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STRENGTH IN NUMBERS On paper, Habitat for Humanity (HFH) on Maui has an impressive track record: 177 homes built for about 450 renters-turnedproudhomeowners. But according to Max Tornai, Habitat’s Director of Development, a truer measure of success lies in sustainability. “We’re striving for long-term success of our ‘partner’ families,” he says. “Our end goal, when we’re able to put a family in a safe house they can afford, is to provide the kind of certainty that comes from having a place you can call your own, and someday hand down to your children. It really is pretty amazing, the stabilizing effect on a family when they know all of them can be together, in one place, for the rest of their lives.” To reinforce sustainability, HFH Maui asks its partner families to invest “sweat equity” in their new home — 500 hours of hands-on participation in its construction so they understand what it takes to build a home, and they’re empowered to do repairs themselves or speak capably with a contractor. HFH Maui also provides homeowner education classes and free consulting services for families that face an unforeseen issue in keeping their home. Max is passionate when he talks about how the community’s generosity has transformed into housing. “People who have given through the Hawai’i Community Foundation (HCF) have already made a huge impact on Maui.

“The combined support of The Haynes Family Fund, Schulenburg Passon Community Fund, and the Kent & Polli Smith Family Fund are enabling us to build 10 new homes in Lahaina, where the housing crisis is particularly acute. The HCF FLEX grant is keeping our lights on and the rent paid, which allows us to divert a resource to where it’s needed most. The Atherton Family Foundation and Fred Baldwin Memorial Foundation are helping us triple our warehouse space for donated building materials that would otherwise be dumped.” Max goes on to say that restoring and reselling these materials will create a sustainable revenue source for HFH Maui. “Habitat Maui is doing amazing work to help low-income families achieve the pride and stability that comes with home ownership. Char and I are happy to support this worthy endeavor through the Schulenburg Passon Community Fund,” adds Gary Passon. Enabling homeownership for lowincome families, creating long-term sustainability, pooling resources to get things done—that’s the big promise of little things. “It really is pretty amazing, the stabilizing effect on a family when they know they can be together, in one place.” – Max Tornai Director of Development Habitat for Humanity on Maui

DID YOU KNOW: In 2017, HCF distributed over $15 million in grants to programs and organizations supporting health and welfare for the people in Hawai‘i. Learn how you can transform your generosity into lasting change at

HawaiiCommunityFoundation.org

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