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Nominees for Citizens of the Year

Songwriter’s Festival coming up

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Red Arena to expand facilities

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News-Dispatch Volume XXXIX No. 2

Serving Western Hays County, Texas since 1982

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75¢

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Expertise, debt focus of county judge debate Dist. 45 BY EXSAR ARGUELLO

Experience, the county’s debt and economic development were primary talking points during a debate between a pair of candidates vying for Hays County’s top elected position Thursday. The event, held by the League of Women’s Voters of Hays County, pitted Democrat Ruben Becerra against Republican Will

Conley in the first debate prior to the Nov. 6 election. The two men are vying for a seat held by longtime County Judge Bert Cobb, who opted to forgo reelection in 2017 due to health reasons. Throughout the night, Conley cited his 14 years of experience as a public official and felt he is someone who can lead Hays County, based on his track record. Conley spoke on his

efforts as a commissioner and chairman of the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (CAMPO) to ensure property infrastructure needs for the county as it continues to rank as one of the fastest growing regions in the country. “I have led those efforts PHOTO BY XXXXX and worked with the state to bring half a billion dolRuben Becerra (left) and Will Conley, candidates for Hays County Judge, addressed attendees at a debate forum

COUNTY JUDGE DEBATE, 3 held at the San Marcos Octivity Center, Oct. 4

Growing coffee industry making its way to Hays County BY EXSAR ARGUELLO

COFFEE CULTURE, 2

BY EXSAR ARGUELLO Senate Bill 4 and healthcare were primary topics brought up in the first public debate between Democrat Erin Zweiner and Republican Ken Strange, who are vying for the Texas House District 45 seat. Zwiener, a progressive Democrat, said SB4, which was signed into law by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott in 2017, is one of the worst and most disgraceful laws in her lifetime. According to the Texas Tribune, SB4 outlaws sanctuary cities in Texas. It also requires local authorities to cooperate with federal immigration officials to allow enforcement to ask about the immigration status of a person they lawfully detain. “Another provision of

Good to the last drop

It’s no secret that coffee is a key component of the average American morning routine. So much so, Austin and San Antonio, both big coffee hubs, ranked in the top 100 cities in America for a good cup of coffee, according to a new 2018 study by Wallethub. Those results leave the Central Texas area, in particular, Hays County, prime real estate for a growing coffee industry. Austin ranked 17th on the list of top cities for coffee, the highest in Texas. Experts at Wallethub credited the high ranking based on the high number of coffee shops per capita and a growing demand for coffee from smaller and developing shops. According to reports, the U.S. coffee industry is currently valued at $48 billion. Part of this new wave of coffee enthusiasts is Tyler Trejo, owner and founder of Café Azteca in San Marcos. Trejo learned his craft in San Antonio, home of a thriving and growing craft coffee

debate focuses on SB4 and healthcare

DISTRICT 45 DEBATE, 3

COURTESY PHOTOS

Members of the Dripping Springs varsity girls basketball team gather in front of an All Hands Volunteers bus during their recent trip to the Texas Gulf Coast. The team was tasked with helping to rebuild homes in Rockport destroyed by Hurricane Harvey.

Dripping Springs girls basketball joins Hurricane Harvey relief effort BY KATIE BURRELL

More than a dozen members of the Dripping Springs Lady Tigers varsity basketball team took to the gulf coast last week to help their fellow Texans rebuild after Hurricane Harvey. The group, comprising of more than 12 girls and three coaches, went to Rockport to help rebuild homes destroyed by the storm, which made landfall in October 2017. Rockport, located roughly 30 miles outside of Corpus Christi, as well as nearby Fulton, were two of the hardest hit areas by the storm. The team arrived in

Head Girls Basketball Coach David Norris planned the trip after former assistant coach Allison Garrett quit her job at Dripping Springs High to be a volunteer with All Hands and Hearts – Smart Response, an organization responsible for rebuilding communities affected by natural disasters.

Rockport Friday where members spent the rest of the day and the following morning installing flooring, painting walls and moving debris for those still affected by the hurricane. Head Girls Basketball Coach David Norris planned the trip after former assistant coach Allison Garrett quit her job at Dripping Springs

High to be a volunteer with All Hands and Hearts – Smart Response, an organization responsible for rebuilding communities affected by natural disasters. Garrett began as a volunteer with the organization, but is now employed there as a logistics coordinator; Garrett maintains a blog detailing the organi-

LAGNIAPPE The Hill Country Living & Rainwater Revival Festival

The Hill Country Alliance has packed a full day with fun things to do and good things to learn about living lightly in our precious Hill Country at Dripping Spring Ranch Park on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be vendors, speakers, and activities on land and wildlife management, water conservation, renewable energy, green home design and building, night sky lighting, sustainable products, and more. For more information, visit RainwaterRevival.com.

Songwriter’s Festival

Over 40 local and international songwriters will take to Dripping Springs Oct. 19-21 for the 5th annual Dripping Springs Songwriters Festival. The event, which will present more than 35 showcases per day, features a variety of musicians hailing from as far away as Toronto, Canada that will play “in-the-round” Nashville-style on five stages across the city. See more on page 6 or visit www. drippingspringssongwriters festival.com.

zations efforts. Norris said keeping up with Garrett’s work inspired him to plan the trip. Norris wanted his players to experience something “bigger than basketball.” “I thought it was a good bonding (experience) for our program,” Norris said. “I can tell

HELPING WITH HARVEY, 3

Hill Country Ranch Harvest Market This shopping event brings in vendors from across the state to show the best in clothing, jewelry, gourmet food, Texas handmade items, home and holiday decor and much more at Dripping Springs Ranch Park Event Center Oct. 13 and 14.

Tails and Trails

On Oct. 13 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Hays County area residents are encouraged to bring their jogging shoes and four-legged friend to Dripping Springs for the inaugural Tails and Trails, Dripping Dog Dip at Dripping Springs Ranch Park. The event is part of the city’s Healthy Parks, Healthy People campaign. For more information, visit cityofdrippingsprings.com.

Two of biggest healthcare systems sign letter to merge BY EXSAR ARGUELLO Two of the biggest health systems in Texas signed a letter of intent to merge Oct.1, a commitment the companies believe will strengthen healthcare in Central Texas. Baylor Scott and White Health and Memorial Hermann Health System are the two Texas nonprofits that will soon share the same brand. Both are founded as faithbased organizations, and with its combined goal, will serve Dallas, Austin, Central Texas, Houston and Temple. According to the letter of intent to merge, Jim Hinton, CEO of Baylor Scott and White, will act as the first CEO of the combined system. The merger will also include a unified board of trustees with an equal number of members from both organizations. “Now that the letter of intent has been signed, we will immediately begin a period of due diligence and the standard regulatory review process,” said a written statement from Baylor Scott and White. “A new name for the combined system will be determined before closing, however, Baylor Scott & White Health and Memorial Hermann will continue to operate under their strong, highly regarded brands in their respective service areas.” The decision to merge

HEALTHCARE MERGE, 2


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Coffee Culture: Good to the last drop Continued from pg. 1

scene. Using his Mexican roots, Trejo incorporates recipes passed from his family, deeply rooted in the culture of Latin America. “After being a manager at Starbucks, I left the company to see how I could incorporate culture into a cup of coffee,” Trejo said. “I took organizational skills from Starbucks, but I learned how to become a craftsman of coffee when I started Café Azteca.” San Marcos has the largest amount of coffee shops in its city limits compared to any other city in Hays County, largely credited to Texas State University. However, some of Trejo’s customers come from across the county, including Kyle. Jill Gonzalez, an analyst at Wallethub, said she believes more people are beginning to move away from bigger coffee chains and investing into local businesses. “Coffee has now become part of our culture, and it’s more than just getting your cup in the morning and heading to PHOTO BY EXSAR ARGUELLO work,” Gonzalez said. “It’s Tyler Trejo, owner and founder of Cafe Azteca buys his coffee from Huckleberry Roasters out of all about the full expeDenver, Colorado. Since he has a close relationship with the owners, he knows where his coffee rience, and local coffee shops may be able to de- is roasted and in which part of the world it was grown.

Help us choose Citizens of the Year Nominees for 2018 Your vote counts, but your words count even more.

The News-Dispatch and Hays Free Press have received nominations of more than 60 people in the Buda, Dripping Springs and Kyle areas that have gone above and beyond to benefit the institutions they care about most. We are asking for input from our readers to share their opinions or experiences about our nominees. Below are all of the Dripping Springs nominees. If you know any of the nominees below, please share your

Thursday, October 11, 2018

liver a more personalized service.” Gonzalez said despite the coffee market being saturated, the demand has not diminished. According to a recent Reuters poll, 64 percent of Americans aged 18 and older said they consumed a cup of coffee the previous day. “Local shops are gaining more traction and the trends are changing, but it’ll always be the 80 percent against the 20 percent,” Trejo said. “Big chains have made a name for themselves for delivering fast, high caffeinated coffee. And a lot of people still like that. Coffee is sometimes treated more like a drug, not an art.” Trejo said the culture of coffee in the United States is still heavily influenced by American

“Coffee has now become part of our culture, and it’s more than just getting your cup in the morning and heading to work. It’s all about the full experience, and local coffee shops may be able to deliver a more personalized service.” –Tyler Trejo, owner and founder of Café Azteca in San Marcos

consumerism, an ideology that fosters quantity and speed over quality. As part of the study, Wallethub analyzed both national chains and small businesses alike to conclude which cities comprise a diverse coffee culture. Texas has two of America’s 50 Best Coffee Shops, a report published by The Daily Mail, which was used as part of Wallethub’s metric for its

study. “Big cities have more an influence. San Antonio’s coffee scene ten years ago was not as big as it is now,” Trejo said. “And those bigger cities have influences from New York, Australia, and around the world, morphing it into its own identity. For me, it’s about connecting my Hispanic culture and those recipes into Café Azteca.”

comments about the person or people that you believe deserve the most recognition. Email us your nominee(s) name and a reason, you think they deserve to be recognized. The efforts of these individuals will be the topic of our quarterly Hays County Echo magazine in December. Please email comments to news@haysfreepress with the subject “COTY 2018.” Deadline for comments is Oct. 15.

Dripping Springs – Community Bob Love – North Hays County Fire & Rescue Assistant Chief of volunteers Wayland and Kathy Clark – Friends Foundation, Order of the Eastern Star and other community events. Denise Henley – 20-year leader of Brent Thurman Memorial Bull Riding committee as well as other area non-profits. Volunteers at orphanage in Guatemala. Amy Hilton – Volunteer photographer for Brent Thurman Memorial Bull Riding event.

Dripping Springs – Education Marisa Tuzzi – Assistant Athletic Director at Dripping Springs High Bailey Kay Hutson – Volunteer with Brent Thurman Memorial Bull Riding event. Carrie Kroll – Child advocate. DSISD school board member

Dripping Springs – Government Andrea Cunningham – Dripping Springs city secretary Ginger Faught – Deputy City Administrator

Dripping Springs – Business Robert Avera – Avera Law Firm Dave Niemeyer – Owner of Acopon brewery

Deadline for comments is Oct. 15

PHOTO BY MOSES LEOS III

Officials with the city of Buda and Baylor Scott and White, along with State Rep. Jason Isaac (R-Dripping Springs) break ground on a new hospital facility that’s scheduled to open in Buda by summer 2019.

Healthcare Merge: Two of biggest join forces Continued from pg. 1

came not long after Buda City Council voted unanimously Feb. 20 to approve the economic development agreement between Baylor Scott and White and the city’s EDC. Baylor Scott and White currently has three facilities in Hays County in the form of a clinics in Kyle and San Marcos, as well as a clinic near the Dripping Springs area. Officials broke ground on a full-service hospital in Buda in April with plans to have the facility open by summer 2019. The merger will create a health care system that spans the state and employs over 70,000 people in all of its areas. Baylor Scott and White officials told the Hays Free Press that the goal of the merger is to combine the strengths and commitments of both systems to advance the health of

Texans and transform the delivery of care. A new name for the merger has not been selected, but both companies are in exclusive negotiations during this early stage of planning.

The merger is expected to be completed in 2019. The first chair of the new combined board will be Ross McKnight, the current chair of the Baylor Scott and White Holdings Board of Trustees.

Notice of Public Meeting to Discuss Dripping Springs ISD’s State Financial Accountability Rating Dripping Springs ISD will hold a public meeting at 6:15 p.m., Monday, October 22, 2018, in the Board Room, 510 West Mercer St., Dripping Springs. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss Dripping Springs ISD’s rating under the state’s financial accountability system.


Thursday, October 11, 2018

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District 45 Debate: Zweiner vs. Strange Continued from pg. 1

the law is the ‘show me your papers’ provision,” Zwiener said. “Any individual law enforcement officer is empowered, if they suspect someone is not in the country with documentation, to demand proof. That’s just opening the door to racial profiling. My Texas is better than that.” Strange said he is a proponent of SB4, as added border security and identification measures can help save the lives of immigrants who are crossing deserts and dangerous conditions to come to the U.S. “I am for SB4. By having sanctuary cities, we are encouraging people to come across on the border,” Strange said. “People are being abused trying to get to these sanctuary cities we are supporting. We need better laws for people to come here, and not protect them from breaking the law.” Zwiener told Strange not to “dress this up” as a law that protects immigrants. The candidates also discussed their plans to give citizens access to healthcare, despite having opposite ideas on how to do that. Strange said the state officials should look at any federal dollars left on the table to build a sustainable program that provides good healthcare for all,

PHOTO BY EXSAR ARGUELLO

Ken Strange (left) and Erin Zwiener, candidates for House District 45 seat, addressed attendees at a debate forum held at the San Marcos Octivity Center, Oct. 4

without burdening the state. Although Strange was not specific on how to build these programs to fund healthcare, he was not a proponent of expanding government programs, such as Medicaid. Zwiener said Texas left $6 billion on the table last year when the state refused to expand Medicare, which could have insured more than one million people. After the debate, Zwiener said in a statement that she was disappointed her opponent could not present solutions to the problems addressed at the debate. “I’m not in this to represent the folks who share my party label, I’m in this to represent everyone,” Zwiener said. “And I will fight for each and

every Texan. What choice you have this election is between the status quo and someone who is ready to get in there and get to work. Someone who is not afraid to tell the specifics.” In his closing statement, Strange said he has been in public service his entire adult life through the Air Force, as a volunteer fireman and current director of Wimberley EMS. Strange said he has received the endorsement of the two previous HD45 representatives, including a Democrat. “They know (I’m the best for the job) because we’ve worked together. This is going to be a tough job and I’m here to do it,” Strange said. “I’ve proven over the years that I can do this and I will continue in my years of public service at your capital.”

County Judge Debate: Conley vs. Becerra Continued from pg. 1

lars in highway improvements,” Conley said. “I am passionate about transportation and how we can solve those issues. I bring every bit of knowledge to ensure we are part of that regional conversation with our transportation needs.” Becerra focused on the county’s “crippling” debt, which is the second highest in the state of Texas per capita at around $2,000 per person. Becerra said property taxes continue to rise, which he believes only burdens the citizenry even more. When asked about incentives for businesses coming into Hays County, Becerra said officials should not give them to everyone. “As the darling we are in Central Texas, I find it very hard to find reason to incentivize dollars to build something over environmentally sensitive areas,” Becerra said. “It’s important for us to be good stewards with our money.” Conley said the county has continued to bring high

paying jobs to the area, calling Amazon’s move to build a fulfillment center a victory. Additionally, Conley said he wants to balance growth with environmental consciousness and continue his efforts with economic development organizations, such as the Greater San Marcos Partnership (GSMP), to bring more high paying jobs to the area. “I am prepared to be the County Judge of this community. I have the experience, knowledge and skill set to take our county into the future,” Conley said. “I have worked with all sides and all interest and all parties, not only in Hays County but at a regional level as well, and put our county on the map in a way it’s never been in our history.” Conley urged Hays County residents to put him and his opponent side by side to evaluate their experience and ability to do the job. Becerra said he wants to focus on the county’s growth intelligently, includ-

ing plans to develop roads and infrastructure on the east side of Interstate 35, an area Democratic candidates believe has been neglected. “I believe in people over politics. Our property taxes are out of control and they need to be brought down. I believe ruining young adult lives over nonviolent offenses is criminal,” Becerra said. “I believe Hays County citizens should have the opportunity to work, live and play here. I believe Hays County needs a hard working Judge, and I will be that Judge for you.”

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Helping with Harvey Continued from pg. 1

that the trip was worthwhile. I can tell it did more for them as (people) than it will when it comes to wins and losses, but at least it brought this group together.” The players met each family they were charged with helping after being split up into three separate groups. One group learned to install laminate flooring, while another learned to paint and prime new walls. The last group was tasked with debris removal. Fitted with gloves and goggles, the girls worked a total of ten hours, so the families could have floors to walk on and walls that replaced the previous coverings damaged by winds and water. Julia Graham, a senior and the Tigers’ leading scorer, tore her ACL days before going on the trip. While Graham is likely to miss the 2018 campaign, it didn’t keep her from sticking by her teammates and going on the trip. Even with a brace on her leg, Graham helped her teammates by painting walls. “It was a good experience because we got to meet the owners of the houses (we worked on)

and they were all really nice,” Graham said. “I can’t stand too long, but I sat and painted the baseboards and helped out.” Dripping Springs senior Kennedy Donovan saw the trip as an opportunity to spend time with her teammates, many of whom are new to the varsity program. Dripping Springs graduated 10 seniors from last season’s team. The trip was also a way for Donovan to continue doing volunteer work, an activity she does with her family regularly already through mission trips. “They (homeowners) would come home and see how much work we’d gotten done and that felt really great,” Donovan said. “I helped put in floors and it was hard. I would be excited if my coach asked us to help again.” The team helps raise money annually for charity, but this was the first trip the girls had taken and their first opportunity to donate their time and efforts. Norris said he’s heard from the school’s other sports teams that they would like to help and participate in future efforts with the basketball team.

Angiel Dahl

See solution, page 7


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News-Dispatch

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Sports Tigers outlast McCallum in 37-30 thriller BY MOSES LEOS III

AUSTIN – While it wasn’t always perfect Thursday, Dripping Springs Tigers senior running back Jake Cox didn’t understate the significance of the team’s 37-30 win over the McCallum Knights. After all, notching a win under the Thursday or Friday night lights is not guaranteed these days. But Cox understood more work must be done if the Tigers wish to keep dreams of a third-straight district title alive. It will be put to the test Friday when they host Austin LBJ in what could amount to the defacto 12-5A, Division I title game. “We have a lot to work on for our biggest game of the season so far,” Cox said. “I think we’re going to come a long way from this week.” Dripping Springs (5-1, 2-0) overcame inconsistent play en route to securing a hard-fought win over McCallum. That included fending off a furious McCallum rally orchestrated during the final quarter of play. Tigers head coach Ga-

Coming Up

Dripping Springs hosts Austin LBJ Friday at 7:30 p.m. at Tiger Stadium.

len Zimmerman credited the Knights and felt if you gave them “a little bit, they’re going to make plays and they’re going to take it.” Zimmerman said he’d like to see his team play a “little bit more cleaner” coming off their bye week. Dripping Springs relied heavily on an aggressive ground game that racked up 306 of the team’s 413 total yards on the night. Leading the way was quarterback Tanner Prewit, who led the team with 122 yards rushing on 13 carries with a touchdown, followed by Cox, who had 118 yards rushing and a pair of touchdowns. Cox said the Tigers focused more on its rushing attack after early passing troubles in the first half. Dripping Springs trailed 7-6 after the first quarter, and were down 14-13 midway through the second frame. By utilizing its ground game, Cox said the Tigers

PHOTO BY NICHOLAS MORRIS PHOTOGRAPHY

Dripping Springs Tigers running back Jake Cox (10) stiff arms a McCallum Knights defender during a run in Friday’s district game at House Park.

were able to chip away little by little at a speedy McCallum defense.

Dripping Springs held a ical runner. We wanted 16-14 lead at intermission to make sure we got him via a field the ball. The goal from better the kicker Colerun game, “He’s (Jake man Chapthe better Cox) a tough man, who everything finished the is,” Zimrunner and game 3-formerman he’s a phys3. said. “GetThe Tigers ting him ical runner. carried that involved is We wanted to momentum a huge part to start the make sure we of what we second half do.” got him the by scoring McCal14 unanball. The better lum, howevswered turned to the run game, er, points to quarterback take a 30-14 Cole Davis the better advantage and running everything is. heading into back Deron the third Gage to get Getting him quarter. them back involved is a Zimmerinto the man said contest. The huge part of getting Cox duo helped what we do.” the ball was McCallum a key comtally 13 un–Galen Zimmerman, ponent in answered Tigers head coach the team’s fourth quarsecond half ter points, PHOTO BY NICHOLAS MORRIS PHOTOGRAPHY game plan. which cut “He’s (Cox) a tough the Tiger lead to 30-27. Dripping Springs Tiger wide receiver Parker Alford (5) looks ahead as he tries to shake the tackle of a McCallum Knights defender Friday. runner and he’s a physDavis went 17 for 28

for 157 yards and three scores, while Gage rushed for 58 yards and two touchdowns. The Tigers turned to Prewit who put the game away with a 51-yard touchdown run to keep McCallum out of reach. But Zimmerman said tackling issues would need to be rectified as the season moves along. Avoiding giving up the big play is also something the Tigers will need to work on as well. “We’ve got to do a better job of wrapping up and hanging on and rallying to the ball,” Zimmerman said. “We’re going to watch film and we’re going to do better.” While the win wasn’t their best, Cox said he envisions the team improving as they take on LBJ. “We didn’t come out with our best tonight, but I think it’s good we didn’t let that get us down, and we didn’t lose sight of the goal of being 1-0 this week,” Cox said.

Tigers roll past Crockett to keep district lead BY MOSES LEOS III The Dripping Springs Tigers volleyball team kept its unblemished district record intact with a 25-11, 25-6, 25-7 road win over the Crockett Cougars Friday. The Tigers (24-15, 9-0) maintained its one game lead over Lockhart in the district standings with four matches left in the season. Dripping Springs takes on LBJ at home Friday before traveling to play at Lockhart Oct. 16. Anchoring the Tigers’ win over Crockett were juniors Mackenzie Murray and Kylar Raymond, who finished with five kills in the match. Senior Necie Watson and sophomore Luren Pyka had four kills. Eleven total Tigers scored a kill against Crockett.

DISTRICT 25-5A STANDINGS AS OF OCT. 9 Dripping Springs 9-0 Lockhart 8-1

McCallum 6-3 LBJ 5-4

Travis 2-5

Crockett 2-7 Lanier 0-5

Reagan 0-7

As a team, the Tigers finished with 16 aces, led by junior Avery Kalsu’s five on the night. Kalso also finished with 16 assists. Sophomore Nicole Herbert had four aces. On defense, Dripping PHOTO BY XXXXXX Springs finished with seven total blocks, while 12 Dripping Springs High’s Mackenzie Murray (9) attempts to power the ball past a pair of Hays Rebel defenders during the team’s players recorded a dig. non-dsitrict match in August.

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Education Superintendent’s Student Advisory Council selected 2018-19 Superintendent’s Student Advisory Council (left to right): Beck McWhorter, Aiden Bailey, Sloan Ashley, Maximilian Hodsden, Allison Haberman, Tallulah Andrushko, Addie Villas, Grey Patterson, Jacob McMullen, Aurora Sloan, Superintendent Bruce Gearing.Â

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Barton Publications, Inc. P.O. Box 339, Buda, TX 78610 Wynette Barton 1717 N. Burleson Rd, Kyle, TX 78640 Jeff, Cyndy, Zach & Mary Barton 201 Marietta’s Way, Buda, TX 78610 Kate and Kuba Barton 2306 Camino Artista, Santa Fe., NM 87505 David White 705 West 2nd St., Kyle, TX 78640 Sandra Grizzle 205 Pin Oak Dr., Mountain City, TX 78610 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or JonOther Schnautz 10616 Thoroughbred Dr., Austin, TX 78748 None Securities. If none, check box 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Full Name Porterfield Complete Address Margot 150 SageMailing Road, Canyon Lake, TX 78133 None Other Securities. If none, check box Barry 622 Brook Hollow Full NameKolar, Sheri Sellmeyer Complete Mailing Address Rd., Nashville, TN 37205 Jane Kirkham P.O. Box 712, Kyle, TX 78640 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding Percent or More of St., Total Amount of Bonds,TX Mortgages, or Juan Palomo 30151 Chenevert Houston, 77004 None Other Securities. If none, check box Melissa Millecam 111 Holland St., San Marcos, TX 78666 Full Name Complete Mailing Address Richard Stone 1306 Cecelia St., Taylor, TX 76564 Jen Biundo 6506 Auburndale St., Austin, TX 78723

10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Full Name Complete Mailing Address

You don’t say...

Sept. 28 was a quiet day for drama students at Sycamore Springs Middle School as sixth-, seventh and eighth-grade theatre students participated in Mime Day. They dressed up in mime costumes and makeup and remained silent throughout the school day.

ŕŻ˜7D[6WDWXV(For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one) The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: ŕŻ˜7D[6WDWXV(For completion by Preceding nonprofit organizations Has Not Changed During 12 Months authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one) The purpose, function, andPreceding nonprofit status of this organization the exempt status federal income tax purposes: Has Changed During 12 Months (Publisher mustand submit explanation offor change with this statement)

X

Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months 13.Form Publication Issue Date for Circulation Data PS 3526, Title July 2014 [Page 1 of 4 (see instructions page 4)] PSN: 7530-01-000-9931 PRIVACY14. NOTICE: See our privacy policy onBelow www.usps.com. Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement)

News-Dispatch PS Form 3526, July 2014 [Page 1 of 4 (see instructions page 4)]

Sept. 14, 2017

PSN: 7530-01-000-9931 PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com. ŕŻ˜7D[6WDWXV(For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one) The purpose, function,ofand nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: 15. Extent and Nature Circulation Average No. Copies No. Copies of Single Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months Each Issue During Issue Published Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement) Preceding 12 Months Nearest to Filing Date

Weekly Newspaper, Hays County, TX

PS Form 3526, July 2014 [Page 1 of 4 (see instructions page 4)] PSN: 7530-01-000-9931 a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run)

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

(1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies) b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail)

74

35

Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

832

472

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Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPSÂŽ

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Dripping Springs High School students had the opportunity on Sept. 27 to learn about more than 80 colleges, universities, and other post-high school opportunities at the school’s College Fair. (pictured is rep from Fort Lewis College)

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19

25

f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e)

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g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

255

200

h. Total (Sum of 15f and g)

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i. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100)

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation 80.5 76.4 (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications)

*16. If you are claiming to line 17 on page 3. Electronic Copy electronic Circulationcopies, go to line 16 on page 3. If you are not claiming electronic copies, skipAverage No. Copies

Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months

No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date

a. Paid Electronic Copies

937

937

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1970

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X I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. 17. Publication of Statement of Ownership PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 2 of 4) If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

X

Publication not required.

Sept. 28, 2017

in the ________________________ issue of this publication. 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

Date

Sept. 21, 2017

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

Worship in a church of your choice Call 512-268-7862 to join the church directory today.

Sunset Canyon Baptist Church 8:45 AM

Author gives presentation about storytelling Young adult literature author Jonathan Auxier visited Dripping Springs Middle School on Sept. 25 to talk to students about storytelling and writing.

Sunday Morning

11:00 AM

Sunday Worship

5:45 PM

Wednesday Meal

6:30 PM

Wed TouchPoint

A Family of Faith...

SCBC Preschool Children Ministries Youth Ministries Family Ministries

www.sunsetcanyonchurch.org

(512) 894-0480

4000 E. HWY 290

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

St. Martin de Porres Catholic Church Mass Schedule

Rev. Charlie

Spanish Mass Sunday: 1:30 p.m.

corner of RR 12 & Post Oak in Dripping Springs

Garza, pastor Saturday: 5 p.m. Located at the Sunday: 8:15 a.m., 11 a.m., 5 p.m.

512-858-5667

www.stmartindp.org

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.


Page 6

News-Dispatch

RED-y to expand

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Equine therapy non-profit opens new San Marcos location BY EXSAR ARGUELLO

building your confidence and self-esteem A local area nonprofit for self-improvement.” that offers equine theraFor young children, py to those with disabil- riding horses builds ities is expanding its social skills, while proservices in Hays County. viding an extracurricular On Oct. 14, RED activity. For those with Arena, a group that uses anxiety and autism, the equine-assisted therapy, horses soothe the senses, will celebrate the grand bringing comfort to opening of its new San the mind giving those Marcos location along who suffer from mental Centerdisabilities point Road. a sense of Horses are RED Arena emotional currently support. prey animals, operates in Horse the Driptherapy can which ping Springs help treat area. makes them motor and The phisensory sensitive losophy of skills in equine therpatients to people’s apy dates with cereback to the bral palsy, emotions, ancient multiple world more sclerosis much likes than 6,000 and stroke, years ago, as dogs or other According domesticatto a study domesticated by Everyed horses were the day Health, animals. first “man’s horses are best friend.” prey aniNow, over 8,000 years mals, which makes them later, Jen Young, physical sensitive to people’s therapist and executive emotions, much likes director of RED Arena, dogs or other domestiand her team have craft- cated animals. ed a physical therapy Additionally, the use center that helps those of horses for therapy is who suffer from anxiety, a discipline practiced cerebral palsy, autism as far back as the fifth and other disabilities. century B.C. Although “When you sit on not a new form of a horse, it shifts your physical therapy, what is pelvis in a three-dimen- now referred to as Hipsional way, working your potherapy is the practice core and developing of using these animals to your muscles, all workbenefit one’s health. ing as good physical Young’s new location therapy,” Young said. will be at what was the “But even as important, A.W.A.R.E therapeutic you are using communi- riding program. The cation with the animal, facility will have reno-

PHOTO COURTESY OF RED ARENA

RED Arena Rider Joseph poses for a photo with therapy horse Hans.

vated facilities, including a 200-by-100-foot covered arena with 14 stalls and wheelchair accessible walkways, feed room, tack room, as well as an ADA accessible restroom and private therapy rooms. RED Arena received $20,000 in donations from the

Dripping Springs Songwriters Festival coming up Oct. 19-21 STAFF REPORT

Over 40 local and international songwriters will take to Dripping Springs Oct. 19-21 for the 5th annual Dripping Springs Songwriters Festival. The event, which will present more than 35 showcases per day, features a variety of musicians hailing from as far away as Toronto, Canada that will play “in-theround” Nashville-style on five stages across the city. All stages are within safe walking distance of each other in the historic downtown district of Dripping Springs. Performance run continuously

Friday and Saturday until late in the evening.

On Sunday, the event includes a Gospel brunch showcase at Hudson on Mercer, followed by a festival wrap party at the Barber Shop.

Musical acts include Lindsay Foote of Toronto, Canada, Claudia Gibson from the Wimberley area, Tom Meny of Buda and Michael Myers from Dripping Springs. Each year a portion of the proceeds of the Dripping Springs Songwriters Festival are donated to Kids in a New Groove, a nonprofit, charitable organization that provides musical instruments and one-on-one instruction and mentorship to foster children in Central Texas. For more information about the 2018 Dripping Springs Songwriters Festival, visit www.drippingspringssongwritersfestival.com.

INTRODUCING

DR. BRENDA WATKINS TO DRIPPING SPRINGS

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Our mission is to treat patients like family. Serving the central Texas area for over 40 years, now with 3 convenient locations.

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Hays County community for its new facility. “We also work with adults who have suffered from strokes, head injuries and anxiety,” Young said. “Horses provide feedback that is not judgmental towards people. They relax and calm the body.”

Young said there is data that indicates there are nearly half a million people in the Austin area and the surrounding Hill Country with physical, social and emotional challenges that could benefit from equine therapy. “We started in Drip-

ping 10 years ago with one horse and ten kids, and now we serve 150 a week through our riding and therapy lessons,” Young said. “And now that we’re in San Marcos, we’ll be able to service the Kyle and Buda communities with a shorter drive to see us.”


Classifieds Thursday, October 11, 2018

20 words for $8!

Place your classified ad by calling 512-268-7862 or send an email to paper@haysnewsdispatch.com. We accept Visa, Mastercard and Discover

DEADLINE: NOON MONDAY FOR THURSDAY’S PAPER

www.HaysNewsDispatch.com

Employment

Page 7

Public Notices

PARK CONSTRUCTION CREW LEADER

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGER-AT-RISK SERVICES DRIPPING SPRINGS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT

NOTICE OF SPECIAL ELECTION (AVISO DE ELECCION ESPECIAL)

The City of Austin is seeking a Park Construction Crew Leader who under general supervision, may assign, direct, and perform specialized construction tasks in and around City parks grounds, both developed and undeveloped, and recreational facilities. Proficiency in performing site layout and setting grade elevations for ADA accessibility preferred. Minimum Qualifications: Graduation from an accredited high school or equivalent, and three (3) years’ experience in construction or general labor services, at least one (1) year of which includes crew experience. For more information on this posting, visit https://www. austincityjobs.org/postings/ search.

To the registered voters of Johnson City Independent School District: (A los votantes registrados el Distrito Escolar Independiente de Johnson City:) An election will be held on November 6, 2018, concerning the issuance of school building bonds in the amount of $10,860,000 for the purposes of designing, constructing, renovating, improving, upgrading, updating, acquiring, and equipping school facilities (and any necessary or related removal of existing facilities) and the purchase of new school buses. (Una elección se llevará a cabo el 6 de noviembre de 2018, en relación con la emisión de bonos de construcción escolar por la cantidad de $10,860,000 con el fin de diseñar, construir, renovar, mejorar, modernizar, actualizar, adquirir y equipar las instalaciones escolares (y cualquier remoción necesaria o relacionada de instalaciones existentes) y la compra de autobuses escolares nuevos.) For early voting and election day details, visit the website of your county of registration. (Para la votación anticipada y los detalles del día de la elección, visite el sitio web de su condado de registro.)

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS

Qualifications will beFOR received by Dripping Springs Independent School District (the CONSTRUCTION MANAGER-AT-RISK SERVICES “District”), 510 West DRIPPING Mercer Street, Dripping Springs, Texas 78620, until 2:00 p.m. local SPRINGS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT time Tuesday, October 30, 2018, to provide Construction Management at-Risk (“CMAR”) Qualifications received Dripping Springs Independent District (the “District”), 510the West Mercer Street, serviceswill forbethe 2018byBond Construction ProjectsSchool as specifically set forth in Request Dripping Springs, Texas 78620, until Pursuant 2:00 p.m. to local Tuesday, of October 30, 2018, to provide Code Construction for Qualifications package. thetime provisions the Texas Government Management at-Risk (“CMAR”) services for the 2018 Bond Construction Projects as specifically set forth in the Request Chapter 2269, Subchapter F, it is the intent of the District to select a Construction Manfor Qualifications package. Pursuant to the provisions of the Texas Government Code Chapter 2269, Subchapter F, it is the via a TWO-STEP At the of the two-step intentager-at-Risk of the District to select a ConstructionPROCESS. Manager-at-Risk via aconclusion TWO-STEP PROCESS. At the procurement conclusion of the twoprocess, theprocess, District select three CMARs. TheThe 2018 step procurement the may District may one, selecttwo one,or two or three CMARs. 2018Bond BondConstruction Construction Projects Projects included in the package follow: included in the package follow: Approximate Square Footage

Facility High School Additions and Renovations Dripping Springs Elementary & Rooster Springs Elementary Renovations Interior and Exterior Transportation Facility Improvements Building Renovations/Paving and Drainage Improvements

Employment

Construction Budget

Complete Construction

Design to Start

60,000 SF

$18,000,000

October 2018

July 2020

Not Applicable

$4,097,000

September 2018

August 2019

Not Applicable

$2,610,000

January 2019

December 2019

TOTAL ESTIMATEDVALUE: VALUE: $24,707,000.00 $24,707,000.00 TOTAL ESTIMATED

$1,000 SIGN ON BONUS

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Construction is contingent upon certain activities being completedbeing withincompleted a specific timeframe, willtimepermit the Construction is contingent upon certain activities within a which specific schoolframe, to meet its contemplated If these activities are not completed when If required, the Districtare may not which will permitschedule. the school to meet its contemplated schedule. these activities proceed construction as anticipated. notwith completed when required, the District may not proceed with construction as anticipated. A non-mandatory pre-proposal conference will be held at the address above October 2018 at 3:00 p.m. at A non-mandatory pre-proposal conference will be held atontheTuesday, address above16,on Tuesday, 510 West Mercer Street, Dripping Springs, Texas 78620. Written questions will be received until 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 3:00 p.m. at 510 West Mercer Street, Dripping Springs, Texas 78620. October 23, 2018. Answers to the questions will be posted on the District’s website at https://www.dsisdtx.us/Page/951 by Written questions will 24, be 2018. received 4:00thatp.m. on may Tuesday, October 23, 2018. An4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October Pleaseuntil also note Offerors be interviewed.

swers to the questions will be posted on the District’s website at https://www.dsisdtx.us/

Page/951 on Wednesday, October 24,with 2018. Please also note thatBond Offerors Interested parties by will4:00 obtainp.m. the Request for Qualifications packet details concerning the 2018 Construction Projects, the anticipated timeline for both Step 1 and Step 2 submissions, by contacting Ms. Michelle Lyons, mayalso beincluding interviewed. Purchasing Specialist, CTSBO at the address shown above, by email at michelle.lyons@dsisdtx.us or by facsimile at 512.858.3039. Interested parties will obtain the Request for Qualifications packet with details concerning the 2018 Bond Construction Projects, also including the anticipated timeline for both Step 1 and Step 2 submissions, by contacting Ms. Michelle Lyons, Purchasing Specialist, CTSBO at the address shown above, by email at michelle.lyons@dsisdtx.us or by facsimile at 512.858.3039.

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LANDSCAPING AND LAWN SERVICE

• Flower Beds • Fencing • Sprinkler Systems • Patios • Mowing, Edging and Cleanup • Tree Trimming and Removal • Rock Gardens • Garden Boxes • Build Sheds

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Shoe Repair

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Landscaping STONE & LANDSCAPING SUPPLIES

Loam • Topsoil • Sand • Gravel • Roadbase • Asphalt Millings • Granite • Compost Mix

Complete Auto Repair

1 120 Hwy 290 W Mon-Fri, 8-5:30 Dripping Springs, TX 78620 Danny Hubbard

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Marcus Lees Affordable Oak Wilt Treatment (512) 858-4018 by TTH Inc. TDA #270421 leestrees@vownet.net (512) 921-4661

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Page 8

News-Dispatch

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Early detection is key in fighting breast cancer BY KATIE BURRELL

ogy, to detect breast cancer. Mueller said those who are While one in eight wom- diagnosed early are highly en will be diagnosed with likely to overcome the canbreast cancer during their cer by discovering it in its lifetime, early detection early stages and maintainthrough an annual doctor’s ing a healthy lifestyle. visit can increase the rate of “The 3-D technology survival. can aid in detection of During October, which early cancers and give the is National radiologist a Breast Canmore comAccording cer Awareplete picture ness Month, of how the to the Texas charities and breast tissue hospitals is,” Mueller Department make extra said. “Most efforts to insurances, of State raise money now, will covand to eduer them just Health cate women as a screenServices, over ing test, so I on the cancer most likely to that if 3,000 women think affect them, it’s a covered according to that are expected benefit the Ameriit’s recomcan Institute mended to to die from for Cancer get the 3-D Research. breast cancer mammoDoctors at gram.” this year, a Seton MedMueller ical Center said both number that Hays offer types of 2-dimesional mammocould be mammograms are grams and sufficient for lowered if other routine detection tests to more women and can detect breast catch signs of got tested. cancer. cancer even They also four years offer referrals to other area before it spreads. But she locations for those who recommends 2-dimesional are interested or in need mammograms without ina 3-dimesional mammosurance or to those whose gram. According to experts, insurance will not pay for 3-dimesional mammothe advanced screening. grams can be better for “Luckily, I don’t see women with dense breasts breast cancer here very or abnormalities. often, but I do see a lot of Dr. Jessica Mueller, OBabnormal mammograms,” GYN at Seton Hays, said Mueller said. “I would say she recommends to her about once a month I see a patients getting screened patient come back with earearly and annually, whether ly breast cancer (signs) or it’s through 2-dimensional an abnormality come back or 3-dimensional technolon their mammogram.”

00 $1.

00 $Ad5m.ission s under 12 Fre Kid

“The 3-D technology can aid in detection of early cancers and give the radiologist a more complete picture of how the breast tissue is. Most insurances, now, will cover them just as a screening test, so I think that if it’s a covered benefit that it’s recommended to get the 3-D mammogram.” –Dr. Jessica Mueller, OB-GYN at Seton Hays

According to the Texas Department of State Health Services, over 3,000 women are expected to die from breast cancer this year, a number that could be lowered if more women got tested. The department reports that only 66 percent of Texas women have gotten a mammogram within the last two years. “All women after the age of 40 should get a mammogram every year,” Mueller said. “The risk increases

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with age and most breast cancers are diagnosed after 50, but anyone is susceptible.” Mueller said women in Central Texas can do their best to prevent breast cancer by also checking their family history, maintaining a healthy weight and reducing alcohol consumption. Mueller said Seton Hays offers assistance to women seeking medical help who may be underinsured or uninsured.

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News Dispatch October 11,2018  
News Dispatch October 11,2018