, July 23, 2017, 7:30 a.m. at Centennial Quarry, 5773 Centennial Rd., Sylvania, Ohio. Tigertown 5000—Saturday, July 29, 2017, 9:00 a.m. (Kids' Run at 8:00 a.m.) at 103 W. Young Street, Liberty Center, Ohio. ❦ Amanda Manthey is a former collegiate runner at Eastern Michigan University. She writes about running and fitness on behalf of Dave’s Performance Footgear.

Single parents, follow these steps to help protect your children by Scott D. Brown

A

s a parent, your primary concern is the well-being of your children, both in the present and future. When planning for the eventual distribution of your estate to benefit your children while also minimizing estate taxes, it’s important to recognize that some of the benefits afforded to married couples will not apply to single individuals. So, what aspects of estate planning might require additional attention on your part? At a minimum, it is essential for single parents to consider the following tips:

to be the best to see to their needs.

Name a guardian

Obtain or increase life insurance

It is essential that your will include the name of a guardian for your minor children and, if different, the person who will be granted custody. Without this information from you, the state courts will make this decision, potentially placing your children with an individual you don’t believe

Review beneficiary designations Not all assets are governed by your will. Update your insurance policies and retirement plans to be sure that your children will receive your assets either directly or through a trust that you have created. If leaving an individual retirement account (IRA) to your children, look into what you might do today to enable it to be used as a stretch IRA in the future.

Review your life insurance coverage to determine if the proceeds will be sufficient to cover your children’s expenses as well as your estate tax obligations. Consider taking life insurance out of your estate tax calculation; set up an irrevocable

trust that will own the policy and, through the trustee, make premium payments from contributions you make to the trust.

Provide for your children’s health insurance Your children’s health insurance coverage might end upon your death, or it might be eligible for continuation for up to three years under COBRA laws. It may be a good idea to familiarize yourself with other health insurance options, whether offered privately or through your state’s exchange, and share this information with the guardian you named.

Gift, gift, gift Monetary gifts to your children can reduce the size of your estate while benefiting your children. You might make these gifts through a trust, such as using the money to cover life insurance premiums. As a single individual, you may make tax-free annual gifts of up to $14,000 per recipient. Depending on your situation, you may need to pay special attention to some of these points. For example, if you are divorced, it may be that

Your Financial Future: Will You Be Ready? Getting your financial and investment act together takes time and close attention to detail. With more responsibilities, the process becomes even more complex. As a Morgan Stanley Financial Advisor, I have access to a range of resources, advice and services to help you meet your needs. Please call me to arrange a meeting about your wealth management needs. Scott D. Brown Senior Vice President Branch Manager 7311 Crossleigh Ct. Toledo, OH 43617 419-842-5312 scott.d.brown@morganstanley.com http://www.morganstanleyfa.com/theauroragroup/

• • • • • • • •

Equities, fixed income and mutual funds Trust and estate planning services Alternative strategies Individual Retirement Accounts Brokerage services Business financial services Lending services Financial planning services

The appropriateness of a particular investment or strategy will depend on an investor’s individual circumstances and objectives. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC, its affiliates and Morgan Stanley Financial Advisors do not provide tax or legal advice. This material was not intended or written to be used for the purpose of avoiding tax penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer. Clients should consult their tax advisor for matters involving taxation and tax planning and their attorney for matters involving trust and estate planning and other legal matters. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC is a registered Broker/Dealer, not a bank. Where appropriate, Morgan Stanley has entered into arrangements with banks and other third parties to assist in offering certain banking related products and services. Banking and credit products and services are provided by Morgan Stanley Private Bank, National Association, Morgan Stanley Bank, N.A. or other affiliates. Investment services are offered through Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC, member SIPC. Unless specifically disclosed in writing, investments and services offered through Morgan Stanley are not insured by the FDIC, are not deposits or other obligations of, or guaranteed by, the Bank and involve investment risks, including possible loss of principal amount invested. © 2012 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

NY CS 7181350 BC004 09/12 CRC394531

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your former spouse is still named and the well-being of your children. as beneficiary of your retirement Begin building an action plan today.❦ plans and insurance policies. If you are widowed, ensure that your es- If you’d like to learn more, please contact tate plan also covers the assets you Scott Brown, Branch Manager, Morgan inherited tax free from your spouse, Stanley Toledo, Ohio, at 419-842-5312. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC (“Morgan Stanley”), its affiliates as those assets now belong to you. and Morgan Stanley Financial Advisors and Private Wealth Advisors do not The situation may become more provide tax or legal advice. Clients should consult their tax advisor for matters complicated if you are in a domestic partnership. Although you may be raising children together, the tax rules regarding your estate could be different from those of married couples. ummer is a great time for elderly For instance, assets do not transfer individuals to get out and enjoy tax free from one unmarried partner to another. Using life insurance as an the outdoors. Many of them enjoy example, a surviving partner must own gardening, which can be quite therthe insurance to avoid it becoming apeutic for those recovering from part of the estate of the deceased. surgery or an illness. But for those Therefore, it’s often suggested that elderly who have physical, visual, or each partner own enough insurance cognitive disabilities, gardening can to pay taxes on the other ’s estate. be difficult and frustrating. In order Also, it is typically recommended to make gardening possithat each partner name the other ble and enjoyable again, as beneficiary and guardian in their adaptive gardening steps wills to help prevent the distribution must be taken. “Among of the most of assets, or even the guardianship of a child, to a blood relative who popular areas on our feels entitled to them. For financial campus are the private assets, you might consider a trust to gardens we offer to our residents,” says Matt avoid probate. 1 4/14/17 1:53 PM Scott’s Elizabeth There10.25x5_ES_SkilledRehFac_Ad_HL_417_HI.pdf are many factors to be con- Bucher, sidered when planning your estate Director of Marketing.

involving taxation and tax planning and their attorney for matters involving trust and estate planning and other legal matters. Insurance products are offered in conjunction with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC’s licensed insurance agency affiliates. Since life insurance is medically underwritten, you should not cancel your current policy until your new policy is in force. A change to your current policy may incur charges, fees and costs. A new policy will require a medical exam. Surrender charges may be imposed and the period of time for which the surrender charges apply may increase with a new policy. You should consult with your own tax advisors regarding your potential tax liability on surrenders. The author(s) and/or publication are neither employees of nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC (“Morgan Stanley”). By providing this third party publication, we are not implying an affiliation, sponsorship, endorsement, approval, investigation, verification or monitoring by Morgan Stanley of any information contained in the publication. The opinions expressed by the authors are solely their own and do

not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and data in the article or publication has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Neither the information provided nor any opinion expressed constitutes a solicitation by Morgan Stanley with respect to the purchase or sale of any security, investment, strategy or product that may be mentioned. Article by Wealth Management Systems Inc. and provided courtesy of Morgan Stanley Financial Advisor. Scott D. Brown may only transact business, follow-up with individualized responses, or render personalized investment advice for compensation, in states where he is registered or excluded or exempted from registration, [insert URL like to FA website or FINRA Broker Check http://brokercheck. finra.org/Search/Search.aspx]. © 2016 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. CRC 1563014 08/16

Adaptive gardening for the elderly

has provided residents and families with adaptive gardening tips that can be used by any elderly individual with physical limitations. “Gardening can be an excellent avenue for improving overall health and well-being and can be modified for those in a wheelchair or who may be unsteady on their feet or have visual issues,” says Lori Wagner, OTR/L, Assistant Vice President of Operations for Concept Rehab, Inc. Wagner offers these suggestions for those with limitations:

S

“The gardens give them a chance to get out in the fresh air and sunshine, to move about, and to bring back fond memories of a past where they used to enjoy gardening at home.” Bucher says Elizabeth Scott’s rehabilitative team from Concept Rehab, Inc.

Make the garden accessible The best height for a flower or vegetable bed at a wheelchair level is two feet high. If the individual is unsteady while standing alone, the height should be no more than 18 inches to enable them to sit on the side or stand with support.

WE’VE EARNED OUR STARS. In 2015, when we opened our skilled rehabilitation center, our goal was to offer state-of-the-art care with patient-centered therapy up to seven days a week.

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Private Rehab Suite

©2017 Elizabeth Scott Community

K

Independent & Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation. 2720 Albon Road Maumee, OH 43537 (419) 865-3002 • www.elizabethscott.org

5-STAR FACILITY As rated by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)

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Start seedlings indoors Fill egg cartons with potting soil and then plant the seeds. Put holes in the bottom of the egg cartons, and keep the soil moist and in a warm sunny area. The seedlings can later be transplanted outdoors when the weather permits.

For those with low vision Use light-colored tools to contrast with the dirt. A rope on the ground can serve as a guide to mark rows for easier planting, weeding, and watering. Choose one-handed short-handle tools to free up one hand to feel the

plants. An apron or bucket should be used to hold tools and debris.

For the arthritic or weakened individual Use tools with larger handles that have a non-slip grip. More adaptive tools and ideas are available at your local garden center or by searching under “adaptive gardening” on the Internet.

Dress appropriately To prevent overexposure to the heat and sun, apply sunscreen often and work during the cooler part of the day.

Hydrate Drink plenty of water, and take rest breaks.

Let them be the boss When helping a person with limitations to garden, allow them to be the gardener. Get them involved in the decisions of the gardening process. This will increase self-esteem and make the garden their own. “We try to accommodate our residents in every way we can, including getting back to the gardening they love,” says Bucher. “But these tips are great for any elderly individual

who still loves to garden.”

The Elizabeth Scott Community, located at 2720 Albon Road in Maumee, is a family owned and operated facility that offers Independent Living, two levels of Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing, and Skilled Rehabilitation. All services are located on a single campus with all facilities connected. For more information, visit Elizabeth Scott’s new website at www.elizabethscott. org. You can also contact Matt Bucher, Director of Marketing, at 419-724-5021 or mbucher@elizabethscott.org.

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F

Asthma sufferers: Put a stop to summer wheezing

or people with asthma, the arrival Vincent Medical Center. of summer can coincide with a According to Dr. Tita, not all allergy worsening of symptoms—the wheez- sufferers develop asthma and not all ing, chest tightness, coughing, and cases of asthma are allergy-related. breathlessness that make their lives Furthermore, some allergy sufferers miserable. Not only does summer’s mostly have upper-respiratory symphot, humid weather aggravate this toms while some develop asthma chronic pulmonary condition, but so and some experience both, though does the higher presence of airborne it’s not fully understood why this allergens and irritants. For those with is the case. It’s also not known why exercise-induced asthma, the other- some people have allergies as a child wise healthy act of becoming more but then develop asthma later in life. active in summertime can Dr. Tita further explains even trigger symptoms. that the cells important in “When we think of seaasthma are the so-called eosonal allergies, symptoms sinophils. These white blood such as sneezing, runny cells, which are a component nose, congestion, and waof the body’s natural immune tery, itchy eyes usually system, are also involved in come to mind. However, the allergic response, thus another disease that can go seasonal allergies and asthma hand in hand with allergies share a common pathway. is asthma, characterized Among the common by inflammation of the seasonal allergens that can Dr. James Tita bronchial tubes, increased cause asthma symptoms are mucus secretion in the the various tree, grass, and lungs, and narrowing of the airways, weed pollens produced in succession or bronchospasm,” says critical care throughout the warmer months. Yearpulmonologist James Tita, DO, Chief round triggers, such as pet dander Medical Officer at Mercy Health – St. and dust mites, can contribute to

the problem as well. With respect to exercise-induced asthma, Dr. Tita says this form is likely related to inhaling cold air, for example when exercising early in the morning when it’s still cool outside. “There are also a number of people with regular asthma for whom exercise is a trigger, and the chlorine in swimming pools can act as an irritant that triggers asthma, as well,” he adds. The good news is, while asthma cannot be cured, it can be managed very effectively like other chronic conditions such as hypertension and diabetes. “In fact, the vast majority of cases—about 95 percent—can be controlled with simple medications. I tell patients that with proper treatment, they should feel almost as if they don’t have asthma,” says Dr. Tita. Avoidance of known triggers is the first line of defense against allergy-related asthma. For instance, people with pollen allergies can try to limit the time spent outdoors when pollen levels are high and those allergic to pet dander can banish furry pets from their home or at least restrict them from the bedroom. However,

strict avoidance of allergy triggers is not always practical, so it’s important to seek treatment. The appropriate treatment regimen for asthma will vary from patient to patient but often includes some form of long-term “controller” medication to reduce inflammation, such as an inhaled corticosteroid or oral leukotriene modifier, along with a “rescue” medication to manage bronchospasm, for example the fast-acting bronchodilator albuterol. Dr. Tita notes that patients with exercise-induced asthma can help keep flare-ups at bay by using their albuterol inhaler 30 minutes before exercising. These individuals can also benefit from doing a proper warm-up before beginning a workout. He continues, “For the small group of asthma sufferers who experience symptoms despite these medications, a good alternative may be a class of drugs called biologics, which are directed at various points of the inflammatory cascade. The drug omalizumab, for example, blocks the action of the allergic protein IgE, sort of like the plastic plugs we put

Ozone is a health hazard for anyone with asthma or other lung problems, for children, and for people who work outdoors. On hot sunny days, everyone can take steps to reduce ozone production.

Use less energy and avoid creating fumes: Drive less-take a bus or bike

Wait to fill your gas tank until evening

Adjust the thermostat to use less air conditioning

Don’t use the grill

Don’t use spray paint or other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) Hang clothes out to dry instead of turning on the clothes drier

For more tips, see ozoneaction.org. Get daily ozone updates at airnow.gov 34  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

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in electrical outlets to protect kids. There are other drugs that exert a similar effect on certain interleukins that activate the eosinophils.” For patients with severe, persistent asthma, Dr. Tita also offers an innovative technique called bronchial thermoplasty. This outpatient procedure involves the use of radiofrequency energy to ablate smooth muscle in the bronchial tubes that has become thickened due to continual bronchospasm, thereby relieving some of the obstruction in the airways. Bronchial thermoplasty is performed under general anesthesia through a small, flexible tube called a bronchoscope, typically over the course of three

sessions spaced three weeks apart. With any asthma-treatment regimen involving medications, it’s critical to continue taking the prescribed medication on a regular basis. “People with asthma often discontinue their medications because they’re feeling better, but then their symptoms inevitably return. Asthma is a part-time disease that requires full-time treatment. It is possible to escalate treatment when patients are symptomatic and de-escalate treatment when they’re not, but they always need to be on some level of medication to keep those symptoms in check,” says Dr. Tita. ❦

GRILLING SAFETY Don’t let your summer fun go up in smoke

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ummertime and barbecuing go hand in hand. Picnics, holidays, and weekend get-togethers are perfect occasions to fire up the grill and do a little cooking in the great outdoors. Even mid-week family mealtimes offer a good excuse to do some grilling. After all, meals cooked on the grill are generally fast and easy to prepare and require a lot less kitchen cleanup afterward—not to mention, they’re delicious! However, whenever your summer fun involves the combustion of gas or charcoal, there’s an element of danger that should not be underestimated. The following steps will ensure that an accidental fire or burn injury won’t cause your summer grilling fun to go up in smoke:

Check your connections If you use a gas grill, be sure to check your hoses and connections for leaks every time you change out the propane tank. To accomplish this, simply apply soapy water to all the hoses and connections and then turn on the gas. If there is a leak, you will see bubbles forming at the site. If a leak is noted, do not ignite the grill until the faulty hose or connection is repaired. In addition, check for insects, spiders, and spider egg sacs inside the

tubes leading to your grill’s burner, and clean them out if any are noted. For some reason, creepy, crawly critters seem to be drawn to these tubes, and their presence can interfere with proper gas flow, often causing delayed ignition followed by a sudden flare-up.

Keep your distance from structures

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Your grill should always be used at a safe minimum distance of 10 feet from your home, garage, other structures, or any combustible materials to prevent fire. Keep in mind that the heat radiating from a barbecue grill can quickly warp or deform vinyl siding if the grill is placed to close to the home. Also, avoid grilling in environments where there are overhanging structures that could catch fire, such as beneath an awning or overhanging section of roof. Even a low-hanging tree branch can catch fire if conditions are sufficiently dry. Any time you’re grilling, make sure you have a water source handy in the immediate vicinity of the grill, such as a garden hose or bucket of water, so you can quickly extinguish the flame in the event of an emergency.

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While grilling, it’s important to take steps to protect yourself from burns.

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Avoid wearing loose-fitting clothing that could catch fire, and be sure to use long-handled spatulas, tongs, forks, etc. so you can keep your hands at a safe distance from the flame at all times. The use of flame-resistant mitts offers another layer of burn protection. Many burns occur because the

person operating a charcoal grill unwisely chooses to use a flammable liquid other than barbecue starter fluid, such as gasoline, to get the fire going or stoke it up. Pouring starter fluid onto an open flame or hot coals can result in a dangerous flare-up. Worse, the flame can follow the path of the fluid right to the container.

Declare the grill area a “kid-free zone” Kids love to be in the area when the grill is fired up, but the combination of excited kids and a flaming or smoldering grill is a recipe for disaster. To keep little ones safe, they should be excluded altogether from the grilling area. A good technique to discourage kids from coming too close is to mark off a “danger zone” around the grill with chalk and tell kids they must remain outside the lines. Also, never leave a hot grill unattended. Children—or even adults—entering the area may not realize the grill is on and could experience a severe burn if they touch it or lean against it.

Beware carbon monoxide!

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On a rainy day, it may be tempting to use the grill in your garage with the door open, but this is not a safe practice. In spite of the open door it’s still possible for carbon monoxide—an invisible, tasteless, odorless, but deadly gas—to build up inside the structure with potentially lethal

consequences. Never use a gas or charcoal grill of any kind in an enclosed or partially enclosed space. And remember, charcoal will continue to produce carbon monoxide fumes until it is completely extinguished. Don’t assume it’s safe to move the coals indoors because they are no longer glowing red.

Play it safe with propane Inspect your propane tank frequently to make sure it is not obviously damaged or corroded, and keep it in an upright position at all times. Avoid storing a spare propane tank indoors (including in a garage) or near the grill. When transporting a propane tank, do not leave it in a hot car or car trunk as the heat can increase the gas pressure in the tank and cause the relief valve to open, allowing propane to escape into the vehicle. Furthermore, make sure the gas hoses are not positioned in such a manner that they come into contact with a hot surface on the grill or with hot, dripping grease.  ❦

Renovated Sunset House blends historic charm with modern updates and vibrant living

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arking 145 years of service to our community in 2016, Sunset Retirement Communities’ Sunset House completed the last component of a major renovation that began in 2014. Wanting to maintain the facility’s historic charm while adding to various amenities, the updates not

only bring Sunset House well into the 21st Century, but also reflect Sunset’s commitment to creating a vibrant, enriching environment for residents and their loved ones to enjoy. Among the renovated areas are the assisted living apartments in the Victorian-style Manor house (built in

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1930), which were given a facelift in 2015 with granite countertops, fresh paint, and new carpeting; Sunset Court, where a number of small studios were combined to create tworoom suites; and now Sunset Hall/ Sunflower Lane, where all apartments have the convenience of full private bathrooms and flexible floor space as the result of removing outdated built-in cabinetry. The common and entrance areas have been freshened up, and the Sunset Hall/Sunflower Lane dining area is being updated with new light sconces, carpeting, wall coverings, and dining room furniture. “This renovation brings together the best of the old with the best of the new, and our residents are thrilled with the outcome,” states Gayle Young, Director of Marketing, Communication and Public Relations for Sunset Retirement Communities. “From the outside, the building presents a stately old-style charm, and inside, the building is abuzz with engaged seniors enjoying activities in our common areas, including the living room, hearth room, community room, and screened porch.” Of course, the appeal of Sunset

House goes beyond the building itself to include the beautiful grounds, which are lushly landscaped and maintained. Residents can take contemplative strolls through the beautiful surroundings on dedicated walking paths, and they can even enjoy a little al-fresco dining in the outdoor courtyard if they choose. Sunset House offers assisted living, healthcare, and respite care. Assisted-living options include beautifully remodeled studio and one- or two-bedroom apartments. Additional levels of care can be added as residents’ needs change. “Whatever living option residents might choose, Sunset relieves them of all the unwanted tasks and burdens of homeownership so they can spend all their time pursuing their favorite

pastimes and activities—or discovering new ones. Plus, our wooded campus is convenient to dining, shopping, cultural opportunities, and many medical offices and services,” says Young. Seniors who choose Sunset House as their new home are encouraged to bring their own belongings and furnishings so they can create a personalized living space that’s a reflection of who they are—and it’s not difficult to find sitting areas in which to entertain one’s friends and family, read a book, start a card or board game, discuss current events, or even practice piano. Also, just like at home, residents can grab a snack or meal when they want, and there are plenty of scheduled activities to fill their day. Residents who are animal lovers can enjoy the aviaries, aquariums, cats, and dogs throughout Sunset House. Furthermore, Sunset’s programming ensures residents are

nurtured in body, mind, and spirit. Life Enrichment programs, which integrate cultural and social outings and events, help keep them connected to the world around them and engaged in the activities that matter to them most. Exercise classes, specially designed for all fitness levels and abilities, help residents stay strong and flexible. Their spiritual needs are also well cared for in Sunset House’s chapel, which offers weekly services led by members of various houses of worship. All of these programs, services, and amenities are a reflection of the person-centered philosophy that Sunset has embraced, focusing on providing care and vibrant, life-affirming environments—placing the resident at the center of every aspect of daily life. ❦ Those interested in learning more about Sunset House are encouraged to stop by for a personal tour and to ask any questions they may have. For more information or to schedule a tour, call 419-536-4645 or visit www.sunsetcommunities.org. Sunset House is located at 4020 Indian Road in Toledo.

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rt

Services, one thing will not change – our deep commitment to faithfully serving people of many different generations.

by Mark S. Faber, USPTA Elite Professional

Is there a secret to development?

WOLF CREEK CAMPUS (Formerly Lutheran Village at Wolf Creek) Independent Living

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arents look to coaches to assist in the development of their child, whatever the point of focus may be. It seems today that people are hiring coaches in the worlds of academics, athletics, and music. All of this is being done to help their child develop and reach their full potential. What Independent Living I would Assisted Living like to share this month are Nursing Care • Respite Care a few tips for parents of younger Term Rehabilitation Lutheran Village is Short Outpatient Therapy as they start their athletic athletes direction developmental journey: Aa Lutheran whole new new direction Village is

4990 | GenacrossLutheranServices.org Assisted Living

Independent LivingCare Nursing Care • Respite Living ShortAssisted Term Rehabilitation Nursing Care • Respite Outpatient TherapyCare Short -Term Rehabilitation Outpatient Therapy

inwhole retirement living. retirement living. ain new direction in retirement living. It's neighborhood! It’s aa neighborhood!

Do not specialize young

As a parent, you will be encouraged to have Lutheran Village is your young child play one It's a neighborhood! A community where residents sport year-round. It will be stressed a whole new direction can add life to their years. in retirement living. A community where residents that this will provide them an advantage and allow them to spend It's a neighborhood! Independent available NOW. can add Living lifeCondos to their years. Call 419-861-5616. more time focusing and developing A ofcommunity where residents Lutheran Village at Wolf Creek, a ministry Lutheran Independent Living Condos available NOW. the skills needed to succeed. When Genacross Lutheran Homes Society in partnership with St. Services Luke’s Hospital. can add life to their years. Call 419-861-5616. I first entered the tennis business, Wolf Campus Lutheran Village at Creek Wolf Creek, a ministry Independent of Lutheran 2001 Perrysburg-Holland Rd. Living Condos available NOW. I was guilty of this. However, over Homes Society in partnership Holland with St. Luke’s Hospital.Call 419-861-5616. 2001 Perrysburg Road Holland, OH 43528 Lutheran Village at Wolf Creek, a ministry of Lutheran the years 2001 Holland, Perrysburg-Holland Rd. Ohio 43528 St. Luke’s Hospital. I have learned from the 419-861-2233 Homes Society in partnership with Holland, OH 43528 2001 Perrysburg-Holland Rd. experts that for kids to develop, they 419.861.2233 Holland, OH 43528 www.lhsoh.org 419-861-2233 should be playing multiple sports at For more information, visit 419-861-2233 a young age to help them develop www.lhsoh.org www.lhsoh.org GenacrossLutheranServices.org all their athletic skills. The better a EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

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child develops athletically overall, the better they will become in whatever sport they choose. So, do not fall into the specialization trap at a young age; have your child play multiple sports, knowing that in the long run they will be better off.

Avoid the “better” player trap One of the biggest things requested by parents in our industry is for their child to be in a class or on the tennis court with “better ” players. Now, don’t get me wrong, I understand the concept of being with “better” players; however, it is not the only way a person can develop. I was listening to a presentation the other day by a coach of the number-three tennis player in the world when a pro in the audience asked him about this issue. He basically stated that if the only way his player could get better was to practice with “better” players, then he would only be able to practice with two players to become better. He followed that up by saying it is more important to practice with players who are focused and will put in good effort. He said that getting a group like this together will lead to development because they will all be pushing each other. So, do not always look for the “better” player, but the group of players who are willing to work hard together.

There’s no need to travel

419.475.4101

1920 Indian Wood Circle, Maumee • email dirk.broersma@awitp.net 38  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

As young players enter the world of youth sports, their parents start to learn about various levels of events that are held throughout the country. What’s interesting is that I thought this was something unique to sports such as tennis and golf. However, I have realized that it’s in all sports. It’s safe to say travel costs have not decreased over the years. So, if you are the parent of a young child, I challenge you by asking, why travel so much? The sports journey transcends many years, and you will incur many costs along the way. Young athletes should stay local to compete and develop. Now, depending on the sport, some short travel might be neces-

sary—three hours or less to find competitions. However, long drives and airplane flights are unnecessary for young athletes. The key here is you should always be able to find ways to develop locally rather than travel and spend the extra money. Now, please let me stress, I am simply talking about younger-age children, for there is a time when travel becomes part of a player ’s overall developmental program. It just should not be at the age of 11 for the majority.

Being a top player at a young age is not an indicator It is awesome when a child is a top player. There is a level of excitement and pride that cannot be replaced. The trap here is that just because a player is on top at the age of 10, does not mean they will be on top at 18. I and my coaching friends have many stories about players and parents who cannot understand how a high level of success at a young age did not dictate a high level of success later. Many times, the level of success is due to the maturation of the young athlete. This simply means some young athletes are bigger, faster, and stronger than other athletes at a young age, which creates a false sense of dominance. Then, as the other athletes start to grow and develop themselves, they catch up and frustrate the once-dominant athlete. The key here is to not get caught up in the success and think the child has developed and will continue to dominate. The focus needs to be on overall technical development through the maturation process. With this focus, it is more likely the child will maintain that high level over the years. As a coach, I have evolved in all four of these areas, and I believe that it has helped me understand the ever-changing world of sport development. Sure, there are exceptions to the above points; however, they apply to the majority of young athletes. Whatever the sport, having your child work with a coach who understands these points will not only help your child develop overall, but also will help you navigate the world of youth sports as a parent. Youth sports is always evolving, and having a person who understands the landscape is crucial in the longterm development of an athlete. ❦

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BySister Mary Thill

Spiritually Speaking What makes you different? One of the greatest challenges of a healthy spirituality is learning to tolerate the differences we find in one another and not to view differences as threats to ourselves. Moreover, a healthy spirituality should lead us to celebrate our differences and to see them as a reflection of God’s beneficence and creativity.  —Melanie Svoboda Differences were meant by God not to divide but to enrich. —J.H. Oldham

“E

asy for you to say, Melanie, that our differences are a reflection of God’s beneficence and creativity. If you lived in my neighborhood or worked where I work, you might not be so high-minded about differences.” It seems to me that the clue to understanding Svoboda and Oldham’s remarks is not just tolerance, but the need to establish a relationship with those we perceive as being different from us. All this talk about the global village and need for opening our UTMC the 1247_2 CONFIDENT_HLN_HalfPg.pdf borders and developing fair trade

1

agreements with other countries really requires us to get to know the people and culture we are working with and trying to understand. They too need to understand who we are and where we are coming from as we continue to work together to establish a better world where we all benefit from one another ’s resources and culture. Recently I had the privilege of attending a learning session at one of the mosques in Toledo. We were a mixed group of men and women who came together to learn about the basic beliefs of the Muslim religion and culture. The Imam and some of the other members of the mosque shared with us their most important beliefs and answered 3/17/17 11:52 AM the many questions we asked regarding their religion

CONFIDENT my doctor is in tune with my needs.

and culture. At one point, several cell phones went off calling people to prayer. We moved back from our circle and witnessed several men of various ages come forward to follow the Imam in prayer. I was impressed with how devout they were and how easily they came forward from their busy lives to stop and pray in the early evening. They do this five times a day. When asked why the women who were there did not come forward to pray but stayed in the back of the room, a woman in the group told us that it is their custom to pray in separate groups. I had to turn off or open my judgmental, feminist mind and try to understand why this worked for them. I happened to meet some of the people from the mosque on our campus in Sylvania a few weeks after my original encounter, and we greeted each other as if we had been friends for a long time. I felt that taking time to learn about another religion and culture really did break through the stereotypes I may have even unconsciously been holding. Hospitality

seemed to be the common thread each time we met. I work in a Catholic healthcare institution where there is a wonderful mix of women and men of different ages, religions, races, cultures, and professional expertise. I love to go to the cafeteria for lunch and see everyone talking and eating together and having a good time. Once in a while, I’ll walk up to the table of someone from a different culture and ask if I may have lunch with them. It’s been a wonderful way to get to know someone and to share my story with them. It’s been a privilege to get to know some of my coworkers “in the breaking of the bread” to use a biblical description. My challenge for the month of July, the month in which we celebrate our independence and freedom, is to get to know at least one person of another faith and culture and to break bread with at least one new coworker by sharing lunch with them. People want to come to our shores, come to our country, because they see us as a place to begin a new life based on freedom and equality and opportunity for all. Let’s pray that we see how our differences really enrich this great land that God has given

Advanced care and healing close to home. We’re here for you. And we are an integral part of this community. The University of Toledo Medical Center offers best in class specialties, better outcomes, and expert physicians, nurses and medical technicians in a superior continuum of care that’s close to home and dedicated to the area’s health and healing. • Served more than 300,000 people last year alone • Recognized by Consumer Reports among the top academic hospitals in preventing bloodstream infections* • Continuing to provide outstanding medical education, teaching and research • Keeping you at the center of all we do

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us to enjoy rather than using these differences to divide and separate us from our sisters and brothers on this planet. God bless America! ❦

Sister Mary Thill is a Sylvania Franciscan Sister. She is Patient Liaison for Mature Health Connections at Mercy Health – St. Vincent Medical Center. She can be reached at 419-251-3600.

A Walk in the Park by LeMoyne Mercer

Affordable Housing for Seniors. Income limits do apply.

Stop by today and enjoy a tour of this wonderful, affordable community. These beautiful 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath villas with a single car attached garage were designed especially for you! Located on the Lakewood Senior Campus, what would make a senior 55 or older feel more welcome and secure? We are just waiting for your visit, you will never want to leave! Certain income levels do apply.

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Vaulted ceilings living room & master bedroom Walk-in closets Energy efficient heating & air conditioning Fully equipped kitchen & breakfast bar Private patio Covered front porch Window treatments provided Plush carpeting and vinyl tile Separate laundry room Handicap units available Trash pickup at the curb Well lighted streets Snow removal provided 24-hour emergency maintenance Convenient to banks, dining & shopping Professional management

419-382-1200 • TTD 1-800-567-5857 1021 Garden Trail, Toledo Mon-Fri 8-5 • www.thelakewoodsofohio.com 40  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

Detour ahead

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eaders and even some family members have expressed amazement at how Shirley and I can spend about six months a year traveling and “drive all that way.” Some vacationers find it difficult to cope with more than a few hundred miles total, especially if there are children in the back seat. And even the most seasoned travelers may be somewhat daunted by the thought of crossing Nebraska. You are not required to drive, of course. Many people enjoy flying to destinations that seem too far. (Well, “enjoy” is probably too strong a term.) Others have discovered trains and the further option that a train could take them to a cruise ship. Bus tours have the advantage of a much broader range of destinations and durations. Still, you have to go when and where the rest of the tour is going. We know people for whom this is an advantage because it eliminates spousal disagreements about what is next on the agenda. But not necessarily other spousal disagreements.

Let’s assume that you have travel ambitions and, having examined your options, reluctantly concluded that you’ll just have to suck it up and drive. How can you make the most of it? Long-distance driving can be both physically and emotionally

In 2012, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument was just a detour between Death Valley and Tucson. Now it is a primary destination.

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challenging so you have to recognize your limits—and those of your companion(s). Shirley and I have talked to fellow RVers who restrict their daily drive to no more than 350 miles. This seems rather artificial to us. We prefer to stop when there is a reason to stop. (Admittedly, “I’m tired” is a pretty good reason.) But we have never been particularly concerned about driving “all that way” because we shift the focus to the interim steps required to get there. Think of it as how you eat an elephant—one bite at a time. Our winter trip, for example was only 6,597 miles. (Holy cow! What do you mean only?) But we did not drive 6,597 miles in a straight shot. Our ultimate destination was Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in Arizona. If you searched Google Maps you would find the shortest way there is through Fort Wayne to Indianapolis and then southwest via the interstates to Tucson. We have never gone that way. At the end of December or early January, the first thing on our minds is getting south of the weather as quickly as possible. So, we might head to Fort Pickens in Gulf Islands National Seashores near Pensacola, FL for a few days before continuing west on I-10. In 2013, we really piled on the miles by going to Everglades National Park at the tip of Florida before doubling back around the Gulf and on to Arizona. It made perfect sense at the time but, as Yogi teaches us, “If you don’t know where you are going, you might end up someplace else.” In Texas, I-10 runs 879 miles from

Beaumont to El Paso. But, again, we are not looking for the quickest route through Texas. We are looking for the

Mission San Jose is one of five, including the Alamo, preserved in San Antonio Missions National Historical Park.

most pleasant winter weather and the most interesting places to visit. From Houston, we might continue to San Antonio to visit the Alamo and the four other Spanish missions in the National Historical Park and take a stroll down the River Walk. For the past two years, we have chosen to turn south at Houston to Padre Island near Corpus Christi and pause there for a week or so. In 2016, we then cut across southern Texas to visit the enormous King Ranch and up the Rio Grande with stops at Laredo and Langtry, home of Judge Roy Bean, “The Law West of the Pecos.” Then

it was to Big Bend National Park for a week. From there, we went up to El Paso and across New Mexico. In Tucson, we prefer to stay at

On Padre Island, the Gulf is right out our back door.

At Big Bend National Park, way out in west Texas, one of our favorite hikes is back into Santa Elena Canyon on the Rio Grande. Connect with our advertisers via our online issue at www.hlntoledo.com  |  Healthy Living News  |  July 2017 

41


Gilbert Ray Campground. It feels secluded and far from the city because of the intervening mountain ridges but is actually just five miles over Gates Pass. Vehicles over 24 feet in length are restricted. The road is scenic but also narrow with numerous very sharp turns, so it is effectively closed to trailers, big RVs, and almost all commercial traffic. Gilbert Ray is also only four miles from Saguaro National Park, one of the few that has no campground of its own, and the Desert Museum with 97 acres of exhibits of plants, animals, birds, fish, and geology. It is far more than what you think of when someone says “museum.” While at Gilbert Ray, we always return to San Xavier del Bac, a simply spectacular Spanish mission on the Tohono Oodham Indian Reservation.

San Xavier del Bac is always on our agenda when we are in Tucson.

Organ Pipe is only 150 miles away, right on the Mexican border. We spend a couple months there soaking up the sunshine, watching the cactus wrens, Gila woodpeckers, and curve-bill thrashers build nests while we celebrate the desert in bloom. At some point in our stay, we take time out to visit friends up in Phoenix. You could say that is also a detour because we have no particular reason to go to Phoenix otherwise. Then it is time to start making our way home. But, again, the objective is not to reach Toledo as quickly as possible. Shirley checks the weather apps on her phone because the travel experience is not enhanced by late season blizzards and/or tornadoes in the Great Plains. We stay south of cold, nasty weather for as long as we can before making that final stretch to Toledo. This year, we took the advice of a fellow RVer and visited the Las Cienegas Conservation Area southeast of Tucson for the scenery, wildlife, and quiet seclusion. We stayed only three days, but it was enough to convince us we should plan a longer visit next year before the great flocks of sandhill cranes migrate. This year we had to settle for brilliant vermilion flycatchers and a herd of pronghorns. Oh,

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Shirley made friends with Samson at White Sands in New Mexico.

and did I mention quiet seclusion? In New Mexico, we took yet another detour at Las Cruces to visit White Sands National Monument. The pure white sand is made of gypsum, eroded and blown from the neighboring mountains. It piles up in great dunes that attract families looking for sledding adventures without all the messy cold and snow. The sand is so soft and powdery that big plastic disks laden with giggling children (and quite a few giggling fathers) easily slide down the face of high dunes. At the head of the White Sands horse trail, Shirley made friends with Samson the camel. (You may recall that a camel is a horse designed by committee.) Samson was friendly and eager to meet Shirley—as all intelligent beings are. With his owner, though, he soon became stubborn, sullen, and ill tempered. Still, it seemed appropriate to meet a camel in the desert. Even at the risk of getting spat on. You may associate White Sands with the WWII secret project that produced the atom bomb. The area is still home to the White Sands Missile Range, Holloman Air Force Base, and Fort Bliss Military Reservation. Periodically, the road to the Monument is closed by scheduled tests at the Missile Range. Ordinary military ordnance. No more A-bombs. While in southeastern New Mexico, we have also made an additional side trip to Carlsbad Caverns National Park. It is even more spectacular than you have heard. Just across the Texas state line from Carlsbad is Guadalupe Mountains National Park, so you might as well go there while you are in the neighborhood. But I probably shouldn’t encourage that too much. The first time we planned to visit, I called ahead to check about the availability of campsites. The ranger said, “Don’t come. The winds are just ferocious.” Because of the elevation, ferocious winds tend to bring bitter

temperatures. When we visited in 2012, the temperatures were still well below freezing, but at least there was no wind. This year, there were flashing lights and a ranger with a clipboard stopping traffic at the entrance. He radioed the campground to see if there was room for us. The campground host hesitated, but his wife overruled him and said she would squeeze us in somewhere. Which she did because the RV “campground” is basically a parking lot and our rig will fit in a short space. She explained that they had been full since February 12. Evidently, word about Guadalupe had spread among college kids on spring break and geezers in RVs, so the park was packed. We avoid crowded campgrounds as much as possible, but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. Our usual strategy for avoiding crowds is to head out while most visitors are still at breakfast. This worked nicely the next morning when we hiked back into McKittrick Canyon. The canyon trail follows a streambed into the mountains where we spooked a herd of mule deer that included a couple fawns. Most of them scrambled quickly over the lip of the canyon, but a few paused to stare back at us. Now, the logical route home from the Guadalupe Mountains is to continue east to Dallas and then across Arkansas to Memphis and Cincinnati. As you have gathered by now, our travel isn’t always governed by logic. It is about having a good time. We have taken that logical route a couple times because I am a slow learner. Driving through the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex is no way to have a good time. So we stayed south on I-10 and went through Houston (also not the best way to have a good time) to Baton Rouge. Nice weather persisted all the way. Then it was north through Mis-

Redbuds, along with dogwood, wisteria, and wildflowers, bloom along the Natchez Trace while it is still winter in Toledo.

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sissippi to the Natchez Trace. If you are in a hurry, the Trace is also not the logical route. The Trace is a long, narrow national park that meanders through 444 miles of open countryside from Natchez to Nashville. There are no billboards, utility poles, or commercial vehicles. But there are numerous reasons to pause along the way, from ancient Indian burial mounds to Civil War battlefields, the tomb of Meriwether Lewis, and the birthplace of Elvis Presley. In March, the dogwoods, redbuds, wisteria, and wildflowers were in bloom. In Kentucky, we were briefly tempted to make still another slight detour to Mammoth Cave National Park. Abandoned that notion when we crossed an invisible line separating spring from winter. So we just gritted our teeth and made that final dash to Toledo through sleet and snow flurries. There is no reason to be daunted by the thought of driving 6,000 or even 12,000 miles. I could have just as easily used trips to Alaska or down the Pacific Coast to illustrate the point. Virtually every trip we have ever taken included several detours to see what there is just a little way off the main route. You would probably not drive

“all that way” to Mt. Rushmore, for example, but if you are headed to or from Yellowstone you really should stop there. Also at Wind Cave, Jewel Cave, the Crazy Horse Memorial, and Badlands National Park. If you just love the rumble and roar of a million Harleys, check the dates for the annual motorcycle rally in Sturgis. If you just hate the rumble and roar, better check the dates for the rally in Sturgis. On rare occasions, a detour reveals something so attractive that it becomes our primary destination on subsequent trips. In 2012, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, now one of our all-time favorite places, was first experienced as a detour between Death Valley and Tucson. That’s why we encourage you not to be overwhelmed by the thought of driving “all that way.” Look for detours that can break your trip into bite-size pieces, and you’ll have that elephant done in no time. You might even discover something that helps turn the challenge of driving into just a walk in the park. ❦

Is water the beverage of choice for your kids? by Cindy Pisano, LSW

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hen it comes to keeping kids hydrated, particularly those who play sports, you can’t go wrong with water. It hydrates, helps regulate body temperature, is a good source of fluoride for healthy teeth, and helps prevent urinary tract infections and constipation. An added plus is that unlike carbonated beverages, fruit drinks, and sports drinks, water doesn’t contain any sugar or calories. Just one can of soda contains 10 to 12 teaspoons of sugar! If your child drank just one 12-ounce can every day for one year, it would add up to 60 pounds of sugar. That’s 60,000 calories. Children should have at least

eight cups of water every day to be their best, and this is easily obtainable by making water fun and accessible. Serve water with meals and snacks. Add a slice of lemon or orange. Let your child pick out a reusable water bottle, and bring it with you all day. Most of all, set a good example by letting your kids see you drink water too. This summer, help your children see that drinking water is healthy and fun. For more tips on keeping your child healthy, visit www.kohlskidsinaction.org. Cindy Pisano, LSW, is supervisor of the Healthy Connections Department at Mercy Health Children’s Hospital.

LeMoyne Mercer is the travel editor for Healthy Living News and the regular contributor of A Walk in the Park.

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Laurels of Toledo earns 2017 Bronze National Quality Award

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he Laurels of Toledo, a skilled nursing and rehabilitation center located at 1011 Byrne Road, has earned recognition as a 2017 recipient of the Bronze – Commitment to Quality Award by the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL), the leading association for long-term and post-acute care. This distinction honors association members across the nation that have demonstrated a commitment to improving quality of care for seniors and persons with disabilities. “We’re one of only 540 facilities nationwide to earn this distinction,” states Laurels Administrator Edward Beatrice. “Quality care has always been our standard, and we’re extremely proud to be recognized by the AHCA/ NCAL for this commitment. This is the most significant honor we’ve received in our history.” The National Quality Award Program is based on the core values and criteria of the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, which helps organizations in different business

44  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

sectors improve and achieve perfor- meeting several of the eligibility mance excellence. The award program criteria for the next two levels, so we is progressive and has three award have every hope and intention of levels—Bronze, Silver, and Gold. Pro- winning the Silver National Quality viders begin the quality improvement Award next year and the Gold the process at the Bronze level, where year after that.” they develop an organizational profile To celebrate this recognition, The with essential performance elements Laurels will be holding a pinning such as vision, mission statement, ceremony this month, in which all and key strengths and challenges. the employees will receive their own Bronze applicants must also demonstrate their ability to implement a performance improvement system. “At the Bronze level, the focus is on all the quality programs and initiatives the applying facility is working to establish—essentially developing a map for how to provide quality care and a vision for where the facility is going. The Silver and Director of Marketing Jessica Blattner, Administrator Edward Gold levels are a little more Beatrice, and Director of Nursing Keryn Werdehoff (left to right) extensive and look at how the are proud to be recognized by the AHCA/NCAL. facility operates once those processes are already in place,” explains bronze pin, and a banner will be Jessica Blatter, Director of Marketing placed on the front of the building for The Laurels of Toledo. announcing the achievement. Also, Beatrice adds, “We’re already The Laurels will receive a special

plaque commemorating this distinction at the AHCA/NCAL’s 68th Annual Convention and Exposition to be held this October in Las Vegas. “I commend The Laurels of Toledo for embarking on the journey to quality improvement,” says Alana Wolfe, Chair of the AHCA/NCAL National Quality Award Board of Overseers. “I encourage The Laurels to continue to build on the strong foundation it has created.” In addition to the Bronze Award, the Laurels of Toledo will be commemorating another major milestone in October—the facility’s 10th anniversary of serving our community. What’s more, The Laurels’ parent company will mark its 25th anniversary this year. “Here at The Laurels, we really have a lot to celebrate in 2017!” says Blattner. ❦ The Laurels of Toledo accepts Medicare, Medicaid, and all private commercial insurances. A physician’s order is required to obtain outpatient services. For more information, call 419-536-7600 or visit www.laurelsoftoledo.com.

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Annual wellness visits put focus on prevention for seniors

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ith our population aging and experienced a fall, feels depressed or approximately 10,000 mem- fatigued, is able to climb stairs, and bers of the Baby Boomer generation needs help with household tasks. turning 65 every day, it has never “One of the most significant questions been more important for health- on the survey is ‘How confident are care providers to assess health risks you in your ability to manage your and promote good preventive care medical problem?’ If they answer among seniors. Putting the focus on that they’re not confident or only prevention—rather than waiting to somewhat confident, we know they intervene with treatment until after a may be headed for trouble,” says Dr. problem arises—greatly increases the Bialecki-Haase. Once completed, odds of identifying chronic ailments the assessment is reviewed by the or other health issues at their earliest, clinician to help characterize the most treatable stages or patient’s risk factors and stopping them in their need for resources. tracks entirely. For this Dr. Bialecki-Haase purpose, Medicare offers notes that Medicare ana free annual wellness nual wellness visits don’t visit to beneficiaries. necessarily have to be According to famiperformed by a physician ly physician Dee Bialor nurse practitioner. Regecki-Haase, MD, vice istered nurses, practical president of operations nurses, and other licensed for ProMedica Physician clinicians can do them as Group and president of well. “In fact, patients are sometimes more comfortProMedica Health Network, the annual wellness able talking with a nurse visit is not the head-to-toe Dr. Dee Bialecki-Haase, MD about concerns that they “physical” many people think are too insignificant expect when they go to see their to discuss with a doctor, which helps doctor on a yearly basis. Rather, it’s us develop a more comprehensive a review of preventive recommen- picture of their health. And if the dations based on the patient’s age, nurse identifies any areas of concern, health status, risk factors, and other an appointment with the doctor can considerations. be scheduled before he or she leaves “The purpose of annual wellness the office, she says. visits is to ensure patients are getting Dr. Bialecki-Haase also cautions all the Medicare-covered benefits that annual wellness visits are best they’re eligible to receive,” says Dr. conducted within the context of a Bialecki-Haase. “This includes, among medical practice, noting that many other things, screening for colon different organizations out there—incancer, breast cancer, depression, cluding various screening companies and dementia; verifying that they’re that offer services such as carotid current on immunizations; assessing screenings and blood pressure checks their functional status and fall risk; at church gatherings and other comlooking at factors such as obesity, munity events—are now offering alcohol consumption, and tobacco use free wellness visits to the public. to determine whether any lifestyle “The problem here is that Medicare modifications are appropriate; as well approves only one free wellness visit as determining whether they have per year. If you have it done by one advance directives, such as a living of these companies instead of your will and durable power of attorney, primary care practitioner or medical care team, they won’t be able to give in place.” A very important aspect of the you a personalized preventive care annual wellness visit is a health-risk plan when you leave because they assessment that the patient is asked don’t know anything about you or to complete prior to the appointment. your medical history. All they’ll be This questionnaire asks a series of able to provide is a generic listing,” questions related to health and func- she says. tion, such as whether the patient has Summing up the benefits of annual

wellness visits, Dr. Bialecki-Haase states, “It’s a great opportunity to close any gaps in care—to ensure seniors are taking full advantage of all the

appropriate Medicare-recommended preventive services available to them so they can continue to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.”❦

Personal-safety tips for outdoor runners

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hen beginning a healthy outdoor fitness regimen, such as running, most people take into account factors such as traffic safety and dressing appropriately for weather conditions, but what they often overlook are precautions they need to be taking to protect their personal safety. While it’s true that running will make you healthier and is statistically very safe, it can also leave you vulnerable to crimes of opportunity. The following personal-safety tips will help you minimize the risk of becoming a victim while you enjoy the many health benefits of running:

information in a prominent location.

Share your route with loved ones

Run with the herd

Before heading out to run, be sure to tell a loved one where you’ll be going and approximately when you’ll be returning. If there’s no one on hand to tell, leave a note containing this

Carry communication and other essentials In this high-tech age, there’s really no reason to be without emergency communication when running. Take your cell phone with you. You should also have on hand: • Identification and your medical insurance card • Medical alert ID if applicable • Emergency contact numbers • A loud whistle or personal alarm you can sound in the event of a confrontation

Avoid running alone, especially at night. Just like lions on the Serengeti, human predators look for isolated victims who appear disinclined or unable to put up much resistance. Running with a partner, group, or,

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45


even better, the family dog, will very clearly convey the message that you’re not going to be easy prey.

Stay close to safe zones Develop your running route with an eye toward safe zones—trusted neighbors’ homes, open businesses, etc.—you can get to quickly if you encounter or perceive danger. If there are emergency phones on your route (e.g., on a college campus), make sure you know where they’re located and how to use them. Avoid running in unlighted, overgrown, deserted, or scarcely populated areas or passing close to parked vehicles. Also, plan out potential escape routes you could take in the event of a confrontation.

Don’t be predictable Try to alter your running route as well as the days and times you run to avoid broadcasting a predictable pattern of behavior that someone with ill intent might exploit.

Keep your senses about you Listening to upbeat music through

46  July 2017  |  Healthy Living News

an MP3 player and earphones can certainly charge up your energy level and make your runs more enjoyable, but it will also obstruct your sense of hearing. That means you won’t be able to detect audible warning signs of potential danger, such as a car approaching, a horn or siren sounding, a cyclist passing (on your left!), or someLeave the one approaching you earphones behind when from behind. If you you exercise want to enjoy music while you work out, outdoors. do so on a treadmill or other stationary equipment at home or the gym, but leave the earphones behind when you exercise outdoors.

Keep your distance It’s fine to politely acknowledge other people as you run, but use your discretion and don’t get too close. Use situational awareness. Take notice of who’s around you and their position relative to yours. If someone in a vehicle asks for directions or other information, do not approach the vehicle. From a distance, direct them to an information source or indicate that you don’t know and

keep moving.

Don’t ignore your instincts Humans are the only animals that will ignore the intuition that something is wrong in order to avoid appearing impolite. If your gut instinct tells you a person or situation is dangerous or that something isn’t quite right, trust that intuition and move away from the perceived threat toward a safe zone.

Know how to react if confronted If you are confronted by a threat, don’t panic. Take advantage of the fact that you’re already in motion and move as quickly as possible toward a more populated area or known safe zone—not toward an isolated area. If someone is harassing you verbally, ignore it and keep moving toward safety. Do not escalate the situation by responding in kind. Call the police to report the incident immediately.

Consider selfdefense training Taking a self-defense course doesn’t guarantee the upper hand in the event of an attack, but it will arm you with simple, effective techniques that will

give you a survival edge. Carrying pepper spray as a deterrent is also a good idea. ❦

Serenity Farm presents Benefit for the Barn— Tickets on sale now! To help support the programs and initiatives at Serenity Farm Equestrian Center— including therapeutic riding, physical therapy, equine-assisted learning, and Team Thunder—be sure to get your tickets for Benefit for the Barn to be held on Saturday, July 22, at 6:00 p.m. at VFW Post #9963, 109 N. Main Street, Walbridge, Ohio. The evening’s entertainment will include dinner, dessert, and drinks; live and silent auction items; 50/50 raffle; Gift Card Jackpot; and much more. Tickets are on sale now for $25.00 and can be purchased by phone at 419-833-1308 or online at www.serenityfarm.org. ❦

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HLN July 2017  
HLN July 2017  

• The Marathon Classic is back! • Shape up and wake up your skin • Beat summer's heat • Tools to assist senior independence • Do you have hi...