Page 1

F R A M E W O R K • PA RT N E RS H I PS • M OV E M E N T


CHANGE strives to create a SHARED MOVEMENT to solve HAWAI‘I’S GREATEST CHALLENGES

ABOUT Hawai‘i is at a critical juncture – the issues facing our state are complex and not everyone in our communities is able to thrive. Creating the large-scale change needed to tackle our biggest issues will require each

The CHANGE framework identifies Hawai‘i’s strengths, gaps, and opportunities through a

common set of data

power of the collective – when individuals from all segments and sectors of the community mobilize around a shared goal. This combination of people, place, and power is what inspired the CHANGE framework, which zeroes in on the following six essential areas:

thriving shared goals

Hawai‘i

At the heart of creating change is Kuleana – our deep sense of responsibility to our people and place. And the catalyst for creating change is in the

A

Creates partnerships and commits to

of us to commit to a shared vision for a better Hawai‘i.

Aligns efforts and takes

collective action

COMMUNITY & ECONOMY HEALTH & WELLNESS ARTS & CULTURE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT GOVERNMENT & CIVICS EDUCATION

Through the common data set as mapped out in the framework, we can collectively change the way we solve Hawai‘i’s challenges. Together, we will create a better island home now and for future generations.

Guided by the CHANGE framework’s common set of data, networks of people can align their efforts around shared goals, so that together, their collective action creates a thriving Hawai‘i.


CHA NG E

COMMUNIT Y & ECONOM Y

HE ALTH & WELLNESS

ARTS & CULTURE

NATUR AL EN VIRONMENT

GOVERNMENT & CIVICS

EDUCATION

Diverse and Healthy Economy

Affordable and Effective Healthcare Delivery Systems

Access to Arts Education for Youth

Strengthened Climate Resilience

Citizen Engagement and Participation

Access to Quality Early Childhood Education

Improvement in Social Determinants of Health

Nurturing and Cultivating Hawai‘i’s Diverse Cultures

Sustainable Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food Systems

Effective and Accountable Government

Success in School and High School Completion

Access to Quality Mental and Behavioral Healthcare

Access to Spaces and Opportunities to Practice and Participate in Arts and Cultures

Natural Resource Protection and Revitalization

Strong Corporate Citizenship

Post-Secondary Success and Career Readiness

Wealth, Income, and Asset Building Housing Affordability and Cost of Living Safe and Sustainable Communities


identify the gaps where help in our community is needed, opportunities where help will do the most good, and areas where sustainable data need to be gathered. By working from a common set of sustainable data, our community can create shared goals and consistently and reliably track the progress of our collective efforts over time. Under the six essential CHANGE areas (or sectors) are key issues (or sub-sectors) that affect the ability of people and communities to thrive. Sustainable data points round out the framework by telling the story of what is happening within each key issue. This curated data set helps us to understand the interconnected nature of the sectors

C H A N G E HEALTH & WELLNESS

ARTS & CULTURE

NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

GOVERNMENT & CIVICS

EDUCATION

DIVERSE and HEALTHY ECONOMY

AFFORDABLE and EFFECTIVE HEALTHCARE DELIVERY SYSTEMS

ACCESS to ARTS EDUCATION for YOUTH

STRENGTHENED CLIMATE RESILIENCE

CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT and PARTICIPATION

ACCESS to QUALITY EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

$56,880

Per capita real GDP

jobs pay a 38% ofliving wage,

U.S.: $56,749

Total traded cluster non-tourism and hospitality employment equaled to

49,184 jobs From 2015: Down by 2.4%

Data points under construction

which equals to more than $20/hour

23%

Unemployment of Discouraged Workers data point under construction

Worker’s income spent on healthcare premiums in Hawai‘i:

Average

14.7%

Hawai‘i’s rank for healthcare and healthcare quality in the U.S.

WEALTH, INCOME, and ASSET BUILDING Among households that accumulate wealth:

$34,730 Median earnings for a single adult Half of single adults

IMPROVEMENT in SOCIAL DETERMINANTS of HEALTH

57% own their own home; 29% do not have savings to weather

11.3% of residents experience food insecurity

Homeownership – U.S.: 63% Emergency savings – U.S.: 43.5%

Adverse Childhood Experiences data point under construction

3 months of financial emergency

earn less than $34,730

U.S.: 12.5%

2,668 sheltered

3,683 unsheltered

HOUSING AFFORDABILITY and COST of LIVING

48%

of households do not meet the Survival Budget level and struggle to afford living in Hawai‘i $28,128 needed for a single adult, $72,336 needed for family of 4

56.1% of renters and 40.3% of homeowners are burdened by housing costs Renters – U.S.: 50.6% Owners – U.S.: 29.5%

SAFE and SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES Violent crime – 242 offenses per 100,000 residents Property crime – 2,965 offenses per 100,000 residents Violent crime – U.S.: 386 offenses Property crime – U.S.: 2,451 offenses

27.4 minutes

Residents spend on average traveling to work U.S.: 26.4 minutes

9.3% of students did NOT go to school because they felt unsafe, either at school or on their way to or from school U.S.: 6.7% Hawai‘i has a Livability Index Score of

53 out of 100 Includes: housing, health, environment, and others

Estimated 4,318 beds in nursing homes and 5,200 spaces in assisted living and residential care facilities for seniors By 2030: Estimated 37,930 seniors will need long-term care

homeless persons

Since 2016: 20% decrease

2,597

children in foster care

ACCESS to QUALITY MENTAL and BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1 mental health ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• of adults with professional for every ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• a serious mental or behavioral 430 individuals in Hawai‘i ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• U.S.: 1 for 440 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• condition did not receive the •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• needed treatment or counseling

45.4%

23% of children who received or needed mental healthcare had a problem obtaining it Adults - U.S.: 34.1% Children - U.S.: 47%

NURTURING and CULTIVATING HAWAI‘I’S DIVERSE CULTURES

29.5% of high school students experienced depression in the past 12 months 2005: 31.8% 83.1% of high school students and 82.1% of middle school students have adult support at home or school 2009: 86.4% high schoolers 2011: 81.5% middle schoolers

Hawai‘i received an overall D+ grade on the state of its infrastructure

D+

Generating 27.6% renewable energy in the electricity sector

U.S.: D+

18%

2005: 10.2%

and how they affect one another. Doing so, allows us to examine the root causes and create effective solutions to solve Hawai‘i’s greatest challenges.

#1

physician shortage, which equates to 797 full-time physicians

29%

of Native Hawaiians and

of non-Hawaiians participate

in Native Hawaiian cultural activities

18,610

‘Olelo Hawai‘i Hawaiian language speakers in Hawai‘i

Other Cultural Activities data point under construction

ACCESS to SPACES and OPPORTUNITIES to PRACTICE and PARTICIPATE in ARTS and CULTURES

$25 million

or 3% of all individual charitable giving supports the arts U.S.: 5%

Government Public Investment data point under construction

$205.6 million in total economic activity generated by the arts and culture sector, which supports 5,968 full-time jobs U.S.: $835 million

11

MILLION gallons per day

OUR

11.6% Local

Food Systems data point under construction

Since 2016, 11 million gallons per day (mgd) of fresh water capacity has been added to Hawai‘i’s existing supply though conservation, reuse, and recharge efforts

11.6% of Hawai‘i’s food supply is from local sources with the remaining 88.4% from imported sources

104.6 million pounds of food is produced locally every year 2008: 133.5 million pounds

NATURAL RESOURCE PROTECTION and REVITALIZATION 55% of the 150 action items in Hawai’i’s Statewide Biosecurity Plan for invasive species control are being implemented

140K acres

of registered voters turned out to vote in the 2018 general election

54%

or 20,000 of 3- and 4-year olds are not in nursery school, preschool, or kindergarten U.S.: 52%

10.7%

of kindergarten classes display ready-for-school characteristics

U.S.: 11.4%

Quality data point under construction

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES, and FOOD SYSTEMS

D FOO

52.7%

11% of Hawai‘i residents contacted or visited a public official

74

or 17% of native watershed forest is under high-level protection

Hawai‘i’s Ocean Health Index score which represents a healthy ocean that provides maximum benefit

2011: 90,000 acres

(74 out of 100)

U.S.: 87%

7.1%

21%

of residents volunteer

of residents work with neighbors to do something positive for the neighborhood or community U.S.: 7.6%

EFFECTIVE and ACCOUNTABLE GOVERNMENT

57%

of residents have a great deal or fair amount of trust in the state government U.S.: 58%

$25 billion

O 404 N

ND T FOU

#46

Hawai’i ranks of 50 states for online access to government spending data in state and county public worker retirement unfunded liabilities, which equates to $17,500 per resident

STRONG CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP Community Investments data point under construction Local Hiring or Job Training for Immediate Employment Programs data point under construction Local Procurement data point under construction

SUCCESS in SCHOOL and HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION

U.S.: 25%

15% of students are chronically absent

73% of public school students felt positively about their school

83% of public high school students graduate

Percentage of public school students who met the achievement standard in core subjects for their grade level: 3rd grade

8th grade

53% English Language Arts / Literacy 55% 55%

Math

38%

Data NA%

Science

44%

POST-SECONDARY SUCCESS and CAREER READINESS 55% of high school completers enrolled at a post-secondary institution in the Fall following graduation U.S.: 69% 59.5% of high school graduates have completed a FAFSA application U.S.: 60.9%

Earning power: Median wage for UH graduates working in Hawai‘i

$50

K

$47K

Quality data point under construction 67% of University of Hawai‘i (UH) graduates have a job 1 year after graduation

$28

K B

Doc

Pr or •

t

Maste

elo ach

r•

o fe

ssio

na

ate C Gradu

Bac ost-

cala

gr l De

ee

ertific

te u re a

ate

Ce r t

ifica

$72

K

$58K

46 te $

K

r•P

5 years

The CHANGE framework is a curated set of statewide data that begins to

COMMUNITY & ECONOMY

1 year

THE DATA


The CHANGE framework data reference the following data sources: AARP, Across the States Profiles of Long-Term Services and Supports (2018) AARP Livability Index (2019) Aloha United Way, Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed (ALICE) Report (2017) Aloha United Way, Early Childhood Indicator Report (2015)

Hawai‘i Community Foundation (2019)

Prosperity Now Scorecard (2016)

Hawai‘i Community Foundation Hawai‘i Giving Study (2015)

State of Hawai‘i Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism (DBEDT) (2018)

Hawai‘i Early Childhood State Plan (2019 – 2024) Hawai‘i Green Growth Aloha+ Challenge (2018) Hawai‘i Ocean Health Index (2014)

American Community Survey (Kids Count) (2015 – 2017)

Hawai‘i P-20 Partnerships for Education (2019)

American Society of Civil Engineers (2017)

Hawai‘i State Department of Education (DOE), Strategic Plan Dynamic Report (2016-2017)

Americans for the Arts (2017) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (2017) County Health Rankings, Hawai‘i (2019) Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs (DCCA) Hawai‘i Insurance Division: The Common Wealth Fund (2015)

Hawai‘i State Department of Education (DOE), Strive HI Report (2018) Hawai‘i State Department of Human Services Annual Databook (FY 2016) Hawai‘i Statewide Homeless Point in Time Count (2019) Hawai‘i Youth Risk Behavior Survey (2015)

Feeding America, Map the Meal Gap (2019)

National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) (2016-2017)

Gallup Poll (2014)

National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2015)

Hawai‘i Budget & Policy Center, Report on Public Worker Retirement Costs (2017)

Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) (2015) Pew Research (2018)

A MOVEMENT FOR

State of Hawai‘i Office of Elections (2018) U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (2018)

Originally established by Hawai‘i Community

U.S. Census Bureau (2017)

movement that builds on existing momentum from

Foundation, CHANGE was created to become a

U.S. Census Bureau, 2009 – 2013 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates

a number of organizations to inspire new entities

U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey – Supplemental Survey (2017)

Recognizing that long-term, large-scale change

U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey – Supplemental Survey on Volunteerism and Civic Life (2017)

and individuals to join in.

cannot be achieved alone, CHANGE works to leverage ongoing initiatives that are making strong progress towards positive outcomes. Through CHANGE, Hawai‘i Community Foundation

U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (2019)

hopes to shine a light on these initiatives,

University of Hawai‘i, Annual Hawai‘i Physician Workforce Assessment Report to the Legislature (2018)

drive greater impact.

University of Hawai‘i Economic Research Organization (UHERO) (2016) U.S. News & World Report (2019) U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) (2018)

encourage alignment, and create partnerships to

To join the CHANGE movement and learn more visit: HawaiiCommunityFoundation.org/CHANGE


Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has. —MARGARET MEAD

Profile for Hawaii Community Foundation

CHANGE Brochure  

Hawaii is at a critical juncture – the issues facing our state are complex and not everyone in our communities is able to thrive. Creating t...

CHANGE Brochure  

Hawaii is at a critical juncture – the issues facing our state are complex and not everyone in our communities is able to thrive. Creating t...

Profile for hcfhawaii