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HEALTHCARE INNOVATION AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

Digitising healthcare

O C T OB E R 2 0 18

FAST-TRACK SCREENING

Revolutionising med-tech with Novoheart

The Medical City DIGITISING THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE

How Metro South Health is transforming Queensland’s hospitals

TOP 10

CEOs in Healthcare


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WELCOME

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(ISCs), to sell essential health IT services and products.

This month, we speak with Australian health provider, Metro South Health, who have completed the digitisation of five major public hospitals in South East Queensland, signalling the end of error-prone paper-based recording and transforming the delivery of patient care.

Looking at the way in which technology is transforming the screening process for cardiac drug approval, Healthcare Global also spoke with co-founder of Novoheart, Kevin Costa to find out how the company is revolutionising the flawed process for screening new drugs.

The industry continues to face a multitude of challenges. From limited budgets to the use of outdated legacy equipment no longer fit for purpose, organisations has placed little attention towards upgrading and investing in new technologies.

Lastly, this month’s issue also looks at the top CEOs transforming the healthcare industry, based on a list written by Robert Reiss and his team at The CEO Forum Magazine for Forbes. Also included are the key healthcare events and conferences for this calendar year.

BlackBerry’s Global Healthcare Lead, Sara Jost discusses how the company seeks to guarantee technological excellence across the healthcare industry by working with customers, carriers, distance integrators, distributors and independent service centres

We hope you enjoy the magazine, and as always, we welcome your feedback on Twitter: @HealthcareGlbl.

elcome to the latest edition of Healthcare Global.

Enjoy the issue! Catherine Sturman. Catherine.Sturman@bizclikmedia.com

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CONTENTS

08

Caring for Queensland

08 22 INNOVATION AT YOUR FINGERTIPS


48 TOP 10

HEALTHCARE CEOS

62 Events

38 IS THE SCREENING PROCESS FOR CARDIAC DRUG APPROVAL SET TO CHANGE FOREVER?


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68 The Medical City

DIGITISING THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE

80 UCSF Health

Championing leading supply chain practices at UCSF Health


Caring for Queensland WRIT TEN BY

JOHN O’HANLON PRODUCED BY

08

K RIS TOFER PA LMER

OCTOBER 2018


A S I A PA C I F I C

09

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M E T R O H E A LT H C A R E G R O U P

A fast-tracked digital transformation at Brisbane’s largest hospital group Metro South Health has just been completed, marking the end of error-prone paper-based recording

M 10

etro South Health is one of

a new patient administration system,

Australia’s biggest and most

rolling out the Cerner integrated elec-

forward-looking healthcare

tronic medical record (ieMR) to more

providers. It runs five major public

hospitals and the replacement of the

hospitals and a network of community

ageing Auslab state-wide pathology

health centres across the south-east-

system.

ern areas of Brisbane. Though it is just

The value being delivered to patients

one of 16 hospital and health services

and the community became evident

in Queensland, one million people

when data was released from the first

– nearly a quarter of the population of

of Metro South’s hospitals to become

the state – depend on Metro South

fully digitised. In 2017, leading tertiary

Health for specialist health, outpatient

facility Princess Alexandra Hospital

and hospital services.

(PAH) rolled out the full Cerner elec-

As the leading hospital group, it has

tronic medical record system, going

been spearheading the transformation

as paperless as possible. Within a

of healthcare across the Queensland

year of going digital, drug administra-

Health, working closely with its eHealth

tion and monitoring errors dropped

Queensland division. Queensland

by 14%, a 33% reduction in drug

Health has developed a strategy for

dispensing and supply incidents, 17%

health ICT and eHealth that calls for an

fewer emergency readmissions with-

investment of more than $1.2bn over

in 28 days of discharge, drug costs

the next 20 years. That figures includes

per weighted activity unit came down

$730mn for clinical software such as

by 14%, stage 3 & 4 hospital-acquired

OCTOBER 2018


A S I A PA C I F I C

“Early in the process we decided it shouldn’t be entirely an IT project but more of a clinical change initiative” — Dr Stephen Ayre, CEO of Metro South Health

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M E T R O H E A LT H C A R E G R O U P

pressure injuries plummeted by 56%

view, and crucially that of the patients,

and healthcare associated infections

into consideration.

reduced by 37%. In the same period

The work he oversaw at PAH had

early identification of deteriorating

been started in 2014 and completed

patients went up by 59%.

over the subsequent 18 months. The experience gained there provided a

12

A clinical approach to IT

template for rolling out the programme

Leading the transformation was Dr

at the other facilities, culminating in

Stephen Ayre, executive director of

July 2018 with the completion of

PAH at the time and now Chief Execu-

digitisation at the Queen Elizabeth II

tive Officer of Metro South Health. Dr

Jubilee Hospital (QEII).

Ayre started his career at the sharp

Planning started in 2014 when the

end as a GP before moving into ad-

Department of Health switched to

ministration: he was therefore ideally

a ‘whole hospital approach’ from the

placed to take the clinicians’ point of

module-by-module process it had

OCTOBER 2018


A S I A PA C I F I C

CLICK TO WATCH: THE PRINCESS ALEXANDRA HOSPITAL BECAME AUSTRALIA’S FIRST LARGE-SCALE DIGITAL HOSPITAL

$2.3bn Annual budget

2007

Year founded

14,000+ Approximate number of employees

previously utilised. Though the Cerner platform is a comprehensive and well-tested one, it took some work to adapt it to fit the culture and practices of Australia, says Dr Ayre: “Early in the process we decided it shouldn’t be entirely an IT project but more of a clinical change initiative. “We brought a number of internal clinicians and specialists onto the team – an endocrinologist and a cardiac surgeon for example, as well as nurses and technicians. Of course, all the technical and governance aspects of the Cerner implementation were addressed, but the front facing part of it was essentially clinical.” He has taken a lead on the involvement w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com

13


M E T R O H E A LT H C A R E G R O U P

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A S I A PA C I F I C

“We came through a very careful engagement programme with the clinicians within the hospital so that everyone understood the process and its goals” — Dr Stephen Ayre, CEO of Metro South Health 15 of the clinical users of the system

to argue from entrenched positions,

throughout. “As chair of the state-wide

so Dr Ayre has done everything possible

clinical advisory group on the imple-

to encourage a holistic view. “We came

mentation not just at Metro South but

through a very careful engagement

all the other hospitals that are fol-

programme with the clinicians within the

lowing on, we have been keeping the

hospital so that everyone understood

clinicians aligned and focused. We

the process and its goals.”

are building an integrated solution

Resource fairs, he explains, gave

that reconciles the niche demands of

clinicians the opportunity to try out

specialists with the intricacies of the

the system and see how it integrated

IT system,” he says.

with the devices within the hospital such as ECG machines and the

Collaborative vision

anaesthetic equipment and various

It’s been hard work, one senses,

monitors. This helped identify pain

to overcome the tendency for each

points. A common problem when mov-

department, often each individual,

ing from standalone products to a w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com


M E T R O H E A LT H C A R E G R O U P

platform such as Cerner can be a perception that functionality is reduced, for example from the anaesthetist point of view. “In fact it allows people outside the theatre and the anaesthetic area to see what was happening with the patient. That continuity of care and management in the pre- and post-operative phase needs to be understood and worked through for the greater good of the patient,” he comments. The ieMR – which automatically uploads observations and vital signs from patient monitoring devices, allows efficient electronic 16

ordering of radiology and pathology tests, and provides decision support for clinicians in prescribing medicines – is the foundation technology, he explains. “Now that the patient records are integrated, all clinicians can view them – wherever they are in our organisation. There is no need for medical staff to travel to a ward to look at paper records: they can see very clearly what happened in the emergency department or in the theatre or in any other areas that a patient may be moved to during their inpatient journey. Even from one hospital to another since there are a number of hospitals throughout the state who now have ieMR.” Soon they all will. Meanwhile work has already started on rolling the system out into the community. General practitioners can get OCTOBER 2018


A S I A PA C I F I C

access to certain components of the record such as pathology, radiology, medications, operative notes and discharge summaries using The Viewer. It is a function already accessible by every GP in Queensland. Software providers such as Medical Director and the pan-Australian My Health Record patient/doctor portal will increasingly be able to interface with the ieMR system to give the community better and faster access to their medical records. “We are very keen to provide access to information,” says Dr Ayre. “There is a whole range of patient-facing services you can update online like appointment checking and registration

“We’re doing a lot of research around the implementation as well… I am keen to take every opportunity to share the learnings from our digital transformation” — Dr Stephen Ayre, CEO of Metro South Health

data. We are also interested in getting some of the community-based services onto the system.” In the coming year, with the inhouse implementation out of the way,

example of the type of service he’d like to see extended and enabled by the provision of ieMR.

he wants to focus on connecting care, across the five hospitals in the

Proving the project

system and out into the community.

Digitisation has improved efficiency,

Metro South Health’s Hospital in the

increased capacity without extra

Home service, which provides short-

resourcing, and enhanced patient

term home-based acute care in the

care. “I want to make sure that I can

homes of patients that formerly would

maximise these benefits while

have had to be hospitalised, is a good

decreasing the hospital complication, w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com

17


M E T R O H E A LT H C A R E G R O U P

readmission and infection rates and

the University of Queensland Business

length of stay,” says Dr Ayre.

School with whom we have been work-

“At the same time, we’re doing a lot of

18

ing closely since the inception of this

research around the implementation

programme. I am keen to take every

as well. There really hasn’t been much

opportunity to share the learnings

validation of this type of implementa-

from our digital transformation.”

tion and I am pleased to say that we

The last four years have been a very

have just been awarded a collabora-

disruptive time for Metro South Health

tive research grant to work with the

but the outcome has been magnifi-

University of Queensland, Cerner and

cent. A complex IT and clinical change

Vancouver Health. And on the purely

project has been delivered in a very

business benefits we are working with

short space of time and thanks to the

“I am lucky in that I have had a focused and balanced team, with health professionals working alongside IT specialists” — Dr Stephen Ayre, CEO of Metro South Health OCTOBER 2018


A S I A PA C I F I C

scrutiny it is getting from researchers it

anced team, with health professionals

is sure to be a benchmark for future im-

working alongside IT specialists, some

plementations in Australia and beyond.

of them also with nursing or medical

“Speaking personally,” Dr Ayre reflects, “the biggest challenge for me

backgrounds. “I am very satisfied by what we have

as CEO has been to maintain business

achieved together and excited by the

as usual while so much of the energy of

prospect of maximising the benefits

the organisation has been focused on

from the implementation. My vision has

a single piece of work. Some change

always been that it’s producing really

management components have also

significant benefits to patient care –

been very taxing for our staff. I’m lucky

and that is what we are all about!”

in that I have had a focused and bal-

19

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LEADERSHIP

22

INNOVATION AT YOUR FINGERTIPS BlackBerry’s Global Healthcare Lead, Sara Jost, discusses how the company seeks to guarantee technological excellence across the healthcare industry WRITTEN BY

OCTOBER 2018

CATHERINE S TURM AN


23

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LEADERSHIP

24

T

he healthcare industry continues

experience to new heights and reduce

to face a multitude of challenges.

rising healthcare costs. From the

From limited budgets to the use

establishment of electronic medical

of outdated legacy equipment no longer

records to the use of secure messaging,

fit for purpose, organisations have

professionals are harnessing new

placed their attention firmly on the deli-

tech-nologies to promote data sharing,

very of patient care, with little focus paid

enhance collaboration and drive

towards digitisation.

positive patient experiences.

Although healthcare leaders commonly lack expertise within new digital tools, this is rapidly changing. Profes-

However, this has also opened the door to further challenges. “One unit of a hospital could decide

sionals are beginning to embrace new

to implement a particular application

technologies, which will take the patient

relevant to their floor, but they’re not

OCTOBER 2018


“A lot of healthcare organisations are implementing electronic medical records; whilst this is a very powerful tool, it is being implemented on an IT infrastructure that is not yet ready to handle it” — Sara Jost, Global Healthcare Lead, Blackberry 25

necessarily learning from each other,

A registered nurse by background

either across the organisation or from

and with previous roles within nursing

hospital to hospital. A lot of health-

and neuroscience research, Jost’s

care organisations are implementing

decision to move to an IT health start-up

electronic medical records; whilst this

led to the development of mHealth prog-

is a very powerful tool, it is being impl-

rammes across North America and in

emented on an IT infrastructure that

the UK, igniting a passion for health-

is not ready to handle it. Wi-Fi is not

care IT, which remains firmly ablaze.

strong enough to handle voice-over-

Originally hired by BlackBerry as

IP, networks can be hacked and equip-

a healthcare subject-matter expert,

ment can fall to MEDIJACK,” explains

Jost has become a renowned figure

Global Healthcare Lead at Black-

across the industry, and continues

Berry, Sara Jost.

to work with BlackBerry’s largest w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com


LEADERSHIP

healthcare customers, carriers, distance integrators, distributors and independent service centres (ISCs), in order to sell essential health IT services and products. “I also do a lot of our certifications work, making sure we meet the global healthcare requirements that are necessary for us to sell into healthcare globally,” she says.

Eliminating barriers The rise of mobile apps has disrupted retail and finance industries, where consumers can source, purchase items and access confidential information at the click of a button. 26

Such accessibility has yet to be fully extended to the healthcare industry, where patients want increased control over the management of their healthcare data, to the same extent as accessing their financial records. “You should be able to easily access your lab results and patient history and be able to share that with those who would contribute to your health status,” reflects Jost. “On the other hand, I have a deep fear of that information becoming public. Working with a company that harnesses strong security and privacy tools would be where I would want my healthcare information to be kept and shared.” With this in mind, the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR), implemented across Europe in May has created a seismic shift in the way in OCTOBER 2018


27

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LEADERSHIP

which patient data is stored and collected. Whilst data that will need protecting is readily generated by health organisations, providers will need to significantly invest in their technological infrastructure to guarantee increased security and scalability. “This doesn’t have to be as expensive as many organisations think it is, but I do understand that it’s a daunting task and at BlackBerry we feel we’re very well aligned to helping organisations deal with 28

this,” says Jost. Additionally, the use of healthcare mobile apps continues to grow apace, but this is in sharp alignment with the use of unsecure consumer messaging apps, which have been reportedly used to share diagnostic images and confidential patient data. “If healthcare professionals aren’t given the correct tool that is easy to use and consumer friendly, they will find insecure workarounds. WhatsApp and Snapchat have been used, which would not meet the guidelines for GDPR or other country OCTOBER 2018

“You should be able to easily access your lab results and patient history and be able to share that with those who would contribute to your health status” — Sara Jost, Global Healthcare Lead, Blackberry


regulations, such as the US or Canada,” she says. “Many healthcare organisations are not taking a holistic approach to recognise that if you work with a company such as BlackBerry, you can reduce your number of vendors, you can have integrated products across your organisation and you can deploy a business continuity solution, where it can do your emergency preparedness, scheduling, clinical codes, IT outages, lone worker safety and more. We can cover all those things with one product, where another could only do your emergency notifications. “I view this as a barrier because organisations decide to just go with what is good enough instead of truly looking at what they could achieve if they deployed a stronger solution.”

Promoting collaboration Harnessing products and services which are gold standard, BlackBerry has therefore sought to develop essential partnerships to support a number of Fortune w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com

29


LEADERSHIP

500 healthcare providers and organisations worldwide. Its collaboration with the University Hospital Birmingham in the United Kingdom, for example, has become a reference site for BlackBerry and is one of the largest healthcare organisations in the UK. Famed for its world-class clinical care, as well as its clinical education and research capabilities, University Hospital Birmingham utilises BlackBerry products and services to promote secure communication and collaboration across the organisation. Similarly, situated in Ontario, Canada, 30

BlackBerry’s partnership with community hospital Mackenzie Health has led to the implementation of an innovation unit, which is home to the organisation’s new digital initiatives. “The organisation has made it so fantastic to work in that the nurses take turns working on this unit.

“Organisations decide to just go with what is good enough instead of truly looking at what they could achieve if they deployed a stronger solution” — Sara Jost, Global Healthcare Lead, Blackberry OCTOBER 2018


31 Everybody wants to work here as it hou-

and ensure stronger working relation-

ses the latest software,” chuckles Jost.

ships between professionals.

“It’s a techy floor and everything links

“There are a number of things which

together. I think that is truly fantastic.

are important to creating positive patient

This group is also building a brand-new

experiences,” explains Jost. “I worked

hospital, which doesn’t happen very

with one particular hospital where they

often as we’re always retrofitting old

integrated their bedside machines to

buildings. It’s very exciting for Black-

send alerts directly to nurses’ smart-

Berry as well as for Mackenzie Health

phones. Through this, they greatly

in that we get to help them on this journey

reduced overhead paging. It’s interest-

towards a smart hospital.”

ing how strong an impact this had and was a very powerful way to improve

Driving innovation

that patient experience.”

Such digital innovations will greatly

However, despite such innovations,

promote positive patient experiences

investment in cyber-security services w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com


LEADERSHIP

32

has risen tenfold, as patient data is more

support healthcare organisations in

valuable to hackers than financial data,

remaining secure, maintaining positive

Forbes has previously reported.

reputations and therefore retaining

The number of attacks on healthcare organisations, in a bid to obtain valuable

patient trust. “Our Unified Endpoint Management

data, has become a growing concern

(UEM) solution also drives complete

across the sector, where the number

flexibility of deployment types which

of healthcare-based cyber-attacks is

means organisations can deploy devices

on the rise. Housing a skilled set of

that are corporately owned and truly

individuals who can source all potential

locked down,” adds Jost.

issues within a provider’s infrastruc-

“An example would be a stationary or

ture, BlackBerry’s security services

a mobile kiosk, so a device is locked

have remained in demand in a bid to

down to one application and is used by

OCTOBER 2018


“The Melanoma Institute of Australia have implemented our secure file sharing to enable their clinical research inside and outside of their own organisation” — Sara Jost, Global Healthcare Lead, Blackberry

33

patients. This could be used for things

professionals to use their own

such as registration, patient education,

equipment, rem-ain accessible

even adjusting the lights in your room

and gain access to essential patient

or the bed height. There’s also shared-

information securely from their

devices, where a nur-

own home.

se, housekeeper or transporter can

“Our workspace product, which

start their shift, take a device from a

is a digital rights management tool is

pool of devices and use that device for

growing steadily, especially in clinical

the shift and put it back in the pool at

research. The Melanoma Institute of

the end of the shift.”

Australia, for example, has implemented

Additionally, to further promote

our secure file sharing to enable their

flexibility, BlackBerry offers a num-

clinical research inside and outside of

ber of ways to enable healthcare

their own organisation,” observes Jost. w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com


LEADERSHIP

34

OCTOBER 2018


Future change Whilst advocates and champions within healthcare organisations will continue to support the adoption of new digital tools, legislative changes will unlock the potential for further patient care to be delivered outside of traditional areas of care. Increased use of services which promote flexibility, such as mHealth and telehealth, will also drive further revenue and cater to increased demands for a continuum of care which doesn’t end upon discharge from hospital. “We are moving towards more clinical decision support. As we gain data from big data exercises, and as electronic medical records become more robust and easier to use, we’re going to gain more knowledge from what has happened to patients, what their results have been with this drug, this age and this diagnosis. Then, having that information delivered to the right person as they are making decisions for the next person that fits the same criteria. I definitely think that that is coming quickly,” concludes Jost. “I feel that BlackBerry is well aligned to help organisations comply with changing legislations. We have the security expertise, as well as the product that can recognise where the holes are and then plug them up.”

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Covering every angle in the digital age The Business Chief platforms offer insight on the trends influencing C and V-level executives, telling the stories that matter Click to read

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TECHNOLOGY

COULD THE SCREENING PROCESS FOR CARDIAC DRUG APPROVAL BE SET TO CHANGE FOREVER? 38

Biotechnology company Novoheart believes it can ‘revolutionise’ the flawed process for screening new drugs. Healthcare Global speaks to CSO Kevin Costa to find out more WRITTEN BY

OCTOBER 2018

S TUART HODGE


39

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TECHNOLOGY

N

ovoheart began with a passion for stem cell research and its impact on human health. “When you’re sitting in the labora-

tory, making exciting discoveries, what you really want to be able to do is have that impact on society – to impact patients, impact the world in some way,” says Professor Kevin Costa, Chief Science Officer and co-founder of Novoheart. The biotechnology startup believes it can do exactly that, as the first company in the world to have created miniature beating human hearts aimed at revolutionising drug discovery and the development of heart therapeutics.

40

Currently, a key issue in treating cardiac conditions is the difficulty of getting new drug candidates tested and approved using existing technology and parameters. Typically, the development of a new drug candidate costs $2-4bn and takes more than a decade, with failure rates for new drugs of circa 90%. The primary cause for the withdrawal of any potentially lifesaving new drugs is heart toxicity. The conventional non-human, non-cardiac cell and animal models used to test potential drugs is poorly predictive of human responses, leading to false negative and false positive pre-clinical results which compromise overall successes. These limitations, coupled with a shortage of available human hearts to test on, make it difficult for new drugs designed to treat heart conditions OCTOBER 2018


41

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TECHNOLOGY

42

to get tested properly and in the past

after contributing to the deaths of

that has led to unsafe products entering

thousands, perhaps hundreds of

the market – such as Flecainide, which

thousands, of people.

was found to cause arrhythmias in

Both cautionary tales, but Novoheart

patients even though it was originally

has managed to design living heart

designed to prevent arrhythmias. The

tissues which deliver predictive accuracy

same can be said for Vioxx, an alterna-

of 90% or more and, as a result, could

tive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory

make the screening process far safer,

drugs for the treatment of pain associ-

faster and cheaper. The mini hearts act

ated with osteoarthritis, which was

as advanced human heart surrogates

subsequently found to increase the risk

and can be utilised in a variety of ways.

of cardiovascular disease and was

The founders of Novoheart believe that

withdrawn from the market worldwide

the technology can be a catalyst in help-

OCTOBER 2018


“What you really want to be able to do is have that impact on society, to impact patients, impact the world in some way” Kevin Costa, CSO at Novoheart

43

ing to fix a currently broken and expen-

“The heart’s kind of a cool organ as

sive system for accurately pre-screen-

it’s really complicated in a way,” explains

ing the effectiveness and safety of new

Costa. “You’ve got the mechanics of

drug formulas.

how the heart wall moves, there’s fluid

While Costa is deeply passionate

mechanics of blood flowing through it,

about the science involved, he credits

there’s the electrophysiology, so the ele-

co-founder Professor Ronald Li with

ctrical signals running through the tissue…

helping him to realise how this could

“Most institutions will specialise in one

be applied from a business standpoint

of these areas, but there are not a lot of

to help save lives. Costa is a biomedical

investigators with the breadth of exper-

engineer and Li brought key expertise

tise to understand all of that, so it was

in electrophysiology – a “perfect mar-

a nice coincidence that Ron came in

riage” of skills, according to the CSO.

with the expertise in electrophysiology. w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com


TECHNOLOGY

I had the expertise with the mechanics, and we were both interested in a stem cell tissue engineering component. “We started working together, and Ron had the vision that maybe this could be a company, something with commercial value. I’m really excited and inspired by the science part of it; I don’t really consider myself that much of a businessman, but he had that vision, and it seemed like a really exciting opportunity.” The third person involved was Professor Michelle Khine, who specialises in microfluidics and machine learning. Together, they 44

founded Novoheart in 2014, with the company going public on the Toronto Stock Exchange in October 2017. Novoheart has developed not just healthy hearts for testing, but they are also able to produce diseased heart tissues, allowing not just the safety of drugs to be tested but also their efficacy in treating disease.

“The bottom line is, mice aren’t humans, and especially with the heart, it’s just fundamentally different” Kevin Costa, CSO at Novoheart OCTOBER 2018


45

Being able to do this is a big step

it’s just fundamentally different,

forward, in technological terms, from

because the heart in a mouse will beat

current methods of testing. “The way

about seven or eight times a second,

scientists test diseases is often by simu-

whereas a human heart beats about

lating that disease in an animal, normally

once a second.

in mice,” says Costa. “They call these

“So it’s faster and it’s smaller. There

‘knock-out mice’, or ‘transgenic mice’,

are obvious differences which can have

where you can change aspects of

very fundamental consequences in

the mouse to kind of behave like the

terms of how the heart handles calcium,

human disease.

how the heart is susceptible to arrhyth-

“But the bottom line is, mice aren’t humans, and especially with the heart,

mias, how the heart contracts, and what the actual molecular interactions w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com


TECHNOLOGY

are within the heart muscle, which means the mouse just isn’t predictive of how human hearts behave.” That’s where this product, which works by synergising the developed tissues themselves with the types of electric impulses that you would see in a human heart, offers something new and unique to the market. Costa is absolutely convinced Novoheart can be a success, citing the fact the company is already working in conjunction with some of the global pharmaceutical giants as evidence. 46

“I think this technology really has the potential to have a major disruptive impact on drug development,” adds Costa. “I think if we could shorten the amount of time that it takes to develop a drug to get approved, that would be a good thing. “If you’re going to invest in something, you need to have confidence that you’re investing in the things that are likely to bear fruit, and if they’re not going to work, then you want to know that as soon as possible so that you’re not wasting time and effort.” Part of the reason for the $2-4bn figure mentioned above, says Costa, is that the cost is averaged out over such a low success rate. “If we can increase OCTOBER 2018


“Hopefully Novoheart can reinvigorate the whole drug development industry, and have a major impact on patient health” Kevin Costa, CSO at Novoheart the denominator, that’s got to be a move forward,” says Costa. “You’re still going to be putting in a lot of money into this development, but if you can get it to pay off more and generate more effective drugs, costs will go down… and hopefully that’ll also restore consumer confidence in the industry. “You know, these examples like Vioxx and things like that happening in the market, it makes people rightly concerned that the process is a broken process,” Costa emphasises. “I think that is true, and I think Novoheart is a novel way to fix that process and hopefully, if the cost can go down, success rates will go up and we’ll start seeing more drugs. The pipeline has been kind of drying out, because there’s not enough companies that have the resources to invest in this process. “Hopefully Novoheart can reinvigorate the whole drug development industry, and have a major impact on patient health.” w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com

47


T O P 10

48

OCTOBER 2018


TOP 10

HEALTHCARE CEOs We take a look at the top CEOs transforming the healthcare industry, based on a list written by Robert Reiss and his team at The CEO Forum Magazine for Forbes. Reiss interviewed the CEOs of over 750 healthcare organisations to whittle down the list WRITTEN BY

HARRY MENEAR

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49


T O P 10

10

Ron Williams RW2 ENTERPRISES

50 Ron Williams is the chairman of RW2 Enterprises, a consulting firm that advises senior executives of Fortune 100 companies on transformational leadership strategy, board preparedness and business strategy, according to his official site. Prior to RW2, he served as the CEO of insurance company Aetna Inc. Williams is .a graduate of Roosevelt University and holds an MSc in management from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

OCTOBER 2018


09

Alan B Miller UNIVERSAL HEALTH SERVICES

51 Alan B Miller founded Universal Health Services (UHS), which is listed as #276 on the Fortune 500, in 1979, and serves as the company’s Chairman and CEO. Between 1990 and 2000, UHS was consistently recognised by the Wall Street Journal and Fortune Magazine as the healthcare provider with the highest return for shareholders. Miller’s management ethos centres on “total patient care… treating both the body and the mind”. He insists USH will continue to “drive health transformation over the next decade”. Miller received his MBA from the University of Pennsylvania. www.uhsinc.com

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T O P 10

08

Kevin Lamb ADVANCED TISSUE

52 Kevin Lamb is the founder and CEO of Advanced Tissue. Since 2000, Lamb has led the company to become the premier supplier of wound care medical supplies in the United States. Now, Advanced Tissue supplies the majority of hospitals nursing homes, home health care providers, cancer centres, alternate care facilities, and managed care organisations in the country. Interestingly, Lamb has also produced over 14 feature films, and brings this unique experience to transform his company’s patient engagement tactics. He told Forbes: “We are connecting with people through customised videos, delivered on rechargeable LCD postcards. Our easy-to-understand content maximises the chances of patients retaining information.” www.advancedtissue.com

OCTOBER 2018


07

Dr. Stephen K Klasko JEFFERSON HEALTH

53 Dr. Stephen K Klasko currently serves as the President and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health, a 13-hospital network in and around Philadelphia. The two organisations are, according to Klasko, “leading the revolution for ‘real people’ in two industries often caught in old traditions - healthcare and higher education”. Since his arrival at Jefferson Health in 2013, the company has grown its revenue to over $5bn and now has a total of 13 hospitals – a sharp increase on its original three. www.jeffersonhealth.org

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T O P 10

06

Jo Ann Jenkins AARP

54 Jo Ann Jenkins has served as the CEO of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) since 2014, having joined the organisation in 2010. Jenkins is frequently praised for her work to “redefine AARP’s vision, challenge outdated beliefs and spark new insights that allow people to adapt to the new realities of aging – with relevant solutions to everyday issues such as health, financial resilience, digital and social connectivity”, according to the AARP. She is also author of the book Disrupt Aging: A Bold New Path to Living Your Best Life at Every Age, which AARP says “has become a signature rallying cry for revolutionising society’s views on aging”. www.aarp.org

OCTOBER 2018


05

Dr. Graham Gardner KYRUUS

55 Dr. Graham Gardner is the co-founder and CEO of Kyruus, which provides search engine, scheduling and data management solutions to healthcare networks to improve quality and efficiency of customer care. According to Forbes, Kyruus “works with over 400 hospitals transforming the patient-provider model by evaluating physicians through a ‘moneyball’ AI type system”. Prior to joining Kyruus, Gardner was employed as a Venture Executive at Highland Capital Partners, where he co-founded health management company Generation Health. www.kyruus.com

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T O P 10

04

Sandra L Fenwick BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL 56 Sandra L Fenwick has served as the CEO of Boston Children’s Hospital since 1999, and was named President in 2008. The institute is regarded as the foremost paediatric facility in the US, and the leading organisation in the field of paediatric research worldwide, according to Forbes. When interviewed, Fenwick spoke of her methods as being cantered around “supporting innovation across the entire continuum, from the building blocks of basic science, to the cures, treatments and devices they’re translated into, and finally to the clinical trials and commercialisation”. www.childrenshospital.org

OCTOBER 2018


03

Nick Desai HEAL

57 Nick Desai is the CEO of Heal, a ‘doctors on demand’ digital health startup in California, which connects patients to licensed primary care doctors in person. Heal provides personal primary care, rebooting the ‘family doctor’ relationship for a digitised world, while maintaining a balance between efficiency and efficacy. Desai told Forbes that an ability to look at medications, environmental factors, lifestyle and diet, the company has “reduced unnecessary prescriptions, tests and referrals by 51% – resulting in cost savings of $27mn in just 40,000 house calls”. www.heal.com

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T O P 10

58

02

Dr. Toby Cosgrove CLEVELAND CLINIC

OCTOBER 2018


59

Over the course of 13 years, Dr. Toby

down from the CEO role, but remaining

Cosgrove ran and improved the

with the organisation in an advisory

Cleveland Clinic, an $8bn health system

capacity. Cosgrove told Forbes: “The

with locations in Ohio, Florida, Nevada,

organisation will continue to innovate

Canada, Abu Dhabi, and a facility

and adapt to the changes taking place

currently under construction in London,

in healthcare. Advancements have

which is set to open in 2020. The

changed and will continue to change

network is now regarded by Forbes as

how we treat patients.” On 1 January

the best run healthcare system in the

2018, Dr. Tom Mihaljevic took Cosgrove’s

United States. In May 2017, Cosgrove

place as CEO.

announced he would be stepping

www.my.clevelandclinic.org w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com


T O P 10

60

01

Dr. Alan Bauman BAUMAN MEDICAL

OCTOBER 2018


61

Dr. Alan Bauman is the co-founder

Bauman said when interviewed: “We

and CEO of Bauman Medical, and one

are setting a new standard for medical

of the world’s leading innovators and

practices across the country. The

medical practitioners in the field of

technologies we offer can transplant

restorative hair treatment and surgery.

one hair follicle at a time artistically

Bauman medical was formed in 1997

and our results are seamless and

and has treated over 20,000 cases

virtually painless�. The core ethos of

(8,000 of them surgical in nature) since

Bauman Medical is that cutting-edge

its inception. Bauman is also recognised

solutions to cosmetic issues with hair

by Forbes for being a pioneer of new

loss provide effective support for long-

technology, namely robotics, and new

term mental wellbeing.

treatments, such as stem cell therapy.

www.baumanmedical.com w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com


EVENTS & A S S O C I AT I O N S

The biggest industry events and conferences from around the world WRITTEN BY CATHERINE STURMAN 05—06 NOVEMBER

18th Annual Pharmaceutical Chemical Analysis Congress [ MADRID, SPAIN ]

29—30 OCTOBER

The Biomanufacturing World Summit

62

The Pharma Analysis 2018 anticipates participants, renowned speakers and eminent delegates across the globe

[ SAN DIEGO, USA ]

attending the conference to share their

The Biomanufacturing World Summit

valuable presentation and galvanise

brings together a ‘who’s who’ of phar-

the scientific community. Scientific

maceutical executives, cutting-edge

people from all over the globe focused

technology providers and media part-

on learning related to emerging tech-

ners for North America’s premier biolo-

nologies concerned with Pharma

gics event. The Biomanufacturing World

Analysis. This is an invaluable glo-

Summit series has grown to become

balised opportunity to reach the largest

the most senior and diverse gathering

assemblage of participants from the

of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

scientific community and research.This

executives anywhere in the world. Based

Pharma Analysis 2018 will emphasise

on an ever-growing network of referrals

on recent areas of more optimised

and recommendations, Biomanufactur-

research techniques like experimental

ing World Summit 2018 is designed

design, chemo metrics, chromatogra-

and built by Executive Platforms to bring

phy, electrophoresis, qualitative and

together the right people from around

quantitative analysis in forensics, medi-

the world and from every relevant com-

cine, science and engineering.

pany to network, benchmark, learn,

Click here for more info

and share with one another.

Click here for more info OCTOBER 2018


63

13—15 DECEMBER

MedTech Impact 2018 [ LAS VEGAS, USA ] MedTech Impact will provide essential

and utilising new digital tools, such as

insights from clinicians, healthcare

health wearables, the event will also

executives, technology and device

look at ways to further engage Medic-

developers, as well as entrepreneurs

aid and Medicare patients to provide

who wish to fully disrupt the industry.

solutions for the future.

Focusing on preventative healthcare

Click here for more info

w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com


EVENTS & A S S O C I AT I O N S

08—11 JANUARY, 2019

Digital Health Summit [ LAS VEGAS, USA ] Digital health is a driving force in how healthcare is administered, customised and reimagined. As the healthcare industry, policy makers, entrepreneurs, patients and business world navigate through highly complex and unpredictable territories, it’s breeding revolupartnerships and groundbreaking solu-

The 13th Annual Health Care Supply Chain Summit

tions. Digital Health—bold, boundless,

[ NEW ORLEANS, USA ]

fearless and optimistic—is showing the

Hospitals and healthcare organizations

world it’s ready for whatever comes

are in the midst of a revolution. Using

its way. With over 55,000 sq ft dedi-

integrated delivery systems (IDS), the

cated to digital health, there are no

health industry is moving towards fur-

shortage of cutting-edge innovations

ther digitization to provide increased

on display. Experience and interact

efficiencies in the face of rising health-

with the latest technologies advanc-

care costs. The 13th Annual Health Care

ing modern medicine, healthcare and

Supply Chain Summit will aim to explore

wellness, including digital therapeutics,

key topics, such as driving savings

artificial intelligence, sleep tech, con-

across the supply chain, whilst optimiz-

dition-specific wearables, precision

ing contracting, logistics and value

medicine, virtual and augmented reality

analysis, fully eradicating inefficiency

and so much more.

across the healthcare supply chain.

Click here for more info

Click here for more info

tionary approaches, unprecedented 64

27—29 JANUARY, 2019

OCTOBER 2018


11—15 FEBRUARY, 2019

Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 [ ORLANDO, USA ] One of the most iconic healthcare events in the 2019 calendar, the HIMSS Annual Conference provides thought leadership, community building, public policy, professional/ workforce development and engaging events to over

05—07 MARCH, 2019

630 corporate members, and over 450

World Healthcare Congress Europe

non-profit organisations. Serving the

[ MANCHESTER CENTRAL, UK ]

global health information and technol-

Exploring the next era of health and

ogy industry, this year’s event will bring

social care across Europe, the World

together IT and healthcare profession-

Healthcare Congress will aim to reduce

als to provide essential learning from

rising healthcare costs and look at

world-class speakers, who will discuss

ways at transforming both areas against

the cutting-edge digital health prod-

growing patient expectations. As the

ucts of the future. Key topics span

industry faces a number of challenges,

clinical informatics and clinician

placing increased strains on resources

engagement, consumer, patient engage-

within health and social care, the con-

ment and digital health, cybersecurity,

gress will bring forth key speakers,

disruptive care models, precision med-

enabling cross collaboration with like-

icine and more.

minded individuals.

Click here for more info

Click here for more info

70,000 global individual members,

w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com

65


EVENTS & A S S O C I AT I O N S

18—20 MARCH, 2019

Phar-East 2019

[ SUNTEC CITY, SINGAPORE ] Returning in 2019 after a successful 2018 debut, Phar-East will once again bring together experts from Asian

18—19 MARCH, 2019

Future Healthcare 2019 Exhibition & Conference 66

pharma and biotechs, big pharma, regulators, payers, technology innovators and more to share their expertise and

[ OLYMPIA, LONDON ]

chart Asia’s path forward. Across two

The Future Healthcare 2019 Exhibition

days, explore four of the most exciting

& Conference exhibition and conference

areas of Asian pharma:

will welcome over 4000 attendees

• Immunotherapy

from 65 countries, where experts will

• Market access

seek to address some of the biggest

• Regulatory affairs

problems presently facing the industry.

• Pharma 4.0.

An event for both public and private

Brand new for 2019, there will be a clin-

sector organisations, the event will

ical trials and biotech investment track,

seek to bring policy makers, buyers

giving you insights into this rapidly grow-

and practitioners together to overhaul

ing market. Phar-East is the premier

traditional ways of working. Large cor-

meeting place for senior executives from

porations can also meet with entrep-

Asia’s pharma and biotech industry.

reneurs and healthcare start-ups, share

If you want to identify opportunities

knowledge and learn from experts in

in Asia for your business…

the field.

Click here for more info

Click here for more info

OCTOBER 2018


67

28 APRIL—01 MAY 2019

The 16th Annual World Health Care Congress [ WASHINGTON, DC ] Designed to meet the needs of profes-

and payment transformation remains

sionals, from providers, payers and

central, as leading experts share stra-

employers, to life sciences and policy

tegic initiatives, promote networking

organisations, The Annual World Health

opportunities and enable attendees to

Care Congress is in its 16th year, and is

hear about a broad range of topics

set to welcome over 2,000 attendees,

across four days from a multitude of

with over 350 speakers in attendance

passionate and diverse c-level figures.

in 2017. Catering to a vast ecosystem,

Click here for more info

its agenda will ensure care delivery w w w.he a l t hc a re gl o b a l. com


68

DIGITISING THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE With its lead hospital accredited by Joint Commission International for its high-quality healthcare, Group Chief Information Officer, Brett Medel, discusses how digitisation will prepare TMC for the future WRITTEN BY

CATHERINE STURMAN PRODUCED BY

MIKE SADR

OCTOBER 2018


TECHNOLOGY

69

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H

ealthcare leader in the Philippines and the owner of the first private

hospital in Guam, The Medical City (TMC) provides cutting-edge health services, housing centres of excellence in wellness and aesthetics, cardiovascular, cancer and regenerative medicine. The company has recently embarked on launching seven new institutes, which will cover a number of common health problems within the country. With one flagship healthcare complex in Manila, four provincial hospitals, 50 clinic sties in Metro Manila and in select provinces 70

in the Philippines, a clinic in Dubai and a hospital in Guam with a total bed capacity of almost 2,000 beds, TMC has looked to fully digitise its operations to adhere to its philosophy – ‘Where patients are partners.’ With over 30 years expertise in the IT space, Group Chief Information Officer, Brett Medel is set to take the organisation to new heights. Through its digital transformation, Medel will establish best practices and ensure TMC retains its position as the healthcare provider of choice. “TMC has been serving the Filipino community for 50 years, and it is considered a legacy institution. However, it has been saddled with a traditional front and back office system. It needs to transform to cater OCTOBER 2018


TECHNOLOGY

71

The Medical City Critical Care experts Dr. Jose Emmanuel Palo and Dr. Jude Erric Cinco go over a patient’s X-ray while discussing his current condition.

w w w. h e a l t h c a r e g l o b a l . c o m


trends.com.ph info@trends.com.ph T +63 2 811 8181 F +63 2 814 0130

Technology To Transcend At Trends, our full complement of services provide the right tools for our business partners to achieve their desired goals and thrive in a constantly changing and competitive landscape. We offer comprehensive services and full support through our skilled and highlyqualified team. Trends has remained an industry leader by committing to understanding its business partners’ needs first, and then identifying solutions and developing tech-enabled services to best meet these needs. We usher our business partners into the digital future by harnessing the power of technology that we carefully curate and customize with our years of expertise. Remaining true to our commitment to excellence and growth, we have expanded with regional offices in Cebu and Davao and international offices in Vietnam and Cambodia. Today, Trends caters to the requirements of various markets, a few of which include: contact center and business process outsourcing, financial services, telecommunications services, government, hospitality, healthcare, education, media, manufacturing and pharmaceutical sectors.


TECHNOLOGY

73

to the needs of the new generation so it has invested heavily across its digital journey to significantly improve the patient experience,” he says. “My charter is to make TMC closer to the Filipino community as much as possible; to positively impact the patient experience

A TMC vascular technician and a consultant perform a Carotid Doppler test on a male patient. A Carotid Doppler test is a safe and painless procedure that uses sound waves to examine the blood flow through the carotid arteries.

and improve on efficiency by building an interconnected ecosystem of stakeholders into a single platform.” GIVING PATIENTS CONTROL

Empowering individuals is something which TMC will strive to achieve through open communication and the use of new digital tools. w w w. h e a l t h c a r e g l o b a l . c o m


“From finding out the treatment for

in the hospital or clinic, as we believe

a particular disease, setting an appoint-

that healthcare is all about providing

ment with a doctor of choice, to being

premium quality of health; starting from

informed of the choices available for

prevention and awareness to ultimately

the type of wellness required is aligned

improving the health of every individual.”

with our value proposition of ‘Patients as Partners,’” adds Medel.

DIGITAL ROADMAP

“We see every individual not as

Providing a digital roadmap, TMC will

merely as a clinical patient, but a part-

partner with like-minded companies

ner who belongs to the ecosystem of

to drive essential change across its

wellness and health management.”

operations.

“TMC looks after the welfare of every windividual even before they set foot

“I always tell my people and my partners, ‘implementing a system is

74

TECHNOLOGIES THAT WORK, SOLUTIONS THAT WIN! At Nexus, our commitment is to enable you to maximise your IT resources to your business advantage. www.nexustech.com.ph sales@nexustech.com.ph


TECHNOLOGY

Laboratory technicians at The Medical City’s Regenerative Medicine Laboratory perform the engineering of cells and other biomaterials for the purpose of preserving, restoring, or enhancing organ function.

75

not the end result,’” reflects Medel. “However, to me, the criteria of success of any technology project is getting users to adopt the system.” With the aim to bring the entire the network of hospitals and clinics under one platform, TMC has implemented a robust cloud infrastructure that can not only cope with the demands of the business, but deliver resilience across its disaster recovery strategy. It will also work to ensure scalability. “By getting all areas interconnected, we can maximise synergies across the hospital

“By getting all areas interconnected, we can maximise synergies across the hospital network, without placing increased investment at each site” — Brett Medel, Group Chief Information Officer

network, without placing increased investment at each site,” says Medel. w w w. h e a l t h c a r e g l o b a l . c o m


E X E C U T I V E P R OF IL E

Brett Medel has been in the

76

IT profession for the past 30 years where 17 years were spent as CIO of various companies in the private sector. Prior to joining The Medical City, Brett served as Group CIO of ePLDT. As Group CIO of ePLDT, he wore two hats - “Internal facing” where he drives the digital transformation journey of the ePLDT, and “External facing” where he engages with the clients to help them in their strategic IT initiatives. He used to be the Chairman of the CIO Council of the MVP Group of companies with

OCTOBER 2018

30 CIO/IT Heads of member companies worked with him to bring about synergy through various IT initiatives of the MVP Group. Prior to joining ePLDT his experience cuts across various industries like mining, manufacturing, government, retail, and insurance. He used to be the Vice President and Chief Information Officer of Philex Mining Corporation (a member of the MVP group of companies) since 2012. He spearheads major business transformation initiatives in Philex to improve operational effi-


TECHNOLOGY

By appointing Orion Health Inc, TMC has

ciency. Prior to joining Philex, he was the VP and CIO of Prudential UK and PNB Life. His IT exposure started way back in 1987 where he joined Andersen Consulting (now Accenture) as a management consultant where he held projects here and abroad for both the financial and manufacturing industry. Brett holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Management Engineering (Honors Program), Ateneo de Manila University.

also invested in a world-class hospital information and consultation system, which will integrate with its other ancillary subsystems. Nonetheless, the organisation is facing a number of regional challenges. “We have server-based and networkbased applications, but capability is always complex,” comments Medel. “To bring all of this into the cloud is the start of our transformation. At the end of the day, it’s all about bringing different players into an interconnected ecosystem.” 77 PROMOTING ACCESSIBILITY

With so many hospitals and clinics situated over a vast geography, connectivity will also present fresh challenges. Strengthening the wi-fi within its hospitals and clinics will become fundamental for TMC to capture data across a number of platforms, particularly mobile, in order to draw insights, trends, associations, sentiments, psychographics and more, in order to develop new programmes and services. “Our digital transformation is not just about automation, but a shift in mindset by introducing new business models to raise the bar of the customer experience. It is about strengthening the company’s value w w w. h e a l t h c a r e g l o b a l . c o m


proposition to the next level,” adds Medel. With this in mind, TMC is undergoing a significant initiative to build on its strong digital marketing strategy to bring the brand into the digital space. This will not only boost the organisation’s foot traffic, but further its digital footprint across a number of touchpoints, such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. “We have shifted our marketing resources to put equal emphasis on digital marketing as to that of traditional marketing. This is a strategy that has never been before done in the entire history of TMC,” says Medel. 78

“TMC aims to top the charts on customer awareness across its products and services. We would also like to get the pulse of the digital community by conducting social listening and see how we are performing as a healthcare provider in the eyes of the digital community. “Social media and mobile apps are sources of information that we can immediately collate and process, where either immediate feedback is given or immediate action is taken. This way, customers feel that they are valued and their feedback is taken on board.” ENGAGING ALL PARTIES

By deploying IT account managers across OCTOBER 2018

“We see every individual not merely as a clinical patient, but a partner who belongs to the ecosystem of wellness and health management” — Brett Medel, Group Chief Information Officer


TECHNOLOGY

A Wellness doctor checks on a patient inside an Executive Suite at the Wellness and Aesthetics Institute.

79

the organisation, TMC has built a cul-

Moving forward, Medel remains

ture of innovation among its employees

keen to explore new avenues and

and medical staff, where it has gained

unlock further potential which has yet

a greater understanding from various

to be explored.

teams on what is required from a digi-

“TMC will be on this digital journey for

tal perspective to enhance the quality

the next couple of years,” he concludes.

of patient care. “We need to make everyone aware

“We will be on top of AI, chatbots and of course, cloud. However, the most

of the benefits and the value of digital,

important aspect is having a robust

of being a part of the digital economy,”

community drive. This will remain the

acknowledges Medel.

focal point for TMC.”

“Not only medical staff or users, but also our stakeholders. Education is essential while we undertake our digital journey.” w w w. h e a l t h c a r e g l o b a l . c o m


Championing leading supply chain practices at UCSF Health With robotics, automation, new processes and more, UCSF Health is setting new standards for healthcare with its innovative supply chain WRITTEN BY

LAURA MULLAN PRODUCED BY

DENITR A PRICE


w w w. h e a l t h c a r e g l o b a l . c o m


U C S F H E A LT H

U

CSF Health is at the forefront

– that’s when he realized how trans-

of healthcare innovation but,

formative technology could be.

behind the scenes, the group’s Medical Center supply chain team are keeping

rote and rudimentary tasks every day,”

the cogs turning so it can focus on

he notes. “I began to realize that with

delivering the state-of-the-art care it is

the help of our Materials Management

known for.

Information Systems Team (MMIS Team)

UCSF Medical Center was recently named among the nation’s premier medical institutions for the 17th consec-

82

“I found myself doing the same set of

we could automate a lot of the procurement activity I was encountering.” Automation has become a prevalent

utive year, standing as the fifth best

trend in the supply chain field and it

hospital in the country and the top-

hasn’t gone amiss at UCSF Health. In

ranked hospital in California, accord-

2009, Limbert and his team partnered

ing to U.S. News & World Report’s

with Global Healthcare Exchange

2017-2018 Best Hospitals survey.

(GHX) to develop tools that allowed

In the back-end, its supply chain

his team to onboard vendors who

team is responsible for a comprehen-

would then receive their purchase

sive set of services that continually

orders (POs) in a highly-automated

strengthen the scope of its patient

and accurate fashion.

care. The organisation provides access

“A requester at the hospital could

to a broad range of medical-surgical

scan an order or put through a request

products, and consistently seeks to

and that would queue up a requisition

reduce supply chain waste and expens-

that would be turned into a purchase

es but, above all else, it is committed

order automatically without any buyer

to delivering quality customer service,

intervention,” explains Limbert. “We

which enables premium care.

call it ‘no touch POs.’

When he began as a buyer in procure-

“We were able to do that on a fairly

ment almost 16 years ago, Jake Limbert,

large scale. We have about 600 POs

now Director of Supply Chain Operations,

that go out every day and so we were

did many menial and repetitive tasks

really able to take our PO activity and

OCTOBER 2018


USA

83

FACT

There are 600,000 pieces of product onsite at all times

w w w. h e a l t h c a r e g l o b a l . c o m


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USA

“If we can empower our clinicians to provide better care then we can also grow with them in a way that’s meaningful” — Jake Limbert , Director of Supply Chain Operations

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay opened, aiming to set new standards for healthcare in the 21st century. The 289-bed complex features three separate hospitals, specialized in serving children, women and cancer patients. With such a mammoth operation, Limbert and his team wanted to focus on automation and streamlining operations where possible. With the latest wave of innovation, it seems robotics are redrawing the healthcare landscape. Keen to tap into

just turn it into an automated process.

this emerging trend, UCSF Health

At that point, we could also hard code

teamed up with Aethon to use its

shipping and logistical standards with

autonomous mobile TUG robots. These

all of our vendors so they knew that

new-generation robots allow UCSF

UCSF had an exact and predictable

Health to distribute items easily and

timeframe to deal with.”

reallocate their workforce so team

Building on this partnership, GHX then built Registration Center, otherwise known as ‘RegCenter’ which

members can focus on value-adding tasks rather than repetitive jobs. “This was revelatory as it allowed us

allowed UCSF Health to onboard its

to reallocate our full-time equivalent

own vendors. As a result of its efforts,

(FTE) resources,” said Limbert. “We also

UCSF was later recognized by GHX

utilize the TUGS for our soiled linen

in 2011 with their first every Industry

pickup which helped us reduce employ-

Impact Award.

ee injuries because, given census and

Since then, Limbert and his team

patient volumes, these linen carts are

have continued on an upward trajec-

becoming increasingly unwieldy.

tory thanks to new and improved

Thanks to robotics we’ve been able to

technological innovations. In 2015, the

keep our employees in an area where w w w. h e a l t h c a r e g l o b a l . c o m

85


U C S F H E A LT H

CLICK TO WATCH : ‘UCSF OUR STORIES: RITE OF PASSAGE — A HOSPITAL PROM FOR TEEN PATIENTS’ 86 they’re most effective and appreciated.

cost-effective supply chain processes

They’re able to further support clinicians.”

whilst meeting the individualistic needs

Like many in the supply chain discipline, UCSF Health has worked to streamline

of the clinicians and patients alike. “If they’re able to interact with clinicians

and standardize its processes, so that

in a meaningful way then that allows us

the medical professionals can focus on

to again, gain their trust,” explains

what matters — patient care. Every

Limbert. “We just don’t want people

patient’s healthcare needs are unique

stocking shelves, we want people to

and highly personalized.

engage the clinician and figure out their

Therefore, Limbert and his team

needs so we can make sure they are

worked closely with clinicians to establish

enabled to deliver the highest quality

their needs and maintain the unparal-

of care.”

leled, innovative care UCSF is known

“There’s a certain level of expecta-

for. In doing so, the group has worked

tion that our clinicians demand and

to strike a balance between streamlined,

I think we are able to provide that by

OCTOBER 2018


USA

FACT

The UCSF Medical Center is the fifth best hospital in the county and the top-ranked hospital in California 87 empowering our employees to resource

that’s not really going to work because

and make decisions on their own. We

our cases start at 7:00 a.m. so we need

call them our ‘supply chain ambassadors.’

product replenished by 5:00am,’ for

We want them to be resources for the

example. In that case, we are able to

customers, not just inventory technicians.

scale it and tweak it for them.

“The real product for us is patient care.

“That is a challenge, however, it’s also

Every patient has a different set of needs

something that we relish. Every patient

and a clinical path unique to them.

is unique and they are our number one

“We are able to engage the end user,

priority. I think we have to be mindful of

the clinician, and say, ‘These are our

where we can standardize and where

schematics and this is our framework.

we can’t.”

Does this synch with your needs?’

The opening of the UCSF Benioff

Almost like a switchboard, we plug and

Children’s Hospital at Mission Bay was

slot them into our order of business.

not only a key milestone in the institu-

“Alternatively, they might say, ‘Well

tions’ history, but it also gave Limbert w w w. h e a l t h c a r e g l o b a l . c o m


U C S F H E A LT H

and his team a fresh slate to drive efficiencies and cost savings. In doing so, the team had two focuses: the first was the customer and the second was generating operational data. “First, we determined, having learned from previous successes and failures, what the customer expected from us and what they needed in order to deliver the quality care that our patients deserve,” explains Limbert. “We were able to listen and figure out what worked and didn’t in the previous care area and then adapt and create new workflows, meaningful periodic automatic replenishment (PAR) levels and service level agreements (SLAs).

88

“Secondly, we built a very robust and intricate set of data,” he continues. “In order to achieve

“Every patient is unique and they are our number one priority” — Jake Limbert , Director of Supply Chain Operations

the previously established automation, we had to engage MMIS and our vendors to ensure the efficiencies would be mirrored in another facility. “We devised new shipping locations and schedules aligned with our new docks for optimal transport up to the unit. For example, right now a technician will transmit an order and in less than 12 minutes the vendor will have it. They can pick it and then it will show up the next day at that room in fewer than 24 hours.” With 78mn products delivered annually at UCSF, its supply chain operation is mammoth in scale. Now, as the organization expands,

OCTOBER 2018


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89

Limbert says the biggest challenge is

their piece within this dynamic jigsaw,

sustaining this growth.

it helps them feel more engaged and

“It’s a good problem to have in that the healthcare environment in the Bay Area

proud to provide a crucial piece in the patient care continuum.”

is very competitive but if we can empower our clinicians to provide better care then we can also grow with them in a way that’s meaningful,” notes Limbert. “Allowing our ambassadors and staff to feel ownership over the care that we’re providing is vital. If you can illuminate w w w. h e a l t h c a r e g l o b a l . c o m


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Healthcare Global Magazine - October 2018  
Healthcare Global Magazine - October 2018