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2009/10

Annual Report

Helen Bader School of Social Welfare


Inside 2009 / 2010 Annual Report From Dean Stan Stojkovic............................................. 3

Research................................................................... 4 - 10 TCARE® Spreading to Caretakers of Wounded Soldiers, Developmentally Disabled

Crime and Variations in Punishment Keeping Families Together

Teaching.................................................................. 11 - 14 Teaching Through International Studies Programs HBSSW Offers First Online Social Work Courses UWinteriM in New Orleans’ Ninth Ward

Community Engagement.................................. 15 - 24 HBSSW Receives Prestigious National Award HBSSW Evaluates Milwaukee County Drug Treatment Court Use of Force Study Looks at Milwaukee Police Department Closer is Better: CABHR’s New Community Space HBSSW Welcomes the Center on Age & Community

Mission: Improving lives & strengthening communities


Helen Bader School of Social Welfare Awards, Alumni, Donors, Changes, Memoriums..................................................................25 - 38 HBSSW Awards Night Professor Christine Lowery Retires Graduate of the Last Decade (GOLD) Award Alumna of the Year Award Continuing Education and Outreach Programs Alumni Giving Increases In Recognition of Generosity In Memory

through research, education & community partnerships


From Dean Stan Stojkovic . . .

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ere’s a Cliffs Notes version of my letter: Budget is balanced. Enrollments are up. Research is growing. But of course, I have more to say! If the question is “Why is UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare on such rock solid ground?” then the answers are here below.

“Our knowledge and voices are part of the ongoing discussions about the myriad of social welfare topics we face today as a nation, as smaller communities and as individuals.” “This year, our research awards totaled $1.8 million. Per faculty member, HBSSW pulls in more research dollars than any other school on campus!”

“More than 200 agencies in Wisconsin partner with us at any time. Their role in student education is crucial, for they provide the field education that brings to life what we teach in the classroom.” 3

It’s our partner agencies – More than 200 agencies in Wisconsin partner with us at any time. Their role in student education is crucial, for they provide the field education that brings to life what we teach in the classroom. It’s the nature of our research – We work to better understand and address societal issues that affect so many of us: aging, child welfare, conflict resolution, our corrections system, crime, cultural diversity, death and dying, disabilities, economic and social policy, homelessness, poverty, marriage and family, mental health, substance abuse, welfare reform and more. It’s the desire for proven, research results in social welfare – This year, our research awards totaled $1.8 million. That represents significant work on behalf of our faculty. Per faculty member, HBSSW pulls in more research dollars than any other school on campus! It’s because our research is well-respected in the professional world – We publish and present our work extensively to international, national and local professional audiences. For a complete list of this year’s publications, presentations, book chapters and more, visit us online at www.hbssw.uwm.edu. It’s because our voice is part of the lay press – This year, faculty members were quoted in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, AOL, and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. We’ve been on numerous public radio shows and local TV news shows. Our knowledge and voices are part of the ongoing discussions about the myriad of social welfare topics we face today as a nation, as smaller communities and as individuals. We hope you will join us – as supporters, partners, students, faculty, staff – as we continue to make a difference.

Stan Stojkovic, Ph.D. Dean and Professor


Annual Report 2009/10 Helen Bader School of Social Welfare 2400 E. Hartford Avenue P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201 414 229-4851 www.hbssw.uwm.edu Editor Carolyn Bucior Writers Carolyn Bucior Jennifer Clearwater Linda Czernicki Beth Stafford Stan Stojkovic Design Ellen Lafouge Photographers Peter Jakubowski Alan Magayne-Roshak UWM Photo Services Wendy Volz-Daniels

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Research: TCARE® Spreading to Caretakers of Wounded Soldiers and the Developmentally Disabled

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he nation’s highest honor given in the caregiving field was awarded October 20, 2010 to Rhonda Montgomery, the Helen Bader Endowed Chair in Applied Gerontology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare. It is a joint award with the Washington Association of Area Agencies on Aging, in Olympia, WA, who partnered with UWM.

Work is currently underway to bring TCARE® to families caring for wounded soldiers. HBSSW is working with U.S. Army Soldier Family Assistance Centers, located on 27 bases in the United States and Europe. 5

The Rosalynn Carter Leadership in Caregiving Award recognizes leaders who implement community-researcher partnerships that help move evidence-based caregiver support programs out of the realm of research and to the front lines. At the award ceremony at Georgia Southwestern State University, former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, whose commitment to improving caregiver support led her to found the Rosalynn Carter Institute for Caregiving at the university, presented the titular award, a cash award of $20,000 and a statue executed by renowned sculptor Frank Eliscu, best known as the designer of the Heisman trophy. The statue will be displayed throughout Washington, including the governor’s office, before coming to UWM, where it will be on display in the Office of Applied Gerontology. Montgomery and her colleagues designed a protocol in 2007 to ease the burden of people caring for relatives. The protocol – Tailored Caregiver Assessment and Referral, or TCARE® -- initially


was created to guide care managers who work with family members caring for relatives with dementia. That was just the beginning. Recently, TCARE® was adapted to use with family members who care for injured soldiers. The Helen Bader School of Social Welfare is working with U.S. Army Soldier Family Assistance Centers, located on 27 bases in the United States and Europe. A pilot study began in 2010 in which HBSSW is training care managers to use TCARE® at six such centers in Georgia, North Carolina, Texas and Washington. In addition, Montgomery and her team are working with Georgia’s Department of Aging to bring TCARE® to care managers who provide services to people caregiving for the developmentally disabled. “Caregiving for a relative is often stressful and can lead to depression,” says Montgomery. “And sometimes those of us who do it, simply cannot continue without physical and emotional support. But support services and resources for caregivers are not uniformly beneficial.” The strain of caregiving, she notes, often is related more to the emotional aspects than the actual care tasks. “Each person who becomes a caregiver undergoes a systematic process of identity change as they take on more caregiving responsibilities,” she says. “As their caregiving role grows, their relationship with their relative changes in ways that are uncomfortable.” The idea of training professionals who work with caregivers came to Montgomery years ago, when she grew alarmed at the general lack of training for this group nationwide. TCARE® provides care managers with a step-by-step tool to tailor care plans for caregivers. Recent findings from a two-year, multi-site randomized control study concluded that TCARE® impacts both care managers and caregivers. Care managers who used TCARE® reported feeling better about the services they provided, more professional, and more hopeful. Caregivers reported increased positive feelings about caregiving, lower levels of stress and depression, and a diminished likelihood of moving the cared-for person out of the home. The development of TCARE® has been funded by grants from the Helen Bader Foundation, the National Alzheimer’s Association, the Jacob and Valerie Langeloth Foundation and contracts with the states of Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota and Washington.

The nation’s highest honor given in the caregiving field was awarded October 20, 2010 to Rhonda Montgomery, the Helen Bader Endowed Chair in Applied Gerontology. It is a joint award with the State of Washington Association of Area Agencies on Aging, who partnered with UWM.

Rhonda Montgomery (right) receiving the 2010 Rosalynn Carter Leadership in Caregiving Award.

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Crime and Variations in Punishment “We already know crime is unevenly distributed in Milwaukee County, and that factors associated with high crime rates include high unemployment, high rates of poverty, and high rates of low birth-weight babies,” Freiburger says. “We want to uncover variables other than race and gender associated with the punishment of those crimes.We’re examining various Milwaukee communities to see if any factors appear to increase or decrease a convicted person’s length of sentence.”

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ina Freiburger’s research is shedding light on sentencing disparities within the U.S. legal system. “Overall, when it comes to punishment for the same crime, black males are treated the most harshly, black females the least harshly,” says Frieburger, an assistant professor in the Criminal Justice Department. While at UWM, Freiburger’s research has been conducted in undisclosed urban areas in Michigan and Pennsylvania. All studies control for offense severity, prior record, offense type (whether it’s a property, drug or personal crime) and method of conviction (whether the defendant plead guilty or went to trial). Now, she is turning her attention to Milwaukee County, where she is researching whether a crime’s geographic location factors into sentencing. The study is being conducted in partnership with the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office. “We already know crime is unevenly distributed in the county, and that factors associated with high crime rates include high unemployment, high rates

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of poverty, and high rates of low birth-weight babies,” Freiburger says. “We want to uncover variables other than race and gender associated with the punishment of those crimes. We’re examining various Milwaukee communities to see if any factors appear to increase or decrease a convicted person’s length of sentence.” Freiburger’s earlier research, done in an unidentified urban Michigan area, concluded that black women were the most likely to be released on their own recognizance and receive a sentence of probation. “The theory is that they are the group most likely to be the sole providers of child care for minors, more so than whites,” she says. “The judge is trying to avoid the high social costs associated with leaving children without a primary caregiver.” Black males, on the other hand, were the least likely to receive probation. When it came to sentencing, Freiburger asked: how much leniency is granted various groups with childcare duties? The unexpected answer: Neither gender nor race were factors. “What mattered to the judge was whether the defendant was the sole provider to minor children. In fact, men with childcare duties were shown the most leniency.”

Now, Freiburger is turning her attention to Milwaukee County, where she is researching whether a crime’s geographic location factors into sentencing. The study is being conducted in partnership with the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office.

Of females, males, blacks and whites who commit similar crimes and have similar prior records… • Most likely to receive jail sentence (typically one year or less): black males • Most likely to receive prison sentence (typically more than one year): black males • Least likely to get probation: black males • Most likely to be shown leniency from judge because of childcare duties: males • Highest bail amounts: males • Most likely to be released on own recognizance: black females • Least likely to be released on own recognizance: blacks

Freiburger (right, with Stan Stojkovic) received the 2010 HBSSW Criminal Justice Research award. 8


Research Collaboration: Keeping Families Together Few schools or colleges pair criminal justice and social work departments. Yet research collaborations between the two disciplines, such as Keeping Families Together, can paint a broader picture of problems and potential solutions for researchers from both disciplines.

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ew schools or colleges pair criminal justice and social work departments. Yet research collaborations between the two disciplines, such as Keeping Families Together, can paint a broader picture of problems and potential solutions for researchers from both disciplines. Keeping Families Together builds on a previous project titled Women in Jails, which tested a motivational enhancement intervention (a one-shot, low-cost method) to help incarcerated women address substance abuse problems after their release. The current project adds a second layer: the testing of an informational intervention designed to help these women successfully reunite with their children after release. It is funded through the U.S. Department of Justice. “I study substance abuse and child welfare,” says Associate Professor Susan Rose, Social Work, one of two researchers leading Keeping Families Together. “By working with a criminal justice colleague, I am seeing the same population of women from a different perspective.” Her colleague on the study, Assistant Professor Tom LeBel, Criminal Justice, adds, “I’m interested in what we can do to help people be more successful upon release from prison or jail. Collaborating with an expert in social work expands the horizons of what I understand about a woman’s barriers to successful re-entry.” To date, the study has screened more than 50 women who are typically serving sentences between 90 and 180 days at the County Correctional Facility-South for petty crimes related to substance abuse. Most are low-income individuals.


Each woman who elects to participate receives substance abuse screening and a problem-solving intervention to help her access substance abuse treatment services and navigate common hurdles to receiving them. They then receive information designed to help them become better prepared to successfully reunite with their children – tips for how to stay in touch with their children during incarceration (the jail prohibits minor visitors), guidelines of age appropriate behaviors, community resources, and more. “We want to know if this low-tech, humanistic approach has a positive impact,” Rose says. “Society has written off women in jail, and assumes women instinctively know how to parent. The kids suffer for it.” Such collaborations between the Social Work and the Criminal Justice departments also benefit students. Social work graduate students working on this project, for instance, see another set of factors that impact a life. “They see what clients’ lives are really like while they are incarcerated and how this affects them, their children, and the possibility of a permanent reunion,” says Rose.

Above: Tom LeBel and Susan Rose.

“We want to know if this low-tech, humanistic approach has a positive impact,” Rose says. “Society has written off women in jail, and assumes women instinctively know how to parent. The kids suffer for it.”

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Teaching Through International Studies Programs This year, 31 of our students earned credits through study abroad programs with professional colleagues from Bristol, England; Upper Austria University of Applied Science, in Linz, Austria; and the Central American Spanish Academy in Grecia, Costa Rica.

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BSSW is committed to offering our criminal justice and social work students international experiences. We believe that exposure to a variety of cultures, social welfare systems and policies, and treatment models ultimately benefits professionals, clients and society. This year, 31 of our students earned credits through study abroad programs with professional colleagues from Bristol, England; Upper Austria University of Applied Science, in Linz, Austria; and the Central American Spanish Academy in Grecia, Costa Rica. Students who studied in England and Austria compared social welfare policies of their host countries with those of the United States. During the two-week programs, student visits to social service agencies were complemented with lectures and historical side trips hosted by local professors. Also in England, two graduate social work students completed internships within the alcohol and drug abuse treatment services. “The center’s services are based on a


HBSSW Offers First Online Social Work Courses

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or the first time, students were offered online courses from HBSSW. This year, two social work courses were made available online: Child and Family Services, for undergraduate and graduate students in social work and other schools and colleges across the campus; and Psychopathology, a course for graduate social work students. “These courses are lecture style, as opposed to methods courses, and were excellent fits for starting our online education offerings,” says Jeanne Wagner, director of Social Work Field Education. The school has identified other courses that would be appropriate for online education and will expand their offerings in 2010-11.

holistic, harm reduction model, quite different from the U.S. medical model,” says Jeanne Wagner, director of Social Work Field Education. “Treatment is rooted in the belief that AODA problems are, in large part, a social issue. This experience exposes students to a client-centered AODA program model that has had positive outcomes in the UK.” Meanwhile in Grecia, seven students who enrolled in Intensive Spanish for Social Work Practice lived with marvelous host families and spoke only Spanish for three weeks. In small, morning classes they discussed local social problems, including substance addiction, domestic violence, sex and drug trafficking and U.S. influence in Latin America. Their afternoons included lectures on Latin social policy and practice and visits to social service agencies. A highlight was a visit to a barrio of Nicaraguan immigrants, where students spent time playing games and doing art projects with children.

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UWinteriM in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward According to Wendy Volz Daniels, clinical associate professor and lead UWinteriM faculty member for HBSSW, post-Katrina New Orleans is “a powerful place to learn about social and economic injustice, culture, resilience and community.”

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ong after Hurricane Katrina blew out of headline news in the Midwest, the social, personal and economic cleanup continues. During this year’s UWinteriM service learning trip, four HBSSW social work students (along with UWM anthropology students) spent three weeks learning the culture and the challenges facing residents of New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward, a low-income community that was hit extremely hard by the 2005 hurricane. Today, the Ninth Ward continues to draw volunteers to help build homes and create a sustainable community. According to Wendy Volz Daniels, clinical associate professor and lead faculty member for HBSSW, post-Katrina New Orleans is “a powerful place to learn about social and economic injustice, culture, resilience and community.” To get acclimated, students learned the history of the area and her people from faculty at Dillard and Louisiana State universities. They also toured Tulane University’s URBANbuild prototype houses, built by architecture students to be affordable and energy efficient. Then it was time to roll up their sleeves. Social work students scattered to work beside an elementary school social worker and a mental health clinic social worker. They also archived artifacts for the House of Dance and Feathers, a backyard museum that emphasizes the Ninth Ward’s cultural and social history, and collected oral histories of residents for Tulane’s Amistad Research Center. These personal stories of those involved in Hurricane Katrina will be archived at Tulane and UWM. But the crux of the experience was much more. “I began to understand why the community was so strong,” says Carol Carlson, an MSW student. “Understanding the history of New Orleans and the struggles the people of the Ninth Ward have endured helped me appreciate the value they have for their homes and community, and the importance of those connections to their well being. And understanding the sources of strength for a community is necessary to supporting them.”


Notes from UWinteriM student Carol Carlson’s course paper: “When I told a friend I was going to study in New Orleans for a month and focus on resiliency in the Lower Ninth Ward, he described the area as a “hell hole” and wondered why anyone would want to live there…”

“Through this experience, I began to understand the openness, acceptance and deep connectedness of these people of New Orleans …” Carol Carlson, student.

“The residents are helping one another recover, and for these reasons, my friend who called the Lower Ninth Ward a “hell hole” is wrong. Perhaps he only saw the devastation and not a community rich in tradition and bonded together in strength and resiliency.” 14


Community Engagement: HBSSW Receives Prestigious American Public Human Services Association Award

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his year, the American Public Human Services Association awarded HBSSW with its prestigious APHSA Excellence Award. Dean Stan Stojkovic accepted the award at the organization’s annual spring conference in Washington D.C., doing so on behalf of (pictured above) Julie Brown, director of UWM’s Child Welfare Partnership for Professional Development; Gwat-Yong Lie, associate professor of social work and principal investigator for the project; Susan Rose, associate professor and program director; and Steven McMurtry, professor of social work and program director.

The annual award recognizes just one human service, social work or social service department or program at a nationally accredited college or university that has distinguished itself in its academic achievements. The APHSA is a nonprofit, 15


bipartisan organization devoted to policies and practices that improve the health and well-being of families, children and adults. According to Reggie Bicha, secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Children and Families, who nominated the school for the award, the institution’s academically rich and rigorous curriculum has prepared more than one in five case managers, supervisors and administrators in his department’s Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare. Because of HBSSW, Wisconsin’s largest public child welfare agency has been able to recruit highly qualified caseworkers, improve practice and reduce staff turnover, he said. Bicha also credited the school with excellence in training and professional development, foster and adoptive parent training, and quality assurance. The state of Wisconsin and the school have partnered for more than 15 years in efforts to improve professional training of social workers and quality of services to those in need. In 1993, HBSSW created the Child Welfare Training Program to provide child welfare workers the opportunity to complete their MSW degrees with a specialization in public child welfare. The program has served more than 250 participants; about one in five staff members of the Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare and its partner agencies are currently enrolled or have graduated. Another initiative, called the Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership, provides high-quality, competency-based in-service training to child welfare staff who work for the Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare. “We have been able to improve how staff are prepared for very difficult jobs,” says Brown. “This award recognizes the partners who have worked with UWM in all of our efforts to improve services for children and families.”

Photo: (From left) Julie Brown, Gwat-Yong Lie, Susan Rose and Steve McMurtry.

According to Reggie Bicha, secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Children and Families, who nominated the school for the award, the institution’s academically rich and rigorous curriculum has prepared more than one in five case managers, supervisors and administrators in his department’s Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare.

Below is a snapshot of this year’s child welfare training activities within HBSSW: • Trained more than 2,500 case managers and supervisors. • Presented more than 300 days of training to entry-, advanced-, and supervisory-level employees. • Continued to offer MSW degrees to Milwaukee’s child welfare workers (with tuition, fees, stipends and book allowances) bringing the total number to take advantage of this program to 250.

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HBSSW Evaluates Milwaukee County Drug Treatment Court

M According to Judge M. Joseph Donald, the Drug Treatment Court’s central figure, this research is essential. “We need that real, empirical data that will elevate the discussion and allow us to get smarter about how we approach addiction and drug use in our community,” he said. 17

ilwaukee County’s new Drug Treatment Court offers treatment to nonviolent offenders with drug problems in an effort to prevent crime and reduce recidivism. This year, the court asked UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare to provide feedback regarding drug court operations during this period of expansion. Michael Fendrich, director of HBSSW’s Center on Addiction and Behavioral Health Research (CABHR) and William Pelfrey, associate professor of criminal justice, were asked by the Milwaukee County Court and The Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division to evaluate the court’s process and outcomes. Fendrich and the CABHR team understand drug treatment and how to design studies of the court that yield good data; Pelfry, an expert in the criminal justice system, has performed drug court evaluations.


Drug courts – which now number more than 1,800 nationwide – have gained popularity as prison populations and corrections budgets have ballooned. In a drug court, nonviolent adult offenders with drug problems can enter a guilty plea and begin the drug court program, explains Holly Szablewki, the Milwaukee drug court’s judicial review coordinator. Without treatment, addicted inmates typically reoffend after they are released. But studies show lower re-arrest rates among drug court participants compared with offenders in traditional courts. “It behooves the county to rehabilitate them and keep them out of the criminal justice system once and for all,” says Pelfrey. To evaluate Milwaukee’s drug court, Pelfrey and Fendrich have partnered with Justice 2000, a local agency that conducts all drug testing and assessment of drug court participants, and the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division, which supervises treatment. These agencies will share data that allow the researchers to see if the local drug court is adhering to its model and to identify specific areas for improvement, such as the points in the process at which participants are most likely to get stuck. According to Judge M. Joseph Donald, the Drug Treatment Court’s central figure, this research is essential. “We need that real, empirical data that will elevate the discussion and allow us to get smarter about how we approach addiction and drug use in our community,” he says. Milwaukee’s Drug Treatment Court expansion and CABHR’s evaluation are supported by grants from the Bureau of Justice Administration and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). According to Fendrich, key leaders at Milwaukee County Behavior Health, especially Walter Laux and Gena Sausa, play critical roles ensuring high-quality treatment to court clients. “Behavioral health was the primary force behind the SAMHSA grant,” he says, “and that grant provides considerable support for drug treatment court expansion at this critical phase of its development.”

Without treatment, addicted inmates typically reoffend after they are released. But studies show lower re-arrest rates among drug court participants compared with offenders in traditional courts.

William Pelfrey, associate professor of criminal justice and CABHR scientist.

(From left): Carl Ashley, Milwaukee County Drug Treatment Court judge; M. Joseph Donald, former Milwaukee County Drug Treatment Court judge; Larry E. Hopwood, drug treatment court coordinator, Justice 2000; and Michael Fendrich, director of UWM’s Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research.

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Community Engagement: Use of Force Study Looks at Milwaukee Police Department Such studies help open the dialogue between the community and police departments. “It documents reality,” says Steven Brandl. When an agency is willing to open their door, have folks come in and look around, and share real data, then they are willing to change.”

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he expertise of the HBSSW faculty extends beyond the UWM campus. Milwaukee area criminal justice policymakers, for example, tap into our faculty’s knowledge and abilities. Associate Professor Steven Brandl, chair of the Department of Criminal Justice, has made significant contributions in this regard. This year, the Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission requested Brandl to analyze police officers’ use of force. Brandl’s study, “An Analysis of 2009 Use of Force Incidents in the Milwaukee Police Department,” found that officers used force (defined as anything from using physical force, to using pepper spray, a Taser, or duty weapon) in 1.07 percent of arrests in 2009, which contrasted sharply with the public’s perception. “The use of force was lower than expected, and in line with other city police departments,” Brandl says.


Such studies help open the dialogue between the community and police departments. “It documents reality,” Brandl says. “When an agency is willing to open their door, have folks come in and look around, and share real data, then they are willing to change.” Brandl will repeat the study using 2010 statistics. Brandl’s landmark Milwaukee gun study, funded by the Joyce Foundation, found that in Milwaukee people who are legally prohibited from buying or possessing guns have easy access to them at Badger Outdoors, a gun shop located in West Allis. Among his findings: 41 percent of guns confiscated by police during criminal investigations in 2005 came from felons and juveniles, two groups that are legally prohibited from gun purchase and possession. And the runaway seller of those guns was Badger Outdoors. “The gun market in Milwaukee is primarily local,” Brandl says. “This means undercover sting operations may have a major impact.” Brandl also has consulted with police agencies in Waukesha, Glendale, and Whitefish Bay. He has been involved in the hiring and promotional processes for the Milwaukee Police Department and Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission, and is still an active member of the Milwaukee Homicide Review Commission. In other studies, he has examined issues related to police officers’ workload and evaluated numerous school-based initiatives designed to reduce violence in Milwaukee Public Schools. Despite his busy schedule, Brandl – who is now investigating the history of murder in Milwaukee -- takes time to meet with students to discuss class, research, work, and criminal justice in general. Stated one student, “His contributions as a role model have helped me and others to develop in the workplace and in the field.”

Steven Brandl’s landmark Milwaukee gun study, funded by the Joyce Foundation, found that in Milwaukee, people who are legally prohibited from buying or possessing guns have easy access to them at Badger Outdoors, a gun shop located in West Allis.

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Closer is Better: Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research Inserts New Step Before Collecting Data The Community Research Center’s cornerstone project is called Stories to Tell, which Michael Fendrich says lays the foundation for significant, community-based research and growth. This study, which seeks to explain the epidemiology of trauma and related substance abuse among women in Milwaukee housing projects, is being led by Associate Professor Laura Otto-Salaj and is funded by a $2.9 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. 21

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ocation. Location. Location. That’s why one new campus research space is so extraordinary.

A research arm of the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare’s Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research (CABHR) settled into new quarters at 1849 N. Martin Luther King Drive this summer. Office space was renovated, community partnerships were formed and finally, CABHR’s new Community Research Center held a celebratory open house for UWM employees and the community last fall. “The new Community Research Center will foster deeper engagement with area residents, benefiting the community and CABHR’s research agenda. This is UWM’s mission,” said UWM’s then-Provost Rita Cheng at the packed open house. CABHR currently holds nearly $3 million in research grants. The Community Research Center provides researchers with a site to conduct epidemiological and


clinical research as well as intervention. The key is the new location – a site that likely will help community participants feel more comfortable than an on-campus site. “Research might be simpler and faster if scientists ignored issues of cultural differences and didn’t involve the community in shaping their research,” says CABHR director Michael Fendrich. “But research that involves the community is more accurate and can lead to more insightful policy recommendations.” The Community Research Center’s cornerstone project is called Stories to Tell, which Fendrich says lays the foundation for significant, community-based research and growth. This study, which seeks to explain the epidemiology of trauma and related substance abuse among women in Milwaukee housing projects, is being led by Associate Professor Laura Otto-Salaj and is funded by a $2.9 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “We devoted the first year to learning about the community and neighborhood in which these women live,” Otto-Salaj says, adding that she and her research team attended multiple meetings and events in order to establish a relationship with community leaders and get their feedback. Only then did the data collecting proceed. “We’re establishing long-term relationships, not just for this study but for others in the future.” Among the community groups who spoke to the open house audience were TRUE Skool, a non-profit youth organization that helps high-risk teens engage with, and improve, communities through their own art. “All of this brings us closer to the community we want to serve. It’s reality based,” says Fendrich. “It’s an exciting time for CABHR and this space is making it happen.”

“All of this brings us closer to the community we want to serve. It’s reality based,” says Michael Fendrich. “It’s an exciting time for CABHR and this space is making it happen.”

Laura Otto-Salaj, (right), associate professor of social work and CABHR scientist.

For more information: Michael Fendrich, director of CABHR, fendrich@uwm.edu, www.uwm.edu/cabhr

(Photo, top) Michael Fendrich, (right), director of CABHR, at the Community Research Center open house. (Photo right), Michael Fendrich, Michael Brondino and Eric Gresnick. 22


Welcome Center on Age & Community A core belief guides the center: innovation happens through conversations across boundaries of practice and research, as well as across traditional disciplinary boundaries. CAC researchers and students come from fields including nursing, the arts, architecture, psychology, sociology, social work, educational psychology, education, film, history, and human movement sciences. This coming year, the CAC is embarking on more innovative projects. To learn more, visit www. ageandcommunity.org. 23

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e are delighted to welcome an addition to our school -the Center on Age & Community. Established in October 2001, the CAC has made a name for itself across the nation with its innovative models of person-centered dementia care through targeted applied research projects and consulting. The CAC combines the expertise of UWM faculty and students with the experiences of those who work in the field of aging to create innovative ways of improving our lives as we age. A core belief guides the center: innovation happens through conversations across boundaries of practice and research, as well as across traditional disciplinary boundaries. CAC researchers and students come from fields including nursing, the arts, architecture, psychology, sociology, social work, educational psychology, education, film, history, and human movement sciences. Creative, social engagement can help improve the quality of lives of people with dementia and those who care for them. CAC is a national leader in this area of research, education and collaboration, much due to the generous and visionary support of the Helen Bader Foundation. (Helen Bader believed ardently in the potential for the


One of the CAC’s primary goals is to remove barriers that prevent students from studying gerontology. To this end, the CAC Graduate Certificate in Applied Gerontology offers students in various disciplines the opportunity to integrate aging policy and practice into their primary fields of study. These students are eligible for the Helen Bader Age & Community Scholarship Program, which has awarded more than $430,000 since 2001. arts, particularly music and dance, to improve the lives of people with dementia.) For example, the CAC is the home to the national TimeSlips creative storytelling project developed by the CAC’s Director Anne Basting in 1998. The TimeSlips method opens storytelling to everyone by replacing the pressure to remember with encouragement to imagine. For more about Timeslips visit www.timeslips.org. One of the CAC’s primary goals is to remove barriers that prevent students from studying gerontology. To this end, the CAC Graduate Certificate in Applied Gerontology offers students in various disciplines the opportunity to integrate aging policy and practice into their primary fields of study. These students are eligible for the Helen Bader Age & Community Scholarship Program, which has awarded more than $430,000 since 2001. CAC has helped produce unique educational tools from its many applied research projects, and distributes those products through its online ordering system. From the free, downloadable white papers from CAC’s many Next Step Think Tanks to the TimeSlips StoryKit, a beautifully designed kit containing 50 images for storytelling, CAC’s products are written to translate complex research into inviting and inspirational formats.

2010-2011 Helen Bader Age & Community Scholarship Awardees: • Christine Block • Melissa Brown • Melanie Contrestan • Christopher Dondzila • Lynettte Duley • Jennifer Fiscal • Kelly Gaglione • Addie Johnson • Sara Kruschke • Jessica Kurz • Mark Proffitt • Susannah Rotter

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HBSSW Awards Night

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n May, HBSSW held its second annual awards ceremony. This upbeat event recognized outstanding students, alumni, field partners, faculty and staff. Keynote speaker Dan Bader, president of the Helen Bader Foundation and Helen Bader’s youngest son, gave a memorable talk that brought listeners into the world of philanthropic decision making and the deep rewards of such work. Congratulations to the following award recipients.

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Alumni Award: Claudette McShane Field Instructor of the Year Awards: Shari Rather, Waukesha County Department of Health and Human Services; Dick Kaufmann, Kenosha Human Development Services; Linda Schmeling, Milwaukee Public Schools; Lori Boesel, 211 Impact Field Agency of the Year Awards: Mobile Urgent Treatment Team; Milwaukee Public Schools Donor of the Year Award: The Brico Fund HBSSW Student Scholarships – Departments of Criminal Justice and Social Work: • HBSSW Alumni/Vega-Will Scholarship: Michelle McKenna • Lucetta O. Bissell Graduate Scholarship: Rebecca Kanitz • Don & Helen Banta Scholarship: Kellie Simmons • Helen C. Carey Trust Scholarship: Julie Lauters • Catherine S. Chilman Family Studies: Heather Saunders • Dean’s New Freshman Scholarship: Tia Renier


• GMAR Youth Foundation Scholarship: Ellis Stephens • Harry & Esther Kovenock Scholarship: Janean Weitzer • Kathleen Scheller Memorial Scholarship: Joanne Anderson • SW Community Organization Scholarship: Andrea Kurth • Laura Tice Memorial Scholarship: Brian Flynn • UWinteriM in New Orleans Scholarship: Carol Carlson, Holly Wasechek • National Organization for Black Law Enforcement Scholarship: Leon Walker-Mets • Robert L. Stonek Memorial Scholarship: Danielle Romain, Neil Verburgt Faculty and Staff Awards: • School Service Award – Social Work: Gwat-Yong Lie • School Service Award – Criminal Justice: Steve Brandl • Research Award – Criminal Justice: Tina Freiburger • Teaching Award – Social Work: Lisa Berger • Teaching Award – Criminal Justice: Michael Durfee • Random Acts of Kindness Awards: Mary Briggs, Kathy Mulder, Grant Witte • Dean’s Merit Award: Diane Miller Student Awards*: • Criminal Justice Undergraduate Award: Jennifer Hanson • Criminal Justice Graduate Student Award: Danielle Romain • Criminal Justice TA/PA/RA Award: Stephanie Sikinger • Social Work Undergraduate Award: Annie Pothour • Social Work Graduate Student Award: John Pilmaier • Social Work TA/PA/RA Award: Maggie Wallendal Chancellor’s Graduate Student Award – Social Work: Alexandra Le Capitaine, Christina Clark, Kelly Hesse, Rachel Mittag, Olfa Zweifel Chancellor’s Graduate Student Award – Criminal Justice: Danielle Romain University Awards: Employee Development Award: Heidi Janzen, Dimitri Topitzes University of Wisconsin System’s 2010 Outstanding Women of Color in Education Award: Christine Lowery Graduate of the Last Decade: Cathleen Pollock * These awards were made possible by a $5,000 earmarked gift from the Helen Bader Foundation.

Opposite page, (top to bottom), Andrea Kurth and Melissa Nimke, grants manager, Brico Fund; Jung Kwak, (left) assistant professor, department of social work, with banquet guests; Dean Stan Stojkovic with Diane Miller, Assistant Dean of Students. This page, (top to bottom), Dan Bader; Michael Durfee; Danielle Romain.

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Retired: Christine Lowery, Associate Professor, Social Work

A member of the Hopi and Laguna Tribes (Southwest), Christine Lowery was committed to advancing women and diversity in higher education.

Christine Lowery in Costa Rica during the HBSSW summer study program.

In 2010, the University of Wisconsin System recognized her significant contributions by awarding her with an Outstanding Women of Color in Education Award.

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C

hristine Lowery, associate professor, social work, retired this year. During her 13 years of service to the university, she distinguished herself through her research, community engagement and outstanding teaching abilities. Lowery’s research centered on areas of human rights and social justice, in particular on Native American Women in recovery, Native American elders, and shared power as a framework for professional practice and community building. She connected her research to the community in tangible ways -- working with Milwaukee area organizations on issues including Native Americans and aging, Indian child welfare, domestic violence, sexual abuse, and the recovery process in addictions and substance abuse. In 2009, Lowery received UWM’s Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching Award, an award which she values highly. She was known for mentored writing; each course she taught had 25 writing assignments, all of which were graded with feedback intended to hone writing and shape social work values and attitudes. A member of the Hopi and Laguna Tribes (Southwest) Lowery, who earned her doctoral degree from the University of Washington, Seattle, was committed to advancing women and diversity in higher education. She was a faculty affiliate and member of the Curriculum Committee of the Women’s Studies Program, as well as an affiliate with the American Indian Studies faculty in UWM’s College of Letters and Science. In 2010, the University of Wisconsin System recognized her significant contributions by awarding her with an Outstanding Women of Color in Education Award. Lowery continues her research with the elders of her tribe in New Mexico.


7* * Number of HBSSW

criminal justice faculty.

27* * Number of HBSSW

social work faculty.

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Graduate of the Last Decade (gold) Cathleen Pollock, ’00 MSW, ’97 BS Social Work

8%* Percent increase in * undergraduate admissions to HBSSW in 2010/11 compared with 2009/10. 29

P

eer recognition carries a lot of weight and this year’s recipient of the GOLD Award, Cathleen Pollock, has known that honor several times. For her contributions to the field, she’s receive both the Wisconsin School Social Worker of the Year award (from the Wisconsin School Social Workers Association) and the School Social Work of the Year award (from Milwaukee Public Schools). In her nomination for that honor, Pollock’s supervisors stated, “She goes above and beyond the usual school social work expectations and is creative in her approach with students and families.” Pollack’s work with MPS has included: establishing mentoring groups for boys and girls to provide positive role models; linking MPS to community agencies to provide an ongoing community clothing bank; connecting school families with mental health, addiction and other community programs; providing field placements to HBSSW social work graduate students; and mentoring new school social workers. She also advocated for the advancement of school social work by serving as a board member for the Wisconsin School Social Workers Association for a decade. In fall 2009, HBSSW named Pollock as its MPS liaison to its social work program. In this role, she helps identify field instructors and coordinates a monthly seminar for graduate students, in which she introduces them to MPS.


Alumna of the Year Claudette McShane, ’77 MSW, ’74 BS Social Work

T

he Alumni of the Year award recognizes a graduate who has distinguished himself or herself through career accomplishments or civic involvement. Claudette McShane’s impressive history in bringing about social change began with her work as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in Brazil at a school for the developmentally disabled. Upon her return to the United States, she received her undergraduate and graduate degrees in social work at UWM and a Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University. McShane went on to co-found Milwaukee’s first shelter for battered women and their children – Sojourner Truth House -- and became its first executive director. She added the Batterers Anonymous program for education and treatment of perpetrators of domestic violence and secured more than $2 million in funding. McShane wrote Warning, Dating May be Hazardous to Your Health, a book which presents dating violence as an equal opportunity problem. At Carroll University, she served as department chair, director of the social work program, director of the Institute for Hispanic Health and Human Services, and grant writer, securing millions of dollars in federal and regional monies. Currently, McShane is a private consultant specializing in grant proposal.

HBSSW Alumni Board,

2010/2011:

• Angie Brunhart • Sandra Chavez • Tobias Libber • Marty Ordinans • Maxine Spears Winston • Daniel Tushaus • Barbara Weber Advisory: John Bartel Jennifer Clearwater

HBSSW Alumni Board,

2009/2010:

• Angie Brunhart • Sandra Chavez • Gwendolyn Gehl • Rachele Klassy • Raymond Konz-Krzyminski • Tobias Libber • Greg Peterson 30


Continuing Education -- On the Road for 2009/2010 By Linda Czernicki, Director, Continuing Education and Outreach Programs

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his academic year, the Continuing Education and Outreach Program continued to offer courses at UWM and at worksites. Plus, we branched out to offer online programs to social work and criminal justice professionals.

Throughout the year, Continuing Education and Outreach was on the road, bringing customized training to worksites. We’ve customized the course Boundaries and Ethics for the social workers at Willowglen Academy and Bell Therapy, and the Zablocki VA Medical Center. In addition, we partnered with the Center for Self Sufficiency - VOW To Succeed Program on healthy relationships. Interested in attending one of our workshops or having a customized on-site program specific to your agency? Contact Linda Czernicki, Program Manager, Helen Bader School of Social Welfare: 414-229-6329; or czernick@uwm.edu. 31

For social work professionals, we offered more than 20 trainings on topics ranging from substance abuse to spirituality. These attracted more than 400 social workers throughout Wisconsin and Illinois. Our three most popular courses? Spirituality in Social Work, A Rock and a Hard Place: Mental Illness and Co-morbid Substance Abuse, and Contemporary Professional Boundaries and Ethics, a basic course mandated by the state of Wisconsin. We also began to offer tailored workshops that address specific ethical concerns, such as boundaries and ethics for persons working with in-home clients, and for social work supervisors. For police officers, we offered a certification course for those interested in enhancing their teaching skills, which met the requirements of the Law Enforcement Standards Board. Throughout the year, CE was on the road, bringing customized training to worksites. We’ve customized the course Boundaries and Ethics for the social workers at Willowglen Academy and Bell Therapy, and the Zablocki VA Medical Center. In addition, we partnered with the Center for Self Sufficiency - VOW To Succeed Program on healthy relationships. At the request of Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Hospice and Circle of Life Foundation, we co-sponsored a conference on hospice care titled, Dying Well: Human Development Through End of Life. Finally, we collaborated with our own school’s Center on Age and Community to offer “Time Slips” training and with the Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health to offer on- campus brown-bag seminars on several topics. Next up? Look for our online courses. Our CE program received a stipend to develop its first online workshop this year and we’re excited to introduce Supervisory Skills for Social Workers in spring 2011.


Alumni Giving Increases in 2009/2010 By Jennifer Clearwater, Director of Development

T

he number of donations to the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare was up in the 2009-10 academic year, largely due to increased support from our alumni. This year, 3.6 percent of alumni made donations, up from 2.6 percent last academic year. That is a noteworthy jump – thank you! In a time of dwindling state support, your donations help us do more for our current students and research initiatives. We are very grateful for every dollar.

Judy Kramer (BS ’94, MSW ’97) is behind one gift that we were especially humbled to have received: the confirmation of her intent to leave a six-figure planned gift to the school. This endowment will establish the Judy Kramer Scholarship for Bilingual Students. Judy works as an emergency room social worker in a western suburb of Chicago. She shared that having a mother who is from an immigrant family has helped her to be sensitive to the needs of the non-English speaking clients with whom she works in crisis situations. However, the lack of available bilingual social workers prevents many of these clients from being able to follow up with needed services. Judy believes that increasing the number of bilingual social work students will be a continued goal for the social work field. Since bilingual social work students may have difficulty paying for college, Judy wants to lessen their college costs with this scholarship. Thank you very much, to Judy and all our amazing alumni, for your dedication to your profession, your volunteerism, and your philanthropy, to HBSSW and elsewhere. We are very proud of you, and we are very proud to be your alma mater.

Judy Kramer (BS ’94, MSW ’97) with her aunt, Violet Conte.

To make an online gift, visit our website at: www.hbssw.uwm.edu. Click on Alumni and Friends. For information on other ways to donate contact: Jennifer Clearwater Director of Development Helen Bader School of Social Welfare Phone: (414) 229-2415 Email: jenwater@uwm.edu

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In Recognition of Generosity Chapman Society Members of the Chapman Society have informed us that they intend to leave a gift to the UWM Foundation (for the benefit of HBSSW) in their estate plans. Anonymous Paul Kovenock Judith Kramer ‘94, ‘97 Karen Morauski ‘83 Aileen Rockjordan ‘61 Stan Stojkovic

Chancellor’s Society Members of the Chancellor’s Society made gifts or pledges of $1,000 or more to HBSSW during the 2009-10 fiscal year. Anonymous The Banta Revocable Living Trust Direct Supply Inc. Extendicare Foundation, Inc. Helen Bader Foundation, Inc. Sharon Keigher Max & Kay Kurz Gwat-Yong Lie ‘80 & Steven McMurtry Christine Lowery & Mark Mattaini Julia ‘67 & William Malooly Karen Morauski ‘83 Retirement Research Foundation Mark & Sandra Scheller Robert Scheller, Jr. Stan Stojkovic Wisconsin Representatives of Activity Professionals 33

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he Helen Bader School of Social Welfare is grateful to the individuals and organizations whose contributions support our students, mission, and programs.

Donors - Alumni & Friends of HBSSW Diana Ahmad Gail Albergottie ’95 Arlie Albrecht ’75 Sally Ali ’77 Anonymous Donations Margaret Anunson Joyce ’82, ’85 & Steven Appel AT&T Foundation Kurt & Joyce Baker Mary ’78, ’80 & Donald Balchunas Jeffrey & Janine Bamberger Denise ’96 & Robert Bartlett Gita Baruah Susan Bayer-Jabb Georgia Becker ’76 & David Lorenz Carol Beckerleg ’86 Darcia Behrens ’81 Carolyn Bell ’02 Gale ’83 & James Berry Willie Bethune ’79 Jay ’87 & Ellen Blankenship Heidi Blumberg ’83, ’85 Suzanne & Kenneth Braden Steven Brandl Angela ’86 & John Brannan Bert & Patricia Briceno Mary Brill ’90 Julie Brown Rachel Brugman ’05 Harry Brzeski ’61 Carolyn Bucior

Sandra Budny ’73 Linda Burris ’83, ’87 Christopher Campbell ’88 Jay Carpenter ’02 Linda ’99 & James Carter III Katherine Castaneda ’02 Maria Champagne ’90, ’95 & William Ouimet James Chinavare ’06 Michael Chmielewski ’76 Benon Chomicki ’05, ’07 Carol Ciesielski Moore ’71 Andrew Cieslewicz ’06 Steve Cincotta ’89 Barbara Claybaugh ’77 Jennifer Clearwater Janis Cohn ’81 & Stephen Hargarten Linda Combes ’69 Mary Coulson ’47, ’65 Melissa Cronick ’08 J. Sheppard Crumrine ’99 & Mary Bednarik Linda Czernicki Michael ’98 & Kelly Czerwonka Joanne Damico-Grajczyk ’81 & Gary Grajczyk Rick Davey ’80 & Mary Jo Caminiti ’83 Martha Degraw ’81 Diane DePanfilis ’82 John Williams, III ’84 & Ramona Dicks-Williams Mary Walker Dillmann ’07 Jed Dolnick ’78


2009/2010 Donors - Alumni & Friends of HBSSW Paul Drellos ’76 John Drexler ’92 Michael Durfee ’84, ’88 & Patricia Kragh-Durfee James Durnil ’87 & Kathleen Gale Alexander Durtka, Jr. ’73 & Sharon Durtka Richard Eaton ’76 Diane Edwards ’82 Steven Eigen ’68 Melissa Emberts ’89 Dale ’71 & Judy Faesi Jerianne Feiten ’89 Michael Fendrich Irene Fiacchino-Symes ’94 Paul Florsheim Donna Foote ’04 Cheryl Frey ’00 Lynn ’78 & Gerard Froh Teresa Full ’92 Susan Garny ’89 Kristine Gauger ’77 John & Joanne Gehlbach Karlene Gehler ’77 Amber Gierach ’05 Patricia Gilbertson ’77 Jean ’77 & Daniel Gilman Karen Gorske ’76, ’77 Rachelle Gramann ’06, ’09 Marybeth Guagliardo ’97 Darlene ’55 & Frank Guernsey Edward Gumz ’65 Doria Haering & Steven Luedtke Adrienne Ahlgren Haeuser Debra Hagen ’77, ’85 Patrick Haggarty ’66 Karen Handrich ’95 Jennifer Hanson ’03 Roberta Hanus Diane Harris ’82

Elizabeth Hartman ’84 Jennifer Hauser-Olejniczak ’04 Ernest Herre ’63 Pamela ’68 & Bradley Hext Betty Hickey Ruane & Marie Hill Donald Holub ’56 Marie Hornes ’91 Cynthia ’78 & Michael Hosale Hospital Pathology Associates PA Mary Hunter ’92, ’95 Heidi Janzen Kristin Jensen ’91 Jeffery Johnson ’69 Rebecca Johnson ’08 Terri Kading-Wheeler ’89 Mark ’82 & Laurie Kadunc Goldie Kadushin & Steven Morrison Carla Kaminski ’89 Lonna ’80, ’83 & Ricky Kannenberg Gretchen Kapperman ’01 Elizabeth Katz ’08 Mari Katz Christopher Keadle ’81 Mary Kearney ’67 Margaret Keshena ’91 Vanessa Key ’84 Renee King ’99 Marilyn Kirchoff Jane Kirkpatrick ’74 Dean Kirst ’81 Joseph Kleiber ’72 Thomas Klein ’62 Georgeann Knier ’01 Carol Knight ’79 Bonnie Knippel ’91 Dione Knop ’90, ’97 Richard Kohloff ’95 34


In Recognition of Generosity

The accuracy of this list is very important to us. If we have listed your information incorrectly, please inform our director of development, Jennifer Clearwater, at (414) 229-2415, or via email at jenwater@uwm.edu. 35

James Koleas ’82 Laura Kolp Paul Konkol ’93 Wendy Kosikowski ’82 Debra Koval ’79 Carol Kozminski Susan Krebs ’67 Mary Kressin Robert ’70 & Kris Kreuziger Fredlyn Kruglak-Viel ’72 & John Viel Ellen Kupfer ’82 Scott Kurtz ’96 Ellyn ’76, ’79 & Maurice Laessig Lydia Lague Jennifer Landry ’03 Kathryn Langley-Arnold Marcia Larson ’71 James ’85 & Patricia Lawton Cynthia Le Clair ’81 Jennifer ’96 & B. Allen Lee Xao Lee ’05 Dominic ’76, ’88 & Donna Leone Frieda Levine ’75, ’83 Robert Lewein ’60, ’61 Joseph Liberto ’52 Peter Lieven ’79 Mary Linton ’67 Frederick Locke ’54 Susan Loeher ’65 Judith Lozier Elliot Lubar ’68, ’69 Luther Manor Bruce & Janice Maas Ellen Maas ’89 Fiona Gordon MacLeod ’78, ’82 Richard MacNally ’82 Mary Madden ’88 Judy Maersch ’91 Patricia Makens ’69

Michelle Mallmann ’09 Patrick ’73 & Mary Malloy Katie Mangan ’86 Allan ’68, ’69 & Marti Marino Francisco ’76 & Elizabeth Martorell James Martz ’76 Charlotte Mayfield ’03, ’05 Kim Mays ’89 Stephanie McAlister ’95, ’98 Tamara McConnell ’05 Norm ’75 & Nancy McLure Lori McNally ’87, ’95 Eric Meaux ’92, ’97 Elizabeth Ortiz Meister ’92 Daysi Mendoza ’02, ’06 Kathleen Menocal ’90 Daniel Meyer ’09 Gary Mijal ’76 Diane & Gale Miller Walter Mirk ’76 Debbie Mitchell ’77 Craig Modahl ’99 Claudia Moll ’76, ’78 Rhonda & Michael Montgomery Walt ’70, ’72 & Patricia Morzy Teresa Mueller ’68 Lois Mulkey ’90 Kristen Munson ’08 Joan Naegeli ’80 Paul ’76 & Holly Nannis Mary Narges ’99 Helen Navarre ’60, ’62 Mary Neubauer ’06 Jeanne Wagner Newton Claire ’85 & Jeffrey Nilsson Mary Nimmer ’91 Daniel Nolan ’78 F. Richard & Arlene Noodleman Amy O’Brien ’01


James & Christine O’Brien Julie Offutt Richard Olaciregui ’88 Allyson ’86 & Dan Olivier Joseph Olsen ’75 Janice ’78 & Arthur Olson Martin ’78 & Karen Ordinans Laura Otto-Salaj Deborah Padgett Katie Parpart ’07 Lisa Patrick ’06 Wendy Patz-Hutwagner ’93 Susan Pauls ’00 Elizabeth Peacock Leroy ’80 & Wendy Peche Denise Penn ’89, ’93 Susan Perry ’79 Deborah Peterman ’91 Greg Peterson ’80, ’92 Heather Pfeifer ’93, ’95 John Phelps ’73 Andrew Phillips ’84 Jeffrey Pitman ’87 Anna Pleas ’93, ’97 Wayne Poburka ’95 Jeanette Poole ’83 Laura Price ’78, ’82 Alan Quosig ’91 Christine Rahn ’75 Jeannine Rapko ’73, ’77 Catherine Redding ’93 Curtis Reid ’77 Patricia Reinhardt ’78 Kyesha Rembert ’00 Terry Rhodes-Carter ’72, ’74 Anne Roberts Karen Roberts ’79 Mary Rohr ’69 Douglas Rose ’77 Lavera Rose

Susan Rose Chris ’72 & Felicia Rosland Rena Safer ’64 Barbara Salfer-Larson & Thomas Larson Joann Sallmann ’91 Calley Savage ’89 Kyra Schallhorn ’96 Armin Schenk ’68 Jennifer Schmitz ’97 Christine Schneider ’93 Cynthia Schneider ’69 Michael Serio ’77 Mary Shelley ’64 Sarah Sheridan ’91 James Sherwood ’95 Stephanie Sikinger ’09 Erick Slamka ’75 John Sliga ’76 Shelly Smith-Payant ’94 James Sobek ’76 Marion Sobieski ’77 Philip & Kathleen Sobocinski Dale Sorensen ’69 Carrie Sorg ’08 Samuel & Mary Beth Sparks Ann Spurgeon ’85 David Steingraber ’74 Jane ’73 & Gerald Steingraeber Barbara Stohl ’80 Milan Stojkovic ’90, ’00 Judith Strauss ’64 Victoria Streich ’96 Susan Strojny ’89, ’94 Jeffrey Sturm ’83 Jean Sweetland ’87 Janet Tenge ’69, ’70 Judith ’69 & Stanley Teplin Cynthia Terrill ’78 Lionel Thalke ’56

Brian Theiler ’82 Antoinette Thompson ’85 Curtis Thompson, Jr. & Barbara Thompson Rebecca Thompson ’97 Judith Tolkan Jose Torres ’72 & Miriam Oliensis-Torres ’81 Wendy Tupper ’72 Gerald Urbik ’89 Corinthia Van Orsdol Vincent ’98 & Cynthia Vitale Mark ’70 & Arlene ’69, ’70 Voelz Carol Wacker ’72, ’76 Cheryl Walker-Lloyd ’87 Mark Walters ’78 Robert Watts ’54, ’58 Marilyn ’78 & Donald Weber Jo Weigandt ’91 Gary Weitzel ’76 Jacqueline Berry West Marlene Widen ’76 Leann Wielebski ’75, ’84 Emma Williams ’83 Maxine Winston ’85 Wisconsin Energy Foundation Kathleen Wolfgram ’08 Mary Wright ’01 Melissa Zarczynski ’00 Linda Zik ’87 Karen ’90 & Robert Zimmerman Leonard Zukrow ’73

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William Berg

In Memory of . . . By Stan Stojkovic, Dean, Helen Bader School of Social Welfare

P

eople who work with me know one of my favorite phrases is “Let’s move forward.” But there’s a time to look backward. This academic year, four members of our community passed away and I’d like to take a moment to honor their memories.

Elam Nunnally outside Enderis Hall.

Beverly Goudy 37

In July 2009, we said goodbye to Carl Pope. When he joined the faculty here in 1975, Carl was one of only two faculty members in Criminal Justice. When he retired 33 years later as a full professor, he was one of seven. Carl helped grow the school in many ways, among them helping to create a master’s program in criminal justice and serving as chair for several years. In September 2009, we lost Beverly Goudy, described by her coworkers as “an amazing person who touched you even in small talk” and “a person that gave you strength, inspiration and encouragement.” Beverly was a valued member of the campus community and most recently worked as a university service program associate in the school’s Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership for Professional Development. Bill Berg passed away in December 2009. Bill was a professor of social work in the school for 37 years and is


Carl Pope

missed by the many people who knew the pleasure of working with him. Bill was a voracious reader, a tennis player, a cook, a quick wit and a dear friend to many of his coworkers. This February, we said goodbye to Elam Nunnally. Elam is fondly remembered as a kind and gentle man, and internationally recognized as a founding member of solutionfocused therapy. He was a professor of social work for many years and after his retirement, he continued counseling clients and teaching part time for us. Thanks to the efforts of Professor Goldie Kadushin (Social Work), Elam will be honored by inclusion on the Spaights Plaza marker, a major institutional honor by which UWM pays tribute to colleagues who have made significant and lasting contributions to the university. His contributions to the understanding of solution-based therapy, and the international awareness of it, enhanced the reputation of our school as a destination for clinical education. The Helen Bader School of Social Welfare moves forward because of the many contributions these four people have made to our school and to our lives. They brought enormous contributions to our school and they were good friends. They will be missed.

You can make a donation in the name of Carl Pope, Beverly Goudy, Bill Berg or Elam Nunnally: By mail: Make out your check to the “UWM Foundation” and specify in the memo line or in an enclosed note which member of the HBSSW family you would like your gift to honor. Gifts will be deposited into the School’s Graduate Social Work Scholars Fund, unless otherwise designated by you. Mail to: UWM HBSSW, Attn: Jennifer Clearwater, Enderis Hall Room 1098, P.O. Box 786, Milwaukee, WI 53201 On-line: Visit our web site at: www.hbssw.uwm.edu. Click on Alumni and Friends.

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Helen Bader School of Social Welfare P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201 www.hbssw.uwm.edu


Helen Bader School of Social Welfare, 2009-2010 Annual Report