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Helen Bader School of

Social Welfare

Criminal Justice & Social Work


UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare Two Departments, Two Growing Professions

Mission

Improving lives

and strengthening communities

through research, education and community partnerships.

Vision

We will be an engaged

community of scholars recognized

for excellence, innovation and the

Stan Stojkovic

T

he U.S. Department of Labor’s most recent statistics state that the country will need more social workers and criminal justice professionals in coming years. Job opportunities are expected to be excellent in both professions. For social welfare students, this means a wide range of meaningful career options awaits them. For those who support or work with us, it means doing so during a critical time. UWM is an ideal place for social welfare students and faculty to study, research and work. Our school is located on the campus of a major research university, itself nestled in a charming neighborhood in the state’s largest city. Since our humble beginnings in 1965 to today, UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare has educated and prepared students for entry-level and advanced careers in human service professions. We’ve continually advanced knowledge regarding social welfare issues, and provided quality services to people in need. Our alumni work to make a difference in the lives of people who are oftentimes dispirited and in despair. As a group, our graduates help to improve policies, solve the vital social issues of our time, and are a strong voice for thoughtful, social change in our society. We hope you will join us -- as students, faculty, staff, supporters, or partners -- to help make a difference. Sincerely,

Stan Stojkovic, PhD Dean and Professor UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare

Our Programs at a Glance Criminal Justice

Master of Science Areas of concentration in the following: Law Enforcement Corrections Administration Bachelor of Science

development of outstanding professionals in criminal justice and social work.

Certificate Programs Death Investigation Forensic Science Forensic Toxicology

Social Work

Doctor of Philosophy Areas of specialization in the following: Addiction and Behavioral Health Applied Gerontology Family and Child Welfare Master of Social Work Areas of concentration in the following: Behavioral and Physical Health Gerontology Child and Family Welfare Bachelor of Social Work Certificate Programs Applied Gerontology Marriage and Family Therapy Non-Profit Management School Social Work Alcohol and Other Drug Addictions


UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare Two Departments, Two Growing Professions

Mission

Improving lives

and strengthening communities

through research, education and community partnerships.

Vision

We will be an engaged

community of scholars recognized

for excellence, innovation and the

Stan Stojkovic

T

he U.S. Department of Labor’s most recent statistics state that the country will need more social workers and criminal justice professionals in coming years. Job opportunities are expected to be excellent in both professions. For social welfare students, this means a wide range of meaningful career options awaits them. For those who support or work with us, it means doing so during a critical time. UWM is an ideal place for social welfare students and faculty to study, research and work. Our school is located on the campus of a major research university, itself nestled in a charming neighborhood in the state’s largest city. Since our humble beginnings in 1965 to today, UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare has educated and prepared students for entry-level and advanced careers in human service professions. We’ve continually advanced knowledge regarding social welfare issues, and provided quality services to people in need. Our alumni work to make a difference in the lives of people who are oftentimes dispirited and in despair. As a group, our graduates help to improve policies, solve the vital social issues of our time, and are a strong voice for thoughtful, social change in our society. We hope you will join us -- as students, faculty, staff, supporters, or partners -- to help make a difference. Sincerely,

Stan Stojkovic, PhD Dean and Professor UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare

Our Programs at a Glance Criminal Justice

Master of Science Areas of concentration in the following: Law Enforcement Corrections Administration Bachelor of Science

development of outstanding professionals in criminal justice and social work.

Certificate Programs Death Investigation Forensic Science Forensic Toxicology

Social Work

Doctor of Philosophy Areas of specialization in the following: Addiction and Behavioral Health Applied Gerontology Family and Child Welfare Master of Social Work Areas of concentration in the following: Behavioral and Physical Health Gerontology Child and Family Welfare Bachelor of Social Work Certificate Programs Applied Gerontology Marriage and Family Therapy Non-Profit Management School Social Work Alcohol and Other Drug Addictions


10 Reasons

to Choose UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare 1. Location

2. Nationally Ranked Programs

The Campus Our bustling research campus lies in the heart of an attractive residential area that borders Lake Michigan. The neighborhood boasts an eclectic blend of stately homes and charming bungalows, plus a main street with a landmark movie theater, a bookstore/coffee shop, casual restaurants and more.

U.S. News & World Report consistently ranks our social work program among the top 40 in the country. Three other reviews have ranked our criminal justice program as one of the top three in the Midwest.

The City Milwaukee is a big city -- the size of Boston and Denver – yet it rubs shoulders with quiet neighborhoods and pastoral settings. For students, our location in Wisconsin’s largest city offers incredible opportunities to explore possible careers through hands-on learning and to make professional contacts for a lifetime. For researchers, the complexity and diversity of the city offer exciting partnership opportunities. And as a resident, you’re never far away from big-city offerings (an internationally acclaimed art museum, professional athletics, theaters, concerts, ethnic festivals, a mediumhub airport serving 90 cities non-stop) or pastoral settings (in which to fish, bike, hike, camp, ski, sail, and kayak). Of note: If you’re considering moving here, and have schoolaged children, you may be interested in knowing that two of the state’s top three high schools (rated by U.S. News & World Report, 2008) are within five miles of campus.

5. Student Support is High

At the School Level We strongly encourage Social Welfare students to apply for scholarships that have been made available through donations from faculty, staff, alumni and other supporters. These scholarships are strictly for Social Welfare students and are in addition to those offered university-wide. Deadlines are usually in April and scholarships are listed on our website at www.uwm.edu/Dept/SSW. In addition, the school offers a variety of paid, work opportunities to students. At the University Level More than half of UWM students receive financial aid. To learn more about financial assistance available from the federal government, your state, institutions, and private sources, contact your local library or UWM’s Department of Financial Aid and Student Employment Services at (414) 229-4551 or visit www.uwm.edu/Dept/FINAID.

3. Flexible Programs

Daytime, weekend and evening courses are offered in criminal justice and social work. In addition, undergraduates may take some courses online or partially online. 4. Job Links for a Lifetime

Our students can find jobs the old way – through bulletin board postings – or the new way – through UWM’s Career Development Center. The center provides students and alumni with a full range of career services and does so for a lifetime.

6. Commitment to Diversity

UWM is the most diverse of the 13 UW System campuses, as reflected in our student body, employees, diversity initiatives, community resources and range of research. UWM is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, religion or any other protected status recognized by Wisconsin or federal law.

Monica (Fernandez) Loser Federal Investigator, Bilingual, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission • BS, Criminal Justice; BS, Spanish Language and Civilization; MS, Criminal Justice “My parents emigrated from Mexico to give their 12 children a better life. UWM was my top choice, as I wanted to remain close to home. I attribute most of my success to my parents and to the support from the criminal justice faculty and staff.”

7. F  ield Instruction and Affiliations

In the Field Education Program, students begin applying what has been learned in the classroom. Our agency partners offer students supervised, professional experience within the full spectrum of criminal justice and social work. Criminal Justice students choose from 200 affiliate sites, including federal law enforcement agencies; Social Work students select from hundreds of agency programs throughout Wisconsin. Field instruction is mandatory for social work majors, highly encouraged for criminal justice majors.

CATHLEEN L. POLLOCK School Social Worker, Milwaukee Public Schools, MSW   Named “School Social Worker of the Year 2007” by MPS and “Wisconsin School Social Worker of the Year 2007.”   “Some of my recent awards can be attributed to the skills learned during my field placement. The school does an excellent job of collaborating with diverse agencies in urban and rural environments, which allows students real-world learning.”


10 Reasons

to Choose UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare 1. Location

2. Nationally Ranked Programs

The Campus Our bustling research campus lies in the heart of an attractive residential area that borders Lake Michigan. The neighborhood boasts an eclectic blend of stately homes and charming bungalows, plus a main street with a landmark movie theater, a bookstore/coffee shop, casual restaurants and more.

U.S. News & World Report consistently ranks our social work program among the top 40 in the country. Three other reviews have ranked our criminal justice program as one of the top three in the Midwest.

The City Milwaukee is a big city -- the size of Boston and Denver – yet it rubs shoulders with quiet neighborhoods and pastoral settings. For students, our location in Wisconsin’s largest city offers incredible opportunities to explore possible careers through hands-on learning and to make professional contacts for a lifetime. For researchers, the complexity and diversity of the city offer exciting partnership opportunities. And as a resident, you’re never far away from big-city offerings (an internationally acclaimed art museum, professional athletics, theaters, concerts, ethnic festivals, a mediumhub airport serving 90 cities non-stop) or pastoral settings (in which to fish, bike, hike, camp, ski, sail, and kayak). Of note: If you’re considering moving here, and have schoolaged children, you may be interested in knowing that two of the state’s top three high schools (rated by U.S. News & World Report, 2008) are within five miles of campus.

5. Student Support is High

At the School Level We strongly encourage Social Welfare students to apply for scholarships that have been made available through donations from faculty, staff, alumni and other supporters. These scholarships are strictly for Social Welfare students and are in addition to those offered university-wide. Deadlines are usually in April and scholarships are listed on our website at www.uwm.edu/Dept/SSW. In addition, the school offers a variety of paid, work opportunities to students. At the University Level More than half of UWM students receive financial aid. To learn more about financial assistance available from the federal government, your state, institutions, and private sources, contact your local library or UWM’s Department of Financial Aid and Student Employment Services at (414) 229-4551 or visit www.uwm.edu/Dept/FINAID.

3. Flexible Programs

Daytime, weekend and evening courses are offered in criminal justice and social work. In addition, undergraduates may take some courses online or partially online. 4. Job Links for a Lifetime

Our students can find jobs the old way – through bulletin board postings – or the new way – through UWM’s Career Development Center. The center provides students and alumni with a full range of career services and does so for a lifetime.

6. Commitment to Diversity

UWM is the most diverse of the 13 UW System campuses, as reflected in our student body, employees, diversity initiatives, community resources and range of research. UWM is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, religion or any other protected status recognized by Wisconsin or federal law.

Monica (Fernandez) Loser Federal Investigator, Bilingual, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission • BS, Criminal Justice; BS, Spanish Language and Civilization; MS, Criminal Justice “My parents emigrated from Mexico to give their 12 children a better life. UWM was my top choice, as I wanted to remain close to home. I attribute most of my success to my parents and to the support from the criminal justice faculty and staff.”

7. F  ield Instruction and Affiliations

In the Field Education Program, students begin applying what has been learned in the classroom. Our agency partners offer students supervised, professional experience within the full spectrum of criminal justice and social work. Criminal Justice students choose from 200 affiliate sites, including federal law enforcement agencies; Social Work students select from hundreds of agency programs throughout Wisconsin. Field instruction is mandatory for social work majors, highly encouraged for criminal justice majors.

CATHLEEN L. POLLOCK School Social Worker, Milwaukee Public Schools, MSW   Named “School Social Worker of the Year 2007” by MPS and “Wisconsin School Social Worker of the Year 2007.”   “Some of my recent awards can be attributed to the skills learned during my field placement. The school does an excellent job of collaborating with diverse agencies in urban and rural environments, which allows students real-world learning.”


Left

Rachele Klassy Psychiatric Social Worker, Office of the Sheriff County Correctional Facility South MS, Social Work

8. Internationally Recognized Faculty

Our faculty has earned national and international recognition for their accomplishments in such areas as applied gerontology, addictions, child welfare, and school violence. In addition, they have been called upon by the state of Wisconsin to lead two statewide initiatives: educating and training foster parents; educating and training employees of the Milwaukee Bureau of Child Welfare. 9. UWM’s tradition of excellence

UWM was founded 50 years ago on the belief that a great city needs a great university, and it has not disappointed. On Milwaukee’s 160th anniversary, the public voted UWM as one of the city’s top ten “gems.” And the New England Board of Higher Education ranked it as the ninth best “Saviors of Our Cities” for its positive contributions to Milwaukee’s economy and quality of life. UWM is one of two public, doctoral-granting research universities in Wisconsin. It is ranked among the top 100 U.S. universities by Vanguard College Ranking, which ranks the quality of college professors. Below is a numerical snapshot of our campus. 29,000 students 1,350 faculty and instructional staff 2,000 staff members 12 schools and colleges 84 undergraduate programs 48 master’s programs 22 doctoral programs.

“I never thought I’d work in mental health; I do and I love it. I get the opportunity to help individuals during the most difficult times of their lives.”

right

Douglas Holton Fire Chief, City of Milwaukee BS, Criminal Justice; MS, Urban Studies

Thousands of students have earned their degrees from UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare. From our classrooms, they’ve gone on to careers in criminal justice and social work. In positions such as the following, they serve the Milwaukee community, Wisconsin, and varied communities nationally and abroad. Social Work

Criminal Justice

Addictions Counselor

ATF Agent Bailiff Border Patrol Agent Computer Security Expert Corrections Officer Court Administrator Crime Scene Investigator Criminalist Criminologist Customs Agent DEA Agent Deputy U.S. Marshal Environment Protection Specialist Evidence Technician FBI Agent Federal Protection Officer Fire Chief Forensic Psychologist Forensic Scientist INS Agent IRS Agent Insurance & Fraud Investigator Intelligence Analyst Internal Security Advisor Legal Assistant Police Detective Police Chief Postal Inspector Pre-Trial Services Agent Private Investigator Probation Officer Sheriff Statistical Research Analyst U.S. Secret Service Agent Warden

Adoptions Counselor Case Manager Child Protection Social Worker Clinical Assessment Specialist

“I was a 28-year-old father of three when I started college. I carefully considered many universities and chose UWM. The professors encouraged thoughtful debate and challenged my ideas. They helped me consider a variety of criteria when making decisions. It’s proved important in my job.”

Clinical Group Worker Clinical Social Worker Community Organizer Crime Victim Therapist Domestic Violence Counselor Employee Assistance Social Worker Evaluator Left

Raymond KONZ-KRZYMINSKI Primary Care Social Worker, Department of Veteran Affairs, Zablocki VA Medical Center, MSW “I’m a U.S. Navy veteran and used the GI bill for my education. Beginning with my internship at VA, I’ve provided social work services to veterans who served in peacetime and in combat from World War I to present day Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom combat.”

10. Opportunity for overseas experience

The Helen Bader School of Social Welfare has student exchange programs with the University of Bristol, England; Central American Spanish Academy in Grecia, Costa Rica; and Upper Austria University of Applied Science. Through class work and visiting social service agencies, students can earn credits comparing specific aspects of social welfare policies in their host country with those in the United States. Students also can complete field placements in a drug treatment center in Bristol.

After the Classroom…

Executive Director Family Practitioner Foster Care Case Manager Geriatric Social Worker Grant Developer Grief Counselor Hospice Social Worker Hospital Discharge Planner Legislative Analyst Lobbyist Planner Policy Analyst Program Developer Program Director

Right

Rape Crisis Social Worker

Crystal L. Williams Forensic Investigator, Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office BS, Criminal Justice; MS, Criminal Justice

Residential Care Counselor

“UWM allowed me to attain my educational goals while staying in the community, working and providing for my family. I recommend the school constantly and speak highly of the faculty and staff.”

Victim Advocate

School Social Worker Substance Abuse Social Worker Trauma Specialist Youth Social Worker


Left

Rachele Klassy Psychiatric Social Worker, Office of the Sheriff County Correctional Facility South MS, Social Work

8. Internationally Recognized Faculty

Our faculty has earned national and international recognition for their accomplishments in such areas as applied gerontology, addictions, child welfare, and school violence. In addition, they have been called upon by the state of Wisconsin to lead two statewide initiatives: educating and training foster parents; educating and training employees of the Milwaukee Bureau of Child Welfare. 9. UWM’s tradition of excellence

UWM was founded 50 years ago on the belief that a great city needs a great university, and it has not disappointed. On Milwaukee’s 160th anniversary, the public voted UWM as one of the city’s top ten “gems.” And the New England Board of Higher Education ranked it as the ninth best “Saviors of Our Cities” for its positive contributions to Milwaukee’s economy and quality of life. UWM is one of two public, doctoral-granting research universities in Wisconsin. It is ranked among the top 100 U.S. universities by Vanguard College Ranking, which ranks the quality of college professors. Below is a numerical snapshot of our campus. 29,000 students 1,350 faculty and instructional staff 2,000 staff members 12 schools and colleges 84 undergraduate programs 48 master’s programs 22 doctoral programs.

“I never thought I’d work in mental health; I do and I love it. I get the opportunity to help individuals during the most difficult times of their lives.”

right

Douglas Holton Fire Chief, City of Milwaukee BS, Criminal Justice; MS, Urban Studies

Thousands of students have earned their degrees from UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare. From our classrooms, they’ve gone on to careers in criminal justice and social work. In positions such as the following, they serve the Milwaukee community, Wisconsin, and varied communities nationally and abroad. Social Work

Criminal Justice

Addictions Counselor

ATF Agent Bailiff Border Patrol Agent Computer Security Expert Corrections Officer Court Administrator Crime Scene Investigator Criminalist Criminologist Customs Agent DEA Agent Deputy U.S. Marshal Environment Protection Specialist Evidence Technician FBI Agent Federal Protection Officer Fire Chief Forensic Psychologist Forensic Scientist INS Agent IRS Agent Insurance & Fraud Investigator Intelligence Analyst Internal Security Advisor Legal Assistant Police Detective Police Chief Postal Inspector Pre-Trial Services Agent Private Investigator Probation Officer Sheriff Statistical Research Analyst U.S. Secret Service Agent Warden

Adoptions Counselor Case Manager Child Protection Social Worker Clinical Assessment Specialist

“I was a 28-year-old father of three when I started college. I carefully considered many universities and chose UWM. The professors encouraged thoughtful debate and challenged my ideas. They helped me consider a variety of criteria when making decisions. It’s proved important in my job.”

Clinical Group Worker Clinical Social Worker Community Organizer Crime Victim Therapist Domestic Violence Counselor Employee Assistance Social Worker Evaluator Left

Raymond KONZ-KRZYMINSKI Primary Care Social Worker, Department of Veteran Affairs, Zablocki VA Medical Center, MSW “I’m a U.S. Navy veteran and used the GI bill for my education. Beginning with my internship at VA, I’ve provided social work services to veterans who served in peacetime and in combat from World War I to present day Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom combat.”

10. Opportunity for overseas experience

The Helen Bader School of Social Welfare has student exchange programs with the University of Bristol, England; Central American Spanish Academy in Grecia, Costa Rica; and Upper Austria University of Applied Science. Through class work and visiting social service agencies, students can earn credits comparing specific aspects of social welfare policies in their host country with those in the United States. Students also can complete field placements in a drug treatment center in Bristol.

After the Classroom…

Executive Director Family Practitioner Foster Care Case Manager Geriatric Social Worker Grant Developer Grief Counselor Hospice Social Worker Hospital Discharge Planner Legislative Analyst Lobbyist Planner Policy Analyst Program Developer Program Director

Right

Rape Crisis Social Worker

Crystal L. Williams Forensic Investigator, Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office BS, Criminal Justice; MS, Criminal Justice

Residential Care Counselor

“UWM allowed me to attain my educational goals while staying in the community, working and providing for my family. I recommend the school constantly and speak highly of the faculty and staff.”

Victim Advocate

School Social Worker Substance Abuse Social Worker Trauma Specialist Youth Social Worker


Focus Areas These interdisciplinary focus areas reflect significant strengths in faculty research. They offer students and the community special opportunities. The Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research (CABHR)

Founded in 1991, CABHR is dedicated to research that informs substance abuse and mental health treatment and policy. In projects that were recently funded by the National Institutes of Health, CABHR researchers designed and evaluated HIV and substance-abuse risk prevention and intervention strategies, developed alcohol-abuse educational curriculum for MSW training programs, and examined the association between high-risk sexual behavior and drug abuse in gay and bisexual men. Led by a core group of researchers at UWM and Marquette University, CABHR collaborates with Milwaukee-area community-based organizations, state and local government agencies, and healthcare providers in order to further its research mission.

Applied Gerontology

Child Welfare

Projects in Applied Gerontology identify strategies to enhance the support of family caregivers. With funding from the Helen Bader Foundation and the Alzheimer’s Association, one project -- the Tailored Caregiver Assessment and Referral project is focusing on the health and well being of family members caring of individuals with dementia, along with the use and cost of support services. Another initiative, called the League of Experienced Family Caregivers, is a national caregiver registry created to facilitate development of assessment tools and care management protocols for service providers to use with family caregivers.

The Wisconsin Department of Children and Families contracts with the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare to provide high-quality, competencybased in-service training to child welfare staff employed by the Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership. Such training supports workers as they strive to be family-centered, childfocused and culturally responsive. A second initiative, the Child Welfare Training Program, helps public child welfare staff in Milwaukee County earn their MSW degrees. Professionallevel employees of the Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare and its lead partner agencies can study full- or part-time, completing their degrees in as little as 15 months. Tuition, fees, stipends and book allowances are available. More than 150 people have graduated from this program since its inception in 1993.

High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

The federal government designated Milwaukee as one of 27 areas facing a significant drug trafficking problem. Now, a $1 million federal grant links the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare to federal efforts to reduce drug trafficking in the city and state. In each of these 27 areas, called High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas, or HIDTAs, federal resources are aimed at eliminating or reducing drug trafficking. At the Milwaukee HIDTA, law enforcement organizations assess drug trafficking problems and design specific initiatives to reduce or eliminate the production, manufacture, transportation, distribution and chronic use of illegal drugs and money laundering. UWM criminal justice students have the opportunity to work at the HIDTA as intelligence analysts.

Ph.D. Program in SOCIAL WORK

The school’s newest academic program is the Ph.D. Program in Social Work, which admitted its third class in 2009. Students prepare for academic careers as university faculty and researchers. They specialize in addictions and behavioral health, applied gerontology, or family and child welfare.

School Violence

Forensic Science

What are the most effective ways to prevent and reduce school violence? The Helen Bader School of Social Welfare is committed to finding long term solutions. To this end, the Department of Criminal Justice has partnered since 1997 with key organizations including the Milwaukee Police Department and the Milwaukee Public Schools. The department creates and assesses community initiatives to address school violence, introduces and evaluates programs for teachers and students to prevent and reduce school violence, and establishes and strengthens long-term relationships with various agencies and organizations to deal with the many critical issues surrounding school violence. Currently (2008 - 2011), the Department of Criminal Justice has a $530,000 grant to assess Milwaukee Public Schools Safe Schools and Healthy Students initiatives across 30 schools.

Forensic science – the application of science to legal matters – integrates social science, basic science, and law. The Center for Forensic Science brings together these academic disciplines plus the expertise of professionals in the field. Working in affiliation with the Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office and the Wisconsin State Crime Laboratory, the center offers a multidisciplinary core curriculum that allows a student to specialize in death investigation, forensic science, or forensic toxicology.


Focus Areas These interdisciplinary focus areas reflect significant strengths in faculty research. They offer students and the community special opportunities. The Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research (CABHR)

Founded in 1991, CABHR is dedicated to research that informs substance abuse and mental health treatment and policy. In projects that were recently funded by the National Institutes of Health, CABHR researchers designed and evaluated HIV and substance-abuse risk prevention and intervention strategies, developed alcohol-abuse educational curriculum for MSW training programs, and examined the association between high-risk sexual behavior and drug abuse in gay and bisexual men. Led by a core group of researchers at UWM and Marquette University, CABHR collaborates with Milwaukee-area community-based organizations, state and local government agencies, and healthcare providers in order to further its research mission.

Applied Gerontology

Child Welfare

Projects in Applied Gerontology identify strategies to enhance the support of family caregivers. With funding from the Helen Bader Foundation and the Alzheimer’s Association, one project -- the Tailored Caregiver Assessment and Referral project is focusing on the health and well being of family members caring of individuals with dementia, along with the use and cost of support services. Another initiative, called the League of Experienced Family Caregivers, is a national caregiver registry created to facilitate development of assessment tools and care management protocols for service providers to use with family caregivers.

The Wisconsin Department of Children and Families contracts with the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare to provide high-quality, competencybased in-service training to child welfare staff employed by the Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership. Such training supports workers as they strive to be family-centered, childfocused and culturally responsive. A second initiative, the Child Welfare Training Program, helps public child welfare staff in Milwaukee County earn their MSW degrees. Professionallevel employees of the Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare and its lead partner agencies can study full- or part-time, completing their degrees in as little as 15 months. Tuition, fees, stipends and book allowances are available. More than 150 people have graduated from this program since its inception in 1993.

High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

The federal government designated Milwaukee as one of 27 areas facing a significant drug trafficking problem. Now, a $1 million federal grant links the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare to federal efforts to reduce drug trafficking in the city and state. In each of these 27 areas, called High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas, or HIDTAs, federal resources are aimed at eliminating or reducing drug trafficking. At the Milwaukee HIDTA, law enforcement organizations assess drug trafficking problems and design specific initiatives to reduce or eliminate the production, manufacture, transportation, distribution and chronic use of illegal drugs and money laundering. UWM criminal justice students have the opportunity to work at the HIDTA as intelligence analysts.

Ph.D. Program in SOCIAL WORK

The school’s newest academic program is the Ph.D. Program in Social Work, which admitted its third class in 2009. Students prepare for academic careers as university faculty and researchers. They specialize in addictions and behavioral health, applied gerontology, or family and child welfare.

School Violence

Forensic Science

What are the most effective ways to prevent and reduce school violence? The Helen Bader School of Social Welfare is committed to finding long term solutions. To this end, the Department of Criminal Justice has partnered since 1997 with key organizations including the Milwaukee Police Department and the Milwaukee Public Schools. The department creates and assesses community initiatives to address school violence, introduces and evaluates programs for teachers and students to prevent and reduce school violence, and establishes and strengthens long-term relationships with various agencies and organizations to deal with the many critical issues surrounding school violence. Currently (2008 - 2011), the Department of Criminal Justice has a $530,000 grant to assess Milwaukee Public Schools Safe Schools and Healthy Students initiatives across 30 schools.

Forensic science – the application of science to legal matters – integrates social science, basic science, and law. The Center for Forensic Science brings together these academic disciplines plus the expertise of professionals in the field. Working in affiliation with the Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office and the Wisconsin State Crime Laboratory, the center offers a multidisciplinary core curriculum that allows a student to specialize in death investigation, forensic science, or forensic toxicology.


DRIVING DIRECTIONS From south and west of Milwaukee From I-43 or I-94 near downtown Milwaukee, take I-794 east. Follow the signs for the lakefront. (Do not take I-794 south.) At stoplight, turn left (north). Lake Michigan will be on your right. Drive 3.5 miles. The road jogs left and up a hill. At stoplight, turn right (north) onto Lake Drive. Drive 2 blocks to Hartford Avenue. Turn left onto Hartford. Drive 0.5 miles west, through the neighborhood and onto the campus. Look for Enderis Hall – first tall building on your right. Metered parking is limited in the adjacent lot. However, metered parking is also available in several campus lots and on the street. Lots include: Student Union, Klotsche Center, Sabin Hall, Cunningham Hall. From north From I-43, exit at Capitol Drive (190). Follow left-pointing arrow to Capitol Drive. Get in one of left lanes; turn left at light and you will be on Capitol Drive. Drive 2.5 miles until road ends in a T at Lake Michigan. Turn right onto North Lake Drive. Drive 0.8 miles to Harford Avenue. Turn right onto Hartford. Drive 0.5 miles west, through the neighborhood and onto the campus. Look for Enderis Hall -- first tall building on your right. Metered parking is limited in the adjacent lot. However, metered parking is also available in several campus lots and on the street. Lots include: Student Union, Klotsche Center, Sabin Hall, Cunningham Hall.

M

Museums… Parks… Festivals & Performing Arts… Professional Sports… Live Music…

All on a beautiful lakefront

P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201

Student Services: 414-229-4851 Dean’s Office: 414-229-4400  ffice for Development and O Alumni Relations: 414-229-3175

www.hbssw.uwm.edu


DRIVING DIRECTIONS From south and west of Milwaukee From I-43 or I-94 near downtown Milwaukee, take I-794 east. Follow the signs for the lakefront. (Do not take I-794 south.) At stoplight, turn left (north). Lake Michigan will be on your right. Drive 3.5 miles. The road jogs left and up a hill. At stoplight, turn right (north) onto Lake Drive. Drive 2 blocks to Hartford Avenue. Turn left onto Hartford. Drive 0.5 miles west, through the neighborhood and onto the campus. Look for Enderis Hall – first tall building on your right. Metered parking is limited in the adjacent lot. However, metered parking is also available in several campus lots and on the street. Lots include: Student Union, Klotsche Center, Sabin Hall, Cunningham Hall. From north From I-43, exit at Capitol Drive (190). Follow left-pointing arrow to Capitol Drive. Get in one of left lanes; turn left at light and you will be on Capitol Drive. Drive 2.5 miles until road ends in a T at Lake Michigan. Turn right onto North Lake Drive. Drive 0.8 miles to Harford Avenue. Turn right onto Hartford. Drive 0.5 miles west, through the neighborhood and onto the campus. Look for Enderis Hall -- first tall building on your right. Metered parking is limited in the adjacent lot. However, metered parking is also available in several campus lots and on the street. Lots include: Student Union, Klotsche Center, Sabin Hall, Cunningham Hall.

M

Museums… Parks… Festivals & Performing Arts… Professional Sports… Live Music…

All on a beautiful lakefront

P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201

Student Services: 414-229-4851 Dean’s Office: 414-229-4400  ffice for Development and O Alumni Relations: 414-229-3175

www.hbssw.uwm.edu


02/2009

of

1/09

Social Welfare

Helen Bader School

P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201

Milwaukee, WI Permit No. 864

PAID

Non-profit Organization U.S. Postage


HBSSW View Book