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Salvador S l d DalĂ­ Sculpture p Collection


Alice In Wonderland Like Alice in Wonderland, Dalí travelled a long and arduous road through the land of dreams, by means of his artistic expression. The artist was clearly l l d drawn tto b both th th the iincredible dibl story-line t li and d the extravagant characters in this intoxicating fairytale. As recreated by Dalí, Alice's hands and hair have blossomed into roses, and her jump rope has h b become a ttwisted i t d cord. d Sh She encounters t the confusion of the surreal looking-glass world with the naiveté and unanswerable logic of the eternal child, finally emerging into reality unharmed, h d and d also l unchanged. h d

Title: Alice in Wonderland Material: Bronze Height: 90.5 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1977 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Alice in Wonderland', gouache, 1977


Homage To Terpsichore In the creation of his version of the muse of music, Terpsichore, DalĂ­ uses a reflected image, setting a soft soft, carnal muse against a hardened hardened, statuesque one. The lack of definition in both faces clearly underlines the purely symbolic significance of these figures. The smooth and classical dancer is representative of inner harmony and the unconscious, while the angular, cubist figure from which we see branches sprouting, represents the evergrowing and chaotic rhythm of modern life life. Both figures dance side by side within each of us, one representing grace and the subconscious; the other representing the sensuality of life.

Title: Homage to Terpsichore Material: Bronze Height: 70.5 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1977 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Homage to Terpsichore', drawing, 1977


Space Elephant In 1946, a film studio commissioned eleven artists to produce a painting based on "The Temptations of St. Anthony". For his contribution, Dalí created the image of an elephant in the Egyptian desert carrying an obelisk, a symbol of power and domination: temptations, according to Dalí, to which St. Anthony would not have been immune. Dalí painted these earthly temptations as a procession led by a rearing horse, a phallic symbol of the mastery of one person over another. Four elephants stand on almost invisible spider legs of desire, and offer art, beauty, power, erotic pleasures, and knowledge. In the creation of this sculpture, based on the elephants in the painting, Dalí chose to focus on the temptation of power.

Title: Space Elephant Material: Bronze Height: 94 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1980 First Cast: 1980 Maquette: 'Space Elephant', plaster, 1980


Nobility Of Time DalĂ­ 's melted and crowned watch is both draped against and supported by the remains of a tree the trunk sprouts new life and its roots entwine a stone The terminology stone. terminology, "the the crown of a watch" watch is assumed to mean a mechanical device that allows us to set the hands and wind the timepiece. Time, however, according to a DalĂ­nian watch, watch has no internal power or motion motion. Given this watch's lack of movement, the crown is interpreted as a royal crown adorning the watch, clearly identifying time's mastery over human beings, beings rather than being an object of utility. His majesty is attended by two reoccurring, mystic DalĂ­nian symbols: a pensive angel and a nude female figure elegantly draping herself in a long piece of cloth cloth.

Title: Nobility of Time Material: Bronze Height: 60 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1977 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Nobility of Time', gouache, 1977


Profile of Time This sculpture echoes DalĂ­ 's famous 1931 painting "The Persistence of Memory", in which the artist's famous soft and distorted watch appeared for the first time. As the watch melts over the tree, it transforms into a human profile, underlining the interminable relationship between human beings and time. The unexpected softness of the watch also represents the psychological aspect whereby time, whilst considered to be a precise and fixed concept, can in fact vary significantly in human perception. The flow of time and its unusually irrational nature developed into an obsession for DalĂ­; the image and symbolism of the melted watch thus reoccurred in many of his works.

Title: Profile of Time Material: Bronze Height: 51 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1977 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Profile of Time', gouache, 1977


Unicorn The unicorn is a mythical creature prominent in legends as an intricate symbol of purity. The horn of a unicorn is believed capable of neutralising any poison. This animal also has connotations of chastity and virginity, both male and female, and was adopted as the sign or ideal representation i off the h ""perfect" f " knight. k i h IIn some legends it was also a symbol of virility. DalĂ­ chose to portray the unicorn as a phallic figure whose horn penetrates a stone t wallll th through hah heart-shaped t h d opening, i from which a drop of blood is slowly falling. The nude, reposing female stretched out in the foreground at the hooves of the animal underlines d li th the sensuall nature t off thi this sculpture.

Title: Material: Height: Edition size: Year: First Cast: Maquette:

Unicorn Bronze 57 cm 350 + 35 EA Conceived in 1977 1984 'Unicorn', gouache, 1977


Adam & Eve In one exquisite artwork, DalĂ­ deftly portrays the Garden of Eden: Adam, Eve, and the serpent, as well as the intricate tension between the three. The artist captures the very moment Eve offers Adam the forbidden fruit - astonished, Adam raises his hand in indecision, unsure of their fate should he relinquish himself to the enticing temptation. In an attempt to comfort the doomed couple, aware of the heartache that lies ahead, the serpent coils himself in the shape of a heart, reminding Adam and Eve that love creates a whole which is greater than the sum of its individual parts.

Title: Adam & Eve Material: Bronze Height: 52 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1968 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Adam & Eve', gouache, 1968


Dalinian Dancer Inspired by her own inner force, this vibrant dancer moves to the intense and passionate rhythms of the Spanish flamenco. DalĂ­ was fascinated with the art and spirit of dance, especially that of the flamenco, emblematic of his homeland, and known for exploring the full range of human emotions. The dancer's skirts twirl around her in a spontaneous display of vitality and ecstasy.

Title: Dalinian Dancer Material: Bronze Height: 40.5 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1949 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Dalinian Dancer, drawing, 1949


Dance Of Time I The melted watch is the most well-known and beloved of DalĂ­'s iconoclastic images the artist chose to portray this image consistently i t tl throughout th h t his hi lif lifetime, ti beginning in 1932. The ever-present fluidity of time is represented in this sculpture as time not only moving, but d dancing i iin rhythm h th tto th the b beatt off th the universe. Universal time knows no limits; it must be remembered that time, as we understand it, is a human notion. Instead, D lĂ­ i ti DalĂ­nian time iis perpetual t l and d 'd 'dances on'' stopping for no man, history or even the cosmos.

Title: Dance of Time I Material: Bronze Height: 38.5 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1979 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Dance of Time', gouache, 1979


Dance Of Time II The melted watch is the most well-known and beloved of DalĂ­'s iconoclastic images the artist chose to portray this image consistently throughout his lifetime, beginning in 1932. The ever-present fluidity of time is represented in this sculpture as time not only moving, but dancing in rhythm to the beat of the universe. Universal time knows no limits; it must be remembered that time, as we understand it, is a human notion. Instead, DalĂ­nian time is perpetual and 'dances on' stopping for no man, history or even the cosmos.

Title: Dance of Time II Material: Bronze Height: 30.5 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1979 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Dance of Time', gouache, 1979


Dance Of Time III The melted watch is the most wellknown and beloved of DalĂ­'s iconoclastic images - the artist chose to portray this image consistently throughout his lifetime, beginning in 1932. The everpresent fluidity of time is represented in this sculpture as time not only moving, but dancing in rhythm to the beat of the universe. Universal time knows no limits; it must be remembered that time, as we understand it, is a human notion. Instead, DalĂ­nian time is perpetual and 'dances on' stopping for no man, history or even the cosmos.

Title: Dance of Time III Material: Bronze Height: 26.5 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1979 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Dance of Time', gouache, 1979


Homage To Fashion DalĂ­'s relationship with the world of haute couture began in the 1930s through his work with Coco Chanel, Elsa Schiaparelli and Vogue magazine, and lasted throughout his lifetime. This remarkable Venus, posing in the stance of a 'supermodel', has been created with a head of roses, the most exquisite of flowers. Her face lacks definition, allowing the admirer to imagine any face he desires. On bended knee we observe a dignified gentleman, a 'dandy' paying homage to this 20th Century muse.

Title: Homage to Fashion Material: Bronze Height: 51 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1971 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Homage to Fashion', gouache, 1971


Horse Saddled With Time In La Vie Secrete, Dalí 's autobiography published in 1942, the artist stated "The mechanical object was to become my worst enemy, and as for watches, they would have to be soft, or not be at all!". Dalí believed that humans cannot rely on the non-dreaming or "real" world in order to understand absolute truth. This theme is evident in his sculpture Horse Saddled with Time. The horse, one of the most famous Dalínian images, is portrayed as the representation of life weighed down and harnessed by time, a tangible symbol of the world of the waking and the world of repression. Dalí has embodied society's repressive restrictive nature, showing that the unconscious, the true psyche of the individual, is constantly trying to reveal and free itself.

Title: Horse Saddled with Time Material: Bronze Height: 44 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1980 First Cast: 1980 Maquette: 'Horse Saddled with Time', wax, 1980


Lady Godiva With Butterflies DalĂ­, the great Surrealist master, selected the image of Lady Godiva as one of his favourites, and pays homage to her sensuous and shapely female form through the conception of this sculpture. Announcing her arrival, butterflies not only hover around her and her noble steed, but also adorn her body as she plays her trumpet. Lady Godiva embodies earthly beauty, whereas the butterflies depict the ethereal otherworld.

Title: Lady Godiva with Butterflies Material: Bronze Height: 51 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1976 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Lady Godiva with Butterflies', gouache, 1976


Man With Butterflies This image of this elegant sculpture was originally designed as part of the DalĂ­'s famous Tarot series, which was created specifically for his wife and muse, Gala. The figure of " Homme au Papillon " leaves the banality of the everyday grounded world for that of the butterfly, which, being lighter, will give the man wings and help him soar to a different physical plane - one where he can shed daily worries and habitual restraint.

Title: Man with Butterflies Material: Bronze Height: 55.5 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1968 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Man with Butterflies', gouache, 1968


Persistence Of Memory DalĂ­ has isolated the central image of his bestknown painting and given this sculpture the same title. It is a simple figure consisting of a limp watch draped over the branch of a tree, the classic symbol of life. In his words, "Materialization of the flexibility of time and the indivisibility of time and space. Time is not rigid. It is one with space - fluid". DalĂ­ examines the human perception of time: the speed of time, while precise in scientific use, is widely variable in human perception. When we are involved in pleasant activities or in work that absorbs all our attention, 'time flies', but when we are mired in boredom or discomfort, it drags. The limp watch no longer 'keeps' time; it does not measure its passage. Thus, the speed of time depends on the individual. Title: Material: Height: Edition size: Year: First Cast: Maquette: 1980

Persistence of Memory Bronze 37 cm 350 + 35 EA Conceived in 1980 1980 'Persistence of Memory', plaster,


Snail And The Angel This sculpture occupies an important place in the Dalínian universe, as it is intimately connected with the artist artist'ss encounter with Sigmund Freud, who Dalí came to regard as his spiritual father. As part of the early Surrealist movement, Dalí was surrounded by psychoanalytical influences, and these ideas were strongly incorporated into his artwork. As Dalí believed that nothing occurred simply by accident, he was captivated when he saw a snail on a bicycle outside Freud's house, connecting the snail with the image of a human head; more particularly, with the head of Freud. Dalí was also fascinated by the natural geometry of snail shells, and like the egg, the duality dua ty o of its ts so softt interior te o with t its ts hard ade exterior. te o Paradoxically then, the snail, the universal symbol of the idle passing of time, has been given wings and is riding fluidly moving waves. A winged g messenger g of the g gods,, capable p of limitless speed, bestows the snail with the gift of motion by touching down on its back for the briefest of moments. Title: Snail and the Angel Material: Bronze Height: 44 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1977 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Snail and the Angel', gouache, 1977


Saint George And The Dragon Dalí D lí again i ttransforms f a ttraditional diti l image by adding new and unexpected symbolic connotations. The classic interpretation of "St G George and d the th D Dragon"" iis commonly seen as the saint's battle against heresy and evil, St George being the guardian angel of Aragon and d a celebrated l b t d saint i t off chivalry hi l throughout medieval Europe. In this sculpture, we can see the artist himself, represented by St. George, slaying l i th the d dragon, while hil hi his inspirational muse, Surrealist Art, exalts in the background. Metamorphic touches find their way i t thi into this sculpture l t ttoo: th the d dragon's ' wings turn into flames, and the monster's tongue is a crutch, a favourite Dalínian image.

Title: Title Saint George and the Dragon Material: Bronze Height: 46 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA

Year: Y C Conceived i d iin 1977 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Saint George and the Dragon', gouache, 1977


Surrealist Piano The Surrealist Piano is one of DalĂ­'s major iconoclastic symbols, first appearing in his oeuvre in 1954. The artist has chosen to transform the banal wooden legs of a piano, replacing them with dancing female legs, and bringing the inanimate piano to life. In this transformation he creates an animate, joyous instrument which can dance as well as play. DalĂ­ often blurred the lines between the real and surreal worlds, taking an inert and lifeless object, and, with a wave of his magic surrealist wand, created an entirely new fantasmagorical happening.

Title: Surrealist Piano Material: Bronze Height: 60 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1954 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Surrealist Piano', drawing, 1954


Surrealist Warrior The image of this Roman warrior, as created by Dalí, represents all victories, real and ethereal, spiritual and physical. Dalí's surrealistic interpretation of the warrior includes the addition of a window of light, portrayed through a “hole" in the warrior's chest - this window inspires us to attempt to see that which is not evident, as well as that which encompasses the dream world beyond everyday reality.

Title: Surrealist Warrior Material: Bronze Height: 51 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1971 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Surrealist Warrior', gouache, 1971


Triumphant Angel So light as to transcend the earth's gravity, angels are a lyrical expression of Dalí's world of dreams and fantasy - in fact, Dalí once said 'nothing is more stimulating than the idea of an angel'! From the end of the 1940s, when the artist began weaving strong religious themes into his artworks, angels appear frequently in his oeuvre. In this beautiful f sculpture, the Dalínian angel trumpets his divine music, wings spread, head thrown back, sending his jubilant message to all who will listen.

Title: Triumphant Angel Material: Bronze Height: 50 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1976 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Triumphant Angel', drawing, 1976


Triumphant Elephant The elephant, DalĂ­'s iconoclastic symbol of the future and one of his favourite images, is often depicted atop mosquito-like legs, emphasising the contrast between robustness and fragility, much like the contrast the artist seeks to make evident in this sculpture, between the past and modernity. The animal's jewelled saddle symbolises wealth, and the dawn of a new era is announced by a flying angel, trumpeting success and prosperity. DalĂ­'s elephant exemplifies every individual's hope for abundance and good fortune in the future.

Title: Triumphant Elephant Material: Bronze Height: 53 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1975 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Triumphant Elephant', gouache, 1975


Vision of the Angel Salvador DalĂ­ reinvents a classic religious depiction through an unusual Surrealistic interpretation. As symbolised in this sculpture, the strength and supremacy of God is represented by a thumb from which all life emerges (as represented by the branches). To the right of this divine being stands humanity: a man bursting with life's vitality. On the left, the presence of the Angel, representative of the meditative spirit, can be found with his wing resting on and supported by a crutch. Through this theological composition, DalĂ­ exalts the presence of the Divine, against and as compared with all false intellectual limitations.

Title: Vision of the Angel Material: Bronze Height: 44 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1977 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Vision of the Angel', gouache, 1977


Woman Of Time This radiant young woman depicted in this sculpture is the culmination of those feminine attributes which Dalí so esteemed. Holding a perfectly formed flower and dressed in gently flowing robes, she bears Dalí's most famous symbol…the melting watch, which hints again at the human construction of the nature of time. The artist allows the watch to pose the question - is beauty dependant on time, or is it eternal ? The clock alludes to the woman's awareness that beauty can be independent of time, whether it is corporeal grace or an ethereal rose.

Title: Woman of Time Material: Bronze Height: 65.5 cm Edition size: 350 + 35 EA Year: Conceived in 1973 First Cast: 1984 Maquette: 'Woman of time' drawing, 1973


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Salvador Dalí - Sculpture Collection