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February 21, 2011

Volume 35 Issue No. 2

Governor to sign Civil Unions bill MATT ROBERTSON staff writer Gov. Abercrombie this week will sign into a law a bill giving same-sex couples in Hawaii nearly the same rights and benefits as traditional marriage. The State Senate passed an amended version of SB 232, the civil unions bill, on Feb.16. The bill passed 18-5 and is scheduled to be signed into law by Abercrombie on Feb.24 at Washington Place. Abercrombie has publicly stated throughout his campaign and time in office that he supports the measure. After the final vote he issued a statement saying: “I have always believed that civil unions respect our diversity, protect people’s privacy, and reinforce our core values of equality and aloha.” The Senate gallery was filled to capacity for the final vote. The vast majority of attendees were supporters of the bill who provided legislators a roaring standing ovation upon its passage. Many people were also on hand to witness the confirmation of Family Court Judge Sabrina McKenna to the state Supreme Court. McKenna was confirmed unanimously by the Legislature. She attended the confirmation with her life partner Denise Yamashiroi,their children and many family members. McKenna who is openly gay has been frequently brought into the discussion of civil unions. Senator Clayton Hee, Judiciary Committee chairman, friend of Judge McKenna’s and avid support of SB 232 said, “We are here on a very momentous occasion, not only to seat a new justice, but to give justice to that justice.” Student organizations at HPU had mixed reactions to the passage of civil unions. “Equality delayed is equality denied, it is time to move on, time to do what is pono. We believe that this vote is reflective of the belief of our generation that we ought to be accepting of all and that we must strive for equality in all facets of life,” a statement by Jake Bradshaw, President of Young Democrats at HPU and Young Democrats of Hawaii President Francis Choe. Nash Roehr, President of the College Cont on p3 Republicans at HPU could not be reached State Capitol gig gives HPU student an inside look at the Legislature PAGE 3

New HPU President Dr. Geoffrey Bannister and SGA President Saige Martin discussed how students and the administration can work together effectively. Courtesy Chanel Wayne

Bannister meets with students

KALAMALAMA STAFF More than 20 HPU students gathered last week in the President’s Conference Room to meet with our next president, Dr. Geoffrey Bannister. Earlier on the same day (Feb. 16), Bannister met with Student Body President Saige Martin. The two discussed the need for improved spaces on the downtown campus as well as changes in HPU’s inter-campus shuttle system. Bannister rearranged his schedule to meet with members of the Student Government Association. The meeting was productive as students asked Bannister about a variety of topics and concerns. The most pressing issues and concerns identified by students varied from off-campus housing at Ohia and Hana Student Housing to HPU’s marketing practices that may confuse prospective students.

Job Interviews. Why you should care, what you can do PAGE 15

Once the meeting was done Bannister and Martin worked through ideas on how to best tackle these issues with a Housing Task Force established by the Student Government Association. Martin said he will also be working with HPU’s marketing team to establish a task force to identify imprecise information in the school’s marketing network that could potentially lead to confusion, frustration and decreased retention rates. A promising idea that came out of the SGA meeting with Bannister is the establishment of a Council on Presidential Affairs. Wanting more information on Bannister’s past successes with his CPA at Butler University, Karina Korneyeva, SGA Communications Director, asked Bannister what his program there had accomplished. Bannister pinpointed his successes by

INSIDE KALAMALAMA

identifying small and large achievements, from larger cups in the dining commons to the multimillion dollar student union expansion the school created with direct student input and participation. Bannister said he will hold meetings of the Council on Presidential Affairs to identify common concerns, and to work with the appropriate leaders of our administration to explore the issues and to find realistic and feasible solutions. Members of the CPA will be students from various areas of HPU’s community. By the end of the meeting Bannister made it clear to the students that he is here to listen, learn and find common solutions to expand HPU’s ohana for future growth. Bannister appeared calm, cool and pragmatic. He wants to know all sides of an issue before acting, soliciting all viewpoints and criticisms to make the most intelligent decision for Cont on p3

The Gastronomist visits the Punahou Carnival

Become a friend of He‘eia Fishpont

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February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

KALAMALAMA Editor

Linda Karlsson

Associate Editors Susanne Haala Nicole Kato

Photo Editor

Riana Stellburg

Web Editor

Mariah Mellor

Business Manager Dayna Kalakau (808) 544-9379

Faculty Editor John Windrow

WRITERS

Joanna Georgiev Nicole Kato Saige Martin Emily Tall Kara Jernigan Kertstin Kent Amanda Vuicich Jun Mooney Thomas Obungen Patrick Ruder Kat Wynn Erica Antoine Janel Lubanski Sanjeev Ranabhat Mark Carpenter Jazzmin Williams Matt Robertson

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Steve Castonguay Emily Tall Kerstin Kent Kara Jernigan Hanna Gabrielle Stewart Thomas Obungen Janel Lubanski Eric Schjoett Namtvedt Eric Alcantara

ADDRESS

Kalamalama, HPU newspaper. 1154 Fort Street Mall suite 312 Honolulu, HI 96813 Telephone: (808) 544-9379 kalamalama@hpu.edu

ISSUE DATES (SPRING 2010) March 7 April 4 April 18 May 2

NEWS

Aloha from President Wright

HPU is in the process of searching for the next dean of the College of Business Administration (CBA), a position that will likely be filled some time this summer. In the meantime, there’s a lot of activity underway thanks to the work of Interim Dean Warren Wee and the CBA faculty. This semester’s executive in residence in the college is Jeffrey M. Boromisa, who worked for the Kellogg Company as the executive vice president of Kellogg International and president of Kellogg Latin America. Boromisa plans to guest lecture in several business classes and he will share his expertise as a mentor to graduate and undergraduate students.

Thanks to the continued generosity of Marilyn and Jim Pappas, HPU has been able to host the Pappas Entrepreneurial Leadership Series again this year. The series connects students with entrepreneurs. Cliff Slater, chairman of Maui Divers, recently made a presentation called “The Accidental Entrepreneur: Seizing the Opportunities that Cross One’s Path,” which was about how to find success by pursuing unexpected opportunities. The Master’s of Business Administration (MBA) Club has been active in networking students with organizations in Honolulu. Recently, Danielle Scherman, presi-

Chaplain’s Corner

with Rev. Dr. Dale Burke

What’s the secret to navigating the rigors and challenges of a university education and successfully finding the finish line i.e. graduation day? Let’s take a look at some thoughts that can help us persevere no matter how difficult the journey may be. Successful university students are those who demonstrate the capacity to maintain balance in their lives in the midst of jampacked schedules. Too much time devoted to one area of life at the expense of other areas can build up stress and throw us off kilter. Four important aspects of self that need lots of TLC (tender loving care) are our mental, emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing.

Obviously, the classroom challenges us to grow mentally. Research papers and exams allow us to discover more about ourselves and the world and stretch our boundaries of understanding and knowledge. Good time management allows us to complete tasks well, which adds to our self-confidence and sense of competency. Our emotional side is nurtured through relationships and co-curricular activities. This provides a nice outlet while our mental batteries are re-charging, and it makes us more efficient when we get back to tackling our mental tasks. Physical exercise is important because it releases chemicals in the brain called endorphins, and this is some of the best

dent of Social Wahines, a social business network for young, Hawaii professional women, introduced students to opportunities to increase their local business contacts. The MBA Club also assisted the Hawaii International Film Festival in collecting and analyzing survey data from viewers during the last film festival. This spring, the MBA Distinguished Speakers Series featured Mel Horikami, owner and president of Optimum Business Consulting, LCC. Horikami served as the vice president of commercial services at Oceanic Time Warner Cable and president of Verizon Com-

medicine we can take for clearing the mind and feeling more in control. Finally, as we take time to nurture our spiritual side, including our faith relationship with God, we get connected to another source of strength – direction and purpose. This can happen in community experiences of worship or in quiet moments of prayer. In these activities, we add faith, hope and love, which give greater meaning to those jam-packed schedules we talked about. One opportunity to nurture our spiritual side is our weekly Chapel service every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Kamaino Center (on Fort Street Mall across from the Sea Warrior Center). All are invited, and a simple lunch is always served. Go for it!

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Designer: Linda Karlsson

munications in Hawaii. ters the CFA curriculum He spoke on develop- worldwide. There are over ing and building one’s 100,000 CFA mebersin personal currency for a 134 countries. successful career. Students in the finance program heard the perspectives of Ray DeAngelo and Chip Deale, representing the Chartered Financial Analysts (CFA). DeAngelo is the managing director and head of the Stakeholders Services, Marketing and Communications Division and Deale is head of society relations. The CFA Institute is the global professional association that adminis- Chatt. Wright, President


NEWS

February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

Cont Bannister

all stakeholders. Attendees of the meeting had very positive reactions to their first discussion with Bannister. Many said they think he is ready to lead HPU to “the next level.” HPU Vice President (Administration) Rick Stepien said that during his five-day February visit Bannister had daily meetings with President Wright, as well as senior administrators. The divisional vice presidents had one-on-one discussions with Bannister, Stepien said, and he was briefed on their respective responsibilities and met key members of their staffs. Bannister also had private discussions with Dr. Ken Rossi, Chair of the

Faculty Assembly, Stepien said. Bannister was interviewed by local media including the Honolulu Star Advertiser and KHON-TV. On Feb. 17 he appeared on the KHON morning show WakeUp2Day, hosted by HPU alumna Olena Heu. Bannister also received a formal briefing on the Hawaii Loa Campus Master Plan by President Wright and the CEO of Group 70 International, Francis Oda. To get more information about joining any of the aforementioned Task Forces, or if you would like to be a part of the Council on Presidential Affairs please email Saige Martin, HPU Student Body President at smarti13@ my.hpu.edu

Freezin’ for a reason

JOANNA GEORGIEV student writer

Special Olympics Hawaii

Balmy Restaurant Row will be transformed into an arctic abyss on March 5 as HPU’s Akamai Advertising Club takes the plunge into freezing ice cold water to show their support for Special Olympics Hawaii. The organization empowers over 2,000 disabled children and adults who love the thrill of sports and dream of taking home the gold. “So many of us take for granted the fact that we can be active and do sports, yet for many people out there it is much more of a challenge,” said Akamai President Jenn Lymburner. “This is an amazing opportunity to bring joy to Hawaii’s athletes with special mental and physical limitations” Last year the organization raised $20,000 for the cause. The festivities begin at 10 a.m at the Restaurant Row Waterfront Plaza’s makai lawn along Ala Moana Boulevard where there will be plenty of food, music and chattering teeth … brrr! Donate today to support training and competitions for these athletes and help Akamai’s club take the plunge. http://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/jennifer-lymburner/polar-plunge_akamai.

p3 Designer: Linda Karlsson

State Capitol gig gives HPU student an inside look at the Legislature NICOLE KATO associate editor

Kat Brady and Tambry Young of Citizens for Equal Rights have been avid supporters of Civil Unions are excited to see equality in Hawai‘i. Photo by Matt Robertson Cont Civil Union for comment. However after the passage of the first version of SB 232 in the Senate he said his organization views civil unions differently. “Our stance is that it threatens the unique establishment of what marriage means to our society. A marriage should be

between a man and a woman only.” Roehr also said the College Republicans at HPU “would like to openly challenge the Young Democrats to a debate on this or any other issue.” A similar bill was passed by the Legislature last year. Gov. Linda Lingle vetoed the bill.

Graduating Spring or Summer 2011? Important deadlines are approaching quickly. Please make sure you have everything completed by the following dates.

March 11

-Mail or drop off Graduation Reply Card (Should arrive in your home mailbox in mid-February) -Order Cap and Gown online at: www.herffjones. com/college/graduation

March 31

-Order Personalized Announcements (optional)

May 18

-Graduation Rehearsal (mandatory) and Ceremony For more information e-mail Ruby Okano at rokano@hpu.edu or visit www.hpu.edu/graduation.

I suffered with blisters on my feet for eight days; walked aimlessly down narrow corridors only to end up where I started; got stuck in an elevator with a B-52 bomber (cockroach); and woke up freezing in my bed long before the sun rose. This was how my first week working at the State Capitol started. Yet, I would not trade these experiences for anything. As a journalism major, at first I felt very out of place. I began this journey knowing next to nothing about the legislative process, but after a month of working at the Capitol I can say that I’ve learned so much. I realized that one doesn’t need to be a political science or law major to appreciate what this job has to offer. This legislative session, I’m working in the office of Rep. Gil Keith-Agaran from District 9 (Paia, Spreckelsville, Puunene, Kahului, Wailuku). My main job is producing Keith-Agaran’s monthly newsletter, but I also find myself creating congratulatory certificates, compiling spreadsheets of testimonies, and running papers and folders to different offices. I have had the opportunity to meet some amazing people: During the opening-day ceremony on Jan. 19, for example, I met Gov. Neil Abercrombie, former Gov. Linda Lingle, former Gov. Ben Cayetano and his wife Vicky, and former Mayor Mufi Hannemann. In addition to meeting important state figures, I also have the chance to learn about the various issues that concern Hawaii this session. On Feb. 8, I sat in on the House Judiciary Committee’s civil unions hearing. My office didn’t know how long the hearing would go, considering there were more than 600 testimonies. Thankfully, the session only lasted a little more than five hours. In the end, the Judiciary Committee deferred HB 1453 and HB 1244 and passed SB 232, signaling its approval of civil unions. The aftermath of this decision made me realize how fortunate I am to be a part of this legislative process. I was able to witness a milestone in the state of Hawaii. I learned why it’s important for me to voice my opinion and why it is essential that I know where I stand on the pressing issues that Hawaii faces. It was hard at first, but my feet have gotten used to wearing heels five days out of the week. And I no longer meander throughout the halls (only sometimes); I’m now an avid stair-taker (even though our office is on the third floor); and I’m slowly getting used to waking up in the wee hours of the morning. I encourage you all to apply for an internship with the State Capitol, and if you aren’t able to do that, it is always possible to shadow a representative or a senator for the day.


STUDENT LIFE

February 21, 2011

p4 Designer: Linda Karlsson

www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

SGA elections

Hey you! Show some leadership

Would you like to become a voice for the students at Hawaii Pacific University? Enhance your leadership skills? Plan fun and exciting events? Then, make your voice heard. Become an officer for Student Government Association (SGA) of Hawaii Pacific University 2011-2012 Session. It’s not as hard as you may think. To run for a position, simply fill out an election packet and submit it anytime before 5 p.m. on Wednesday, March 16.

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Applications are available at: • • • •

Center for Student Life and First-Year Programs Sea Warrior Center Online at http://www.hpu.edu/Studentlife/SGA/ Online at http://www.facebook.com/sgahpu

Available Positions:

• Nursing and Health Sciences Senators (2 positions) • Hawai‘i Loa Campus Senator • Downtown Campus Senator • Military Senator • Graduate Student Senator

Campus Activities Board

• Chairperson • Downtown Members of the CAB (3 positions) • Hawai‘i Loa Members of the CAB (3 positions) All applications are due by 5 p.m. on Wednesday, March 16 (please see the election packet for more details). The election packet details all of the steps you must take to run for an office and make a difference by serving as an officer for your student government.

• Student Body President Elections will take place on Campus Pipeline on April 4 • At Large Senator through April 8. • Business Administration Senators (2 positions) • Humanities and Social Sciences Senators (2 posiIf you have any questions, please email SGA Vice Presitions) dent and Director of Elections, Melanie Heins at mheins@ • Natural and Computational Sciences Senators (2 posimy.hpu.edu. tions) Matt Lau

Senate Spotlight Military Student Senator, Matt Lau Personal/Hobbies: Born and raised in Honolulu 2002 Kaimuki High School Graduate Hawaii Army National Guard for 9 years 26 months of serving in Iraq and Kuwait Likes to review businesses on Yelp.com and attend events Likes to workout at Pearl Harbor Gym/Ala Moana Beach Likes Hiking Favorite magazines are the Economist and Armchair General Likes strategy video games Academic: Attends Hawaii Emerging Leader Program meetings by Pacific Forum Center of Strategic & International Studies Member in the Association of Diplomacy and Military Studies and United Nations Club Treasurer of the Student Secular Alliance Vice President of the Student Veterans of HPU


February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

STUDENT LIFE

p5 Designer: Mark Carpenter & Megan Nichols

Student Senate elects Diedrich to Speaker post

Forums let student voices be heard KALAMALAMA STAFF On Friday, March 11, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., members of the University Administration, Student Government Association (SGA) and students will gather in the Sea Warrior Center to create a dialogue and about student concerns at HPU. SGA’s main focus for the spring semester is to integrate students into the decision-making processes at our university. We believe that by hosting student forums, the administration will be more aware of the concerns of students and will be more likely to address the matters in a student focused manner. SGA will also be hosting student forums on the Hawaii Loa Campus as well; the forum on the Hawaii Loa Campus will take place on Friday, March 18, from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. on the front lanai. We hope to hear your ideas for university improvement, your concerns, or ways that the administration could be more transparent. If you are unable to attend a student forum in March, we would still like to represent your ideas to the administration so please email us at sga@my.hpu.edu, and we will make sure to present your questions at the forums.

Photo 2 colx 5in Joanna Georgiev

Joanna Georgiev

Campus Activities Board

Spotlight

Downtown Member, Joanna Georgiev Personal/Hobbies: Singing and dancing Going to concerts, painting, fishing, volunteering, bonding with friends, and garage sales Originally from Walled Lake, Michigan Speaks Polish Plays: piano, violin and board games Loves nature and taking pictures A dream of Joanna’s is to be in an opera Joanna loves animals and one day would like to own a farm She is on the way to being a vegetarian. Joanna has a puppy named Kona and a Betta fish named Bubalo Designer and assistant at Orangroc. Academic:3.7 GPA Presidents Host International Choir Member CAB member Vegetarian Club Member Akamai Member

SAIGE MARTIN student body president On Wednesday, Feb. 2 the student Senate elected Nursing and Health Sciences Senator Emily Diedrich as the second Speaker of the Senate. Sen. Diedrich’s initial reaction to her election was, “I am honored and privileged to serve as Speaker of the Senate for the spring 2011 semester.” The Speaker is in charge of chairing weekly business meetings of the student Senate and will serve as the Chair pro tempore of meetings until the end of her term. Sen. Diedrich chaired her first meeting as the Speaker of the Senate on Feb. 9. When asked what she is most excited about, Diedrich said, “I look forward to working with SGA [Student Government Association] to unite HPU’s two campuses, bring

to light and address student concerns and recommendations for improvement, as well as welcome and work with our new university president to help improve our college experience in any way possible. “It is a goal of mine this semester to encourage students to voice their concerns, opinions and recommendations for improvement throughout the university to help make our time at HPU the most memorable and productive it can be,” Diedrich said. She has been an active member of the Student Nurses Association at HPU, while also devoting her time and energy to various honors organizations and community activities. The Student Senate would like to wish their new Speaker the best of luck during the remainder of the spring semester.

Voice your concerns What: Student Government Association forum Where: Sea Warrior Center When: March 11th, 1-2 p.m. Why: To talk about concerns students have about HPU

At Hawaii Loa Campus? Where: Front Lanai When: March 18th, 12-1 p.m. Still want to be heard, but can’t make it? email: sga@my.hpu.edu


STUDENT LIFE

February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

p6 Designer: Jun Mooney & Miki Saiki

Center for Graduate and Adult Services Success is within your reach Want to increase your success as a student at HPU? Here are a few suggestions from fellow students and graduates who know. With a proactive approach to learning, regular contacts with your support group of faculty, staff, including your academic advisor, and classmates, as well as staying focused on the ultimate goal of graduation, you too, can become a more successful student. Establish your credibility as a conscientious student in class by following these simple steps: 1. Be familiar with your syllabus to include: • test dates and due dates for assignments • attendance and tardy policies • make-up tests and late assignment policies 2. Since notebooks can be lost and, unfortunately, stolen, make extra copies of papers and handouts and keep them in a safe place.

HPU alumn Steve Castonguay in front of the Taj Mahal in New Dehli on his first job working for the Foreign Service as the vice consul. Courtesy Steve Castonguay

HPU grad is globe-trotting diplomat

SAIGE MARTIN student body president

After completing his BA and MA coursework for communications in 2007 at HPU, Steve Castonguay began working for the Foreign Service as the vice consul in his first posting in New Delhi, India; where he served from 2007 to 2009. After interviewing thousands of candidates for visas to the United States, and after assisting Americans abroad in New Delhi, he was selected to serve at his next post in Kabul, Afghanistan from 2009 to 2010. While stationed in Kabul he worked with the U.S. Consul to Afghanistan, assisting him with research, briefings and weekly communications with Secretary of State Hilary Clinton, as well as weekly telecommunications with President Obama. He at-

tended policy meetings with Afghani President, Hamid Karzai. While in Kabul, Castonguay was faced with many challenges, including the world’s first look at WikiLeaks. Castonguay said that the exposure of secret classified documents to the public changed the life of United States Embassies abroad. More specifically, life changed quickly for those working in a region such as Kabul, Afghanistan; government employees lost jobs and members of the community were much less likely to speak candidly about the things that Castonguay needed answers for. This affected his job but

more importantly affected the lives of Americans everywhere he said. After serving in Kabul for a year Castonguay is headed to Washington D.C. to begin learning Spanish before a two-year post in Costa Rica. After Costa Rica, Castonguay sees himself possibly applying to be posted in Cote d’Ivoire, Africa.

Wherever the road may take him, members of the HPU community will always support Castonguay for his service across the world, making him a true global citizen.

3. Attend all labs, study sessions or supplemental instructions programs associated with a class. Your grades should show marked improvement. Also, consider learning more about your program by joining a club at HPU. “I would definitely add paying attention to student clubs (Registered Student Organizations or RSO) that are relevant to the subject of study,” says Emre Tuncbelik, a Master of Business Administration student and president of the MBA Club Hawai`i. “This not only helps making friends rapidly, but also makes it easier to form groups during semester for various class assignments.” 4. Turn in all of your assignments on time.

For more information 5. Ask several people in your class for their phone numbers on Wikileaks Visit www. for missed notes. wikileaks.ch/ 6. If you missed an assignment, ask TWO different people in class about what you need to do to catch up. Try to avoid asking the professor a question that could easily be answered by fellow students. 7. Professors are busy people. Use their time and your time wisely and productively. Schedule an appointment with your professors and be prepared at these meetings by taking notes, bringing in assignments, handouts, etc. that you may have questions about. 8. Have a plan of action for your particular course. Also, have a contingency plan in case things do not go according to your original action plan. 9. Go for small victories, and celebrate when you achieve them. Be proud of your accomplishments and visualize the finish line. Finish strong.


February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

STUDENT LIFE

p7 Designer: Riana Stellburg

GERALDINE LIEW & CHELSEY TAFEAMALII student writers Love was in the air Feb. 12 at Hawaii Loa, and the night was sweet. HPU’s first dance of the new year, Lovefest—in dedication to Valentine’s Day—proved to be a love-filled night. HPU’s Hawaii Loa Campus welcomed students with energetic mainstream music, floating bubbles, disco lights, and a table full of appetizers—cupcakes, slices of banana, strawberry, other fruits, fruit punch and a chocolate fountain to top off the sweet treats. Lovesfest is an annual event held by the Campus Activities Board (CAB). This year’s goal was to welcome new students of various ages, cultures and backgrounds. It was an opportunity for students to have fun and affiliate with their peers on campus in an enjoyable environment. Hours before the dance took action, the committee began decorating Hawaii Loa’s Academic Center (AC) with festive lights and romantic tables enhanced with candles and paper hearts. At noon the disc jockey found his position on the dance floor and propped up his equipment. Doors opened at 8 p.m. and gradually students—dressed in their semi-formal attire—started to check in. Chanel Wayne, chair of CAB, said about 40 people attended. Aira Pajarillo, a member of student government, had a great time at Lovefest. HPU students and their beaus gathered at CAB’s “Lovefest” on Feb. 12 at the Hawai‘i Loa campus for an early “I believe that Lovefest was a success, but I wish that we Valentine’s Day. could have had more time to promote the event,” she said. Photos by Nick Blasquez and Kaja Foss Pajarillo took the floor to show off her dance moves for her fellow students. Melissa Renteria, a freshman, arrived to Lovefest with a group of HPU students. For Renteria, Lovefest was her first taste of HPU’s many dances. “The best part was that everyone there was friendly and willing to dance. All the girls who didn’t have dates danced together (even if we didn’t know each other), which was a great way to meet new people,” Renteria said. “Oh, and I can’t forget the chocolate fountain.” Couples embraced on the dance floor. HPU students Nicole Fagaragan and Blake Richards were in the midst of it all, drifting in a world all their own. “My boyfriend and I barely get the chance to go out and do something fun; it wouldn’t have been as fun if it wasn’t for him,” Fagaragan said. Lovefest was not limited to HPU students; but opened its doors to neighboring colleges, as well. Narosshene Paramanantham, a freshman from Leeward Community College, used the event as an opportunity to catch up with friends. “The best part was that everyone “I wanted to hang out with my friends and see for myself what a college dance would be like since my school doesn’t Lauren Uno and her boyfriend took a quick snapthere was friendly and willing to dance,” have events like these,” Paramanantham said. shot before hitting the dancefloor. Despite the low turnout, Lovefest was a success. At the - Melissa Renteria end of the night, those who showed up took home happy memories.


PEOPLE & PLACES

February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

El Viaje de España: Madrid EMILY TALL staff writer As if moving from Texas to Hawai’i wasn’t a big enough step, I decided to throw Spain into the mix. Although it does not seem like a typical journey for a college student, it is mine, and I wouldn’t trade it for the world. When first choosing which university I wanted to attend, I had checked to make sure that there was a good study abroad program in place. I didn’t know specifically where I wanted to go, but I knew the fact that I was going to go abroad somewhere was no question. Spain didn’t come into play until very late in the game. I hadn’t really given it much thought until the moment I was sitting down in the International Relations office talking about where and when I wanted to go abroad. I figured Europe would be a good place to start - I could easily travel around to several different countries while still getting to know a specific country’s culture. Spain, well, it just happened. I am a planner. I am usually very organized, plan ahead, and map things out before doing anything drastic. With Spain, however, I threw all of that out the window (or “la ventana” as the Spanish say). I arrived in Spain on Jan. 5 with no plans, no apartment, and absolutely no knowledge of the city. Luckily I had a friend come with me for a few days, so I wouldn’t seem like a complete fool. I also took a bit of Spanish in the past, learning some of the language in Texas with the help of my best friend’s family (from Spain and Mexico). I knew, or should I say hoped and wished and des-

p8 Designer: Thomas Obungen

Tips for your next Spanish adventure 1. Do NOT order “taza de calda”— while “a cup of soup” may sound perfectly appetizing on a chilly, winter day, this is literally a cup of boiling broth. No chicken, no noodles, just broth. 2. Do NOT wake up before 9 a.m. — the sun does not rise until about 8:30 a.m. and as if that weren’t enough, people don’t rise until about 10 a.m. 3. Learn to love ham — ham on sandwiches, ham thinly sliced, ham for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Yum yum … I love ham. “I am now on my own, completely

lost in a new city, in a new country, with a new language. And I couldn’t be more thrilled,” Emily Tall

Talk about culture shock. HPU Journalism student Emily Tall arrives in Spain with a clean slate: no agenda, no apartment, and no knowledge of Madrid, Spain’s capital. Photo by Emily Tall

perately prayed, that my slight knowledge of the language would pull me through, at least until school started. My friend left a few weeks ago, along with any security and comfort from her. I am now on my own, completely lost in a new city, in a new country, with a new language. And I couldn’t be more thrilled. I have been in the country about a month. I have found an apartment; I have discovered just how uncomfortable an overnight train from Barcelona to Madrid

really is; I have begun to know the city; and am slowly but surely settling in. The upcoming weeks bring the promise of at least two more explorations - the great Swiss city of Geneva, as well as the oh-so-exciting start to the school semester. Though I am stoked to have the opportunity to explore Europe’s great cities, I am really having an issue with the start of school. For some reason, it does not

matter what grade I am in, or which school I am going to … I always have the worst case of first-day jitters. The countdown to my Spanish schooling has begun.


PEOPLE & PLACES

February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

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Designer: Richard Powers & Ruth Leigh

From Spain to Switzerland, HPU Journalism student Emily Tall is getting the full dose of Europe. Tall visited Geneva and Lausanne (pictured above) where she had the chance to experience the beautiful architecture of the museums and cathedrals. Photo by Emily Tall

La Suisse is sweet EMILY TALL staff writer

It is rumored that many European women do not shave. As of today I understand why the women in Europe don’t shave – the temperature is beyond freezing. It makes sense to have an automatic extra layer of “body heat” to help with the dealings of winter weather. I have yet to try such a feat, but I can honestly tell you that I am jealous of this rumored “extra layer.” Though the temperature in Madrid has been fluctuating from 0 to10 degrees Celsius since the beginning on January, I decided that perhaps my chances of a warmer climate

would be better served with a weekend away, and exactly where did I end up choosing you ask? Switzerland – the cities of Geneva and Lausanne to be exact. Yes I know, smart plan, Emily. Surprisingly, the weather (and everything else about the trip) was beyond perfect. Yes, it was more than freezing in the early morning and late evening, but the temperature throughout the day was perfect. Though the majority of my time was spent exploring the wonders of both cities –museums, cathedrals, lakes, you name it – the most memorable events took place in the most unexpected ways.

I had taken two steps into the hostel when all of a sudden I heard my name being called. Lo and behold I look around the corner and my friend, whom I haven’t seen in three years, is checking into the hostel. Not only was she in the same country, same city and same hostel as I was, but we were also staying in the same room. This is one of the elements I love about traveling. You end up running into and meeting so many amazing and unique people in the places you least expect. Having my friend in Switzerland with me was the icing on the cake to a perfect preschool vacation.

Tips for your next Swiss soiree: 1. Learn French. Or Italian. Or German. Switzerland is home to three distinct languages, and each has its own area depending on which part of the country you visit. Luckily, my high school French kicked in – barely, but it was enough to pull me through. 2. Take slippers when staying in your Swiss hostel – you never know whose feet have touched the same mildewridden floor. 3. Slow down. Switzerland has a very calming ambiance. With is serene lakes and unmatched scenery of the Alps, as well as its historic cities, one can’t help but sit an outside café for hours taking it all in.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

February, 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

p10-11 Designer: Kara Jernigan

Black light tattoos Spectral Pigments mark their spot in the world of body art KARA JERNIGAN staff writer Over the last ten years, a new fad has emerged in the tattooing circuit. While some people are still skeptical due to past safety concerns, Ultra Violet (black light) tattooing is becoming more and more popular. Black light tattoos are done with a special fluorescent dye called a “Spectral Marking Pigment.” The ink is available in 17 visible colors and an 18th called UV ‘Titanium White’ or just ‘black light’ that is invisible until it’s under a UV light. The colors are not as bright as ordinary ink, but do have a bright glowing effect when shown in UV light. These black light tattoos make it easy to get the body art you want without hindering employment opportunities in a professional work environment where tattoos aren’t accepted. Another use of black light tattoo ink is to add an outline or shading to an existing tattoo. This is one way to add a little something extra to the ‘wow-factor’ of a tattoo. The Spectral Marking Pigment does not mix with the other tattoo ink so it can be applied without affecting existing artwork. “I love my black light tattoo because no one knows it’s there unless I decide to tell them,” said student Sara Sektnan, “Or if someone has a black light I can pull it out and shock people.”

Her approach to tattoos is that, “a tattoo doesn't have to be in your face it just has to mean something to me.” Safety Concerns This ink was originally developed for the use of fish and animal tracking. Since its first appearance on the market, the chemical composition of the ink has been altered and tested for adverse reactions in humans. Most black light visible inks are generally accepted as “safe,” but it’s still important before getting a black light tattoo to make sure that the ink the artist is using is not radioactive and does not contain EverGlow or phosphors. Spectral Marking Pigments have not been proven to cause cancer. The Tattooing Process Though the same types of tools are used, the tattooing process for a black light tattoo is a little different from ordinary tattoo. Because the fluorescent dye is thinner, the tattooing process takes longer to make thick lines and shading. The artist will also have to stop every so often to turn off the lights and check the tattoo under a black light since it won’t be completely visible in the normal light. Any tattooing process can leave small scars on the skin. Normally, the scars are not visible because they are covered by tattoo pigments. However, these scars may be visible from a black light tattoo beacuse the Spectral Marking Pigment has no color to cover the scars. Price Differences

Sara Sektnan smiles at her black light tattoo that reads “Just let the lovin’ take a hold.” Photo by Hannah Gabrielle Stewart UV light tattoos are more expensive than traditional tattoos. The ink itself costs a little more. A 1 oz bottle of traditional ink costs about $10-15 whereas a 1 oz bottle of Spectral Marking Pigment costs around $30-40. Where a minimum price may be $60 for a regular tattoo, the same tattoo in black light ink would be more like $80 or $100 dollars. Student, Hannah Gabrielle

Stewart said, “Black light tattoos are considerably more expensive and new to the scene, but if you’re down… go for it!” Where to go There are many tattoo studios in Honolulu but only a few of them do black light tattoos and even fever have the inc in stock. On O‘ahu, there are several shops that stock the Spectral Marking Pigment.

Liquid Metal Tattoos and Piercings, in Aiea and Bonsi Tattoo, in Pearl City are generally known to have the special ink in stock and have experienced artists. Another studio that stocks the UV ink that’s closer to HPU is Black Cat Tattoo Studio, in Chinatown. While Xtreme Ink in Honolulu, Odyssey Tattoo in Kaneohe and Kailua, and Rock Star Tattoos and Piercings will order the ink after you make an

appointment. Where to find the ink Since you must have a tattooing license to purchase tattoo supplies, most tattoo studios will be more than willing to order the ink for your appointment. It is important to pick the artist for their quality of work, not just because they have a special type of ink.

Tattoo Artist: Micah Perry

at Black Cat Tattoo Studio

Artist Micah Perry stands in front of his work station and oil paintings that are on display at Black Cat Tattoo Studio.

Just behind HPU’s downtown campus, Black Cat Tattoo Studio on Bethel Street opened two years ago and has been a part of the Chinatown art scene ever since. Walk-ins are welcome but appointments with a selected artist are recommended. The shop’s minimum tattoo cost is $60, which is not unusual or expensive for tattoo studios. Small tattoos can usually be given a flat rate price, but larger pieces are charged by the hour or by a per session rate. Like most artists, they recommend saving up to get the tattoo you really want and not just settling for something smaller. After all, these tattoos aren’t temporary. The only tattoo artist at Black Cat Tattoo Studio with black light ink is Micah Perry. He has been with this studio since Halloween 2009, and worked at Tattoolicious in Waikiki before then. Coming from a sheltered background, Perry was first exposed to tattoos by his cousin when he was a teenager. Perry got his first tattoo when he was 18 and

has been hooked ever since. He was originally attending Memphis School of Art. But when his tattoo artist saw his portfolio of drawings and offered him an apprenticeship at Flat Line Tattoos, in Mississippi, he jumped at the chance. Perry feels that the black light ink is just as safe as the regular ink. He also tells that the glowing effect of the ink does wear off, and will become fainter over time, just like the color in regular tattoo ink. “It has to be the right kind of tattoo to use this ink,” Perry said about the black light ink. He recommends it for tribal designs or patterns, because unless you want colors (which appear a “pastel color” in normal light) outlines and shading cannot be differentiated. “So far, I’ve only done outlining or shading in the black light ink,” Perry said, “never a whole tattoo.” You wouldn’t know it unless he tells or shows you, but he actually has his face tattooed with Skin Candy white spectral pigment in a spiraled pattern of freckles.

Photo by Kara Jernigan

Availability This is not an x-ray; it’s a popular style UV tattoo that gives the impression on a skeleton under black light. Photo from tattooartists.org

Sara Sektnan and Gabrielle Stewart show their UV tattoos in normal light. Photo by Helena Wyatt

Black Cat Tattoo Studio is at 1157 Bethel Street. To reach Micah Perry directly call (808) 292.2238 or call (808)524.7580 to reach the shop. Visit their website at: blackcatchinatown.com Photo by blackcatchinatown.com


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

February, 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

p10-11 Designer: Kara Jernigan

Black light tattoos Spectral Pigments mark their spot in the world of body art KARA JERNIGAN staff writer Over the last ten years, a new fad has emerged in the tattooing circuit. While some people are still skeptical due to past safety concerns, Ultra Violet (black light) tattooing is becoming more and more popular. Black light tattoos are done with a special fluorescent dye called a “Spectral Marking Pigment.” The ink is available in 17 visible colors and an 18th called UV ‘Titanium White’ or just ‘black light’ that is invisible until it’s under a UV light. The colors are not as bright as ordinary ink, but do have a bright glowing effect when shown in UV light. These black light tattoos make it easy to get the body art you want without hindering employment opportunities in a professional work environment where tattoos aren’t accepted. Another use of black light tattoo ink is to add an outline or shading to an existing tattoo. This is one way to add a little something extra to the ‘wow-factor’ of a tattoo. The Spectral Marking Pigment does not mix with the other tattoo ink so it can be applied without affecting existing artwork. “I love my black light tattoo because no one knows it’s there unless I decide to tell them,” said student Sara Sektnan, “Or if someone has a black light I can pull it out and shock people.”

Her approach to tattoos is that, “a tattoo doesn't have to be in your face it just has to mean something to me.” Safety Concerns This ink was originally developed for the use of fish and animal tracking. Since its first appearance on the market, the chemical composition of the ink has been altered and tested for adverse reactions in humans. Most black light visible inks are generally accepted as “safe,” but it’s still important before getting a black light tattoo to make sure that the ink the artist is using is not radioactive and does not contain EverGlow or phosphors. Spectral Marking Pigments have not been proven to cause cancer. The Tattooing Process Though the same types of tools are used, the tattooing process for a black light tattoo is a little different from ordinary tattoo. Because the fluorescent dye is thinner, the tattooing process takes longer to make thick lines and shading. The artist will also have to stop every so often to turn off the lights and check the tattoo under a black light since it won’t be completely visible in the normal light. Any tattooing process can leave small scars on the skin. Normally, the scars are not visible because they are covered by tattoo pigments. However, these scars may be visible from a black light tattoo beacuse the Spectral Marking Pigment has no color to cover the scars. Price Differences

Sara Sektnan smiles at her black light tattoo that reads “Just let the lovin’ take a hold.” Photo by Hannah Gabrielle Stewart UV light tattoos are more expensive than traditional tattoos. The ink itself costs a little more. A 1 oz bottle of traditional ink costs about $10-15 whereas a 1 oz bottle of Spectral Marking Pigment costs around $30-40. Where a minimum price may be $60 for a regular tattoo, the same tattoo in black light ink would be more like $80 or $100 dollars. Student, Hannah Gabrielle

Stewart said, “Black light tattoos are considerably more expensive and new to the scene, but if you’re down… go for it!” Where to go There are many tattoo studios in Honolulu but only a few of them do black light tattoos and even fever have the inc in stock. On O‘ahu, there are several shops that stock the Spectral Marking Pigment.

Liquid Metal Tattoos and Piercings, in Aiea and Bonsi Tattoo, in Pearl City are generally known to have the special ink in stock and have experienced artists. Another studio that stocks the UV ink that’s closer to HPU is Black Cat Tattoo Studio, in Chinatown. While Xtreme Ink in Honolulu, Odyssey Tattoo in Kaneohe and Kailua, and Rock Star Tattoos and Piercings will order the ink after you make an

appointment. Where to find the ink Since you must have a tattooing license to purchase tattoo supplies, most tattoo studios will be more than willing to order the ink for your appointment. It is important to pick the artist for their quality of work, not just because they have a special type of ink.

Tattoo Artist: Micah Perry

at Black Cat Tattoo Studio

Artist Micah Perry stands in front of his work station and oil paintings that are on display at Black Cat Tattoo Studio.

Just behind HPU’s downtown campus, Black Cat Tattoo Studio on Bethel Street opened two years ago and has been a part of the Chinatown art scene ever since. Walk-ins are welcome but appointments with a selected artist are recommended. The shop’s minimum tattoo cost is $60, which is not unusual or expensive for tattoo studios. Small tattoos can usually be given a flat rate price, but larger pieces are charged by the hour or by a per session rate. Like most artists, they recommend saving up to get the tattoo you really want and not just settling for something smaller. After all, these tattoos aren’t temporary. The only tattoo artist at Black Cat Tattoo Studio with black light ink is Micah Perry. He has been with this studio since Halloween 2009, and worked at Tattoolicious in Waikiki before then. Coming from a sheltered background, Perry was first exposed to tattoos by his cousin when he was a teenager. Perry got his first tattoo when he was 18 and

has been hooked ever since. He was originally attending Memphis School of Art. But when his tattoo artist saw his portfolio of drawings and offered him an apprenticeship at Flat Line Tattoos, in Mississippi, he jumped at the chance. Perry feels that the black light ink is just as safe as the regular ink. He also tells that the glowing effect of the ink does wear off, and will become fainter over time, just like the color in regular tattoo ink. “It has to be the right kind of tattoo to use this ink,” Perry said about the black light ink. He recommends it for tribal designs or patterns, because unless you want colors (which appear a “pastel color” in normal light) outlines and shading cannot be differentiated. “So far, I’ve only done outlining or shading in the black light ink,” Perry said, “never a whole tattoo.” You wouldn’t know it unless he tells or shows you, but he actually has his face tattooed with Skin Candy white spectral pigment in a spiraled pattern of freckles.

Photo by Kara Jernigan

Availability This is not an x-ray; it’s a popular style UV tattoo that gives the impression on a skeleton under black light. Photo from tattooartists.org

Sara Sektnan and Gabrielle Stewart show their UV tattoos in normal light. Photo by Helena Wyatt

Black Cat Tattoo Studio is at 1157 Bethel Street. To reach Micah Perry directly call (808) 292.2238 or call (808)524.7580 to reach the shop. Visit their website at: blackcatchinatown.com Photo by blackcatchinatown.com


PEOPLE & PLACES

February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

p12 Designer: Jillian Parel

Study abroad: Vienna waits for you KERSTIN KENT staff writer

I never thought I’d willingly leave my slippers and bathing suits in Hawaii and spend my spring semester wearing winter jackets and scarves while trying to (unsuccessfully) translate German into English … yet, here I am. Vienna, Austria: home of Mozart, Sachertorte, and an unbelievably cold winter. I look around and see snow-covered pine trees and European license plates and wonder exactly how I ended up here, and I think most of my friends and family are wondering the same thing. HPU offers students the opportunity to study in a different country for a semester while earning credits toward their degree. HPU has programs in many different parts of Europe, Asia and Australia. Students interested in studying abroad must either attend a meeting or set up an appointment and go though an interview process. After the interview, it’s a matter of deciding where and when to study. Upon deciding on a school, students sign up for classes and upon passing, receive credit for similar classes at HPU. The process is fairly easy, but students must be prepared to devote time to learning about the country they’ll be studying in, learning a little bit of the language, and making transportation and living arrangements. However, as I learned the hard way, there’s more to studying abroad than simply buying a plane ticket and packing your bags. In order to live and study in a country for more than a few months, a visa is needed. However, to get a visa, one needs proof of housing, proof of international insurance, and a valid passport among other impor-

tant documents. For those lucky students who don’t procrastinate and do their research, this isn’t a problem. However, for those of us with a dominant procrastination gene and a tendency to put off today what can be done tomorrow, applying for a visa calls for an impromptu trip to the Austrian embassy in Los Angeles and many desperate phone calls asking if it’s been mailed yet. Needless to say, I probably didn’t start off on the best terms with the Austrian government, but I’m successfully (and legally) here now. Vienna, the capital of Austria, is a city of roughly 2 million people, and it lies on the east side of the country. The main language is German, although English is very widely known. I don’t know much about the city or the country, but I think that’s part of the beauty of spending a semester abroad. Billy Joel sang, “Vienna waits for you,” but the opportunity to study abroad should be seized when available, so don’t let the chance pass you by. Immersing oneself in a new, unknown culture is an incredible learning experience. While a fear of the unknown is inevitable, I have no doubt that this will be an amazing experience,

Photo by Kerstin Kent

HPU Journalism student Kerstin Kent, a beach and sun lover, trades all that for cold wintery days in Vienna.

“I don’t know much about the city or the country, but I think that’s part of the beauty of spending a semester abroad,” - Kerstin Kent academically and personally. I hope you join me on my journey, both in the Kalamalama and on my blog: http://myeuropeanloveaffair. blogspot.com.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

p13 Designer: Linda Karlsson

Persian Film Festival offers look into Iran

JUN MOONEY staff writer

admission will cost $12, and tickets for all subsequent screenings will cost $7.50 for students. For those who are planning to see all eight screenings, a festival pass is also available for $40. The films, with dialogue in Farsi and Engl i s h s u b t i t l e s , o ff e r a n insight into contemporary Iranian culture and society. However, each film incorporates a different genre, style, and theme, illustrating the variety and diversity of Iranian cinema.

The Honolulu Academy of Arts will be hosting a Persian Film Festival at Doris Duke Theater, screening films by some of the most talented contemporary Iranian filmmakers. Inspiring films such as “No One Knows About Persian Cats” directed by Bahman Ghobadi, winner of the 2009 Cannes Film Festival Un Certain Regard Special Jury Prize, will be among the films shown. The festival starts on Feb. For more information visit 22 and will continue until March 4. Opening night www.honoluluacademy.org

Miss Communication AMANDA VUICICH staff writer

There’s nothing more exciting than getting a new cell phone. You go to the store, spend a good half an hour playing with each and every one of the displays, and imagine yourself being the owner of such an awesome piece of technology. But secretly, you know deep down which one you’re going to pick, and it’s going to be an iPhone. Why? Because they’re great. If you don’t believe me, ask my mom. My parents were so excited that I came home to visit this past winter that they decided to buy the whole family new phones. My dad, who has no social networking website interests, barely uses e-mail, and cannot figure out a voicemail for the life of him, was totally adamant on getting the Windows phone offered by AT&T. I tried to explain to him, that he probably wouldn’t get too much use out of it, but our salesman was just too good. My mom, on the other hand, found the iPhone 3GS for $49.99 and decided that was the phone for her. As soon as her credit card was approved, that phone never left her hand. While sitting in my room, I’d get a text from the next room, “Hi!!!!” Or she’d meander over to ask how what iTunes and is or what an “app” was anyway. The next morning, I woke up to find her, wearing the same clothes, phone in hand. “Did you sleep?” “How do I set up my e-mail?” The night before I left, she had her nose buried in that phone. I would try conversing with her, throwing in ridiculous phrases, “So the sky is orange today,” to no avail. People blame our generation for being mobile-obsessed, but I say it’s just a matter of getting the right tools into the wrong hands.

Courtesy of Joanna Georgiev

Streetlight Cadence, HPU’s own musicians, consisting of violinist Jonathan Franklin, accordion player Jesse Shiroma, and cellist Brian Webb, put the spotlight on themselves using the streets as their stage.

HPU trio makes sweet street sound JOANNA GEORGIEV student writer Streetlight Cadence, a group of HPU student musicians, have hit the streets performing in Honolulu. The members, all juniors, are cellist Brian Webb, a psychology major; violinist Jonathan Franklin, an entrepreneurial studies major; and accordion player Jesse Shiroma, a history major. The group originally was a duo: Shiroma and Franklin met on Craigslist and started playing together. Then Franklin, who was in orchestra with Webb, noticed his passion for playing cello. “After rehearsing religiously we went to First Friday ready but without expectations,” Franklin said. They were blown away by the streets jammed with

society. “At first we played for the homeless people until a crowd gather. It turns out, locations matters less than we thought,” said Franklin. Streetlight Cadence also plays in Waikiki. Although people, and the many eyes and most of their performances are impromptu, you can alears tuned into their music. The group is inspired by ways catch them playing First music by Yann Tiersen and Fridays in Chinatown by the Bach. I had a chance to hear Hawaii Theatre between 7 them at the last First Friday and 9 p.m. “Crowds are great, food performance and was impressed by their energy and money is great, but it’s really raw talent that made their just about making and sharing music,” said Webb. playing sound effortless. At the end of the day the Then, in the wandering minstrel tradition, they moved entrepreneurial trio are happy to another street corner with if they are making music and sharing a smattering of “As long as I’m their talents homeless people and introduced playing accordion, with others. Like all buda recently writ- life is good,” ding artists, ten rap about the - Jesse Shiroma the group has less fortunate in

“I’ve made some of my best friends playing music. That’s all I ever wanted,” - Jonathan Franklin

high hopes for the future, but say as long as they are friends making music they will be happy with or without fame.

“ I w a n t to u s e music as a way of understanding others and myself,” - Brian Webb Other info: Years playing Jon – 11 years Brian – 5 ½ Jesse – 2 Favorite song: Jon – “Clair de Lune” … long before “Twilight” Brian – “I Belong to You” by Muse Jesse – “La Noyee”


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

The Gastronomist

p14 Designer: Ethan Perry & Kezia Holm

Punahou Carnival offers culinary cornucopia THOMAS OBUNGEN staff writer In Hawaii, it’s a tradition for half of Oahu to converge on Punahou School for two nights of flirting, E.K. Fernandez, and best of all, carnival food. That is, if you’re willing to wait. This year’s theme was “The Carnival Before Time,” but would have been more aptly named, “The Carnival That Took Time.” Lesson 1 From taking the bus to and from Punahou School, to waiting in line after line, to sweating it out for fried noodles, my partner Riana Stellburg and I could have grown two beards trying to get something to eat. “Out of the whole night we spent at least 75 percent of our time waiting in line,” said Stellburg, an HPU senior and gastro-compadre. The easiest solution would be to go early and expect to wait. Make sure you allow enough time to work your way through the booths you want to visit. Lesson 2 However, working through the crowds is only half the struggle; knowing where to go to find the best grinds (food) is what got us. After exchanging our hardearned cash for script, we wandered around aimlessly trying to find the food booths until we walked into the taco tent where we made our first purchase of the night. Knowing we were going to do this, we should have made a plan of what we were going to devour instead of watching the food booths turn into Time Square on New Year’s Eve. Lesson 3 After muching on the forgettable nachos, we finally we decided to start at one end and

Photojournalism student Riana Stellburg struggles to hold her “Dinoodles” and the “Land Before Tofu” teri cheeseburger at Punahou School’s famous carnival. Photos by Thomas Obungen

work our way around making our first stop at “Dinoodles.” Long story short, if there’s a wait time posted, forget about it, move along, and come back for it later. When we finally got our fried noodles we ate like the cavemen we had become. “There’s something about carnival food that brings out the kid in you,” said Stellburg. “The greasy goodness may be detrimental to your arteries, but the memories these

noodles bring back are so good, you just can’t put your chopsticks down.” Next booth was the “Land Before Tofu” burger stand. We redeemed 26 ($6.50)script for two juicy Teri Cheesburgers. Needless to say, these simple burgers had done us in. No longer could we stomach the famous malasadas! Lesson 4 Whatever you do, do not put off the Malasadas! As we waited in line to leave,Stellburg picked up a

cone of cotton candy while I splurged on a soda at the Candy Wagon because we still had half a page of scripts to spend. Cavities ensued, but they became our battle scars from conquering some of the food booths at the Punahou Carnival. Not all carnivals are the same, but that’s what make them attractions. Next time you’re at one, take note of how to make the best of it next year!


CAREER

Feburary 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

p15 Designer: Nicole Kato

Job interviews:

Why you should care, what you can do PATRICK RUDER student writer NICOLE KATO associate editor Seven, six, five, four, three, two, one ... next résumé. Seven seconds is the average time employers take to look at each résumé. Seven seconds to sell yourself to get placed in another stack of possible hires. “Someone can look good on paper, but not be right for the job at all personally or socially,” said Lauren Uno, an English (secondary education) major. “I think employers nowa-

days are looking for people who are more people-oriented rather than task-oriented, and employers like to see if you are willing to learn,” Uno said. When preparing for a job interview, Uno researches the company’s dress code and asks friends or peers who work for that company. “It is professional if you know what you’re doing, but it’s also nice to admit that you’re human and will not know all of the answers right away,” Uno said. “I know it’s like cheating, but hey, it helps a lot.” Tiffany Garrett, an HPU alumna with a bachelor’s

degree in journalism, agreed that job interviews are a tool for interviewers to better understand the applicant. “Potential employers are looking to see everything they can in a short while — your work ethics, your ability to be reliable and your ability to shine,” Garrett said. According to HPU professor and small-business owner Gail Honda, “the interview is about the fit between the job skills and the job description.” A job interview has three phases: before, during and after. A successful job interview requires preparation and knowledge at each phase.

Before the interview • Research the company, position and industry. • Dress professionally and be well-groomed. • Rehearse and practice. • Prepare possible questions the interviewer may ask in advance: o What are your strengths and weaknesses? o What is one of your past failures and how did you resolve it? - “Be positive; try to turn a negative into a positive,” Gail Honda, an HPU professor and small business owner, said. o How do you handle conflict? o Why do you want to work for this company? During the interview • Be ready to listen. “Really listen to what the person is saying,” Honda said. The last thing you want to do is not pay attention. • Do not be late. • Talk about yourself in terms of how and why you are a good candidate for the company and job. • Ask for clarification if necessary. • Never say negative things about previous bosses, companies or experiences. • It’s appropriate to ask when you can expect to hear back. • Never leave an interview without asking follow-up questions: o How long have you been with the company? o What do you like most about working at this company? After the interview • Follow up with a handwritten thank-you letter. o “Statistics show two-thirds of the hiring managers think poorly of you if there’s no thank-you note, and one-third will disregard you if there’s no note,” Honda said. “If all candidates are equally qualified, a thank-you note can set you apart.” • Make sure to ask when you will be contacted with a decision. o If you haven’t heard after the date stated in the interview, call the company to find out your status.

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SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENT

February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

p16 Designer: David Lawrence & Miriam Landru

Fishpond Graphic 6Col x 4In

He‘eia Fishpond is not only one of the few active fishponds on the Windward side but also plays a crucial role in Hawaiian culture. Non-profit organization, Paepae o He‘eia’s mission is to preserve and sustain this beautiful fishpond through hard work and education.

Become a friend of the He‘eia Fishpond KARA JERNIGAN staff writer With alien plant species overtaking a time-crumbled wall, the ancient Hawaiian fishpond in He‘eia needs our help to be rebuilt and maintained. Every second and fourth Saturday of the month, Paepae o He‘eia has community work days when volunteers can lend a helping hand in the restoration of this loko kuapā (walled fishpond). The volunteer months run from February to May. The volunteer hours start at 8:30 a.m. and run until 12:30 p.m.; and lunch is provided. Studying environmental science at HPU, sophomore Alyssa Persau feels that it’s important to stay involved with the community because “volunteering can really broaden your horizons … It inspires you to learn more

about what’s going on around the island and how you can have a part in keeping it clean.” The non-profit organization, Paepae o He‘eia, works with and counts on community members of all ages to help with projects such as taking out harmful mangrove trees, removing invasive limu (seaweed), and rebuilding the wall that surrounds the fishpond. Mangroves originate from Southeast Asia and were first introduced to Oahu in the early 1900s. These trees have extensive, sometimes aerial, root systems that can be destructive to nearby infrastructure. They also pose a problem in the fishpond because they block the trade winds from circulating the surface water, reducing the amount of available oxygen in the pond. Though limu is edible and is commonly seen in

local dishes like ahi limu poke, it is an invasive algae that grows in mats that blocks out light and smothers what is left of the coral reefs along the coasts of Oahu. The type of limu spreading in He‘eia Fishpond is called gorilla ogo and is very similar to the kind found in supermarkets. Visit http://wn.com/ limu_(algae) to view a short video clip on invasive limu control at the fishpond. The third project is called Kū Hou Kuapā, meaning, “let the wall rise again.” The kuapā (wall) is 1.3 miles long and between 10 feet to 14 feet wide. Built from the same type of original materials of pōhaku (basalt rock) and koa (coral), the kuapā completely surrounds the pond. Volunteers help to stack pōhaku and fill in spaces with coral by drystacking, a traditional Hawaiian method of building.

The GREEN Club at HPU is currently arranging a trip out to the fishpond. Their tentative volunteer date is March 26; e-mail greenclubrecycling@gmail. com for further information if you are interested in joining the club in volunteering. The workers at Paepae o He‘eia would like to remind all their volunteers that it’s important to remember to wear work clothes and closed-toe shoes or tabis, bring sunscreen, and bring water to drink. Located just north of Kaneohe at 46-077 Ipuka Street, the next chance to volunteer at Paepae o He‘eia is this Saturday, Feb. 26. Because of limited parking at the fishpond, and so employees know how many lunches to provide, please RSVP for any community workdays at (808) 236-6178.

Web photos


SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENT

February, 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

p17 Designer: Kara Jernigan

Waikiki worms put waste to good use ERICA ANTOINE staff writer

Oahu residents generate tons of food waste per capita. While the government’s solution may be to scope out a place for another landfill, citizens are finding alternative, eco-friendly solutions in unexpected places. “Waste is our greatest resource. Why aren’t we using it?” This is the motto of Mindy Jaffe, owner of Waikiki Worm Company in Honolulu. Outside the windows, which feature posters of grinning children, hands entrenched in clods of live worms, there are hanging worm homes on display, not much different from a hanging planter found on any front porch. Inside it smells like a fresh garden – not what one would expect from a shop selling worm poop and the stuff to make it. The shop relocated to South King Street when it

outgrew its original space in Waikiki, where it started with Jaffe raising “worms under the bed” in her apartment. To start a new business, she said, you “do what you need to do.” On one side of the shop are stacks of worm homes, w aiting for occupants . They’re as simple as plastic bins and kitty-litter boxes; all one needs to do to make them fit for a worm family is provide cardboard bedding, add a few new residents and feed them food waste. The worms like apple cores, banana peels and any other kind of food, as long as it’s not meat or dairy. Wa i k i k i Wo r m h a s containers of all sizes, from small starter bins to 18foot-long pipelines. Small bins make raising worms in college dorms and apartments easy. “Most people have this much room,” Jaffe said. “It’s not that different from having a potted plant.” Instead of dumping food

waste into landfills, it can be recycled in a nutrient-rich, sustainable and organic way. Worm bins produce a rich, dark vermicast, which is used for farming, gardening and is even sold for profit. At Hokulani Elementary School, fourth-graders maintain and feed their own worm pipeline as a class project. By recycling their food scraps from lunch, they produce 415 pounds of organic worm soil a year. They reportedly also sell their soil at $5 a pound to give back to their school. Former Honolulu Mayor Mufi Hannemann actively supports vermicomposting: He attended Hokulani’s pipeline harvest in 2007, blessing the Hokulani Worm Hale with a special worm chant. Hokulani isn’t the only place with a worm farm. Institutions such as Kapiolani and Windward community c o l l e g e s , t h e Wo m e n ’s Community Correctional Center, the Hawaii State

Hospital and 6,000 Oahu homes all have worms. Worm farms are just one of three products the Waikiki Worm Co. offers. To go a step further with vermicast, you can purchase a system to brew compost “tea.” The brew, made from vermicast and water, works as an organic and nonpolluting plant pesticide that replaces expensive and harmful chemical versions. Photo Courtesy of Waikiki Worm Company You can also buy a BioPod A group of 4th-grade students from Hongwanji Mission to raise black soldier fly larvae, which often take up School work with Waikiki Worms Pipeline worm system. residence in compost piles and, like worms, devour food waste. 1917 S. King St., Honolulu Schools and organizations can apply for grants for large Free parking on King Street vermicast systems. There or take TheBus routes 1 or 1L from the is no government aid to Hotel/Bishop Street stop on Fort Street Mall support vermicomposting, but a pending House bill 945-WORM (9676) (HB-488) requests tax credit for people who have worm Open Tuesday-Sunday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. farms. Closed Mondays Jaffe said all people have to do to get support in www.waikikiworm.com the recycling revolution is “spread the worm!”

For your well being, take the waters, nutritionists say KAT WYNN staff writer When it comes to beverages to fuel their goals, people often choose among soda, sports drinks or water. The ongoing debate is which drink is best. Soda – which contains high-fructose corn syrup and a weak acid that can damage tooth enamel – is clearly the most inferior option. The constant ingestion of soft drinks can ruin one’s teeth and pack extra calories into one’s diet. Sports drinks such as Gatorade and Powerade are favored by athletes and are better nutritionally than soda. They’re used to replenish salt, sugar and electrolytes lost during physical activity. Chemistry major James Herman of Seattle, a former football player, favors water and sports drinks, though he warned the latter is not for everyone.“I think (sports drinks) are not a drink people should drink regularly,” Herman said. “They are typically classified as a fruit juice (and) the amount of sugar and salts are not necessarily beneficial to the average person if they drink it daily. “If you are not an athlete, water is the best choice.” Herman said soda – diet included – is the worst of the three options and is a major part of the country’s health

problems. The final, and clearly the best, option is water. It is a life essential – in fact, without it humans would die in a matter of days. When we engage in physical activity, our bodies cool down with sweat, which comes from the water in our bodies. If we are not properly hydrated, we run the risk of passing out or suffering a heat stroke. Water is also said to aid weight loss: When cold, it takes longer to break down, forcing one’s metabolism to work twice as hard. And according to mens-total-fitness.com, “the less water you have in your fat cells means less mobilization of fat for energy” – in other words, poor hydration makes it harder for our bodies to burn fat. Water also is essential for “maintaining body temperature, metabolizing body fat, helping with digestion, lubricating and cushioning organs, moving nutrients, and flushing toxins from your body.” Herman said he tries to drink water and sports drinks. For athletes, he advises hydrating with water half the time and sports drinks the rest of the time. “It is just a smarter way in trying to maintain a high amount of energy,” he said. Ultimately, the consumer must decide what to drink. Water is the best option for nonathletes, while those who work out should consume water and sports drinks. Soda, which only caters to our tastes and offers zero health benefits, should be

avoided, many nutritionists say. Now that the best hydration option is clear, the question becomes how much water one should consume. The Mayo Clinic offers several ways to calculate one’s optimal intake: Replacement approach. The average urine output for adults is about 1.5 liters (6.3 cups) a day. You lose close to an additional liter (about 4 cups) of water a day through breathing, sweating and bowel movements. Food usually accounts for 20 percent of your total fluid intake, so if you consume 2 liters of water or other beverages a day (a little more than 8 cups) along with your normal diet, you will typically replace your lost fluids. Eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day. Another approach to water intake is the “8 x 8 rule” — drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day (about 1.9 liters). The rule could also be stated, “Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of fluid a day,” as all fluids count toward the daily total. Although the approach really isn’t supported by scientific evidence, many people use this easy-to-remember rule as a guideline for how much water and other fluids to drink. Dietary recommendations. The Institute of Medicine advises that men consume roughly 3 liters (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day and women consume 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) of total beverages a day.


SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENT

February 21, 2011 www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

p18 Designer: Janel Lubanski

Debris from the sea, new art form JANEL LUBANSKI staff writer Wa s h e d A s h o r e , t h e newest exhibit at the Oregon Coast Aquarium is made up of several sculptures, brightly colored, elaborate designs and made up of trash all collected from the Pacific Ocean. Community members from all over the Pacific Northwest gather debris that is washed up along the coastline, from plastic bottles, tin cans to rubber slippers, these items are constructed into shapes of marine life that are most effected by the garbage. It was reported in 2010 that over 14 billion pounds of trash gets dumped into oceans every year, and we thought the water was a safe place to be. Thousands of trash has

been collected and turned into art since this project started. Angela Haseltine Pozzi, a born and raised Oregonian and the artist of this exhibit has used recycled or discarded materials in her artwork before. “My sculptures evolve as the ocean environment changes,” Pozzi said. “Ocean plastics now outweigh the amount of plankton by at least six to one.” She believes that exhibits like this will raise awareness on the delicate state of our oceans and bring to light how people can reduce and stop the amount of garbage affecting today’s marine life. “I am using what the ocean is throwing back at us to create an artistic response,” she said.

Jellyfish use their tentacles to catch and eat tiny fish, eggs, and zooplankton. As you can guess, they also trap small plastic particles floating in the water that are mistaken for food.

Editors Note: A Gyre is any large system of rotating ocean currents, usually associated with wind movements. Gyres collect large amounts of debris and circulate throughout the water column breaking down further into plankton-sized particles and enter the food chain.

Plastic pollution kills several species that live in coral reefs. This Styrofoam coral reef is an eerie testament to a plastic sea. Hawaii reefs are prone to the accumulation of marine debris because of our proximity to the North Pacific Gyre.

Photos by Janel Lubanski

The first and largest sculpture displayed in the exhibit was a fish made of plastic lids, tin cans and plastics.


SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENT

February, 21, 2011

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Designer: Kara Jernigan

www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

HPU student at international Gulf oil spill SANJEEV RANABHAT student writer When HPU grad student Marianne Preus Jacobsen attended a prestigious international conference on the Gulf oil spill last month, she learned a great deal. But she now feels that what we don’t know about the spill should concern us all deeply. “What I learned is something I already feared; deepwater oil drilling and transport of oil in water is high-risk business and actually there are big knowledge gaps,” Jacobsen said. “We get the impression of that the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is rescued or naturally disappeared because of the US government’s and BP’s clean-up actions or chemical and natural dispersants processes. “The truth is nobody knows for sure if there is still oil out there … and certainly nobody knows about the long-term effects. For instance what is the effect for the coral reefs?” said the 37-year-old Jacobsen. Jacobsen who was born in Germany and raised in Norway came to HPU in 2009 and is studying global leadership in the sustainable development program. She is working on her thesis on the oil spill entitled “Oil and Narration: A study of How the Petroleum Industry Dealt with the Reputation Crisis After the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico.” She attended the oil spill research and development workshop that was held on Feb. 8 at the Norway House in Houston. The workshop was held

HPU grad student Marianne Preus Jacobsen had the opportunity to attend the international conference in Houston, Texas about the Gulf of Mexico’s oil spill. This conference increased her passion for sustainability and the world’s environment. Photos by Eric Schjoett Namtvedt by the Norwegian government to learn about the oil spill, focusing on future deepocean drilling, especially in the Arctic (Alaska, Canada, Russia and Norway). Majority of participants were researchers from universities, governmental projects and major oil companies such as BP, Conoco Phillips, Shell, Chevron and Statoil. “I got a tip about this conference by the Norwegian Consulate General in New York, found the Web site with further information, and sent the application telling them about my HPU program, professional background and the thesis I am working on,” Jacobsen said. She plans focus on the challenge of the BP oil spill aftermath and compare the different oil companies, their stories, the BP oil spill and the

consequence of deep water oil drilling. “ My job at the conference was to listen and learn, get contacts and try to register what are being said between the lines and what are the participants saying between the sessions,” Jacobsen said. After attending the conference, Jacobsen said the participants said the effect on the ecology was less than scientists at first learned. “The oil had lighter density compared to the North Sea or Venezuela oil types, so it is easier to recover by skimming, burning or using natural and chemical dispersants processes,” Jacobsen said. “Also, the Gulf current did not spread the oil spill along the Atlantic coast and further, as many researchers and meteorologists had feared, and thereby it remained con-

centrated. Again, low density, concentrated crude oil spill is easier to skim or burn. Pure luck,” she said. BP’s offshore deep-ocean drilling plant Deepwater Horizon exploded on April 22 causing a constant leak of crude oil for three months in the Gulf of Mexico. According to the National Geographic estimated leak was 206 million gallons and covered 68,000 square miles. Although the conference stated that the oil spill had a lesser effect than expected, participants concluded that there is a knowledge and information gap between the government, corporations and the general public. “What most people do not know is that there is no international body that controls governments’ and companies’ off-shore oil

drilling,” Jacobsen said. “The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has guidelines for tapping and transporting oil from platform to ships, but it is in fact non-regulated wild west in most countries.” Jacobsen has traveled the world attending international conferences, reporting, communicating, and meeting global, high-profile figures including former president of South Africa Nelson Mandela, actor Richard Gere and former president of Pakistan Pervez Musharaff. She went to Pakistan and India to report about the needs and emergency work for her NGO in October 2005 when the countries were hit by a 7.5 magnitude earthquake killing 79,000 people. As a strong advocate for

alternate energy, Jacobsen believes that everyone should improve their service public transportation an consume less oil. “Although people here along the Gulf of Mexico do not want oil spills in their backyard they prefer cheap gasoline and drive their cars as much as before,” she said. Jacobsen believes that US should develop more mass transit. Planning to graduate next December, Jacobsen wants to work with international agreement and policy work that deals with energy, climate and oil. Scheduled to return to HPU soon (hopefully), Jacobsen messaged to fellow students: “I am looking forward to seeing you again soon on Fort Street, and yes, remember to recycle!”


SPORTS

February 21, 2011

p20

www.hpu.edu/kalamalamaonline

New golf coach takes care of business

MARK CARPENTER student writer With a new coach and globally diverse group, the Sea Warrior golf team hopes to play on par with high expectations this year. Retirement is no life of leisure on the golf links for Coach Steve Phillips. The former HPU professor Phillips heads a well prepared Sea Warrior golf team this year. Phillips, who taught at the

HPU Business College for 16 years, was more than willing to trade downtown classes for tournaments all over the country. “I thought maybe this will be a way I can give something back to President Wright,” Phillips said. “Not just to the president, but the university as well.” Team captain Matthew deMoraes has seen a number of coaches during his three plus years on the squad, and he is

impressed with how Coach Phillips is handling his new position. “It’s been interesting because he is the first coach who has been solely involved with the team. He’s been great. He’s a strong coach,” deMoraes said. “He’s definitely the most hard-working coach we’ve ever had.” With players from the United States, Canada, England and Italy, the Sea War-

The HPU golf team competed in the John Burns Intercollegiate Tournament at Turtle Bay’s George Fazio Course on Feb. 19. Photo by HPU Athletics

Defense, defense, defense! JAZZMIN WILLIAMS student writer The mantra of the night: “no mercy!” The key to the game: defense. The Sea Warrior ladies basketball team took that message to heart when they defeated their cross-town rivals Chaminade 71-29 at the Neal Blaisdell Center on Feb. 8. Holding an opponent to just 29 points, with only 10 being scored the first half, is a school record. “It was a great overall team effort,” said head Coach Jeff Harada. “Their point guard couldn’t take Juice [Taiyande Huskey] off the dribble.” The win put HPU at 15-4 overall and 9-1 in their conference. It also placed the lady

Sea Warriors alone at the top of the PacWest standings. HPU controlled the tempo of the game from the start with Chaminade scoring their first point of the night on a free throw with 12:39 left in the first half. The Sea Warriors then allowed only three more completed field goal attempts and a 3-pointer, finishing the half at 37-10. “I think that [defensively] we’re on the right path,” said sophomore guard Melody Ladrido. “But we still need to work on transition defense and not playing defense in spurts.” On the offensive end, balanced scoring was the theme of the night, with 12 players scoring, and three in double digits. Freshman guard Skye Savini led with 12

points. Ladrido also noted that the lady Sea Warriors seemed to be breaking a few records this year. “We had our 12 game winning streak, the best preseason record yet, and Courtney Buster holding the single game rebounding record,” said Ladrido. “It feels like we’re breaking records left and right.” When asked of the highlight of the game, junior guard Taiyande Huskey gave props to her fellow point guard, freshman Brittany Hale. “When she [Hale] crossed that girl so hard she made her fall on her face,” said Huskey. “That was definitely the best part of the night.” Jamie Higa and Kayci Will headed the Silverswords with 6 points each.

riors are like a mini United hope to make a real strong showing at the PacWest tourNations. “The diversity ends up nament in April.” Second-year player Matt enhancing the dynamic of the team. It offers all sorts of Tweddell has high aspiradifferent perspectives on how tions. “We want to get past to play golf, and we all have the PacWest and hopefully by a good time with each other,” ranking, get to the next step, said deMoraes, a native of which is nationals,” he said. Hopefully the professor Surrey, England. “It’s great that HPU is turned coach will have his squad taking care of busiinternational.” With new additions like ness. freshmen Mac Keats and Ian Boat, the Sea Warriors seek to build on last year’s seventh-place finish at the PacWest Championships and make a dent in the competition. “We have a very young team, but our attitude is great. We are growing and getting stronger,” Phillips said. “We Steve Phillips, the new men’s golf head coach.

Photo by Janay Troutman

Photo by Eric Alcantara

HPU’s Jazzmin Williams averages 12 points a game. The Lady Sea Warriors basketball team defeated BYU.

Designer: Susanne Haala

News from

“Coach V”

Darren Vorderbruegge HPU Athletics Director

Earlier this month I was pleased to be a part of the ring ceremony for our national champion softball team. It was quite the event; President Chatt Wright and Pacific West Conference Commissioner Bob Hogue were on hand along with 14 members of the team and all five coaches. The celebration was carried live on television and on the Internet for all of Hawai’i and the world to see. A season-high for attendance was set for the basketball games that surrounded the ceremony, staff, studentathletes, and fans turned out for the event. Although the 2011 season is underway, the accolades and respect for last year’s champions continue to roll in. Next, HPU will be honored by the Legislature at the State Capitol on March 3.


Kalamalama Vol. 35, Issue 2