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W I T H

BRAIN INJURY IMAGES FOR AWARENESS

HARBOUR GROUP 2011


Contents

2  

Reflections on the Harbour Group Process  

#1 Living with a Brain Injury 

#2 Do You See What I See? 

#3 Ireland has 13,000 Brain Injuries 

#4 The Empathiser 

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#5 The Brain Trauma Workout 

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#6 Size Matters 

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Reflections on the Harbour Group Process The illustrations and thoughts depicted in this e‐book were created by the  Headway peer support “Harbour Group” in Summer 2011. This group exists to  provide an opportunity for people with brain injury to meet, exchange stories  and offer each other personal support, facilitated by staff from Headway.  The individuals of the Harbour Group have shared their life experiences with  each other over a period of just eight weeks.  In that time, they have come to  support one another in the joint understanding and gentle acknowledgment of  the challenges of having to live with the unexpected ‐ an Acquired Brain Injury.    There was an exceptional amount of talent and creativity in the group; and a  passion and motivation to improve services for people with Brain Injury.  The  openness and insight of the group members inspired a decision to share with  others the experience of living with brain injury. So they set out to make a goal  of raising awareness of what it feels like to have one.  During the hours spent sharing, caring and supporting each other, humour  came to be the fundamental element in helping group members talk about  their challenges and learn from one another. They put themselves and their  experiences into these pictures, while at the same time emphasising the funny  side of living with a brain injury.  Together, they have created a collection of art pieces that show the challenges  they have experienced.   We hope you enjoy them.          Marie McGrath  Group facilitator  Headway Harbour Group 2011 

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Let us tell you a little about the people in our group, they are empathetic, creative, compassionate and outgoing. They bonded together over chocolate, indecent talk, high heels, coffee and laughter....

#1 Living with Brain Injury  Living with a brain injury involves coping with extra issues that might not be visible  to the casual outsider. For this reason, it is ofted called the “invisible disability” 

4  


WITH A BRAIN INJURY PART ONE: RELATIONSHIPS

. .. . ... .. .. MEMORY BAGGAGE

AVERAGE BAGGAGE

LANGUAGE JUST BAGGAGE BAGGAGE PROCESSING NORMAL BAGGAGE BAGGAGE FATIGUE EMOTIONAL BAGGAGE BAGGAGE


The Harbour Group 2011 members are:

Alan, Patrick, Clare, Teresa, Tom, Helen, Martin, Peter, Seamus, Alan, Rachel, Bernard, Ann and Barbara.

#2 Do You See What I See?  Visual difficulties following brain injury can arise as the brain struggles to  piece together the visual information received by the eyes.  

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DO YOU SEE WHAT I SEE ?

NORMAL

SIGHT PERCEPTION

ALTERED

SIGHT PERCEPTION


#3  Ireland Has Approximately 13,00 Brain Injuries Each Year  The full extent of the problem caused by brain injury in Ireland is not fully known but  based on European averages,  there could be over 30,000 people dealing with disability  following brain injury. 

8  


I R E L A N D

H A S

APPROXIMATELY

13,000 HEAD INJURIES EACH YEAR.


#4 The Empathiser  Acquired Brain Injury is often not well understood, even by healthcare  professionals. 

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Introducing

TH E

VIRTUAL BRAIN INJURY SYMPTOMS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

INSTRUCTIONS

INSERT HEAD IN TRAY & TURN HANDLE WITH LEFT HA ND AT LEAST 3 TI MES. PATENT PENDING

For All Health Professionals encountering brain injury. WE CAN’T DO THIS YET, BUT WE CAN PROVIDE INFORMATION FOR BRAIN INJURY.


#5 The Brain Trauma Workout  Sometimes it can feel like a balancing act, coping with the consequences  caused by a brain injury. 

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#6 Size Matters  Fatigue and a limited capacity to deal with situations that many people  take for granted is a common difficulty following a brain injury. 

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HARBOUR GROUP 2011


Living with Brain Injury - Images for Awareness