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MAKING CHANGE

2018 ANNUAL REPORT S E C T I O N T I T L E | 2 0 18 A N N U A L R E P O R T

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H A W A I ‘ I C O M M U N I T Y F O U N D AT I O N | M A K I N G C H A N G E


I N T RO DU C I N G C H A N G E

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O U R PRO M I S E

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O U R G I V E R S

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O U R ‘ O H A N A

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BUILDING A FRAMEWORK FOR CHANGE Hawai‘i is a place known not only for its beauty but also for its soul. Compassion for each other and caring for our resources make up part of our cultural DNA. So when essential elements of our island home are not working well for everyone, we are driven to bring people and resources together to solve our most critical problems.

Hawai‘i Community Foundation is committed to creating a thriving Hawai‘i for all and for always. Nowhere has this commitment been more apparent than during this time of crisis on Kaua‘i following the devastating flood damage and on Hawai‘i Island as Kīlauea volcano continues to erupt. Through the generosity of our donors, HCF is quickly distributing grants and mobilizing resources to help our islands stabilize and recover. Whether building or rebuilding, community is why we exist. HCF’s CHANGE Framework zeroes in on six essential areas where there are opportunities for change that will create the the healthy and sustainable Hawai‘i we all want to live in. Our vision for a better Hawai‘i—where keiki are healthy, kūpuna are cared for, and families are self-sufficient—is more than something we are wishing for; it’s something we are planning for. And we’re already seeing progress. In this annual report, you’ll learn more about the strategies developed and impact made in the CHANGE areas. You’ll also read stories about people and places that have changed for the better because of individuals, like you, that stepped forward to help level the playing field and provide help where it would make the most difference. We thank you for joining the Hawai‘i Community Foundation on this journey. Together, we can transform our collective vision for a thriving Hawai‘i into a wonderful reality.

MICAH A. KĀNE CEO & President

DEBORAH K. BERGER Board Chair


Following the devastating flood damage on Kaua‘i and the volcano eruption on Hawai‘i Island, HCF and its donors came together to establish the

KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND and the

HAWAI‘I ISLAND VOLCANO RECOVERY FUND. Generous individuals and businesses continue to contribute to these funds and HCF is working with its staff on each island to quickly deploy grants to help our islands heal.

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HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION CREATING LONG-TERM, LARGE-SCA

COMMUNIT Y & ECONOM Y

HE A LTH & WE LFA R E

A RT S & CULTUR E

Strengthening communities to build self-sufficiency

Enabling residents to lead healthier, more productive lives

Fostering creativity and diversity to increase critical thinking and collaboration


IS FOCUSED ON LE

N ATUR A L E N V IRONME NT

GOV E R NME NT & CI V ICS

Protecting our resources to ensure our economic and environmental sustainability

Engaging citizens and leaders to address community issues

E DUC ATION Helping students unlock their potential to enrich their futures


CO M M U N I T Y & ECO N O M Y

STRENGTHENING COMMUNITIES TO BUILD SELF-SUFFICIENCY We believe in supporting nonprofits that deliver vital services and programs, enabling local communities and their residents to thrive. HCF’s current work in the area of the CO M M U N I T Y & ECO N O M Y includes these initiatives and grant programs:

Advancing Nonprofit Excellence HCF invests in high-performing organizations through grants and providing connections and training to strengthen their capacity and leadership.

$1.1M+ $14M+ $5.2M in skilled volunteer services have been donated to nonprofits through a partnership between HCF and Catchafire

invested in nonprofits over the past decade to build capacity and leadership

in FLEX Grants provided unrestricted support to effective nonprofits in 2017


Community Improvement Funds HCF manages funds established and supported by local residents, businesses, and organizations so that communities have the resources to respond to ongoing, emerging, and immediate needs in their neighborhoods.

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$11,809,428

funds established to support communities from North Kaua‘i to East Hawai‘i

distributed to strengthen neighborhoods across the state over the past 10 years

PIN Grants Program For over 30 years through the Persons in Need for Elderly Services Program (PIN), HCF has distributed grants to community-based caregiving services and adult day programs so that kūpuna in need can connect with their communities and their caregivers can lead more balanced lives.

OVER $9 MILLION

OVER 1,500

has been distributed to organizations to support seniors throughout Hawai‘i since 2008

low-income seniors have been served by 15 PIN grantees through this program in 2017


CAFÉ 100 SAVED OUR LIVES – Gloria Kobayashi, Café 100, Hilo

FE E DING OUR COMMUNIT Y As a member of the 100th Battalion during World War II, Richard Miyashiro fought alongside other Hawai‘i-born Japanese-American young men who had to prove their loyalty as Americans. S T O R I E S O F C H A N G E | 2 0 18 A N N U A L R E P O R T

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Their perseverance and pride were later tested when a tsunami hit Hilo in 1946, damaging the diner Mr. Miyashiro opened only three months earlier, and again in 1960 when a tsunami demolished his second restaurant 21 days after it opened. Thirteen-years old at the time, Gloria Kobayashi, eldest of the three Miyashiro sisters, said, “Café 100 saved our lives,” explaining that the force of the wave hitting the restaurant probably spared the family house behind it. “Where many would have stopped there,” Gloria says of her dad, “my father persisted.” Two years later in 1962, he built the third incarnation of Café 100 on Kīlauea Avenue, where people continue to flock for its Loco Moco™. When their parents died, daughters Gloria, Kay, and Gail wanted to honor them. They turned to HCF because of its strong reputation and relationship with the East Hawai‘i Fund. So they established the Richard & Evelyn Miyashiro Fund to continue to support organizations in their community including The Food Basket, Hawai‘i Island’s Food Bank. “Grants from community members are critically important to us,” said Kristin Frost Albrecht, Executive Director.

“Here’s a family that’s been feeding Hilo’s community for decades and is now feeding us through its philanthropy.”

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H A W A I ‘ I C O M M U N I T Y F O U N D AT I O N | M A K I N G C H A N G E


Kay Shintani, Gail Miyashiro, Gloria Kobayashi, and Richard Kobayashi at their family restaurant. (far left photo from left to right) Each month, The Food Basket’s Kupuna Pantry program provides nutritious foods to over 1,000 low-income seniors at 22 sites across Hawai‘i Island.

THE RICHARD & EVELYN MIYASHIRO FUND SUPPORTS THE EAST HAWAI‘I FUND, a hui of donors that has come together to support communities and organizations in East Hawai‘i

Since 2010, the East Hawai‘i Fund along with the Sadamitsu, Milly, Fred & Leatrice Yokoyama Fund, have distributed over

$375K to nonprofits that serve families in East Hawai‘i S T O R I E S O F C H A N G E | 2 0 18 A N N U A L R E P O R T

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H E A LT H & W E LFA RE

Enabling residents to lead healthier, more productive lives We believe that effective systems of community support— especially for Hawai‘i’s most vulnerable —improve the welfare of families, the long-term outlook for children, and the ability of residents to lead productive lives. HCF’s current work in the area of H E A LT H & W E LFA RE includes these initiatives and grant programs: Medical Research The Medical Research Program supports projects that help to promote a robust local medical research community for the benefit of Hawai‘i’s people.

Since 1997, HCF has facilitated over

$18.8M in medical research grants

Funding has been leveraged to secure

NATIONAL FUNDING

for continued research conducted in Hawai‘i


Tobacco Cessation Through a public/private partnership, HCF administers grants from the Hawai‘i Tobacco Prevention and Control Trust Fund to support smoking cessation and prevention efforts.

73,300 fewer adults

and 8,200 fewer youth

are smoking in Hawai‘i saving an estimated $1 billion in health care costs since 2000

12,000 people have

quit using tobacco products with the help of the cessation program since 2009

3rd lowest

Hawai‘i ranks in the nation for adult smoking and has reduced smoking by high school students by 71%

HousingASAP HCF convened a partnership of 13 funders to create HousingASAP, an initiative to move more families into stable housing faster and keep them there. A network of eight nonprofit organizations came together to receive coaching, technical assistance, and resources so that they could better collaborate, create shared goals, and address policy and funding changes.

The network expanded to

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organizations in 2018

In 2017, family homelessness in Hawai‘i decreased by

19%

Since 2014, 714 families were moved into permanent housing and were placed

50-100

DAYS FASTER


BY ADDRESSING THE ROOT CAUSES OF CHILDREN’S BEHAVIORS, WE CAN PROVIDE INDIVIDUALIZED CARE THAT IS CHILD-CENTERED AND FAMILY-FOCUSED – Ryan Lee, M.D., Milestones founder

IMPROV ING C A R E FOR OUR CHILDR E N When the doors to the Milestones clinic opened in March 2018, it was the culmination of years of research and planning by a group of people who recognized that too many young children in Hawai‘i with developmental needs were falling through the cracks of a broken system. S T O R I E S O F C H A N G E | 2 0 18 A N N U A L R E P O R T

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Hawai‘i Community Foundation learned about the work being done on Hawai‘i Island (by Dr. Ira Chasnoff) on the effects of prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol on child development. “When we discovered that there was a critical gap in correctly diagnosing and treating keiki who are suffering the consequences of early exposure,” said Chris van Bergeijk, HCF Senior Vice President of Strategies, Initiatives & Networks, “we felt compelled to respond.”

Milestones board member Michael Broderick, Dr. Ryan Lee, Chris van Bergeijk, and Milestones board member Mike Mohr at the blessing of the new center. (left to right).

That response was two-pronged: HCF recruited a group of funders to support the planning and design of HCF’s Children’s Behavioral Health Initiative and then convened leaders from different sectors— medical, child welfare, early education, health insurance, and family court—to study the issue for two years. “Collective wisdom is what’s called for with an issue as important and multifaceted as children’s behavioral health,” said Virginia Pressler, M.D. Director of Health, Hawai‘i State Department of Health. The upshot of these efforts is Milestones, a center of excellence for child development directed by Ryan Lee, M.D. with a transdisciplinary team of physicians and therapists. “By addressing the root causes of children’s behaviors, we can provide individualized care that is childcentered and family-focused,” said Dr. Lee. Operations of the new nonprofit are supported by a set of funders who, like the families being served, are deeply grateful it exists. 16

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Research and planning for Milestones was funded by: Hawai‘i Community Foundation Gwenfread Elaine Allen Fund Anderson-Beck Fund Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund The NME Fund Stupski Family Fund Victoria S. & Bradley L. Geist Foundation Kamehameha Schools Frost Family Foundation

The 5-year operations for Milestones is supported by: Hawai‘i Community Foundation Gwenfread Elaine Allen Fund Agne Family Fund Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund The NME Fund Stupski Foundation Victoria S. & Bradley L. Geist Foundation

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A R T S & C U LT U RE

Fostering creativity and diversity to increase critical thinking and collaboration

We believe that artistic and cultural experiences encourage innovative thinking and appreciation for the rich diversity of our traditions and artistic expressions. HCF’s current work in the area of A R T S & C U LT U RE includes these initiatives and grant programs:

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Artists in the Schools In partnership with the Hawai‘i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts, the Artists in the Schools program provides funding for arts residencies in Hawai‘i’s public and charter schools by qualified teaching artists and nonprofit arts organizations. The residencies engage students deeply in the artistic process of creating, performing, exhibiting, sharing, and responding to art.

Since 2008, HCF awarded

$2.3M+

to support art residencies in schools throughout the state

Laila Art Fund – Artists in Residence Program Continuing the legacy of Laila Twigg-Smith, this fund supports arts organizations statewide to bring recognized, outstanding artists to Hawai‘i for long-term residencies that actively engage Hawai‘ibased artists and the greater community. The fund also provides scholarships for local artists to attend art schools.

$650,000+ has been awarded to local arts organizations to provide artists-in-residence programs since 2005

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local artists received scholarships to attend art schools since 2005, including Pilchuck Glass School and Anderson Ranch Arts Center

In 2016-2017, HCF provided grants to nine nonprofit arts organizations serving 47 schools and impacted over

6,500 STUDENTS


PART OF WHO WE ARE NOW AS A COMMUNITY INCLUDES WHO WE ONCE WERE – Effie Cameron Ort, Fred Baldwin Memorial Foundation Trustee

PE R PE TUATING OUR HE R ITAGE The charming town of Makawao, located in Upcountry Maui, has one foot in its paniolo past and another in its present, lively arts scene. Sitting at the crossroads of both is the Makawao History Museum, which is run by a group of dedicated volunteers who love making the history of Makawao come alive for residents and visitors from around the world. S T O R I E S O F C H A N G E | 2 0 18 A N N U A L R E P O R T

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When the museum set out to record the stories of kūpuna from Makawao, trustees of the Fred Baldwin Memorial Foundation immediately recognized the project’s value.

“Preserving the stories and wisdom of these elders is a wonderful way to engage people in the history and cultural heritage of our community,” – Kristina Lyons Lambert, Makawao local & Fred Baldwin Memorial Foundation Trustee To Museum Board President Mary Orwig, the timing was crucial. “The need to record the stories of those who can still narrate them firsthand is urgent.” Interviews conducted thus far tell stories about cowboys, immigrants coming to work on plantations, the local USO Club serving over 50,000 military, and the transformation of kūpuna homes into shops that now make up Makawao’s main street. “Watching the change has been both exciting and poignant,” reflects Effie Ort, fellow trustee of the Fred Baldwin Memorial Foundation. “Part of who we now are as a community includes who we once were.”

Mary Orwig shares a photo from the original Makawao School (right) and talks about The Kūpuna Film Project made possible through a grant from the Fred Baldwin Memorial Foundation. The project captures stories from kūpuna, like Violet Komoda and Wilbert Kajihara (previous page), who share the unique and important history of Upcountry Maui.


Serving the Maui community since 1910,

THE FRED BALDWIN MEMORIAL FOUNDATION

serves the legacy of Emily Alexander Baldwin and Henry Perrine Baldwin to honor their son

Foundation Trustees (left to right): Effie Cameron Ort, Shaun Lyons, Jeremy Baldwin, Kristina Lyons Lambert, Morag Rice Miranda, and Wendy Rice Peterson

HCF provides grantmaking support for this and many other private foundations. In this capacity over the last 20 years, HCF has helped to facilitate more than

$170 MILLION into island communities 23


N AT U R A L E N V I RO N M E N T

Protecting our resources to ensure our economic and environmental sustainability

We believe that the protection of our natural environment safeguards the well-being of residents and ensures the long-term environmental and economic health of the Hawaiian Islands. HCF’s current work in the area of the N AT U R A L E N V I RO N M E N T includes these initiatives and grant programs: Environmental Funders Group (EFG) In 2009, HCF convened and organized EFG to steadily increase the amount of philanthropic support for environmental and sustainability efforts in Hawai‘i.

EFG members have more than doubled with a total of 19

MEMBERS in 2018

Since 2016, EFG has produced

TWO REPORTS

on the State of the Environment in Hawai‘i to highlight challenges and responses

EFG was a foundational supporter of the

ALOHA+ DASHBOARD

that tracks Hawai‘i’s sustainability efforts


Community Restoration Partnership HCF, with its partners the Harold K.L. Castle Foundation, Kamehameha Schools, the Marisla Foundation, the Weissman Family Foundation, and other funders, provide support for lower watershed and coastal restoration projects in Hawai‘i. Their efforts complement the state’s goal for 30% healthy functioning near shore areas by 2030.

$3M+

in grants was distributed to communities across the state since 2009

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local organizations received support to help strengthen ties between cultural and environmental efforts

Wai Maoli: Hawai‘i Fresh Water Initiative Recognizing that fresh water is at the center of our economy and ecology, HCF convened stakeholders from all sides of the issue to come up with collective recommendations, which resulted in a common goal of 100 million gallons a day of additional reliable supply by 2030.

A Fresh Water Council was created, consisting of

22 EXPERTS on water issues from across the state

Through the Fresh Water Council’s advocacy efforts and in partnership with elected officials,

10 LAWS

passed in support of the ambitious fresh water goal


WHEN YOU GIVE TO YOUR COMMUNITY, YOU ARE LIGHTING THE TORCH FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS TO DO THE SAME – Kathy Richardson

PROTEC TING OUR R E SOURCE S Kaua‘i native Kathy Richardson grew up spending time on her grandmother Juliet Rice Wichman’s North Shore land, relishing the acres of trees and plants that were her playground. S T O R I E S O F C H A N G E | 2 0 18 A N N U A L R E P O R T

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Kathy stands next to an environmental sculpture made of sticks, branches, and vines created by Internationally known artist, Patrick Dougherty.

The land, now known as Limahuli Garden and Preserve, became one of three gardens on Kaua‘i and one of five total that comprise the National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG) network. “My grandmother started me on this journey,” said Kathy Richardson, who has carried on the family’s tradition of support for the botanical garden by serving on the NTBG board for over 20 years. “She had a vision that we on Kaua‘i could help educate the world to enjoy and preserve nature.” The gardens and preserves of the National Tropical Botanical Garden are safe havens for at-risk species that otherwise might disappear.

“The survival of plants is tied to our very own survival. That’s why a big part of NTBG’s conservation efforts is to educate people about the role of plants in providing food, oxygen, and medicine for humans and other species.” – Kathy Richardson

It wasn’t just land that Kathy Richardson’s relatives passed on, it was also a passion for giving back to the community. “My commitment to the mission of the National Tropical Botanical Garden goes way beyond this moment in time,” she said. “When you give to your community, you are lighting the torch for future generations to do the same.”

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Established by Kathy Richardson’s family, the Goodale Family Fund has provided

$84,000

in grants to NTBG to support educational programs at the gardens

NTBG honors Juliet Rice Wichman’s legacy by providing numerous

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS to students and visitors 29


GOV E RN M E N T & C I V I C S

Engaging citizens and leaders to address community issues We believe that informed citizens and civically engaged leaders can increase the effectiveness of policies and practices and together take on complex community challenges. HCF’s current work in GOV E RN M E N T & C I V I C S includes these initiatives and grant programs: Civic Engagement Recognizing that progress cannot be made in isolation, networks are increasingly being used to address complex problems.

HCF has convened community, business, and elected leaders and created more than

10 NONPROFIT NETWORKS AND FUNDING PARTNERSHIPS

to address the community’s most complex issues including family homelessness, at-risk middle school youth, and preserving fresh water resources


Transform Hawai‘i Government Changing how state government delivers programs, information and services is about creating equal access for every citizen on every island; supporting employees with the tools needed to be efficient and effective; and promoting an open, transparent and responsive Hawai‘i government.

Since 2011, through the Omidyar ‘Ohana and Technology and Transformation Funds, HCF provided

$5 MILLION+

to support the state’s efforts to complete a baseline assessment, develop a strategic plan, hire the first state Chief Information Officer, and partner on demonstration projects

$1 MILLION+

has sustained communications and advocacy work and a community coalition network of citizens to build public support, help shape the outcome, and hold the state accountable for progress on the transformation

HCF CEO & President Micah Kāne moderates a panel discussion with Speaker of the House Scott Saiki, Senate President Ron Kouchi, and United States Congresswoman Colleen Hanabusa at HCF’s Advancing Nonprofit Excellence Conference.


IMAGINE HOW MUCH HAPPIER THE WORLD COULD BE IF ALL OUR CHILDREN GOT OFF TO A GREAT START – Suzanne Chun Oakland

S TR E NGTHE NING OUR BONDS In reflecting on the 25-year history of the Hawai‘i Children’s Trust Fund (HCTF), a public-private partnership between HCF and the Hawai‘i State Department of Health that retired Senator Suzanne Chun Oakland helped to launch, she said, “One of the best features about HCTF is the flexibility of its grants to let communities, who know their families best, decide how to use the funds for the greatest impact.” S T O R I E S O F C H A N G E | 2 0 18 A N N U A L R E P O R T

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Some of those funds now support the Parents as Teachers™ (PAT) program at the Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture (INPEACE).

“By offering free home visiting services and resources, we’re empowering parents to become their children’s first and best teachers.” – Nālani Galariada, INPEACE Program Director In the past six years, 549 families and 633 keiki received home visiting services in Hawai‘i from certified PAT educators. Parents report that the program increases their knowledge about child development and strengthens the bonds with their children. “I learn something new about my baby every visit,” said Tammy, a PAT program participant. “It relieves a lot of stress because I understand what my son is doing.” Approaching families with respect, meeting them at whatever stage they’re at, and building strong relationships with parents, has earned praise from the national PAT program and good word-of-mouth in the local community. “One child, one family, one community at a time,” reflects Chun Oakland. “Imagine how much happier the world could be if all of our children got off to a great start.”

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Parent Educator Claudia Kapi‘olani Quintanilla (left), shares parenting resources at regular home visits with Tammy.


HCTF’s success is built through a comprehensive partnership that includes: HAWAI‘I STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES HAWAI‘I HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES HAWAI‘I STATE SENATE THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I

In its first 20 years, HCTF invested

$5 MILLION

toward the prevention of child abuse and neglect in Hawai‘i

NONPROFITS

HCTF committed to

3 YEARS

of investment in effective, community-based programs that support young parents Tammy’s son Henry engages in playtime to help reinforce skill building.


E DU CAT I O N

Helping students unlock their potential to enrich their futures We believe that helping students afford and access high-quality education is key to their success in and beyond the classroom, enabling them to achieve their highest hopes and benefit their communities. HCF’s current work in the area of E DU CAT I O N includes these initiatives and grant programs: Connecting for Success By identifying, tracking, and providing services to struggling middle school students, the likelihood increases that they will complete 9th grade, graduate from high school, and prepare for success in college, career, and community.

98%

of the at-risk students served completed 9th grade and were promoted to 10th grade on time; a rate higher than the overall Hawai‘i Department of Education 10th grade promotion rate

At-risk students who received some form of social and emotional learning or counseling saw substantially greater GRADE IMPROVEMENT than students who did not


Social & Emotional Learning School-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programs teach skills to reduce social isolation and distress that can lead to violent behavior, bullying, suicide, and drug/alcohol abuse, while also improving positive peer relationships, grades, test scores, and graduation rates.

OVER $2M

With in support from HCF, over

60 SCHOOLS

have received training in and/or implemented one of 30 different SEL programs

Beginning in 2015, HCF supported the addition of a SEL track and keynote speakers at the annual Schools of the Future Conference, which drew

2,000 PARTICIPANTS in 2017

Career Connected Learning In order to succeed in 21st century careers, Hawai‘i’s students must receive a strong foundation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, as well as in problem solving, critical thinking, teamwork, and creativity. The Career Connected Learning grant program encourages educator-employer relationships that inspire youth to consider local STEM careers and provide real-world projects that engage students. Since 2015, the funding partnership has distributed

In 2018, the partnership increased to

$2.2 MILLION

11 FUNDERS,

to support programs reaching over 12,000 students and 900 educators across Hawai‘i Island

allowing the program to expand to Kaua‘i


I MADE THE DECISION TO REGAIN MY LIFE – Ann Yoshida

E MPOWE R ING THROUGH E DUC ATION In 2000, Ann Yoshida was a passenger in a car crash that resulted in a spinal cord injury. Her journey to recovery wasn’t easy but, recalls Ann, “One step, one second at a time, I made the decision to regain my life.” S T O R I E S O F C H A N G E | 2 0 18 A N N U A L R E P O R T

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The life she has since created is a remarkable one by any measure. It took her two years to get back to school — ­ first finishing her bachelor’s, then her master’s, and ultimately her doctorate. “I simply could not have done this without the scholarships I received,” said Ann, “including support from HCF that I am extremely grateful for.”

“Education is not a piece of paper. It’s empowerment: learning to trust your abilities, navigate the environment, and adapt to activities in the life you CAN LIVE.” – Ann Yoshida

As a doctor of occupational therapy, Ann helps to empower individuals who have physical, psychosocial, or cognitive challenges by teaching daily living skills and water movement therapy such as Watsu.

Her skills as a professional occupational therapist now enable Ann to help others, but it’s the way she is living her own life that inspires them to believe there are no limits. Ann went back to being a water woman and competitor, from paddling to surfing and other water sports, which had long been a place of freedom and cultural connection for her. “In the water, I was reborn to my original identity and free to make my own life,” said the three-time world champion and paracanoe/kayak paralympian. Now clearly in the driver’s seat, Ann says, “When you focus on being normal, you exclude the possibility of being extraordinary. HCF has helped me to live my extraordinary life.” 40

H A W A I ‘ I C O M M U N I T Y F O U N D AT I O N | M A K I N G C H A N G E


One online application gives students

ACCESS TO OVER 250 SCHOLARSHIPS established by individuals, families, and businesses

HCF provides over

$

6 MILLION

in scholarships to Hawai‘i students each year

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With the knowledge we’ve accrued and the trust we’ve earned over a century of service to this community, we are a catalyst for positive change in Hawai‘i


w h at we do

WE AMPLIFY THE POWER OF GIVING


w h at w e d o WE ENHANCE the lives of those in need and enrich the lives of those who give By supporting programs that achieve specific results and by helping donors make smart choices, the benefits and satisfaction of giving go both ways.

WE CREATE

partnerships to tackle tough problems and build stronger communities By bringing funders together with nonprofit, community, and government leaders, the whole can be greater than the sum of its parts.

WE TRANSFORM people’s generosity into lasting change By serving as a trusted steward of donors’ funds, the impact of giving can endure for generations.

WE SHARE more than a century of experience and knowledge to make giving more effective By informing philanthropists and leaders about needs and opportunities in the community, initiatives and grants can be more responsive to changing priorities.

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DONOR S OF ALL SIZES HCF customizes your plan by helping to find the best method for your giving and connecting your interests with reputable charities.

how we help

GIVERS

Philanthropy is a personal expression of who you are and what you care about. 46

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PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS Clients can focus on charitable giving while HCF handles administrative, financial, and grantmaking services.

PROFESSIONAL ADVISOR S HCF is a resource for estate planners, accountants, and financial advisors seeking charitable solutions for their clients.

BUSINESSES

PL ANNED GIVING

HCF helps businesses support the community while achieving their own charitable goals.

A planned legacy gift through HCF will have a long-lasting impact on a charity or a cause that is important to you. 47


how we help

NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS When our local nonprofits perform at their very best—delivering vital services and programs across the islands—Hawai‘i’s people and communities are better off


HAWAI‘I LEGACY GIVING CAMPAIGN

In 2016, HCF launched a partnership with over 100 nonprofit organizations across the state to encourage people to think about their legacies and provide for the community and charities in their wills. Nonprofits have since increased, and at times more than doubled, the number of legacy commitments to their organizations.

ADVANCING NONPROFIT EXCELLENCE

Over more than a decade, HCF invested $14 million in grants to strengthen the capacity and leadership of organizations. Today, HCF is focused on providing connections, knowledge, and resources that improve the effectiveness and results of high-performing nonprofits.

FLEX GRANTS

Since 2013, more than 40 donors have joined HCF to provide over $21 million in unrestricted grants to high-performing nonprofits; each grantee organization decides how best to use the funds to support its mission.

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how we

PARTNER We believe in the power of partnerships to make better decisions and build stronger communities


professional advisor s HCF is a resource for estate planners, accountants, and financial advisors seeking charitable solutions for their clients. Three individuals received the 2017 Outstanding Professional Advisor in Philanthropy Award for giving back to the community through their own time and treasure, and for incorporating philanthropy into their everyday work by helping clients consider and achieve their charitable goals. See past awardees and videos at HawaiiCommunityFoundation.org/TheCenter

ROGER M. HIGA, PARTNER

ANTHONY F. CHUN, ESQ.

DARL C. GLEED, ESQ.

New York Life & NYLIFE Securities

Law Office of Anthony F. Chun

Darl C. Gleed & Associates LLLC

government partner ships HCF secures the cooperation of government, business, community leaders, and nonprofits into multi-sector partnerships that create long-term, systemic change. funding partner ships HCF brings together funders with a shared vision to leverage resources, solve tough problems, and achieve outcomes that might otherwise be unobtainable. In 2017, $14.9 million was distributed through government and funding partnerships to address issues including helping homeless families, improving outcomes for at-risk youth, and preserving fresh water. O U R P R O M I S E | 2 0 18 A N N U A L R E P O R T

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how we cr e ate

LONG-TERM CHANGE

Taking on the most pressing needs of our community relies on deep reserves of knowledge and the ability to bring people and resources together to find high-impact, long-term solutions


Hawai‘i Community Foundation is making great strides against some of our community’s most pressing needs. By building networks of leaders from the public and private sectors as our partners for social change and catalyzing funding around targeted strategies, we’re working together to achieve lasting change for the people of Hawai‘i.

build networks We build networks of people and organizations to establish the trust and collaboration that are required to tackle complex challenges.

define success We invest in data systems as a tool for making informed decisions and tracking progress towards goals.

change systems We partner to create innovative strategies that can be replicated for maximum impact.

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WHERE WE ARE With experienced staff located across Hawai‘i, a 20-member Board of Governors, and Leadership Councils comprised of local residents on Maui County, Kaua‘i County, and Hawai‘i Island, the work of HCF is both statewide and unique to each island community

K AUA‘I & NI‘IHAU

O‘AHU

• Office opened on Kaua‘i in 2001

• The Hawaiian Foundation was established

in 1916 and renamed Hawai‘i Community

• There are 61 funds established to benefit

Foundation in 1987

Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau including the Annie Sinclair Knudsen Memorial Fund, Kaua‘i Aloha Endowment Fund, and the Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund •

over $5 million in grants to 180 nonprofits on Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau in the past 3 years

• Over $300 thousand in scholarship awards for over 90 students 54

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hcf headquarters since 2011 at the historic C. Brewer Building in downtown Honolulu

• Nearly $30 million in grants awarded to nonprofits on O‘ahu • Over $3.5 million in scholarship awards for nearly 750 students


MAUI, L ĀNA‘I & MOLOK A‘I hcf maui office —serving the islands of Maui, Lāna‘i, and Moloka‘i— opened in 2002 • There are 58 hcf funds established to benefit maui county including Maui Nui •

Community Fund, Hāna Community Endowment Fund, and Lāna‘i Community Benefit Fund •

over $9 million in grants were awarded to

Maui County nonprofits in the past three years

• Over $550 thousand in scholarship awards for over 100 students

HAWAI‘I ISL AND •

first neighbor island office

opened in 2000 in Waimea •

95 hcf funds established to benefit Hawai‘i Island, including the East Hawai‘i Fund, West Hawai‘i Fund, Kūki‘o Community Fund, and Hawai‘i Island Volcano Recovery Fund nearly $16.5 million in grants to Hawai‘i

Island nonprofits in the past 3 years

• Over $1.6 million in scholarship awards to 300 students •

hilo office opened in 2015 to better serve

East Hawai‘i

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$9.6M

hcf initiatives

$20.3M

$5.8M

schol ar ships

donor advised gr ants

$7.8M contr ac t clients

$4.3M

$5.3M

$6.1M

other hcf gr ants

donor designated gr ants

partner ships

In 2017, HCF distributed more than

$

59 MILLION

to the community from over 850 funds established by individuals, families, and businesses that care about making Hawai‘i a better place

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Last year, your collective generosity supported the community in these areas: COMMUNIT Y & ECONOMY

GOVERNMENT & CIVICS

HE ALTH & WELFARE

EDUC ATION

ARTS & CULTURE

OTHER

$3.4M

$2.5M

$15.2M

$18.2M

$3.2M

$1.4M

NATUR AL ENVIRONMENT

$4M

GRAND TOTAL

$

47.9 MILLION*

*Includes expenses related to the implementation of various programs and contracts. Does not include $11,146,458 in grants administered on behalf of private foundations and other clients.

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Generous individuals, families, and businesses stand behind HCF’s 850 funds, each with a meaningful purpose and a deeply-held commitment to making Hawai‘i a better place for all


L EVERY ONE OF OUR DONORS HAS A REASON FOR GIVING The choice to make a difference through philanthropy is a reflection of the values and hopes that an individual holds dear. Who a person is informs how a person gives. “My Living, My Giving” highlights just a few of the thousands of individuals we’re honored to partner with to make Hawai‘i a better place. Beginning this year, a complete list of funds created by generous givers has been moved from this printed report to our website at HawaiiCommunityFoundation.org/MyLivingMyGiving. Doing so ensures that less is spent on production and more is spent on philanthropy.

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LEGACY SOCIETY RON & IVY TIMPE

What inspires you? We are inspired by beauty in the natural world and by humankind’s achievements. What brings you joy? Joy can be found in many places: The tenderness of love, a grandchild’s success, a puppy’s kisses, a great round of golf, the perfect cake. What do you hope for Hawai‘i’s future? Because our first hope is for Hawai‘i’s long-term viability, we support the actions being taken now to conserve water, become energy self-sufficient, and provide more of our own food. People are surprised when they learn that a boy from Kansas and a girl from Brooklyn can live happily ever after. Our favorite word is chocolate!

Ron & Ivy are HCF Legacy Society Members Legacy Gifts provide lasting support to communities and honors an individual’s passion for making a difference beyond his or her lifetime. Legacy Society Members choose to leave a gift to the community in their will or trust, creating a legacy for a particular cause for generations to come.

Hawai‘i has welcomed us with open arms. We, in turn, believe in giving back to the communities to which we have an affinity, and are grateful to HCF for helping us do that here.”


What inspires you? I consider life in general to be inspiring, whether spending time with good friends or working with good business partners; I strive to find the right balance and make it all enjoyable. What brings you joy? My family. What do you hope for Hawai‘i’s future? I really hope that we can improve the public education system in Hawai‘i because having a broadly educated and motivated community will help solve a number of issues we currently face here. What motivates you to give? My wife and I feel very blessed and really want to help make a difference to improve the lives of others. People are surprised when they learn I have great grandparents buried here! My great grandfather was a Big Island paniolo and sheriff, my grandfather was born in Honolulu, so coming to Hawai‘i in 1982 was an ancestral homecoming for me.

Jeff is a donor to HCF’s Catalyst Fund

MY FAVORITE WORD IS

GRATITUDE JEFF ARCE

Catalyst Fund contributions provide flexible dollars that enable HCF to address critical issues by convening key stakeholders, creating partnerships, and establishing shared goals to promote systems change for a better Hawai‘i.

CATALYST FUND


ADVISED FUNDS

PETER & LANI YUKIMURA What inspires you? We are inspired by people who contribute not only money, but also time, expertise, and support. Young people who are driven by their compassion for others and a genuine desire to help others also inspire us. What brings you joy? Our children and grandchildren bring us the greatest joy. We feel blessed that they are making our island their home. What do you hope for Hawai‘i’s future? Our hope is that education would be a top priority and homelessness would be a thing of the past. People are surprised when they learn that Peter played a Polynesian warrior in the Dick Van Dyke comedy, “Lt. Robinson Crusoe” filmed on Kaua‘i in the 60’s, and Lani was a Blackjack dealer at Harrah’s, Lake Tahoe when she was 21.

What motivates you to give? It’s part of our family’s culture to give back to our community.

The Yukimura Family Fund supports Kaua‘i’s community Donor Advised Funds allow maximum flexibility to recommend grants for the benefit of the community. Donors contribute to the fund as frequently as they like and recommend grants when they are ready.

OUR FAVORITE WORD IS

FAMILY

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What inspires you? My husband, Bob, who diligently worked his way up from humble beginnings and my daughter, Nani, a Special Ed teacher for 21 years in the public school system who says at the end of the day, her kids make her happy. What brings you joy? I enjoy seeing young people happy at what they are doing to achieve a better place for themselves. What do you hope for Hawai‘i’s future? I hope for an atmosphere that encourages our young people to remain here to support Hawai‘i’s future. What motivates you to give? It’s simple. Hawai‘i made it possible for us to have the life we have, so giving back is easy and rewarding. People are surprised when they learn I am from Wai‘anae. Wai‘anae is a beautiful place where I was privileged to grow up.

The Frances Katsuda Bean Wai‘anae High School Scholarship Fund supports students in drama, fine arts, and Searider Productions. Scholarship Funds help Hawai‘i’s students to achieve their goal of obtaining a college degree.

MY FAVORITE PHRASE IS

THANK YOU

FRANCES BEAN

SCHOLARSHIPS


DESIGNATED FUNDS

MARGARET PEGGY BUCHWACH What inspires you? I am impassioned about fighting for social justice and bringing attention to good organizations doing great work. What do you hope for Hawai‘i’s future? My hope is that there will be mutual respect for the various ethnicities here; together, we make Hawai‘i one ‘ono mixed salad. What motivates you to give? The desire to help others rise up is what motivates me to give. You don’t need to be a multimillionaire to be able to do good and make some kind of impact in the community.

Peggy created the Brendan Buchwach Fund to support the Waikiki Health Center. Designated Funds allow donors to select a specific nonprofit organization or group of organizations to receive long-term support.

WHAT BRINGS ME JOY IS BEING

The designated recipients receive

ABLE TO FIGHT FOR THE LESS

regular distributions from the fund.

FORTUNATE. I FEEL A SENSE OF SATISFACTION IN SPEAKING OUT FOR WHAT IS RIGHT.”


What brings you joy? Joy comes when people join together around an issue and those efforts conclude in a positive result. What do you hope for Hawai‘i’s future? I am very concerned that Hawai‘i’s special qualities are eroding—the air, water, infrastructure, ‘āina, and acceptance of people from different backgrounds—and hope we can rekindle these. What motivates you to give? I was brought up to share. My parents used to say, “Money is like manure; you have to spread it around to make things grow.” People are surprised when they learn I sing. My favorite word is integrity.

Marti established the Maui Nui Community Fund to benefit Maui, Lāna‘i, Kaho‘olawe, and Moloka‘i.

I AM INSPIRED WHEN PEOPLE COME TOGETHER TO ADDRESS AN ISSUE” MARTI deBENEDETTI

Field of Interest Funds enable givers to benefit a particular field or certain group of people. When organizations or charities serving that field change, merge, or cease to exist, this type of fund can continue to serve the purpose.

FIELD OF INTEREST


FUNDING PARTNERSHIPS GLEN GALAICH

What inspires you? People who have a vision for social change and find a way to put it into action inspires me. What brings you joy? I get joy from supporting individuals and organizations that work through barriers to improve services and programs for those in need. What do you hope for Hawai‘i’s future? I’ve met with so many dynamic leaders in the state and hope other funders will join us in supporting the innovative work being done in the face of Hawai‘i’s challenges. What motivates you to give? As CEO of the Stupski Foundation, I am carrying out the vision of Joyce and Larry Stupski in their support for Hawai‘i and their determination to encourage others. People are surprised when they learn I was an AM talk show host during morning and afternoon drive in the Boulder/Denver market … not a common entry on a foundation leader’s resume.

Glen, on behalf of the Stupski Foundation, provides support to improve the lives of people in Hawai‘i and the San Francisco Bay area. Funding Partnerships pool resources including knowledge, funds, and connections to enable diverse groups of people with shared goals to make a larger impact than any one of them could do alone.

MY FAVORITE WORD IS

POTENTIAL 67


What inspires you? I am inspired when I see ordinary people—especially the younger generation—doing extraordinary things to help our world, whether addressing an environmental issue or a social justice cause. What brings you joy? Time is the one commodity that diminishes with each passing day, so I relish spending time with the people I love. What do you hope for Hawai‘i’s future? I hope Hawai‘i retains its unique sense of place, where strangers are welcomed like family and people look out for each other; where diversity is celebrated; and where multi-ethnic and multigenerational communities can flourish. People are surprised when they learn that I am a conservatory-trained classical violinist and that I am pursuing my private pilot’s license! My favorite word is Credibility: the quality of being trusted and believed in.

GIVING IS EMPOWERING. I AM ABLE TO MAKE A POSITIVE DIFFERENCE IN MY COMMUNITY FOR THE THINGS I CARE ABOUT”

GREGORY WRENN

Gregory, President of the Cooke Foundation, Ltd., supports worthy endeavors that focus on the welfare of people in Hawai‘i. Private Foundation Services including grantmaking and administrative assistance are provided by HCF to help individuals, families, or corporations carry out their charitable missions.

PRIVATE FOUNDATION SERVICES


MANAWALE‘A KA HĀ‘AWI, KŪ‘ONO‘ONO ‘O LOKO By giving with an open heart, one has all they need – Hawaiian Proverb

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The HCF ‘ohana is made up of dedicated and knowledgeable individuals who are passionate about making a difference and committed to serving their community


2018 BOA RD OF GOV E RNORS The Board establishes policies, sets organization-wide priorities and program strategies, and ensures that the financial stewardship and operations of HCF are conducted with integrity and accountability.

President

DEBORAH K. BERGER The Learning Coalition Co-Founder

Vice-President

PETER HO

Bank of Hawaii Chairman, President & CEO

This year we bid aloha to governors Eric Yeaman and Elizabeth Rice Grossman. We are grateful for their commitment. We welcome new governor, Mark E. Agne, and former governor and past chair, Paul Kosasa. These highly respected community leaders provide invaluable support for the work and mission of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation.

Secretary

MICHAEL BRODERICK YMCA of Honolulu President & CEO

Treasurer

KALEIALOHA K. CADINHA-PUA‘A Cadinha & Co., LLC President & CEO


MARK E. AGNE Private Investor

ROBERTA F. CHU Bank of Hawaii Sr. Vice President

ROBERT S. HARRISON First Hawaiian Bank Chairman & CEO

ELLIOT K. MILLS

Aulani, A Disney Resort & Spa Vice President & General Manager

First Hawaiian Bank Vice Chairman

Alert Holdings Group, Inc. President & CEO (Retired)

ROBERT R. BEAN

MARY G.F. BITTERMAN

JOHN C. DEAN

TAMAR CHOTZEN GOODFELLOW

RICHARD W. GUSHMAN, II DGM Group, Inc . President

TYRIE L. JENKINS, MD Jenkins Eye Care

PAUL KOSASA

ALAN H. ARIZUMI

Central Pacific Bank Executive Chair

MICHAEL P. IRISH

Halm’s Enterprise, Inc. CEO

JUDY B. PIETSCH

Judy B. Pietsch Consulting Owner

Philanthropist & Community Volunteer

Owner

KATHERINE G. RICHARDSON

Community Volunteer

The Bernard Osher Foundation • President

ABC Stores CEO & President

JENNIFER G. SABAS

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2018 N E IGH BOR ISL A N D LE A DE RSH IP COUNCIL S Leadership Council members provide HCF with personal, in-depth knowledge of community needs across the state. The dedication of these volunteers enables HCF to make a difference in every island community. Over the years, these volunteer leaders have helped HCF further its mission by providing advice on issues relevant to their respective islands.

H AWA I‘I ISL A N D

BRIAN IWATA

NANCY CABR AL

ROBERTA F. CHU

DAVID K A APU

ROBERT KILDOW

DALE ISHIDA SUEZAKI

LYNN WHITE

CHAIR

LAUR A MALLERY-SAYRE

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ALAN OK AMOTO


K AUA‘I

M AUI COUN T Y

K ATHERINE G. RICHARDSON

TAMAR CHOTZEN GOODFELLOW

CHAIR

CHAIR

PAUL HORNER

SAR A MIUR A

ROBERT K AWAHAR A

KRISTINA LYONS LAMBERT

MICHAEL J. MUR AKOSHI

GREGG TAK AR A

PAUL MANCINI

R. CLAY SUTHERLAND

ROBERTA WEIL

GLENN YAMASAKI

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2017 SCHOL A RSH IP A M BA SSA DORS Volunteer scholarship ambassadors have the difficult task of reviewing and making recommendations for scholarship awards for over 250 funds. Made up of community members, educators, and past scholarship recipients, these dedicated volunteers truly understand the impact that education can have on an individual’s future.


H AWA I‘ I ISL A N D

O‘A H U

Kumu Belcher Nahua Guilloz Ray Hasegawa Rod Hinman Sally Kimura Lisa Laun Clayton Leonard

Dana Anderson

Faye Kurren

Lynette Araki

Kenneth Lee

Noe Archambault

Cheryl Leialoha

Corey Au

Cathy Mizumoto

Bert Ayabe

Colin Moore

John Bravender

Terry Murphy

Kapena Lum Michelle Oishi Gladys Sonomura Cynthia Sorenson Lauren Whittemore Stacey Williams

Lisa Bravender

Todd Nohara

Janice Casey

Judy-Ann Oliveira

Paul Casey

Sarah Razee

Blane Chong

Keopu Reelitz

David Choy

Eileen Sakai

Lurline Choy

Greg Sakamoto

Lori Eldridge

K AUA‘ I Hope Chihara Janine Cuthberson Karen Goodale

Marni Sakumoto

Eric Fujimoto

Amy Sato

Debbie Halbert Paul Horner Robin Pratt Sonia Topenio

Christine Ho Komer Leslie Hsiung Elizabeth Ignacio Matthew Ing Kim Coco Iwamoto

Tetine Sentell John Stepulis Ruth Stepulis Karen Takata Cynthia Takenaka

Gerald Keir

Marisa Tanaka

Elizabeth Kent

Yukie Tokuyama

Suzi Kiss

Chelsea Tsuchida

M AU I COU N T Y

Mary Kubota

Barbara Ward

Barbara Kuljis

Lynn Watanabe

Sandra Florence Theresa Gerry Sheila Haynes Brandon Higashi

Barry Kurren

Marlene Young

Galen Nakamura Helen Nielsen Charlene Schulenburg Karen Temple

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H AWA I‘I COM M UN IT Y FOUN DAT ION STA FF A highly motivated team of talented individuals carries out the work of HCF. Staff members are knowledgeable about the community and passionate about making a difference. They walk their talk as HCF professionals and caring members of the community.


ROBERT ABAD

LYDIA CLEMENTS

MARTHA HANSON

Senior Accountant

Vice President of Foundation & Corporate

Director of Donor Relations

Partnerships JUSTINA ACEVEDO-CROSS

KEN HASEGAWA

Program Director,

L. CHIPS DAMATE

Strategies, Initiatives & Networks

Senior Communications Officer

JANA ALAMILLO Executive Assistant, Communications LEO AMADOR Donor Relations Assistant CHRIS ARCHAMBAULT Web Solutions Senior Officer KAWENA BEAUPRÈ Senior Director of Gifts and Compliance & Associate General Counsel

MALU DEBUS Philanthropy Officer Hawai‘i Island TESS DELA RAMA Front Office Administrator IPO EHIA Gifts & Compliance Associate JAEDINE EHIA

Senior Scholarship Administrator JAIME HINAGA Executive Assistant, Community Grants & Investments CATHERINE HOWLAND Associate Director of Communications COURTNEY IKEDA Development Services Manager MICAH A. KĀNE

Senior Scholarship Associate

Chief Executive Officer & President

Program Officer,

PAM FUNAI

ROBBIE ANN KANE

Community Grants & Investments

Program Director,

Director of Programs, Omidyar Initiatives,

Community Grants & Investments

Strategies, Initiatives & Networks

OPHELIA BITANGA-ISREAL

IOLANI CASTRO Program Assistant, Community Grants & Investments DIANE CHADWICK Director of Community Philanthropy Hawai‘i Island WALLACE CHIN Senior Vice President & Chief Financial Officer CHELSEY CHOW Philanthropy Officer - Hawai‘i Island

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CHERYL KANESHIRO

AMY LUERSEN

ELIZ ABETH NA AI

Knowledge Management Specialist

Senior Vice President,

Program Associate,

Community Grants & Investments NELLA KAUWENAOLE

Strategies, Initiatives & Networks DANA OKANO

Executive Assistant to the Chief Executive

JEN-L LYMAN

Officer & President

Director of Philanthropic Partnerships

TOM KELLY

SUSAN MALTEZO

CARLA PANG

Senior Grants Manager,

Senior Accountant

Vice President, Knowledge Evaluation & Learning LARISSA KICK Senior Program Officer, Community Grants & Investments LISHA KIMURA Program Associate, Community Grants & Investments ERIC LA‘A Senior Development Officer

Program Director, Strategies, Initiatives & Networks

Community Grants & Investments LUIS PASCUAL, JR. LYNELLE MARBLE Senior Director of Communications URI MARTOS Philanthropy Officer - Kaua‘i

Systems Architect KEVIN RAPP Donor Relations Officer LISA RODRIGUES Executive Assistant,

TOM MATSUDA

Strategies, Initiatives & Networks

Program Director, Community Grants & Investments

GLORIA ROMUAR Administrative Support Coordinator

MARY-JOY LLAGUNO

PI‘IKEA MILLER

Program Assistant,

Program Director,

Community Grants & Investments

Strategies, Initiatives & Networks

KATE LLOYD

NATALIE LUZ MILLON

Senior Vice President,

Program Associate, Omidyar Initiatives,

Executive Assistant to the Senior VP,

Engagement, Culture & Donor Experience

Strategies, Initiatives & Networks

Development & General Counsel

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CURTIS SAIKI Senior Vice President, Development & General Counsel TINA SANTOS


GEORGE SEYMOUR

INGER TULLY

CHRISTEL WUERFEL

Scholarship Associate

Senior Philanthropy Officer - Maui County

Program Associate, Community Grants & Investments

MYLES SHIBATA

CHRIS VAN BERGEIJK

Vice President, Marketing Initiatives

Senior Vice President, Strategies, Initiatives & Networks

TARA SHIBUYA Senior Scholarship Officer

ELISE VON DOHLEN Program Officer,

LYNN SHIMONO

Community Grants & Investments

Controller JOANNE WATASE-YANG LINDA TAKEHARA

Communications Officer

ETHAN WUNG Development Data Manager KAWEHI YIM Executive Assistant & Administrative Coordinator to the Board of Governors DARCIE YUKIMURA Director of Community Philanthropy Kaua‘i

Accounting Assistant HANNAH WERTH

MIYA ZIALCITA

KELVIN TAKETA

Senior Philanthropy Associate -

Executive Assistant, Engagement, Culture

Senior Fellow

Maui County

& Donor Experience

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CONTAC T US

M AU I COU N T Y

O‘A H U

K AUA‘ I

827 Fort Street Mall

4139 Hardy Street, Suite C

Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96813

33 Lono Avenue

Līhu‘e, Hawai‘i 96766

Kahului Building, Suite 390 Kahului, Hawai‘i 96732

Tel: 808-537-6333

Tel: 808-245-4585

Toll-free: 888-731-3863

Tel: 808-242-6184

H I LO

99 Aupuni Street, Suite 214 Hilo, Hawai‘i 96720

Tel: 808-935-1206

KAMUELA 65-1279 Kawaihae Road

Parker Square, Room 203 Kamuela, Hawai‘i 96743

Tel: 808-885-2174

This report is a “thank you” to the people who partner with HCF. Our goal is to share their stories with the highest quality and in the most cost-effective way so that we continue to maximize our resources for the benefit of our island home. Design by Wall-to-Wall Studios

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LŌKAHI KA HANA, UA LAKO KA HALE Through working together, the community prospers – Hawaiian Proverb

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2018 Annual Report  

Hawaii is a place known not only for its beauty but also for its soul. Compassion for each other and caring for our resources make up part o...

2018 Annual Report  

Hawaii is a place known not only for its beauty but also for its soul. Compassion for each other and caring for our resources make up part o...