Healthcare Digital Magazine - July 2022

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July 2022 | healthcare-digital.com

Health Service Executive

Ireland’s digital health transformation journey

UHSFT

Accelerating its digital transformation post-COVID

Healthcare campuses across the world

USING TECHNOLOGY TO TRANSFORM HEALTHCARE

MODERNA’S B

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Digital infrastructure got the COVID-19 vaccine out in time, says Barbara Salami, Digital VP Medtronic

B I O T E C H N O L O G Y Supporting doctors’ continued learning with medical technology


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The Healthcare Team EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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FOREWORDS

This summer, clean air equality rules In this issue of Healthcare Digital, we explore protecting hospital data with Iron Mountain, how MultiCare and Valera Health are assisting mental health patients on telehealth platforms, PlanetWatch’s vision for clean air equality and upholding the vaccine supply chain at Servier Hello Healthcare Digital readers,

“We have also been forced to confront the true state of our mental health. A partnership between MultiCare and Valera Health has overseen many people bravely booking their first appointment”

In this issue of the magazine, we look at how preserving hospital data can be a challenge when the volume keeps growing, as well as how consulting company Iron Mountain has it covered. One thing the pandemic has taught us is the unseen importance of air quality. At PlanetWatch, new technology is being created to offer health equality for the air we breathe. We have also been forced to confront the true state of our mental health. A partnership between MultiCare and Valera Health has overseen many people bravely booking their first appointment. But in order to keep the healthcare industry moving, pharmaceutical manufacturing company Servier kept the vaccine supply chain in order over the worst months of the pandemic. Keep looking up

HELEN ADAMS

helen.adams@bizclikmedia.com

HEALTHCARE-DIGITAL MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED BY

© 2022 | ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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CONTENTS

Our Regular Upfront Section: 8 Big Picture 10 The Brief 12 Timeline: A Hepatitis timeline 14 Trailblazer: Mary Seacole 16 Five Minutes With: Jalil Allabadi

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Hospitals

Safeguarding hospital data with Iron Mountain

20

44

Barbara Salami, VP of Digital at Moderna on new capabilities

Ireland's digital health transformation journey

Moderna

Health Service Executive


64

Digital Health

Telehealth services supporting mental health patients

96

Supply Chain

Creating supply chain solutions in oncology with Servier

72

UHSFT

Accelerating its digital transformation post-COVID

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104

PlanetWatch's technology offers clean air & health equality

Healthcare campuses across the world

Technology

Top 10


BIG PICTURE

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July 2022


Elementary, African American girl with mum on the first day of school USA

After a school shooting, survivors then face a battle with PTSD. While this can look and feel different for everyone, nightmares, difficulty sleeping, anxiety and grief are often symptoms. Survivors' education may also take a hit, with increased absences a result of anxiety and stress. Meanwhile, children who have not experienced a school shooting but have seen the aftermath on their television live in fear that their school may be next. healthcare-digital.com

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THE BRIEF “My proudest achievement was right in the midst of joining Moderna, we were pretty optimistic about the potential of MRMA” Barbara Salam

VP of Digital Commercial, Moderna

 READ MORE

“Together with other professional leaders, we mobilised a national movement around large tech, small tech, clinicians, academics and patients” Martin Curley

Director of Digital Transformation and Open Innovation, HSE

 READ MORE

BY THE NUMBERS

90%

of children worldwide are exposed to air that doesn't meet minimum WHO standards

Safeguarding hospital data with Iron Mountain There is a massive volume of hospital data. At Iron Mountain, the challenge is managing it in a secure way.

Telehealth services supporting mental health patients Telehealth providers moved quickly to increase access to remote mental healthcare, something many people were previously able to put off, say MultiCare and Valera Health

PlanetWatch’s technology offers clean air & health equality High-tech environmental service PlanetWatch has used the COVID-19 pandemic to expose the dangers of air pollution and the desperate need for clean air 10

May 2022 July


 FLAIR FLAIR uses data to protect ethnically marginalised employees in healthcare from discrimination. While there has been progress, inequities exist and there is a need to build inclusive workplaces for the benefit of patients and staff.

Creating supply chain solutions in oncology with Servier For Eric Lemay, Head of Global External Manufacturing at Servier, the COVID-19 pandemic shone a spotlight on the importance of the supply chain. Servier’s Operation Warp Speed saw collaboration between private business and public governments to speed up vaccine development, creating 300mn COVID-19 vaccines. “It was a really phenomenal programme,” said Lemay. The downside of that was, in putting vaccine development ahead of everything else, oncology medicines were deemed less essential. Lemay spoke with his industry peers, where he was able to discuss the challenges of prioritising COVID-19 vaccines, especially for those fighting cancer. “At Servier, we understand the importance of getting lifesaving medicines to the patients who need it,” said Lemay. “Within my role in manufacturing and supply chain, it's about ensuring that our patients get the medicines and that they never miss a treatment.”

 PAYMENT OF APPRECIATION TO AUSTRALIAN HEALTHCARE WORKERS The Australian state of New South Wales has thanked its healthcare workers for fighting COVID-19 with a payment of AU$3,000. It is hoped that this will also help to retain talented staff.  E-SCOOTERS As the transport sector works to become more sustainable, e-scooters offer a long-term solution for congested cities. But while e-scooters do lower air pollution, they also increase road accidents – causing a headache for the healthcare sector.  INFERTILITY STIGMA Africa’s First Ladies and The Merck Foundation stand together against genderbased violence and infertility stigma. Together, they call for girls education The Merck Foundation, the philanthropic sector of Merck KGaA Germany, held its 4th Merck Foundation First Ladies Initiative this month, to call for an end to the social stigma caused by infertility.

W I N N E R S JUL22

L O S E R S

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TIMELINE

A

Post-war era welcomes new discoveries

An anti-cancer hepatitis vaccine

Target to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030

The origin of the Hepatitis C virus has been traced back to World War Two, where the treatment of soldiers in chaotic locations such as field hospitals led to perfect conditions for the blood-borne virus to spread between soldiers as they received care.

Dr. Baruch Blumberg won the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the Hepatitis B virus. A few years later, in 1969, he and his team created the Hepatitis B vaccine, which is classed as the first anti-cancer vaccine as it helps to prevent liver cancer.

The WHO Global Health Sector Strategy on viral hepatitis created a plan to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030, with a 65% reduction in mortality by 2030 compared to 2015. One study suggested that up to 4.5mn deaths could be prevented by 2030 with vaccinations, tests and education campaigns.

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July 2022


It may surprise you to discover that hepatitis holds a higher death rate than HIV and malaria combined, killing two people every minute. The sickness causes damage to the liver and there are five different forms: Hepatitis A, B, C, D and E. While there’s a vaccine and effective treatment for Hepatitis B, as well as a cure for Hepatitis C, research continues.

TIMELINE Hepatitis in children rises

Hepatitis eradication

With the global healthcare sector focused on COVID-19, many healthcare initiatives have been forgotten or ignored. Babies are usually offered a hepatitis vaccine, but vaccine schedules have been delayed. Between April and May 2022, there have been 650 cases of acute Hepatitis in children, from more than 30 countries.

14 years previously, the WHO Global Health Sector Strategy (GHSS) vowed that it would eliminate viral hepatitis as a public health problem, by 2030. Preventative interventions include Hepatitis B vaccinations for babies, education on injection safety and widening treatment for patients. If successful, millions of lives will have been saved. healthcare-digital.com

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M ARY S E AC O L TRAILBLAZER

M

ary Seacole was born in 1805, Kingston, Jamaica and died in 1881, London, England. She is best known for nursing British soldiers during the Crimean War (1853-1856), at a time when prejudice against women and Black people was rife, and discrimination was legal. Mary Seacole inherited her desire to nurse soldiers from both of her parents: Her father was a Scottish soldier and her mother was a free Black Jamaican woman, who was an expert in traditional medicine. Mary married Edwin Horatio Seacole (the godson of Admiral Nelson) in 1836, and the two travelled around the Caribbean.

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July 2022

In 2004, Seacole came in first place in a poll for the '100 Great Black Britions'

Seacole began nursing after she encountered a cholera epidemic in Panama and yellow fever in Jamaica. In 1854, a widowed Seacole was living in London when she heard about the poor quality of nursing for British soldiers in the Crimean War. Seacole applied to serve as an army nurse but was refused. While she now had extensive experience in nursing, Seacole knew that racial prejudice was behind this rejection. Undeterred, Seacole was supported by her late husband’s family and she left for Crimea. On her way, Seacole crossed paths with another pioneering nurse, Florence Nightingale, while in Turkey.


LE Once she had reached Crimea, Seacole established the British Hotel. There, she sold supplies to soldiers and offered them medical assistance. A journalist from The Times, William Russell, visited the British Hotel and was fascinated by Seacole. Soldiers told him how well she cared for soldiers – including enemy ones – and visited the battlefield herself to offer sandwiches and bandages to the troops. After the war was won, Seacole was unable to sell the British Hotel and the financial hit was devastating. The Times newspaper featured another article from Russell, where he demanded recognition for

“W AR, LIKE DEATH, IS A GREAT LEVELLER, AND MUTUAL SUFFERING AND ENDURANCE HAD MADE US ALL FRIENDS” Seacole. He organised a party for her that included a message of congratulations from Queen Victoria. Seacole published the Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands in 1857, the first autobiography to be sold by a free Black woman in the British empire. It became a bestseller and helped to break down misconceptions and prejudices about women and Black people. Mary Seacole remains an iconic figure to this day. UK television series Doctor Who even wrote an episode that featured Seacole fighting against aliens and a memorial statue of her sits in the gardens of St Thomas’s Hospital in London, the UK’s first statue to honour a Black woman. healthcare-digital.com

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FIVE MINUTES WITH...

JALIL ALL ABADI CEO OF DIGITAL HEALTH PLATFORM,

HI JALIL! CAN YOU PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF AND YOUR ROLE? “I am the co-founder and CEO at Altibbi. I grew up in Jordan, did a lot of my studies outside of Jordan and then came back here in 2011.” TELL US, WHAT IS ALTIBBI? “Altibbi is an end-to-end digital health platform that aims to integrate an entire patient journey, from informative medical content all the way through to primary care, telehealth, and now drug delivery and diagnostics. “We want to really follow the patient journey and be able to capture the data and the necessary information so we can provide better health, at a more affordable cost.” WHAT HAS BEEN ALTIBBI'S GREATEST CHALLENGE? “When we launched our primary care telehealth platform, it was the first time in this part of the world. We spoke to insurance companies, to regulators, government officials – they were just laughing us out the door. That was the greatest challenge, until COVID-19. “Now, funding is secured, we're ahead and the only remaining challenge I would say is retaining talent.”

“ IT WAS CHALLENGING, BUT ONE OF THE BIG LESSONS HERE IS THAT I BELIEVED IN WHAT I WAS DOING” 16

July 2022


“ EVEN IF PEOPLE COULDN'T SEE IT, WE HAD TO CARRY ON; EVENTUALLY, DESTINY AND COVID-19 PROVED US RIGHT” DURING YOUR TIME HERE, WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST LESSON FOR YOU PERSONALLY? “People were laughing at us. Honestly, that was a big challenge, even personally. I come from a family where my father is a doctor and my mom works at a big pharmaceutical company, so they are well entrenched in the healthcare industry. People were talking about me, in a small country like Jordan, saying, ‘What is this guy doing, telling patients that they can solve their problems over a phone?’ “It was challenging back then, but one of the big lessons here is

that I believed in what I was doing. I did my research, and my team was convinced that we were solving a problem. Even if people couldn't see it, we were doing it, and we had to carry on; eventually, destiny and COVID-19 proved us right.” OVER THE NEXT 12 MONTHS, WHAT WILL ALTIBBI BE DOING? “We are building a couple of very, very important partnerships that hopefully will be propagating Altibbi beyond the Arab world alone. So this is something that we're very excited about.” healthcare-digital.com

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7 - 8 SEPT 2022

STREAMED & IN PERSON

BUSINESS DESIGN CENTRE, LONDON

SHAPING THE BUSINESS OF SUSTAINABILITY 3,000+

Participants

2

Days

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Watch our 2022 Showreel

Join us at SUSTAINABILITY LIVE LONDON Showcase your values, products and services to your partners and customers at SUSTAINABILITY LIVE LONDON 2022. Brought to you by BizClik Media Group SUSTAINABILITY LIVE LONDON, the hybrid event held between 7th-8th September is broadcast live to the world and incorporates three zone areas of Sustainability LIVE, B-Corp LIVE plus March8 LIVE in to one event. With a comprehensive content programme featuring senior industry leaders and expert analysts, this is an opportunity to put yourself and your brand in front of key industry decision makers.

Get tickets

From keynote addresses to lively roundtables, fireside discussions to topical presentations, Q&A sessions to 1-2-1 networking, the 2-day hybrid show is an essential deep dive into issues impacting the future of each industry today. Global giants and innovative startups will all find the perfect platform with direct access to an engaged and active audience. You can’t afford to miss this opportunity. See you on:

7 - 8 September 2022

Sponsor opportunities


BARBARA SAL AMI VP OF DIGITAL AT MODERNA ON NEW CAPABILITIES WRITTEN BY: HELEN ADAMS PRODUCED BY: TOM VENTURO

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July 2022


MODERNA

healthcare-digital.com

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MODERNA

Moderna developed a vaccine against COVID-19 in record time and the company’s digital infrastructure played a critical role; Barbara Salami explains how

I

n August 2020, biotechnology company Moderna, headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was deep in the fight against COVID-19. While the company harnessed the power of digital in driving its clinical innovation, it recognised that it also needed to build a powerful digital ecosystem to enable its global commercialisation goals. It was at this time that Barbara Salami joined Moderna as Vice President of Digital for Commercial, to help build the company’s digital for commercial capability. “I started my career as an engineer, however I pivoted into other areas that have gotten me to where I am today. Looking back, I am glad that I wasn’t afraid to be vulnerable, stayed curious and open minded,” explains Salami, who is also a mother of three. “I was excited to join Moderna. I was drawn to the challenge and opportunity of having a green field to build a future-ready digital platform that will be second to none in our industry and a yardstick for other industries. I knew it wasn’t going to be easy. Nearly two years in, we are beginning to see value created from the foundations of the work that we have done so far. It is early days, but very exciting. One of my biggest lessons on this digital acceleration journey is that technology is not enough to deliver value. The organisation needs to be clear on the why. Technology enablement needs to be coupled with

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Example of an image caption healthcare-digital.com

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MODERNA

“ Being unapologetically relentless and bold with room to fail and pivot fast is important for any organisation” BARBARA SALAMI

VP, DIGITAL FOR COMMERCIAL, MODERNA

a solid strategy, committed business partnership, robust change management, correct processes and a very deliberate approach to how we think about engaging with customers.” Moderna was founded in 2010 and is focused on mRNA technology, which carries instructions across the body, instructing cells what to do. The company is fully committed to delivering on the promise of mRNA science for patients everywhere. 24

July 2022

“Our platform has a huge opportunity to go beyond COVID-19 to transform how we deliver medicine to the world across multiple modalities and therapeutic areas – such as immunology, virology and rare diseases among others. The opportunities are limitless.” In Salami’s role as VP of Digital for Commercial, she is accountable for: • Creating a frictionless and inclusive experience for external stakeholders • Delivering digitisation and simplification of business operations • Building an automated intelligence engine to power understanding of performance, drive recommendations and personalise “We are obsessed about reducing friction and making it easy for our external stakeholders who already have to navigate a complex ecosystem of wellness and healthcare,” says Salami. “We want to make


MODERNA

EXECUTIVE BIO BARBARA SALAMI TITLE: VP, DIGITAL FOR COMMERCIAL LOCATION: UNITED STATES Barbara Salami is the VP of Digital for Commercial at Moderna, where she leads digital transformation for Moderna's new commercial organisation. She is accountable for building digital experiences and digitisation of business processes globally. Prior to joining Moderna, Barbara worked at GSK, Shire, BMS, AstraZeneca and Aetna among others. Barbara holds an MBA from Pennsylvania State University and a BS in Biomedical Engineering from Drexel University. A tech-geek at heart and an advocate for STEM, she enjoys empowering young girls to explore STEM programs/ careers. Her passion for STEM led her to co-found StemDragons, a program designed to teach K-8 kids the fundamentals of coding. Barbara and her husband have three children who keep them on their toes.

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MODERNA

Hundreds of millions of individuals across the world have been vaccinated with Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine.

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MODERNA

it easy for consumers and their caregivers to inform their decisions and get access to our medicines. We are committed to healthcare providers who make sure that they offer their patients the best advice and care for healthier lives. We also want to support governments who are keen on providing health security for their citizens. In the same token, we must make it easier for our employees to do their jobs and digitise.” Being relentless and bold at Moderna “Being relentless and bold is a way of life at Moderna. You instantly feel this energy here. In Moderna mindsets, we describe this as acting like owners, pushing past possible and questioning conventions,” she says. “I came from other organisations where you would imagine a lot of cool ideas – but it was hard to turn those ideas into reality. Moderna has really changed my perspective in terms of how far you can go when you start thinking bigger. It is no news to the world, or to anyone, what Moderna was able to accomplish. Being relentless, bold, collaborative and curious were key factors.” In a record-breaking 42 days, Moderna went from sequence to medicine in a vial ready for human trials. In a matter of eleven months, they had a conditionally approved product designed to protect lives against COVID-19. At the time of writing, the United States has just passed one million deaths from the virus. “Being unapologetically relentless and bold with room to fail and pivot fast is important for any organisation that wants to do great things. It is important to create psychological safety for employees to exemplify these behaviours habitually. Moderna gets that,” she says. healthcare-digital.com

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Give it a shot


MODERNA

“ Looking back, I am glad that I wasn’t afraid to be vulnerable, stay curious and open minded” BARBARA SALAMI

VP, DIGITAL FOR COMMERCIAL, MODERNA

Answering consumer questions and building Moderna’s digital infrastructure “My proudest achievement was being part of the inaugural team that supported our first commercialisation opportunity for our COVID-19 vaccine. Before we knew whether the vaccine would pass the final test, we began preparation. I had just started my journey at Moderna and immediately partnered with an amazing team of visionaries

and problem solvers (also known as my colleagues) across many functions to align on a clear strategy and execution plan. Everyone came ready to roll their sleeves up. Many of us were one-person teams at the time and had to wear multiple hats. At the time, we were a little over 700 employees in total. We had to operate with dynamic range, toggling between strategy and execution as needed. We didn’t have all the answers. There were no examples of others who had walked this path before us. The entire world was experiencing the pandemic at the same time. Decision making was quick. We pivoted fast as we learnt more - which felt like hourly. It was the best form of collaboration that I had ever experienced in my entire career.” Salami knew that they had to improve the digital infrastructure at Moderna. There was no question. “We strive to make it easy for patients and caregivers to get the help they need, to support healthcare providers with additional tools for better patient care and healthcare-digital.com

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MODERNA

for governments who want to ensure health security for their citizens. As a digital first organisation, we must be obsessed about our stakeholders and deliver the most meaningful and delightful experiences. Ultimately, if we do not get it right for patients, we have failed. We learnt from health care providers and consumers alike that they wanted an easy way to learn more about mRNA and our vaccine, contact us and have their questions resolved. It was super important to address these needs. Consequently, we went into action to enable what we described as a minimum delightful experience,” said Salami. Within six weeks, Moderna had a contact centre up and running, web experiences built, digital apps that required cross-platform integrations in operation and a foundational analytics tracking framework implemented, among other things. “There are many other great things that Moderna has done,” says Salami. “Being able to be part of that is something I will never forget.” Using data and AI to create an exceptional customer experience at Moderna Moderna is in the early stages of its commercial journey and digital is a core strategic enabler. The digital ambition is to create frictionless and impactful experiences for our stakeholders globally. This is an area where the life sciences industry continues to fall short. Salami understands that this is no small feat but is confident that if any company can do it in life sciences, it will be Moderna. Beyond the goal of delivering delightful experience and solutions, she is also working on simplifying commercial operations and processes through digitisation. “We must do both exceptionally well. However, it is not lost on me the challenge that lies ahead.” 32

July 2022

“ Technology enablement needs to be coupled with solid business partnership and the right change management” BARBARA SALAMI

VP, DIGITAL FOR COMMERCIAL, MODERNA


MODERNA

One of many exciting areas that her team is exploring is the digitisation of Moderna’s content review and approval process. Moderna is also working with its data to create exceptional customer experiences. “We are taking a deliberate approach in how we design, build and enable an automated intelligence engine,” explains Salami. “Data is a strategic asset. We are taking both a product and data as a service approach to how we envision creating value with data and analytics at Moderna. Presently, we are laser focused on building the right data foundation from sourcing to democratisation.

The data must be highly secure, compliant and clean. These are non-negotiables.” When it comes to how Salami and her team are designing the digital platform, she says that lessons learnt from the past guided her decision on the architecture. “We do not buy technology suites for convenience, ease of implementation or due to peer pressure. Instead, we leverage best-of-breed platforms to fit into a modular, composable and flexible framework. All platforms that are part of the customer engagement and marketing technology stack are Microservices-enabled, API-first, Cloud-based and Headless (MACH). You can think of each of the platforms in the stack as a Lego piece. If a specific platform stops meeting our needs, we can quickly pivot to another platform without significant disruption to the business. We have also been deliberate about building global components that can be leveraged everywhere. Our approach to platform architecture has also contributed to faster access to data for internal stakeholders. For example, we have real-time access to data generated by Moderna’s own call centre ecosystem,” said Salami. Salami stresses the importance of partnering for scale and innovation. She does point out the need to find partners who share similar values as Moderna as well as match Moderna’s pace of innovation. She is not afraid to and has stepped away from organisations service providers and strategic technology providers who have struggled on either end. Salami works with a select number of partners including Apply Digital and Salesforce. Apply Digital is a partner who has worked with Moderna since November 2020. Headquartered in Vancouver and founded in 2016, the Apply Digital supports Moderna healthcare-digital.com

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“ Each day, we get closer to the moment when personalised medicine will become a reality and be accessible” BARBARA SALAMI

VP, DIGITAL FOR COMMERCIAL, MODERNA

with a critical part of its ecosystem, which is the development of its web and digital experiences. “Beyond core web development, Apply Digital has also partnered with us in designing customer experience journeys and great thought partners on our technical architecture,” says Salami. Salesforce is also an important stakeholder and partner. The company was founded in 1999 and is based in San Francisco. “Our global customer relationship management (CRM) platform is built on Salesforce,” said Salami. “We are also working with Salesforce to build out a reimagined case management platform to support agents across the world. It has been great to learn from Salesforce about some of the cool innovations that they have matured in other industries and 34

July 2022

brainstorm on how to bring some of those to life at Moderna. Beyond the technical aspects of our partnership, we have come together to volunteer and help underserved communities and underrepresented students to advance their STEM careers. I'm grateful for that opportunity to partner with Salesforce.” The future of biotechnology and healthcare at Moderna As part of its Global Public Health strategy, Moderna has committed to advancing into clinical trials a portfolio of 15 vaccine programmes targeting emerging or neglected infectious diseases. It is also advancing vaccines that address current diseases of significant impact to low- and middle-income countries.


MODERNA

“Having lived a better part of my life in Nigeria, empathy, inclusion and accessibility to medicine are important to me. It takes courage for any organisation to choose to leverage its resources to help citizens of the world who live in low and middle-income countries in a meaningful way. It warms my heart to see what Moderna is doing and even more so to be part of it. Each day, we get closer to the moment when personalised medicine will become a reality and be accessible to all who want it irrespective of your socio-economic status, gender and racial identity among others,” says Salami. Moderna currently has 46 development programmes in its pipeline. Over the next year, there's going to be a keen focus from Moderna on making sure that they have the digital

infrastructure in place to continue to advance those development candidates at speed and with the highest quality. “From the standpoint of readiness, we've done some great work in enabling the foundational platforms and technologies. I do recognise that we are still early on our journey to a future ready state,” says Salami. “We will continue to be deliberate in our choices on digital platforms and how we architect them, data ecosystem, strategic partnerships and building a high performing digital team. We need to bring our employees along with us on this journey. People make or break any digital transformation.”

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SAFEGUARDING HOSPITAL DATA WITH IRON MOUNTAIN Simon McNair, director of Iron Mountain's healthcare government and public sector business, discusses digital transformation and keeping hospital data safe WRITTEN BY: HELEN ADAMS 36

July 2022


HOSPITALS

W

hen Iron Mountain was founded in 1951, the threat of nuclear war hung over Germantown, New York, even though it sat safely outside of the blast zone. A local farmer with an entrepreneurial streak, Herman Knaust, saw an opportunity to transform his underground mushroom farm into a security vault for banks to store their files. Simon McNair, director of Iron Mountain's healthcare government and public sector business in the UK, has been with Iron Mountain for ten years. He’s seen a lot of innovation within the company, but has not been invited into the Germantown nuclear bunker.

“I’m interested in the impact that service changes have on innovation and how technology improves the way services are delivered,” says McNair. “Ultimately, it's about improving outcomes for patients.” Iron Mountain is a global information management leader, which offers customers a way to protect their most valuable assets – from art to receipts – both digitally and in physical storage. “We offer a really broad portfolio of services,” says McNair. “Since our foundation, we've grown and expanded our relationships and solutions, particularly around the security we offer. We provide a range of digital transformation and data centre services to 225,000 customers worldwide.” healthcare-digital.com

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“ We advise empowering every employee to become a risk ambassador by embedding risk awareness within the overall culture” SIMON MCNAIR

DIRECTOR, PUBLIC SECTOR SALES, IRON MOUNTAIN EMEA

Hospitals and data storage Iron Mountain has been working with the NHS, the largest public sector employer in the United Kingdom and one of the world's largest employers of highly skilled workers. “In the last few years, we’ve been digitising patient records,” explains McNair. “More

recently, we've had an opportunity to support some of the GP-based reforms around primary care. This was about the digitisation of some of those physical records that you see in the doctor's surgeries. In digitising those records, we can free up space, help to drive some efficiency and reduce some of that administrative burden on the healthcare sector.” One Iron Mountain collaboration is on the secondary care side with Barnsley Hospital NHS foundation Trust. “We worked on a major digitisation project in digitising 180,000 medical records. They are securely scanned and then put into an electronic document records management system. The aim of that project essentially is to provide the clinicians with an intuitive digital workflow that supports care planning and to build multi-user systems healthcare-digital.com

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HOSPITALS

Meet today’s Iron Mountain

“ I’m interested in how technology improves the way services are delivered and improves outcomes for patients” SIMON MCNAIR

DIRECTOR, PUBLIC SECTOR SALES, IRON MOUNTAIN EMEA

that enable healthcare professionals to simultaneously access records. This is all about access to information in the format they need it, when they need it.” 40

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Digital transformation can be a real balancing act and for McNair, the key words are accessibility and security. The real work is finding balance in between. “You're creating content to add to the already massive and continuously growing volume of digital healthcare information and hospital data – it’s just growing at just such a rapid rate. So that's a definite challenge, in terms of ‘how do we manage it in a very secure way?’” For Iron Mountain, there are many different data formats that form part of a digital health record; managing them all is both a challenge and an opportunity. “Finding a balance between the growing volume of data, the technological changes and improvements, and managing it


67%

of remote staff are happy to allow family members to use their work computer, according to Iron Mountain

220ft

below the earth, Iron Mountain has an underground data centre in a former mine

in a secure way is so important. For IT professionals working in the healthcare sector, there are issues around data storage, backup, archiving and disaster recovery, as well as business continuity – particularly where systems are being updated and changed. But also, data is growing at the rate that it is, and that proliferation of data in an IoT-enabled healthcare system can create useability problems for healthcare officials and technicians.”

Does McNair think that healthcare services are in need of accelerating their digital goals even further? “Yes – it was already hard for healthcare workers to manage their data prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, then it got even harder. As we come out of the pandemic now with the healthcare backlog, we can properly review some of the challenges in the healthcare systems that need to change. It's about healthcare organisations being able to digitise some of that legacy where there's value in doing so at scale. “I think the pandemic-related work pressures have led to a huge amount of data backlog, which needs to be handled through efficient and effective automated digital systems – which is another challenge. healthcare-digital.com

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HOSPITALS

“Pandemic-related pressures have led to a huge data backlog, which needs to be handled through automated digital systems” SIMON MCNAIR

DIRECTOR, PUBLIC SECTOR SALES, IRON MOUNTAIN EMEA

“Additionally, the growing threat of cyber attacks indicate that it's now important – more so than ever – to better manage employees, particularly wherever they're working from home in terms of building that resilience into the system.” Hospital data leaks and digital transformation For a company with an iron bunker 67 metres below the Earth, Iron Mountain must know a lot about security. So how exactly can data leaks be prevented? “It's really important to look at employee security habits, particularly with remote working, which makes some of that monitoring difficult,” says McNair. “Iron Mountain's done some research that reveals 67% of remote staff are happy to allow family members to use their work computer, while 16% log on to public wifi to complete their work. Obviously, that creates some challenges. I think in high-pressure environments, like hospitals, data leaks can be common – particularly in the physical space, due to misplaced files and other logistical errors. It's easily avoided by digitising some of those legacy records protecting the valuable data online in the right way. We advise empowering every employee to become a risk ambassador by embedding risk awareness within the overall culture, whether that's in the healthcare sector or otherwise.” healthcare-digital.com

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IRELAND'S

DIGITAL HEALTH TRANSFORMATION WRITTEN BY: BLAISE HOPE PRODUCED BY: BEN MALTBY

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JOURNEY


HEALTH SERVICE EXECUTIVE

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HEALTH SERVICE EXECUTIVE

Coming from a laggard position, Ireland’s healthcare system now has a rapid digital improvement trajectory steered by a unique leadership initiative

T

he Irish Digital Health Leadership Steering Group (IDHLSG) is a community of over 65 Irish and international leaders (clinicians, patients, CEOs, Academics, policy makers) who have joined together to help lead the transformation of Ireland’s Health system through digital. Recognising that the Health Service Executive, or HSE, as the Republic of Ireland's publicly funded healthcare system – which employs over 110,000 staff – and the Department of Health could not transform the health system on their own, a collaborative ecosystem-wide approach was created that has resulted in fast, cohesive and radical results. Dr John Sheehan, radiology director at the Hermitage Clinic in Dublin and clinical vice-chair of the IDHLSG says: “I really think aligned public private healthcare and health tech, med tech, big tech and industry working together is such an exciting opportunity with so many benefits…..not reinventing the wheel, economies of scale etc… it completely gets you out of bed in the morning.” In a country that has failed to deliver a national electronic health record in over a decade despite having an explicit strategy and the funding to do so, a unique, almost covert public/private collaboration has developed an architecture that could underpin the future digital health system of Ireland.

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Example of an image caption healthcare-digital.com

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HEALTH SERVICE EXECUTIVE

Ireland: Healthcare in the comfort of your home

“OUR OVERALL STRATEGY IS ABOUT 'KEEPING WELL PEOPLE WELL' IN THEIR HOME” MARTIN CURLEY

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION AND OPEN INNOVATION, HSE

Prof Martin Curley presented a Leap Frog strategy to the HSE board in April 2020 that proposed the new Digital Health System should be focused around the patient and centred around a secure patient electronic health record. In addition to Curley, several other key leaders collaborated with one another in an digital transformation 48

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ecosystem: Dr Donal Bailey, innovation director of the country’s largest GP network; Eileen Byrne, CEO of Clanwilliam, the largest GP Practice software supplier in the country; Una Kearns, CEO of MyPatientSpace; and Dr Mohammad Al-Ubaydli, CEO of the world’s leading personal electronic health record. The aim of this ecosystem was to create a working prototype instantiation of a digital health platform that could help move the point of care rapidly to the patient and the home. With further work, the potential is there to create an architecture that empowers patients, that is 10 times simpler and 10 times more productive than what exists today,


MARTIN CURLEY TITLE: D IRECTOR OF DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION AND OPEN INNOVATION INDUSTRY: HEALTHCARE LOCATION: DUBLIN. IRELAND

and that could be 25 times cheaper than the 800 million originally touted as the cost of a National Acute EHR deployment. Interoperability, security and privacy are critical, so these have been carefully considered. But, like all digital solutions, the HSE Digital Transformation iterates and tests the architecture in its living labs, improving it to ensure it acts as a platform that enables solutions meeting the SLSL quadruple aim – better outcomes, lower cost, better experience, better quality of life – as well as meeting SSFE criteria – Sustainability, Scalability, Security, Functionality and Ease of Use – while also meeting appropriate financial hurdles.

EXECUTIVE BIO

Martin Curley is Professor of Innovation at Maynooth University and Director of the Digital Transformation and Open Innovation at the Health Service Executive (HSE), helping enable the digital transformation of Ireland’s health service. Previously, Martin was Senior Vice President and group head for Global Digital Practice at Mastercard and, before that, vice president at Intel Corporation as well as Director of Intel Labs Europe, Intel’s network of more than 50 research labs, which he grew across the European region. This year he was identified as a top 10 Global Influential Health Leader and as a Top 10 Global Inspiring Educator by leading US publications.


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“MANY, MANY PEOPLE WOULD RATHER BE TREATED IN THEIR HOME THAN IN A HOSPITAL” MARTIN CURLEY

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION AND OPEN INNOVATION, HSE

What has occurred here is an example of Open Innovation 2.0 (OI2) and what is called Architectural Innovation, where new, existing and emerging technologies are combined with knowledge to create a whole new product or platform with functionality that is far greater than the sum of the individual parts. Support from the HSE solicitors Philip Lee and HSE Procurement have helped create an environment where collaborative and co-funded innovation

could be done in a safe fashion, while being fully compliant with procurement rules. The collaborative research and innovation work creates a prototype or minimum viable platform and an opportunity to learn what is actually needed before going for a national procurement. In contrast to the traditional waterfall model, this agile innovation process dramatically reduces risk and with clinician, administrator and patient involvement will result in a solution that actually meets all the user’s needs. As with the introduction of new paradigms and platforms, there may be strong pockets of resistance, but hopefully wisdom will prevail and opponents will recognise that putting patients in control of their data and empowering them will only lead to better outcomes, longer lives and lower costs. Taking an ‘honour the past and healthcare-digital.com

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co-create the future’ approach will hopefully lead to a unified accelerated approach. Given the cloud-based nature of the solutions – and with the increasing support of the Irish digital minister Robert Troy – the digital health platform could be quickly scaled nationally, potentially making Ireland the first European country to reach the EU target of 90% of citizens having a personal electronic health record by 2030. "The purpose of the HSE is to provide safe, high-quality health and personal social services to the population of Ireland. The vision is a healthier Ireland with a highquality health service valued by all." The goal of the IDHLSG is to accelerate and turbocharge this vision. Patient advocate 52

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and patient vice chair of the IDHLSG Gary Boyle says putting the patient first is critical, and he has worked with Zendra Health’s CEO, Thomas Coleman, to quickly build an app to support and educate the community of Parkinson’s patients in a country that has one of the lowest ratios of nurses to Parkinson’s patients in Europe. Prof Anthony Staines of Dublin City University and IDHLSG academic vice chair believes the key to the progress already made is the open collaboration attitude combined with the shared vision of ‘Stay Left, Shift Left’. The presence of ‘heavyweight’ innovative clinicians in the IDHLSG such as Prof Richard Costello, who pioneered innovative digital respiratory solutions during COVID, and Prof


HEALTH SERVICE EXECUTIVE

Michael Sugrue, who is pioneering data-driven approaches to improving surgical outcomes, gives the IDHLSG real clinical credibility. Recognising that the nursing community is the backbone of the healthcare system, the IDHLSG vice chair for nursing is Karen Kelly, an advanced nurse practitioner who modified a remote respiratory monitoring system into a heart failure remote monitoring system with outstanding results. Karen is also pioneering the introduction of the 10x Butterfly mobile ultrasound system into Ireland. Having respected leaders in the IDHSLG who buy into the economy of mutuality and value people and purpose as much as profit is creating very positive momentum and early promising results.

Transforming Irish healthcare with digitalisation leading the charge Martin Curley is professor of innovation at Maynooth University, chair of the Irish Digital Health Leadership Steering Group and the director of digital transformation and open innovation at the HSE. Prior to joining HSE, Curley cut his digital teeth as vice president of Intel between 2009 and 2016, before bolstering his credentials by serving as senior vice president at MasterCard for a year, until 2018. According to Curley, he switched gears and put his skills to use in the healthcare industry to “transform the Irish healthcare system using digital". "I firmly believe we can do it," Curley says. "Together with other leaders, we have been able to mobilise a national movement around radical digital transformation with tech, medtech, pharma, clinicians, patients and academics. We now have more than 50 living labs across the country. I've also written a book called Open Innovation 2.0, The New Mode of Digital Innovation for Prosperity and Sustainability, which discusses how to drive a structural change in industry using digital technology and an exponential innovation methodology. "And the net impact of applying the method in the book is we're getting multiplicative and exponential outcomes rather than additive outcomes where we are seeing 10X better outcomes, 10X lower cost, and 10X higher volume. [Some people have called] this Curley's law. I'm not sure how I feel about that, but I've [been told to] just go with it." One of these goals set to help Curley reform Ireland's healthcare system is to bring hospital services into homes via tech. Stay Left is about keeping well people well in their home or, if you happen to have a chronic condition or need rehab, the healthcare-digital.com

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HEALTH SERVICE EXECUTIVE

understanding that this can be done best of all from home. "I am wearing a small device on my arm (from Waire) that can show you my realtime vital signs," he says. "This includes pulse rate, core temperature, oxygen saturation level and breathing rate, so the device is going to enable hospitals at home. In the future, it’s likely that many people will prefer to be treated in their home than being in a hospital. This will solve a really big problem in the healthcare system.” In Ireland, the problem is particularly acute where acute hospital occupancy routinely runs higher than 95%. If planes ran at this level of utilisation, they would routinely fall out of the sky. Curley argues that providing health monitoring systems closer to houses for personal use would "improve health" while "lowering costs". He then explained how technology could further be used to improve the global healthcare system. "I think that it’s within reach," he says. “Using the internet of things, artificial

“WE'VE NOW LEAPT FROM HAVING A LAGGING RESPIRATORY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM TO A WORLD-LEADING CAPABILITY” MARTIN CURLEY

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION AND OPEN INNOVATION, HSE

intelligence, big data and cloud computing, we can make a real change – one that hasn't been seen before." Further to this, Curley also believes that current advancements in healthcare technology could increase general life expectancy by two-three years, every five years, for the next decade or so. "We don't necessarily need to put more money into healthcare, actually," he says. "Digital therapeutics are a much more pivotal investment in terms of lifestyle and behavioural changes around nutrition and exercise. They're much more impactful. We recently created a living lab (Health Elevator) where you can get a health assessment, a personal electronic health record, and a wellness device all at the same time, and healthcare-digital.com

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HEALTH SERVICE EXECUTIVE

“WE NEED THAT SAME KIND OF AGILITY TO RESPOND TO OPPORTUNITIES AROUND LEGITIMATELY TRANSFORMING HEALTHCARE VIA DIGITAL APPROACHES.” MARTIN CURLEY

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION AND OPEN INNOVATION, HSE

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all for less than the price of a PCR test. This will enable us to walk the walk on wellness management, identifying risk factors earlier and reversing chronic diseases with assistance of digital therapeutics. “We mobilised eight companies and services to work with us to create a new integrated health and wellness offering in less than two weeks. This is again what is called architectural innovation, integrating existing and emerging solutions and knowledge to create something. It's a very powerful type of innovation.” Improving personal and population health doesn’t necessarily need more spend on clinical care but investments and improvements in lifestyle, nutrition, exercise, patient empowerment, diagnostics and smarter resource allocation.

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HEALTH SERVICE EXECUTIVE

According to Curley, HSE and the broader ecosystem aims to “empower patients and give them more self-control by testing solutions with patients as well as clinicians via its 50 living labs, ultimately providing people with closed-loop digital systems", for example such as the Medtronic 780G, which measures blood glucose levels in real time and adjusts insulin levels automatically directly via linked digital insulin pump. The technologies incorporated in the labs are deemed by Curley to be engaging, empowering, educating and encouraging for patients. "We're now expanding the Health Elevator living lab, first to 500, and then to 5,000 people –for the price of just two to three cups of coffee per person!" he enthuses.

Together with John Shaw of Legato Health Technologies, Curley, in his role as Maynooth University Professor, set up the IDHLSG research working group to develop the Digital Health and Wellness Capability Maturity Framework. This grant was aided by IDA Ireland and Enterprise Ireland, while Medtronic, Roche, Cisco, and Huawei co-funded and supported it. A working group of executives, clinicians and patients meet monthly to build the roadmap, key interventions and measurements that will chart and guide Ireland’s progress over its digital health decade, towards being a global leader in digital health. Ireland, in Curley’s eyes, is behind the rest of Europe in terms of healthcare, having jumped a maturity level from level 1 to level 2 in a 5 level maturity model, with COVID 19 acting as a big bang disruptor.

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Shaw says: “We now have a 2025 digital capability because of the acceleration driven by COVID. Curley and Donal Morris, CEO of Redzinc, had a telehealth solution, Blueeye, co-designed and deployed in St James Hospital as well as in HSE Mental Health Services, before most of HSE mainstream employees had ever heard of Zoom or Teams. "We have a very well supported national healthcare strategy, called Sláintecare, but the results delivery is lagging behind the vision, perhaps through overdependence on external consultants. I have always believed that strategy and accountability for delivery cannot be outsourced. All of the parties in the government approved the programme – which is unique in the history of Ireland – so while we are still lagging in Europe with respect to healthcare, we are on a fast improvement trajectory. Sláintecare is a programme developed by the Department of Health of Ireland and HSE that aims to build equal access to services for every citizen, with its vision of one universal health service for all as a guide. With this new model, patients will be treated based on their need, instead of their ability to pay. "We've now leapt from having a lagging respiratory measurement system to a world-leading capability with a company called PMD Solutions and their product, RespiraSense. RespiraSense is deployed in 23 acute hospitals and we have just now made it available in a community living lab setting. We're deploying vital signs automation to over 20 hospitals, detecting deteriorating patients earlier, improving the nursing experience, shortening average length of stays and adding new capacity back into the system through efficiencies. 58

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The financial return is extraordinary, with an internal rate of return of about 1100%. The support of leading HSE clinicians such as Dr Mike O’Connor and Dr Siobhan ni Bhriain has been of huge importance, because, as Erik Topol famously said, ‘Medicine is remarkably resistant to change’. A strong clinical champion is the most important ingredient for success. Prof Colin Doherty, a consultant in St James Hospital, not only has been the sponsor for a new epilepsy EPR currently being built in an agile fashion with IBM and Salesforce, but has been the main co-designer. “Together with major partner companies Centric Health and Roche, we have been able to reduce the rate of heart-related care home hospitalisations in one of the living labs by 10 times for patients with heart failure." Patient responses to treatment within the living labs indicated that they felt "a lot more secure". "They actually are monitored maybe a hundred times a year rather than eight," he says while adding that "the costs for the monitoring are reduced by a factor of two or three". Curley explains that the "overall strategy is about 'keeping well people well' in their home". Tunstall Emergency Response and Irish based Pandu have developed a novel technology called a PanPan watch, which detects falls quickly and, within 20 seconds, connects the faller with a call centre in County Wexford and initiates two-way voice communication through the watch to see what help is needed. If the person is unresponsive, emergency services can be dispatched as the GPS locations are known. The PanPan watch allows 10 times earlier detection of falls, which has been shown to reduce average length of stay and, indeed, healthcare-digital.com

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save lives. Already, 300 older Irish citizens are using the PanPan device in a distributed living lab. T-Pro’s digital dictation solutions have now been adopted in every hospital group in the country, demonstrating a tenfold improvement in productivity, capturing speech in real-time, cutting out time waste and speeding time to treatment. To be the best, you have to work with the best, and the HSE Digital Transformation team have forged strategic collaborations with ten global leaders, including: Microsoft, Medtronic, Dell, Cisco, Roche, Google and others. Additionally, Curley and his team are working with Enterprise Ireland to create ‘the first 25’ – a portfolio of 25 Irish Digital Health SMEs, such as Health Beacon, Synchrophi and PMP, with whom they have collaborated to bring value to Irish citizens, patients, clinicians and the overall system. All of these companies have positioned their solutions to help support and accelerate the ‘Stay Left, Shift Left – 10x’ agenda. The collaboration with the British Embassy and the UK Department of International Trade has been particularly fruitful, with HSE Digital Transformation working with over 7 UK digital health startups. Principle-centred leadership across the Irish health ecosystem. According to Curley, Ireland has adopted a principle-centred leadership approach to the Irish Health Service’s Digital Transformation Innovation Plan, with the principles being "fundamentally important to the digital transformation” and having the potential to “maximise the success of digital transformation in Ireland'.' Curley and fellow ecosystem colleagues such as John Sheahan (Blackrock Health), 60

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Brian Jordan (Cisco), Dr Donal Bailey (Centric Health), Prof Richard Costello (RCSI), Ronan Hurley (Medtronic), Maeve McGrath (Roche) and patient advocate Gary Boyle convened the Irish Digital Health Leadership Steering Group (IDHLSG) to oversee and orchestrate the digital transformation, using an all-ofIreland and all-of-ecosystem approach. Curley drafted a set of 10 principles that were then reviewed, iterated and agreed upon by the IDHLSG, and then by the broader ecosystem. Within this approach, there are ten core principles: "The first principle is to leap frog


from being a laggard to being a leader. We want to move from a healthcare system that is paper-based, hospital-based, clinician and presence-based, to one that is patient-centric, in which remote monitoring is key and performed via cloudbased personal electronic health devices into a personal electronic health record." IDHLSG’s campaign, ‘Stay Left, Shift Left’, fully realises the second principle. Where ‘Stay Left’ is about 'keeping well people well' in their own homes, ‘Shift Left’ focuses predominantly on “moving patients from an acute care setting, to

a community one, to a home setting as quickly as possible”. “All this can be achieved with different technologies and devices. With automated vital signs’ monitoring in a home, for example, we can allow early discharges post-surgery and perhaps more importantly enable a new Hospital at Home model,” Curley explains. McKinsey predicts that by 2025, 25% of care currently provided in facilities such as acute hospitals could be performed in the home, with no loss of quality or access. The third principle, Health 4.0, is the result of applying the principles of the healthcare-digital.com

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currently evolving Industry 4.0 paradigm into a healthcare setting. Health 4.0 also revolves around patient engagement, patient empowerment, and patient encouragement. The fourth principle revolves around “Open Innovation 2.0 (OI2), which is a leading-edge, innovative digital innovation methodology that identifies key design patterns that can lead to a structural change in an industry". Simply put, OI2 is about intensive networking and experimentation amongst high-trust partners aligned with a shared vision (Stay Left, Shift Left) and with the goal of creating a new kind of shared value incorporating increased wellbeing, welfare and wealth. Curley’s team member, Jim McGrane, runs a disciplined innovation management process to manage the various living labs, governed by an overarching digital solutions review board comprising senior clinicians and executives across the HSE. Inspired by the "incredible exponential power 62

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of digital technologies", the fifth principle is what Curley calls, "10x radical innovation". "We have been deploying digital technologies and healthcare settings. What we're finding from that is we are getting 10x better outcomes, 10x lower costs, and 10x volume increase," he says. A pattern is emerging and this could be codified in a new emerging ‘power law’. The sixth principle, as Curley explains, is "a digital transformation pillar model". The model consists of five vectors, the first two of which concentrate on education. "We've created a digital academy and a Master's programme. We ignite the ecosystem using the digital academy forum, which has ‘TED Talks for Digital Health’," he elaborates. The other three pillars focus on using living labs to ideate, iterate and ultimately implement disruptive solutions. He then explains that the seventh principle "is value-based healthcare". "We are building on the principles of the book by Michael Porter


HEALTH SERVICE EXECUTIVE

and Professor Elizabeth Teisberg, Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-based Competition on Results," Curley adds. We move further to focus on value-based competition. A fundamental point of OI2 is that the unit of competition has moved from the organisation to the ecosystem and from the product to the platform. “Our number eight is about dynamic capabilities and capability maturity for frameworks (CMF)," Curley says. "So many healthcare organisations exhibited dynamic capabilities as a response to COVID, where they dramatically reconfigured themselves to enable massscale testing and mass vaccination – we need that same kind of agility once more in order to respond to opportunities effectively, which includes the legitimate transformation of healthcare through a digital approach. We use capability maturity frameworks as a way of organising how

we sequence and prioritise solutions for implementation," he says. Working with leading cardiologists, Prof Ken McDonald and Dr Matt Barrett, the IDHLSG research team have built: a digital cardiovascular CMF that identifies and prioritises key 10x interventions, such as AI-assisted echo tests; the Alivekor Kardia device for rapid, mobile ECG testing; and the Butterfly ultrasound device, which allows point of care ultrasound at high quality and is a lower cost than the current solutions. These solutions are targeted at constraints in the cardiovascular pathway leading to faster diagnosis, treatment and recovery. The ninth principle argues that the digital health strategy should also be a crossgovernment and sector strategy with mutually reinforcing enterprise, sustainability and education goals. Curley and the IDHLSG work with many SMEs and multinationals to create new solutions which save and improve lives but also create growth and jobs through exports and also improve sustainability. Transport Minister Eamonn Ryan and Department of Enterprise Secretary general Dr Orlaigh Quinn have been particular champions of the cross Government approach to ‘Stay Left, Shift Left - 10x’.The last principle is about using design thinking and design science research to envisage and create solutions that meet real needs and solve real problems. Curley’s team member, Des O’Toole, has built a repeatable design thinking process that is used at the front end of the clinical and patient engagement process. To summarise this final principle, Curley utters the words that will always have a place in healthcare, regardless of the technological advances: “Empathy is key!”

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Telehealth services supporting mental health patients MultiCare’s Samantha Clark teams up with Lauren Mills of Valera Health to discuss how their telehealth partnership is assisting mental health patients

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he COVID-19 pandemic and the ongoing effect of multiple lockdowns have severely impacted the planet’s mental health – especially for those dedicated hospital staff working in intensive care units and emergency departments, who have existed in a state of chaos since it began in 2020. “Putting anybody in that situation, you are going to severely inhibit their ability to cope and function normally,” says Samantha Clark, assistant vice president of strategy and business development for MultiCare's Behavioural Health Network. “It’s so challenging seeing day-to-day what our clinicians and providers have had to go through. As an employer, it can sometimes feel so disheartening looking at what you can do. That's a question that our healthcare system asks all the time: what can we do? How can we listen?

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“ Partnerships like this will become more common, we can grow more quickly by leaning on other organisations' expertise and strengths” SAMANTHA CLARK

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT OF STRATEGY AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, MULTICARE

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DIGITAL HEALTH

Valera Employing more than 500 certified and experienced coaches, licensed therapists and psychiatrists, Valera’s mental health professionals have facilitated more than 130,000 clinical visits

MultiCare MultiCare’s network of care includes 11 hospitals and more than 230 primary care, specialty care and urgent care clinics

“I would say that, even for individuals who didn't have mental health problems before, there are so many people for whom there's this general sense of a lack of joy. There’s this fatigue, a general grey area, where they feel a little numb after all this.” Lauren Mills, director of new markets at Valera Health, is determined to make sure that those supporting healthcare workers do not forget what people on the front lines went through. “By continuing to pay attention to the mental health of healthcare workers – for a long time to come – is going to be really important,” says Mills. “It shouldn't be something that people think has ended or is going away. When it seems like we might be coming out of the pandemic and on to some new stage, it makes it easy for people to forget what healthcare workers went

“ In terms of digital health, there will need to be this continued emphasis on measuring outcomes” LAUREN MILLS

DIRECTOR OF NEW MARKETS, VALERA HEALTH healthcare-digital.com

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“ A question that our healthcare system asks all the time is: what can we do? How can we listen?” SAMANTHA CLARK

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT OF STRATEGY AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, MULTICARE

through. We have to be really conscious to not do that.” Mills is responsible for Valera Health’s geographic expansion into new states and markets, as well as health plan partnerships and strategic partnerships with hospital systems such as MultiCare. “I think what's most exciting about this partnership is that our organisations have this commitment to reaching the people most in need of care and inclusive services,” explains Mills. “Reaching adolescents, reaching those with serious mental illness and reaching those who have Medicaid insurance – it’s a shared mission that we both have.” 68

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In her role at MultiCare's Behavioural Health Network, Clark also covers market expansion, in addition to new programmes, model development, strategic planning, process improvements and project management. “When I first was introduced to Valera, they just really shone in ways that most companies didn't,” says Clark. “They work with not just commercial plans, but also Medicaid plans and smaller regional plans. They see the mild, the moderate and what we call seriously mentally ill. Yes, they have the same proprietary technology and all the really amazing tech services and capabilities that we all go at, but, most importantly, they have a commitment to quality and


DIGITAL HEALTH

outcomes that I think even the largest virtual behavioural health companies right now are still struggling with.” The Valera Health and MultiCare Health System partnership has expanded access to high-quality mental health care. Working together allows both businesses to provide access to more people in need of care. “By working together, we can actually get to those people faster,” says Clark. COVID-19 increased demand for mental health support, amplifying telehealth services According to Clark, the impact of the pandemic – and its ongoing fallout –

exacerbated people’s existing mental health needs. “For individuals who maybe didn't consider themselves as someone with mental health needs, it kicked them into a new level due to isolation, stress, grief, change – all of these different things,” says Clark. “We're seeing mental health needs reach a crisis level with children and adolescents,in particular” says Mills. “I think their socialisation was impacted and anxiety increased due to all the uncertainty and stress around them. Then, all the way through to older age groups, where isolation, loneliness and exam stress had a healthcare-digital.com

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DIGITAL HEALTH

“ Continuing to pay attention to the mental health of healthcare workers is going to be really important” LAUREN MILLS

DIRECTOR OF NEW MARKETS, VALERA HEALTH

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DIGITAL HEALTH

huge impact. Across the spectrum, it's impacted people in so many ways.” Telehealth service providers jumped to increase access to remote mental healthcare. Previously, many were easily able to put off seeking help for their mental health, invoking reasons ranging from the logistics of childcare to stigma. “Transportation could be a barrier, as could finding a provider that is close enough that you could travel to,” says Mills. “Sometimes, people prefer being in the comfort of their own home and find it even easier to open up to their provider clinician in a virtual setting. There are many ways that can help really increase access.” But barriers to access don’t just impact patients. “On a workforce shortage note, when you have a bricks-and-mortar clinic location, your pool for who you can recruit is only so big,” says Clark. “If you're virtual, that expands. You get to have clinicians who live where they want to live and they're not chained to a specific area.” A contentious question among patients and professionals alike – does digital healthcare rank as a higher quality service than in-person treatment? “It really depends on individual preference,” says Clark. “Both in-person and virtual healthcare should be driven by data and outcomes and each should have clinical guardrails. We should offer both.” “From a clinical efficacy standpoint, studies have shown that it's just as effective,” says Mills. “If you can meet people where they are and provide care in the way that they prefer to receive it, you're only going to increase engagement, and it's more likely that person will stay in-services.”

The future of digital health post-COVID-19 Over the next year, Valera Health will continue its expansion and focus on quality outcomes. At the MultiCare Behavioural Health Network, Clark says it’s now looking at how it can “ensure behavioural health access and behavioural health presence not just in primary care and paediatrics family medicine, but also across different service lines that maybe we didn't fully appreciate, where behavioural health was occurring before the pandemic”. But what about the future of digital health? “It's going to keep growing and we're going to get better at it – and keep it sustainable,” predicts Clark. “Partnerships like this will hopefully become more common, because as we've made it through as a healthcare system and certainly developed lots of great strengths in virtual services, we can learn, develop and grow more quickly by leaning on other organisations' expertise and strengths.” “The expansion into telehealth adoption that was ushered in by the pandemic will, I think, be here to stay,” says Mills. “In terms of digital health, I think there will need to be this continued emphasis on measuring outcomes and quality, and ensuring that it is evidence-based. There are so many options now for consumers that it could be confusing, and I think making sure that we're taking that outcomes-based approach is really important.” healthcare-digital.com

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UHSFT

Accelerating

ITS DIGITAL

TRANSFORMATION WRITTEN BY: CATHERINE GRAY

post-COVID

PRODUCED BY: JAMES BERRY

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UHSFT

Adrian Byrne, CIO, and Ashwin Pinto, Chief Clinical Information Officer, discuss the Trust’s digital strategy and how it supports patients

A

s one of the largest singlesite NHS Trust’s in the country, the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UHSFT) has a number of different units at its sites dedicated to supporting different patients with specialist needs. Included at the site is a children’s hospital with one of the very few paediatric cardiac surgery programmes in the country, a cancer hospital, neuro hospital, adult cardiac services, a major trauma centre and a women’s hospital. “We are one of the biggest single-site hospitals in the country,” said Ashwin Pinto, Joint Chief Clinical Information Officer and Consultant in Clinical Neurology at UHSFT. He added: “We're unusual in that everything's been centralised on this site.” As well as serving its patients, UHSFT is also a University teaching hospital. This means it teaches future medical professionals as well as embarking on medical research. Pinto outlined the research the Trust has done in recent years: “In the pandemic, we were either the second or third most active research hospital in the country in terms of recruiting people to COVID trials. We were one of the leaders in the COVID vaccine trials. We actually nationally led the COVBoost study that allowed us to recommend booster vaccinations.”

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UHSFT

Accelerating its digital transformation post-COVID

“ We are one of the biggest single-site hospitals in the country” ASHWIN PINTO

JOINT CHIEF CLINICAL INFORMATION OFFICER AND CONSULTANT IN CLINICAL NEUROLOGY, UHSFT

Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic The healthcare industry has been impacted unlike any other during the COVID-19 pandemic. Not only has the NHS had to deal with an overwhelming amount of patients in its care, but it has also had to become more digitised to respond to restrictions and changes imposed by the pandemic. Although COVID brought its challenges for 76

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UHSFT, in terms of digitalisation and IT, it had a lot of solutions in place previously that supported them, as Pinto explained: “The IT team were well prepared. We had the right things in place at the right time.” Continuing, he said: “We were lucky enough that we already had a plan in place. We could see how we could change things, make simple changes that had far-reaching consequences for clinicians and particularly for patients.” One solution which has helped the Trust, and has undoubtedly helped many


ASHWIN PINTO TITLE: JOINT CHIEF CLINICAL INFORMATION OFFICER AND CONSULTANT IN CLINICAL NEUROLOGY INDUSTRY: HEALTHCARE, TECHNOLOGY LOCATION: UNITED KINGDOM

organisations around the world transition to remote working where possible, was Microsoft Teams. Having already recognised how this could streamline and facilitate more meetings, as well as helping connect up clinicians and other people to deliver services to the Trust, UHSFT “had already done a lot of the groundwork behind implementing this technology,” said Pinto. “Although we had to deploy Teams at scale, we deployed at scale very fast as we had a little bit of understanding of what we

EXECUTIVE BIO

Dr Ashwin Pinto is Joint Chief Clinical Information Officer (CCIO) and consultant in clinical neurology at University Hospital Southampton NHS FT. Dr Pinto graduated from the first cohort of the NHS Digital Academy in 2019 and was appointed joint CCIO shortly after. Key digital interests include clinical data integration between primary and secondary care and the development of untethered personal health records (PHRs).



InterSystems: accelerating UHSFT’s digital transformation InterSystems’ David Hancock discusses how the company supports the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust with its digital transformation.

With its HealthShare platform, InterSystems connects providers, patients, and payers through a unified care record and analytics, that span the care continuum. HealthShare was named a KLAS Category Leader for 2019 and 2020, and also received an exceptional 91/100 approval rating based on customer feedback. David Hancock, Healthcare Executive Advisor at InterSystems explained how he works to support the healthcare industry through InterSystems: “I work with our customers on how they’re able to successfully adopt integration and interoperability solutions into their operations as part of their digital transformation programmes.” “InterSystems is a major supplier to the NHS around integration and interoperability as well as specific data platforms and electronic patient records,” he added. As it can be used across many industries, InterSystems’ technology is highly adaptable. To support the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UHSFT) on its journey towards digital transformation, InterSystems supplies the Trust with its technology. Adrian Byrne, Chief Information Officer at UHSFT commented on the partnership: “We’ve been working together for a long time and we migrated from other integration technology into the InterSystems suite.”

Outlining the partnership, Hancock said: “What we’ve been able to do as part of University Hospital Southampton’s digital strategy is to help it integrate its solutions. If you’re going to go with a number of different separate solutions, like UHSFT are, you need to integrate them together well.” Adding to this, Hancock discussed the Trust’s unique strategy: “The University Hospital Southampton has a quite distinctive digital strategy because of how it’s going to be able to support the organisation. What Southampton has always done is work in a best-of breed kind of way. UHSFT, rather than buying a single solution, is doing something more incrementally to retain control over some of the things it does.”

@InterSystemsUKI linkedin.com/company/intersystems-UK


UHSFT

were deploying. We knew the advantages and what we could gain out of it because we'd actually done a lot of that appraisal before we deployed to the organisation,” he added. Looking at more patient-focused technological initiatives, Pinto outlined how technology supported the Trust during COVID. During this time, it was imperative medical staff had real-time notification of when a patient received a COVID diagnosis so they could be appropriately isolated and treated. “We had a system in place that meant in real-time, clinicians had access to positive results, they knew immediately on their device that a patient was positive. This was great for infection control, as the patients could be moved to a safe area and they could start their treatment,” he said. “You couldn't really get a better example of being well-prepared, because we'd already started to think about this, and then we could just turn that into a project that had immediate benefit for patients,” Pinto added. Looking at UHSFT’s digital journey so far Adrian Byrne, Chief Information Officer at UHSFT reflected on the impact of COVID in the context of his 18 years of work as CIO of the Trust: “I know people like to talk about the change under the pandemic and I say it's kind of obvious because of the impact of it. We would never go from 100 people using a system to 5,000 people using a system in two months the way that we did. “But if you look at the organisation transformation over 10 years, going from an organisation that used to prescribe on paper, that now electronically prescribes; from an organisation that didn't have a wireless network to one that has a complete wireless network. Those kinds of things are much more impactful in the longer run, I like to think,” he added. Despite the Trust’s 80

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willingness to invest in digital over the past years, Byrne did commend his team’s efforts to keep their spending on digital technologies as low as possible. “If you look at our model hospital data, you will see that we're well into the lower quartile in terms of spending. In terms of the size and complexity of our organisation, we are low on the spending chart, but we've achieved quite a lot,” Byrne explained. UHSFT has adopted


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UHSFT

“ Communications technology is going to really take us on to a level where we can monitor patients from secondary care in a much better way than we have”

ADRIAN BYRNE TITLE: CIO INDUSTRY: HEALTHCARE, TECHNOLOGY LOCATION: UNITED KINGDOM “As Chief Information Officer at UHSFT Adrian oversees the strategy and operational digital services for a large University Teaching Hospital with more than 1,200 beds and £1Bn turnover. Adrian's experience includes project and IT management over more than 20 years. A keen supporter of open data platform approaches to health systems, he has worked with a multivendor integrated electronic medical record, and a cloud based connected personal health record called My Medical Record. Adrian was also chair of the Health CIO network for six years until 2021, but is still on its advisory panel, where one of the key aims is to improve the professional standing of the Health CIO.”

ADRIAN BYRNE

many different digital strategies and technologies to support its operations ultimately improving patient services. “One of the things that we do as an organisation is run a personal health record service called My Medical Record. We've got more than 100,000 patients on that now and it's growing around 5,000 a month,” said Byrne. “It's a big thing for us. We're a leader in it, in terms of secondary care. You can see the impact of technology. Communications technology is going to really take us on to a level where we can monitor patients from secondary care in a much better way than we have, and in fact, do things that we could never even think of doing even five years ago. The pace of change is rapid,” he added. Pinto celebrated the work Byrne and his team have executed over the years: “What's really interesting is that Adrian's time at the Trust as the CIO has been coincident with this rapid, just extraordinary expansion in services over that time.”

EXECUTIVE BIO

CIO UHSFT


“ We were one of the leaders in the COVID vaccine trials” ASHWIN PINTO JOINT CHIEF CLINICAL INFORMATION OFFICER AND CONSULTANT IN CLINICAL NEUROLOGY, UHSFT

DID YOU KNOW? UHSFT’s 12,000 staff provide a range of secondary care services to our local population and specialist tertiary services for nearly 4 million people across the south of England and beyond. It achieved Foundation Trust status in 2011, which enables greater local accountability and greater financial freedom.

Adopting technology from partner companies To accelerate its digital journey, the Trust needs to invest in technology that will 84

July 2022

support operations as it becomes more digitised. Pinto explained that some technologies “will be able to do some really clever things with the data that we get from patients to risk-stratify patients and make sure they get the right follow-up.” However, he added that he doesn’t believe the technology is ready yet. Another challenge with introducing new technologies into the NHS is the regulation around it. “Any technology that is developed effectively has to be regulated in the same way that a new bit of monitoring equipment might have to be in the hospital or a new scanner and


UHSFT

so on. That's mighty complex in its own right,” said Pinto. Despite these challenges, UHSFT has partnered with InterSystems, an industryleading vendor for database management, rapid application development and integration. With InterSystems, UHSFT utilises its HealthShare platform that sits at the centre of the Trust’s systems. By integrating its solutions, InterSystems has been a key partner in UHSFT’s digital transformation. Continuing with UHSFT’s digital strategy to improve operations At the heart of all of the Trust’s initiatives is its patients. Pinto believes in order for

UHSFT’s digital strategy to be successful, it needs to consider both inpatients and outpatients. Discussing outpatients, Pinto said, “I'm a great believer that what we need to do is empower patients to have the information they need to help them manage their care, and if they're a long-term patient in the hospital, they can easily access that when they need it. That, without any question, is a real focus on personal health records and sharing data with patients; asking them where appropriate to rate their symptoms. It's called patient-reported outcome measures, which we then share with their clinical teams.” healthcare-digital.com

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“ We've achieved quite a lot” ADRIAN BYRNE CIO UHSFT

He also noted the significance of wearable technology in outpatients for monitoring and improving remote healthcare. The global wearables market is expected to record a value of US$116.88bn in 2025, rising at a CAGR of 17.12%, for the time period of 2021-2025. “There's amazing work that goes on in heart failure in our hospital, which I would never have dreamt we would have been able to do that sort of level of monitoring at home. We're already there in certain areas, said Pinto. Looking to the future, he said: “What we need to do is make that available to virtually everybody who attends the hospital as an outpatient.” To continue to improve inpatient services, Pinto explained it is imperative the Trust’s inpatient record continues to become more digitised, he explained: “We've been very successful in digitising our inpatient record, but not to an extent that would allow us to gain some of the real advantages from it.” “How does that benefit the patient? it will improve efficiency, so that right at the start of a patient's inpatient journey, we have a much better handle on their trajectory in the hospital and how long they're likely to be in for. Plus, we know what treatment they might need and we can plan our services in a much more proactive way, which is much better than how we used to collect data before,” he concluded.

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TECHNOLOGY

PLANETWATCH’S TECHNOLOGY OFFERS CLEAN AIR & HEALTH EQUALITY Claudio Parrinello, PlanetWatch CEO, uses blockchain technology to bring real-time data on clean air to customers concerned about air quality post-pandemic WRITTEN BY: HELEN ADAMS

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H

igh-tech environmental service PlanetWatch was not thrilled when the COVID-19 pandemic exploded in Europe. But, as a company pushing for better air quality across the world, they have used the past two years to amplify their message: clean air is a pressing global issue and, just because we can’t see it, does not mean it’s not there. PlanetWatch decentralises and incentivises environmental monitoring by leveraging reliable yet affordable sensors writing data on the Algorand blockchain. “We are the only company in the blockchain world to be a spinoff of CERN. PlanetWatch has a strong collaboration with CERN and other big scientific players worldwide,” says CEO Claudio Parrinello. CERN is the leading physics research centre in the world, based in Geneva, the birthplace of the World Wide Web. PlanetWatch is based just across the border in Saint-Genis-Pouilly, France, and has a global outlook that mirrors Parrinello’s. PlanetWatch’s technology Parrinello is a widely-travelled Italian national. He’s been doing research in the United States as well as in the UK – at the University of Liverpool and the University of Edinburgh – after getting a PhD in theoretical physics from the Italian institution Scuola Normale Superiore. The one constant in Parrinello’s life has been the taste for innovation, first on the science side, and later on, more on the technology and business side. “I've always been trying to build bridges between industry and academia,” he says. “I've been several things in my life. Until the end of the previous century, I was a researcher in theoretical physics. Then I moved to the Geneva region on the French healthcare-digital.com

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riMedik

R E D E F I Care NING CARE Redefining

g Vital Patient rldwide

oy (TriMedika) and tin Curley (Health Service cuss how TRITEMP™ has helped drive the on agenda in Ireland.

es that really make a ients.

edical industry for 25 years, CEO at TriMedika, where technology wasn’t patient need. “We set up vide the most accurate clinical als, and this is where as being different.”

that Dr Molloy explains hasn’t opment is thermometry. no development for 15 years. e routine diagnostics that we orld, so we set about making on-contact thermometer.“

hat came from talking to nd healthcare workers within viously the savings on the healthcare workers at also to manage infections, n to build the future for

Partnership with the HSE. ears, TriMedika has been SE, now in over 200 locations

Transforming Healthcare Transforming Care Through Innovative in the HSE Through Innovative Technology Patnerships in Ireland, as well as hospitals in over 20 countries. “We have been working with the HSE team to really understand their needs and their pain points, as well as looking at research to make thermometers better and develop them so that they are better for nurses and hospital teams. The HSE is a very forwardthinking organisation”, says Dr Molloy.

Technology Partnerships

Adding to Dr Molloy’s comments, Professor Martin Curley, HSE Director of Transformation/ Maynooth University, says, “It has been tremendous to partner with TriMedika. The ambition of the HSE is to move Ireland from being a digital health laggard to a European digital leader in the years ahead. To do that, we need to partner with the best and the brightest, both here and abroad.” “We have an overarching strategy, which we call ‘stay left, shift left’. Stay left is about using technology to keep people well in their home, or if you happen to have a chronic condition you can be managed best of all from home. Shift left is about moving patients as quickly as possible from an acute to a community, to a home setting. Every time we make these digital interventions, we’re trying to achieve the quadruple aim: lower cost, improved quality of care, improved quality of life and improved clinician experience. TriMedika delivers on all of these.” “The TRITEMP™ is a superior thermometer because it is non-contact, thus helping with infection control - very important during the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s going to be an essential tool for preventing Hospital Acquired Infections. It’s also more sustainable with no consumables making it about a fifth of the total cost of ownership of conventional thermometers.”

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TECHNOLOGY

Improving Vital Patient Care Worldwide Dr Róisín Molloy (TriMedika) and Professor Martin Curley (Health Service Executive) discuss how TRITEMP™ thermometer has helped drive the digital innovation agenda in Ireland.

“ THE FIRST IMPORTANT difference for patients. Working in the medical for 25 years, THING TO MEindustry IS RAISING Dr Róisín Molloy, CEO at TriMedika, could see areas where technology AWARENESS THATwasn’t keeping up with patient need. “We set up TriMedika to provide the most accurate clinical THIS IS AN ISSUE AND devices for hospitals, and this is where we see ourselves as being different.” THAT EVERYBODY CAN A particular area that Dr Molloy explains hasn’t TAKE ACTION” seen much development is thermometry. Developing devices that really make a

“There has been no development for 15 years. Yet it is one of the routine diagnostics that we CLAUDIO PARRINELLO use around the world, so we set about making CEO, the TRITEMP™ non-contact thermometer.“ PLANETWATCH “The key things that came from talking to doctors, nurses and healthcare side. I set up a consulting firm workers there atwithin the the HSE, were obviously the savings on beginning of the 2000s. Then I actually cost and time for the healthcare workers at joined CERN with managerial appointments, the hospital, but also to manage infections, and we were keen to build the future for and, eventually, I became the head of thermometry.”

technology transfer.” In 2012, Parrinello co-founded TriMedika and its Partnership with thehis HSE. For the last four years, TriMedika has been first tech startup, involving sensors and selling into the HSE, now in over 200 locations robotics. Later, he got interested in blockchain technologies, which led to

in Ireland, as well as hospitals in over 20 countries. “We have been working with the HSE team to really understand their needs and their pain points, as well as looking at research to make thermometers better and develop them so that they are better for nurses and hospital teams. The HSE is a very forwardthinking organisation”, says Dr Molloy. Adding to Dr Molloy’s comments, Professor Martin Curley, HSE Director of Transformation/ Maynooth University, says, “It has been tremendous to partner with TriMedika. The ambition of the HSE is to move Ireland from being a digital health laggard to a European digital leader in the years ahead. To do that, we need to partner with the best and the brightest, both here and abroad.”

PlanetWatch in 2020, where Parrinello was “We have an overarching strategy, which we able to marry technology with his interest call ‘stay left, shift left’. Stay left is about using technology to keep people well in their home, in air pollution. or if you happen to have a chronic condition PlanetWatch’s air quality sensor data sits you can be managed best of all from home. on anleft environmentally-friendly Shift is about moving patients asblockchain quickly as possible from an acute to a community, to network that has a highly valued reputation a home setting. Every time we make these for being carbon-neutral: Algorand. digital interventions, we’re trying to achieve PlanetWatch the quadruple decentralises aim: lower cost, reliable improved quality of care, improvedand quality of life and air quality monitoring focuses on improved clinician experience. TriMedika collecting quality data. delivers ononly all of high these.” “To give the broader context, the World “The is a superior thermometer HealthTRITEMP™ Organisation says that there are because it is non-contact, thus helping with seven million premature deaths perthe year infection control - very important during COVID-19 pandemic. It’s going to be an worldwide that are related to air pollution. essential tool for preventing Hospital Acquired This is impressive yet terrible. But then, Infections. It’s also more sustainable with when you learn making that 90% of children no consumables it about a fifth of the total cost of ownership of conventional worldwide are exposed to air that doesn't thermometers.” meet minimal WHO standards, then it's even worse.”

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TECHNOLOGY

PlanetWatch - First episode Act on climate

Even before the COVIDother viral infection risks,” “PLANETWATCH 19 pandemic drew a says Parrinello. “Because sharp focus on the air we when we are indoors, the HAS A STRONG breathe, air pollution was main means of contagion COLLABORATION a critical issue. Since the is via aerosol. These are onset of COVID-19, there very tiny droplets, which WITH CERN are even more reasons to can carry viral matters and AND OTHER BIG look into air pollution. float in a poorly ventilated Yet health specialists SCIENTIFIC PLAYERS room for hours.” claim that indoor air quality WORLDWIDE” is even more important How air pollution impacts for human health than health inequality CLAUDIO PARRINELLO outdoor air quality for two Developing countries are CEO, reasons: firstly, because labelled so because they PLANETWATCH we spend most of our time have a lower economic indoors and secondly, because pollutants can output. In the strides being made to perform stagnate indoors, particularly in areas with at a higher level or simply survive, clean air is poor ventilation. To this end, PlanetWatch often an afterthought. also provides sophisticated and certified “90% of those children worldwide indoor air quality monitoring. impacted by air pollution are mostly living “Once again, since the onset of the in developing countries,” says Parrinello pandemic, what has emerged is that indoor sadly. “That is well known because there air quality is really a proxy for COVID-19 and are a number of drivers for air pollution, 92

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TECHNOLOGY

“ THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION SAYS THAT THERE ARE SEVEN MILLION PREMATURE DEATHS PER YEAR WORLDWIDE CAUSED BY AIR POLLUTION” CLAUDIO PARRINELLO CEO, PLANETWATCH

particularly indoors, with the use of cooking stoves and in-house wood combustion, which are big drivers of fine particulate matter and that is very harmful – although wooden stoves and outdoor fires are very widespread in developed countries, as well.” In some developing countries, there is really no alternative answer just yet. “Indoors, typically we're monitoring particulates, CO2 and something called

VOC: volatile organic compounds,” explains Parrinello. CO2 indoors is mostly related to the presence of people. When customers use a PlanetWatch sensor, they are often shocked to discover that after watching television with their children for two hours, the CO2 in the room has shot up. PlanetWatch leverages many sensors for indoor or outdoor use, or even mobile monitoring, which can tell customers more about the quality of air they breathe. Air pollution and climate change Another global issue besides the COVID-19 pandemic is the threat of climate change, which is also related to air pollution, as there are some air pollutants that are also greenhouse gas sources.

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TECHNOLOGY

“ SINCE THE PANDEMIC, WHAT HAS EMERGED IS THAT INDOOR AIR QUALITY IS REALLY A PROXY FOR OTHER VIRAL INFECTION RISKS” CLAUDIO PARRINELLO CEO, PLANETWATCH

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TECHNOLOGY

• The World Health Organisation says that there are seven million premature deaths per year worldwide related to air pollution • 90% of children worldwide are exposed to air which doesn't meet minimal WHO standards

“The most obvious one is CO2, but there are others such as methane and ozone; ground level ozone is relevant in that respect,” says Parrinello. “So the two issues are tightly related. But again, it's also a matter of long]-term versus short-term. I mean, climate change is a huge challenge, but it is also important to focus on pollutants that can harm public health today, regardless of climate change.” So, what can we all do to help create a clean environment with top quality air and health equality? “The first important thing to me is raising awareness that this is an issue so everybody can take action, thanks to initiatives such as PlanetWatch, which is truly a citizen science initiative,” says Parrinello proudly. “This means that everybody can contribute to generate scientifically relevant data, by using approved sensors and streaming their data to us.” PlanetWatch wants to raise awareness and continue to provide ways for people to operate their plug and play devices. “By looking into what happens to an air quality sensor when you are exposed to a situation that is a part of your lifestyle, you can really understand whether it makes sense to modify your lifestyle to improve the quality of the air that you and your family are breathing.” PlanetWatch hopes to collect data on the air we breathe to be able to educate the public and pass important information onto people who can help to uplift air quality. healthcare-digital.com

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SUPPLY CHAIN

CREATING SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS IN ONCOLOGY WITH SERVIER Eric Lemay, head of global external manufacturing at Servier, manages pharmaceutical supply chain challenges to support cancer patients WRITTEN BY: HELEN ADAMS

S

ervier Pharmaceuticals, a commercial stage, privately held United States pharmaceutical company that was launched by Servier Group, is committed to finding solutions that will address today's challenges. The company's oncology portfolio of innovative medicines is designed to bring more life-saving treatments to a greater number of patients, across the entire spectrum of disease and in a variety of tumour types. Last year, Servier Group hit a revenue of €4.7bn. Eric Lemay is the head of global external manufacturing at Servier. “I'm responsible for the end-to-end delivery of Servier’s portfolio products that are manufactured outside of our internal manufacturing network, at what we can call contract manufacturing organisations,” said

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Lemay. “My team is responsible for the dayto-day management and oversight of all production activities, such as forecasting, batch production, release of the product and shipment. I've been doing external manufacturing for almost 20 years – it’s my passion. I really enjoy the science aspect, but I really enjoy the business and the operations sides, too.” Servier is dedicated to bringing the promise of tomorrow to patients, with one of its key medicines in the USA being a paediatric oncology drug. “It really brings things home for you, in terms of the who and the why behind the work we’re doing,” said Lemay. “It connects the dots in terms of manufacturing and making a medicine that is essentially saving children's lives. So for me it’s extremely rewarding.”


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SUPPLY CHAIN

“ AT SERVIER, WE UNDERSTAND THE IMPORTANCE OF GETTING LIFESAVING MEDICINES TO THE PATIENTS WHO NEED IT” ERIC LEMAY

HEAD OF GLOBAL EXTERNAL MANUFACTURING, SERVIER

Supply chain disruptions and cancer patients Lemay typically tends to work with strategic suppliers that he has purposely selected, a team that he wants to build a long-term relationship with, because having an efficient supply chain is essential.

“At Servier, we understand the importance of getting lifesaving medicines to the patients who need it,” said Lemay. “We know that the patients are the most important part of everything we do. Within my role in manufacturing and supply chain, it's about ensuring that our patients get the medicines and that they never miss a treatment.” For Lemay, the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the fragility of the supply chain. But, one thing that didn’t get enough press was Operation Warp Speed – the delivery of 300mn vaccines. “It was a really phenomenal programme,” said Lemay admirably. “You saw the benefits of collaboration across private business and public governments to really accelerate vaccine development.” healthcare-digital.com

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We Are Servier

The downside of that it already was, adding is, in putting vaccine even more pressure onto development and vaccine healthcare services. manufacturing over “I think one of the other everything else, oncology challenges for us was that medicines were deemed one of our more important less essential during that medicines used in paediatric period. Lemay had multiple oncology has a very short conversations with past shelf life, sot's really justcolleagues in the industry, in-time manufacturing. where he was able to We can't have safety stock discuss the challenges and throughout the supply implications associated chain. So, any last minute ERIC LEMAY with prioritising COVIDdisruption has a direct HEAD OF GLOBAL EXTERNAL 19 vaccines, especially for impact on our ability to get MANUFACTURING, SERVIER people living with cancer. the product to the patient. “What ended up For example, if we can't get a happening was that critical raw materials and raw material or a component, then it delays components that we use in our manufacturing manufacturing. It's an extremely challenging process were essentially being prioritised to product to manufacture and distribute.” the COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers.” Servier is maintaining an agile, strong supply This just made the entire supply chain chain with their patients in mind, because, that much more difficult to manage than as a private company, it has a little bit more

“MY ROLE IN THE SUPPLY CHAIN IS TO ENSURE THAT OUR PATIENTS NEVER MISS A TREATMENT”

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SUPPLY CHAIN

“ THE BENEFITS OF COLLABORATION ACROSS PRIVATE BUSINESS AND PUBLIC GOVERNMENTS REALLY ACCELERATED VACCINE DEVELOPMENT” ERIC LEMAY

HEAD OF GLOBAL EXTERNAL MANUFACTURING, SERVIER

freedom and flexibility to operate, as opposed to a publicly-traded pharmaceutical company that may have stakeholder pressures. “At the forefront of our mission are our patients,” said Lemay. “Everything we do is based on our patients, it's not shareholder value or anything like that. Yet this doesn't make us immune to the supply chain challenges that every other pharmaceutical company has faced. One of the things that

we're most proud of is that, even through the pandemic and with all the challenges we've had, we have not stocked out. Our people have put in hard work to think creatively and do things differently to ensure a patient never goes without product. “We’re working with our contract manufacturing sites to order things way further in advance. Where we typically would hold maybe three or six months of safety stock of some of those critical materials, we may have up to a year's worth instead, just to limit any susceptibility within the global supply chain. Current challenges in the pharmaceutical supply chain Having navigated the COVID-19 pandemic, what’s next for Servier and the supply chain?

healthcare-digital.com

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150

Servier works across 150 countries

€4.7bn

Servier hit a revenue of €4.7bn in 2021

“There's obviously a focus on anything that's potentially single-sourced. Across the pharmaceutical industry, there is a lot of focus on having multiple sources of not only your products, but also, your critical raw materials and components.” Servier is also working with other companies and government agencies to educate them on the pharmaceutical supply chain. “One of the things that I've noticed more recently is that, early on, we saw impacts on our ability to obtain some of the critical materials we needed to make our products; where I'm seeing most of the issues now is in transportation and logistics. “What we're seeing within the transportation sector is a lot of attrition, a lot of turnover. It's requiring more and more training and getting people up to speed. But obviously with new people, you have mistakes being made. The biggest issue for us is that we could do things flawlessly – from getting our critical materials, manufacturing the product, releasing the product – but then it has a shipping issue, and we have to investigate whether our product has been compromised.” Supporting patients, ensuring quality and compliance of products are critical for Servier, as is maintaining an efficient global supply chain. healthcare-digital.com

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HEALTHCARE CAMPUSES

ACROSS THE WORLD In the post-pandemic world, a career in healthcare has caught the interest of many prospective students. Here are our Top 10 global healthcare campuses WRITTEN BY: HELEN ADAMS

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University of Ibadan Ibadan, Nigeria

As the first university to be founded in Nigeria, in 1948, the University of Ibadan (UI), was built on the grounds of a former Military General Hospital on land leased by the Ibadan chiefs. Senior Lecturer Dr. Akin Ojagbemi was recently recognised as being in the top 1% of dementia experts.

“ First university to be founded in Nigeria”

09

Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul

Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil The Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul is celebrated internationally for its faculty, modern laboratories and diverse activities within the student community. Programmes aim to enable students to aid the overall health of patients from children to the elderly; from regular health issues to those in need of advanced care.

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“Also known as ‘The University of First Choice and the Nation’s Pride’”

08

Institute of Medical Education and Research Chandigarh, India

Established in 1962, the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER) offers healthcare students more than 50 medical and nursing courses, from Undergraduate to PhD. The Institute is endorsed by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Medical Council of India (MCI) and the Indian Nursing Council (INC).

07 University of Lagos Lagos, Nigeria

Since 1962, the University of Lagos has offered healthcare students in search of knowledge a wellrounded and qualitative education. Also known as ‘The University of First Choice and the Nation’s Pride’, the University of Lagos nurtures a professional workforce dedicated to the political, social and economic development of Nigeria. healthcare-digital.com

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Market Leading Ambulance and Integrated Care Systems. Proven, effective, intuitive ambulance, 999 / 111 / PTS CAD integrated care systems, leveraging NHS Digital interoperability and national system interfaces. Enhanced care pathway management for patients is now at your fingertips with the feature laden C3 TriPath.

www.mis-es.com


TOP 10

05

Shanghai Jiao Tong University Shanghai, China

06

University of Sydney Sydney, Australia

The University of Sydney was the first university founded in the continent of Oceania and continues to rank as one of Australia’s best universities. Whatever their social or cultural background, medical students are welcomed to fulfil their potential and build a healthier Australia, from the city to the outback.

In 2005, the Shanghai Second Medical University merged with Shanghai Jiao Tong University, offering courses that focus on health management, preventive medicine and psychology. The University of Edinburgh partnered up with Shanghai Jiao Tong University to focus on One Health, a collaborative approach that recognises the interconnection between people, animals and the environment.


TOP 10

04

All India Institute of Medical Sciences Delhi, India

Founded as an institution of great national importance through an Act of Parliament, the All-India Institute of Medical Sciences was established to demonstrate the best standard of medical education across the country. The education provided at the institute ranges in terms of qualifications, but encourages self-sufficiency across all of them.

03

Heidelberg University Heidelberg, Germany

As one of the oldest medical faculties in Germany, the Medical Faculty in Heidelberg holds an international reputation. The medicine degree consists of three phases: preclinical study, clinical study and the practice year. Students are offered e-learning programmes, digital databases and instructional videos to aid their independent study. 110

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02

TOP 10

Monash University

Melbourne, Australia

Australia’s biggest university is research-intensive across its many international classrooms. Monash is a global institution with five Australian campuses and another in Malaysia, as well as a joint graduate school in China, a learning centre in Italy and a research centre in India. "Adopt as your fundamental creed that you will equip yourself for life; not solely for your own benefit, but for the benefit of the whole community," said founder Sir John Monash.

“ Adopt as your fundamental creed that you will equip yourself for life; not solely for your own benefit, but for the benefit of the whole community” healthcare-digital.com

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TOP 10

Université de Paris devient Université Paris Cité

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“ more students are looking to work in the healthcare sector and begin their studies with distinguished doctors”

Université de Paris Paris, France

In 2019, Université de Paris was created through a merger between two other universities: the Paris Descartes and Paris Diderot. The institute offers students 49 laboratories and 18 science and technology platforms for their training and research across medicine, pharma and odontology. The Lariboisière medical school was built in the 19th century following a second cholera pandemic. Now, in the postpandemic world, more students are looking to work in the healthcare sector and begin their studies with distinguished doctors.


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