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Advertising/Public Relations Program Why Study Advertising/Public Relations at HPU? Have you ever seen an advertisement on TV and thought you could create better? Are you interested in managing the rollout of new products and working to improve the perception of those products by the media? If so, then you could be well suited for a career in advertising or public relations (PR). The core activity of advertising and public relations is to take a product, whether it be Pepsi or the latest Pirates of the Caribbean film, and construct promotional campaigns that get people excited about the product. Firms help companies, non-profits, and governments manage everything from speeches and the look of brochures to major crises. Sometimes it’s hard to tell where PR and advertising are different as new media is changing the face of advertising. This area now addresses social media marketing, as well as traditional forms. There’s no doubt that this field will continue to change, offering tremendous opportunities to someone with an interest in the area.

Why Study Advertising/ Public Relations in Hawai‘i? Hawai‘i Pacific University’s ideal location at the hub off g the economically vibrant Pacific Rim means outstanding co-operative education, internship and career opportunities. Students have found careers and internships with a wide variety of companies and organizations both in Hawai‘i and around the globe. Students studying in Hawai‘i are uniquely posed to examine emerging Asian markets.

HPU’s ideal loc ation and diverse student body pr students to live, ovides an excel work and learn lent environment as active members for of a global socie ty.

Program Overview The Advertising and Public Relations: Strategic Communication (ADPR) degree is a fresh approach to traditional, separate degrees in Advertising and Public Relations and reflects today’s integrated industry. The “strategic communication” portion of the name represents communication’s central role and our emphasis on an organization’s total and long-term communication efforts. Our bachelor of science degree is a single degree; however, students are given the flexibility of choosing two separate tracks. One track is geared more to management of integrated accounts and the other is designed more for the creative aspects of campaigns. For the account management track, we recommend concentrating elective classes (and/or a minor) in a specific discipline such as business, science, or health. This pairing allows for a more knowledgeable interaction with clients. For the creative track, we recommend concentrating elective classes (and/or a minor) in one of our arts programs such as multimedia, music, studio arts, or theater arts. The creative option orients students more toward the production of campaign materials, from classic print to the latest in multimedia productions. Both options allow students to build a marketable degree around their interests, learn traditional advertising and public relations skills, and meet industry needs – all within a single 124 credit hour degree. For students wishing to delve deeper into specific aspects of ADPR, we offer the option of additional course work or a double major; similar to more traditional, separate advertising and public relations degrees.

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www.hpu.edu/advertising


Hands-On Experience Rather than relying solely on textbooks, students in the Advertising and Public Relations program apply what they learn in the classroom to actual problems faced by organizations and businesses. In addition, eligible students are encouraged to take COM 3950 – Communication Practicum, an internship offering actual experience in a professional setting. Students select internships in any area of communication including advertising, corporate communication, journalism, public relations, speech, theater, or visual communication. Supervision is conducted both by a professional on site and by HPU faculty. Internships allow students to gain practical experience by working at an advertising or public relations agency, newspaper or television station, or in the communication department of a business such as a hospital or hotel. Many internships offer a stipend for extra spending money.

Career Options Future Outlook on Advertising and Public Relations by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: • Keen competition is expected for these highly coveted jobs. • College graduates with related experience, a high level of creativity, and strong communication and computer skills should have the best job opportunities. • High earnings, substantial travel, and long hours, including evenings and weekends, are common. • Because of the importance and high visibility of their jobs, these managers often are prime candidates for advancement to the highest ranks. Career opportunities include: advertising managers, marketing managers, promotion managers, public relations managers, social media marketing specialists, advertising media planners, media traffic personnel, copywriters, illustrators, creative individuals, production managers, directors of advertising and/or public relations, public relations specialists, and account executives.

Sommer Meyer, owner of Closet Fetish, constantly credits her classes at HPU as being the origin of her business’s success. Meyer was enrolled in HPU’s Advertising/Public Relations class in which students were taskedd with drawing up a business plan. Meyer reflected on her long-standingg practice of taping photos of her shoes to shoe boxes for easy identification. n. It worked, but it bothered her that “all the boxes were different sizes and nd colors.” She decided to create standardized boxes, ordered three sample boxes es from China, and sent out a press release to see whether anyone might be interested in buying them. In one week, InStyle magazine, Oprah and nd Traditional Home all called and wanted to feature her shoe boxes. These days, she counts celebrities like Michelle Obama, Halle Berry, Kim Cattrall, and Denise Richards as her clients. She has also been on Oprah’s O list and in InStyle twice. Meyer’s business plan and press release writing

assignments gave her the skills she needed to make a simple idea a success! – Sommer Meyer Owner of Closet Fetish BA, Advertising

www.hpu.edu/advertising

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ADVERTISING/PUBLIC RELATIONS CURRICULUM

A

B

C

Communication Skills

Global Systems

ED 2300 HIST 1717 JOUR 1100 WRI 1100, 1150

BIOL 1000, 2052 CHEM 1000 GEOG 1000 GEOL 1000 MARS 1000 PHYS 1000

COM 1000, 1200, 2500 ED 2301 Lower division modern language classes

CLST 2600 COM 1500, 2000, 2640 CSCI 1011 (DL) LAT 1100 MULT 1100 THEA 1400*

Research & Epistemology

COM 1400 WRI 1200

ECON 1010 GEOG 2000 HIST 2002 INTR 1000 MARS 1500 MULT 2060

CSCI 2611 MATH 1110, 1115, 1130, 1140, 1150, 2214, 2215 PHIL 2090

BIOL 1200,1500, 2010, 2030 CHEM 2050 CSCI 1041 (DL) ENVS 3000 HIST 2630 MULT 1050 PHYS 1020 SOC 2600

ENG 1500 HIST 2900 MATH 1123 PHIL 3731 PHYS 2030, 2050 PSY 1000 SOC 2100

Values & Choices

World Cultures

AMST 1776 CLST 1000 ENG 2201*, 2203 ENVS 1030 HUM 3000 PHIL 2500 PSCI 2000 SWRK 2000

ARTH 2000*, 2100*, 2200* ENG 2101* GEOG 1500 HIST 2001 JADM 2000 MATH 2007 REL 1000

BIOL 1300 ECON 1000, 2010 ED 2000 ENG 2202, 2204, 2301* HIST 2111 HUM 1000 JADM 1000 PSCI 2500 SOC 2000 THEA 1000*

AL 1000 ANTH 2000 COM 2300 HIST 2402 HUM 1270 MUS 2101* REL 2001 SOC 1000 STSS 2601

ECON 2015 ENG 2000* HIST 2112, 2301 NSCI 2000, 2100 PHIL 1000 PSCI 1400

AL 2000 ARTS 1000*, 2150* BIOL 2170 ENG 2510*, 2520* GEOG 2500* HIST 2113, 2401 MUS 1000* REL 2151 THEA 2320

Curriculum is periodically updated. Please visit www.hpu.edu/GenEd for the most current list of courses.

i. lower-division requirements general education common core (at least 45 semester credits) 1. Complete the general education common core consisting of one course in each of 15 common core categories. Take one course from each of the 15 boxes. If a course shown is a lower division requirement for this major, it can simultaneously fulfill both requirements. These potential overlaps are indicated parenthetically after the name of the course in the list of lower division major requirements. Extra courses from the same box in the table will apply to lower division requirements where applicable or be counted as unrestricted electives. 2. No more than two courses with the same alpha (the alphabetic prefix such as HIST or BIOL) may be applied toward the common core requirements. 3. Among courses chosen to meet these 15 requirements, choose one that meets each of the cross-theme requirements: • Digital Literacy (DL): Complete CSCI 1011 or CSCI 1041 or take the proficiency exam. • Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity: Complete any course marked with a “*” in the table.

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www.hpu.edu/advertising


ADVERTISING/PUBLIC RELATIONS CURRICULUM (CONTINUED) lower-division major requirements (15 semester credits) ADPR 2000 Introduction to Integrated Advertising and Public Relations COM 2000 Public Speaking (Communication Skills C) MULT 2460 Graphic Design For Creative track: ADPR 2500 Creativity MULT 2465 Motion Picture Production

COM 3650 Media Ethics and Law COM 3950 Communication Practicum MULT 3475 Web Interface and Design Plus 6 credits of the following: ADPR ADPR ADPR JOUR JOUR MULT

3320 3400 3910 3420 3455 3675

Consumer Behavior Media Strategies Selected Topics in Advertising/Public Relations Publication Design Photojournalism Advanced Web Design

For Account Management track: MATH 1123 Statistics (Research and Epistemology C)

ii. upper-division requirements upper-division general education (6 semester credits)

iii. unrestricted electives The number of unrestricted elective credits will vary depending on the number of credits that overlap between the general education requirements and the major requirements, but students will need to earn enough college-level credits to reach a total of 124 semester credits.

upper-division research and writing (3 credits) Any Upper-Division Research and Writing Course upper-division citizenship requirement (3 credits) Any Upper-Division Global Citizenship or Service-Learning course Note: If ADPR 3700 is chosen for both the upper-division research and writing requirement and the major elective, the student will have three additional credits of unrestricted electives.

upper-division major requirements (30-33 semester credits) Account Management track: ADPR ADPR ADPR ADPR ADPR ADPR COM COM COM MULT

3200 3250 3400 3600 3700 4900 3000 3650 3950 3475

Public Relations Writing Communication Media Research Media Strategies Media Sales Integrated Promotion Management Seminar Mass Media Media Ethics and Law Communication Practicum Web Interface and Design

Plus one of the following: ADPR ADPR ADPR COM

3320 3500 3910 3440

Consumer Behavior Creative Copywriting Selected topics in Advertising/Public Relations Interpersonal Communication

The marketing minor is recommended.

upper-division major requirements (30 semester credits) Strategic Creative track: ADPR ADPR ADPR ADPR ADPR

3200 3250 3500 3700 4900

Public Relations Writing Communication Media Research Creative Copywriting Integrated Promotion Management Seminar

www.hpu.edu/advertising

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FOUR�YEAR PLAN FOR THE ADVERTISING/PUBLIC RELATIONS MAJOR Below is a typical fall-spring sequence for a full-time student planning to complete a B.S. in Advertising/Public Relations in four regular academic years (no summers). Summer and/or winter courses could be taken to expedite the completion of the degree process. Please take this proposed 4-year plan as only a model. Completion of the major may depend on what courses are offered during a given semester.

Freshman Year Fall ADPR ARTS COM CSCI WRI

2500 1000 1200 1041 1100

Spring

Creativity Introduction to Visual Arts Foundations of Communication Studies Digital Literacy in a Global Society Analyzing & Writing Arguments

3 3 3 3 3

ADPR COM GEOL MULT WRI

2000 2000 1000 2460 1200

Intro to Adv./Public Rel. Public Speaking Introductory Geology Graphic Design Studio Research, Argument and Writing

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15

Total Credits: 15

Sophomore Year Fall ECON GEOG MULT PHIL PSCI

2010 2000 2465 2090 2000

Spring

Principles of Microeconomics Introduction to Human Geography Motion Picture Production Principles of Logic Introduction to Politics

3 3 3 3 3

ADPR ECON ENG MUS PSY

3200 2015 2101 2101 1000

Public Relations Writing Principles of Macroeconomics Representations of Pacific Life Music in World Culture Introduction to Psychology

Total Credits: 15

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15

Junior Year Fall ADPR 3500 COM 3000 JOUR 3455 JOUR 4900 MULT 3475

Spring

Creativity & Copywriting Mass Media Photojournalism Seminar in Journalism Web Interface & Design

3 3 3 3 3

ADPR 3250 ADPR 3910 ARTH 3301 COM 2500 COM 3650 PSY 3235

Communication Media Research Selected Topics in Adv./Public Rel. Art of China Sex, Gender and Communication Media Ethics and Law Cross-Cultural Psychology

3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15 Total Credits: 18

Senior Year Fall ADPR ADPR COM HIST JOUR JOUR

6

3320 3700 3340 3302 3420 3455

Spring

Consumer Behavior 3 Integrated Promotion Mgmt. 3 Nonverbal Communication 3 History of Modern China 3 Publication Design 3 Photojournalism 3 Total Credits: 18

ADPR 3400 ADPR 4900 COM 4990 HUM 3000 THEA 1000

www.hpu.edu/advertising

Media Strategies 3 Seminar 3 Portfolio Development 3 The Contemporary Choices 3 Introduction to Theatre 3 Total Credits: 15 Total Credits: 126


COMMUNICATION PROGRAM Why Study Communication at HPU? The Communication major at Hawai‘i Pacific University (HPU) is a comprehensive program of study that develops the skills and confidence necessary to present ideas in various formats and situations. The Department of Communication (DOC) seeks to create an integrated environment for the study and production of communication and media content. Our students study how to communicate effectively, ethically, across multiple platforms and with people from diverse backgrounds. The DOC provides a rigorous curriculum in a stimulating environment that addresses the history, theories, mechanisms and techniques of communication. Communication focuses on how people use messages to generate meaning in various contexts, cultures, channels and media. Known as “rhetoric” in the Western academic tradition, communication pedagogy has been a central concern of Greek, Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, Asian, indigenous and modern cultures. Today, the study of communication embraces telecommunications, the Internet, e-commerce, mobile communications, global diplomacy, advertising, public relations, journalism, broadcasting, intercultural and interpersonal communication, as well as public speaking, semiotics, digital mechanisms and media studies.

Why Study Communication in Hawai‘i? Living and learning in Hawai‘i is a stimulating experience. Honolulu is a major hub of activity for business, education, government, the arts, the leisure industries, sports, and health services. These sectors provide students with a variety of local and transnational opportunities to conduct research, network with professionals, and experience on-thejob training.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW/ OBJECTIVES

Dr. John Hart con tinues a discussi on of communicati after class. HPU on theory with stu Professors pride dents themselves on be out of the classroo ing highly access m. ible in or

Program Objectives for the Department of Communication: • • • • • •

Recognize, understand and be able to apply basic communication theories. Develop the ability to apply communication principles in various practices. Demonstrate dynamic, effective, and persuasive oral communication skills. Write clearly, concisely, correctly, and in an appropriate style for the communication objective. Employ appropriate research techniques and analyze, interpret, and present data effectively. Demonstrate an appreciation of the global diversity of communication and its impact in the world.

The Department of Communication offers six different minors. Each requires six upper-division courses.

MINOR IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES The Communication Studies minor recognizes that the modern study of communication builds on the foundation of rhetorical studies, social science, and rhetorical research.

MINOR IN GLOBAL COMMUNICATION The Global Communication minor educates students about world wide cultures and prepares them to work and communicate effectively in the global economy of the 21st century.

www.hpu.edu/communication

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MINOR IN JOURNALISM The Journalism minor focuses on gathering, interpreting, and ons. presenting information upon which we base our decisions. rces Students learn to interview and gather data from multiple sources ata in an era of media convergence. They learn to present that data quickly, accurately, and objectively.

MINOR IN MULTIMEDIA The Multimedia minor provides in-depth engagement with h contemporary multimedia software tools across multiplee platforms. Students will need to address digital imaging,, photography, web design and motion picture production, amongst other multimedia options.

MINOR IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION The Speech Communication minor emphasizes oral communication techniques, built on a foundation of communication theory and research. The program encompasses the oldest and core part of the Communication field, descending directly from the study of rhetoric, an original part of the classical trivium.

MINOR IN STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION

HPU studen ts come from all 50 states endless oppo and more th rtunities to de an 100 coun velop comm tries, provid unication sk ing ills across cu ltures.

The Strategic Communication minor is a fresh approach to traditional separate minors in Advertising and Public Relations and reflects today’s integrated industry. It allows students to build a marketable minor around their interests, learn traditional advertising and public relations skills, and meet industry needs.

HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE The Department of Communication (DOC) Internship program is one of the flagship areas of the department. Rather than relying solely on textbooks, students in the Communication program apply what they learn in the classroom to actual problems faced by organizations and businesses. In COM 3950, Communication Practicum, students select internships in any area of communication including advertising, corporate communication, journalism, public relations, speech, theater, or visual communication. Supervision is conducted by both a professional on site and by HPU faculty. Students also gain hands-on experience participating and traveling to international tournaments and competitions with DOC sponsored organizations, including Toastmasters and the Sea Warrior Debate Society.

CAREER OPTIONS At HPU’s Department of Communication, students prepare for graduate study and careers in a spectrum of communication industries. Built on a theoretical framework, students develop critical thinking and analytical ability. They also learn to frame and express their ideas logically, clearly, concisely, and dynamically through writing, the spoken word, still and moving images, text, and other “non-speaking” modalities. Furthermore, they learn techniques and mechanisms for decoding both the ubiquitous messages of our mediated environment and other culturally specific articulations. Communication is sometimes referred to as an “umbrella degree,” meaning that there are hundreds of different jobs for which the degree can prepare you for, including media sales at a television or radio station, writing for a magazine, or creating advertising messages. In addition to the spectrum of jobs specifically in communication fields, this program will help you succeed in other careers, from teaching to management. Communication is also excellent preparation for further study in business, law or medicine.

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www.hpu.edu/communication


COMMUNICATION CURRICULUM

A

B

C

Communication Skills

Global Systems

ED 2300 HIST 1717 JOUR 1100 WRI 1100, 1150

BIOL 1000, 2052 CHEM 1000 GEOG 1000 GEOL 1000 MARS 1000 PHYS 1000

COM 1000, 1200, 2500 ED 2301 Lower division modern language classes

CLST 2600 COM 1500, 2000, 2640 CSCI 1011 (DL) LAT 1100 MULT 1100 THEA 1400*

Values & Choices

World Cultures

AMST 1776 CLST 1000 ENG 2201*, 2203 ENVS 1030 HUM 3000 PHIL 2500 PSCI 2000 SWRK 2000

ARTH 2000*, 2100*, 2200* ENG 2101* GEOG 1500 HIST 2001 JADM 2000 MATH 2007 REL 1000

BIOL 1300 ECON 1000, 2010 ED 2000 ENG 2202, 2204, 2301* HIST 2111 HUM 1000 JADM 1000 PSCI 2500 SOC 2000 THEA 1000*

AL 1000 ANTH 2000 COM 2300 HIST 2402 HUM 1270 MUS 2101* REL 2001 SOC 1000 STSS 2601

ECON 2015 ENG 2000* HIST 2112, 2301 NSCI 2000, 2100 PHIL 1000 PSCI 1400

AL 2000 ARTS 1000*, 2150* BIOL 2170 ENG 2510*, 2520* GEOG 2500* HIST 2113, 2401 MUS 1000* REL 2151 THEA 2320

Research & Epistemology

COM 1400 WRI 1200

ECON 1010 GEOG 2000 HIST 2002 INTR 1000 MARS 1500 MULT 2060

CSCI 2611 MATH 1110, 1115, 1130, 1140, 1150, 2214, 2215 PHIL 2090

BIOL 1200,1500, 2010, 2030 CHEM 2050 CSCI 1041 (DL) ENVS 3000 HIST 2630 MULT 1050 PHYS 1020 SOC 2600

ENG 1500 HIST 2900 MATH 1123 PHIL 3731 PHYS 2030, 2050 PSY 1000 SOC 2100

Curriculum is periodically updated. Please visit www.hpu.edu/GenEd for the most current list of courses.

i. lower-division requirements general education common core (at least 45 semester credits) 1. Complete the general education common core consisting of one course in each of 15 common core categories. Take one course from each of the 15 boxes. If a course shown is a lower division requirement for this major, it can simultaneously fulfill both requirements. These potential overlaps are indicated parenthetically after the name of the course in the list of lower division major requirements. Extra courses from the same box in the table will apply to lower division requirements where applicable or be counted as unrestricted electives. 2. No more than two courses with the same alpha (the alphabetic prefix such as HIST or BIOL) may be applied toward the common core requirements. 3. Among courses chosen to meet these 15 requirements, choose one that meets each of the cross-theme requirements: • Digital Literacy (DL): Complete CSCI 1011 or CSCI 1041 or take the proficiency exam. • Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity: Complete any course marked with a “*” in the table.

www.hpu.edu/communication

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COMMUNICATION CURRICULUM (CONTINUED) lower-division major requirements (12 semester credits) COM 1200 Foundations of Communication Studies (Communication Skills B) COM 2000 Public Speaking (Communication Skills C) COM 2640 Argumentation and Debate (Communication Skills C) One course chosen from: COM 2300 Communication and Culture (World Cultures B) COM 2500 Sex, Gender, and Communication (Communication Skills B)

lower-division language requirements (8 credits) Two semesters of the same language: ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT or SPAN (One semester of a modern language meets Communication Skills B, while LAT 1100 meets Communication Skills C).

ii. upper-division requirements upper-division general education (6 semester credits) upper-division research and writing (3 credits) Any Upper-Division Research and Writing Course upper-division citizenship requirement (3 credits) Any Upper-Division Global Citizenship or Service-Learning course

upper-division major requirements (36 semester credits) Essentials: Take all of the following: COM 3000 Mass Media COM 3250 Communication Research COM 3320 Persuasion COM 3950 Communication Practicum COM 4900 Seminar in Communication Criticism Contexts: One course chosen from: COM 3200 Interpersonal Communication COM 3300 Intercultural Communication Advanced Applications: One course chosen from: COM 3440 Advanced Public Speaking COM 3670 Legal Communication Theory: One course chosen from: COM 3680 Rhetorical Theory COM 3900 Communication Theory Electives: Four courses chosen from the following and/or above—Contexts, Advanced Applications, or Theory—that have not otherwise been counted: COM COM COM COM COM COM COM

3010 3340 3350 3420 3650 3770 3910

Advanced Career Skills Nonverbal Communication Team Building Business Communication Media Ethics and Law Media Literacy Selected Topics in Communication*

*May be repeated when topics change

iii. unrestricted electives The number of unrestricted elective credits needed to graduate will vary depending on the number of credits that overlap between the general education requirements and the major requirements, but students will need to earn enough college-level credits to reach a total of 124 semester credits.

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www.hpu.edu/communication


FOUR�YEAR PLAN FOR THE COMMUNICATION MAJOR Below is a typical fall-spring sequence for a full-time student planning to complete a B.A. in Communication in four regular academic years (no summers). Summer and/or winter courses could be taken to expedite the completion of the degree process. Please take this proposed 4-year plan as only a model. Completion of the major may depend on what courses are offered during a given semester.

Freshman Year Fall COM 1200 MARS 1000 THEA 1000 WRI 1100 Any Language

Spring

Foundations of Communication Introductory Oceanography Introduction to Theater Analyzing & Writing Arguments ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT, or SPAN

3 3 3 3

COM 1400 COM 2000 GEOG 1500 PSCI 2000 Same Language

4

Crit. Reasoning and Rhetoric Public Speaking World Regional Geography Introduction to Politics ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT, or SPAN

Total Credits: 16

3 3 3 3 4

Total Credits: 16

Sophomore Year Fall COM COM PHIL PSY SOC

2500 2640 2465 1000 1000

Spring

Sex, Gender, and Communication Argumentation and Debate Introduction to World Philosophies Introduction to Psychology Introduction to Sociology

3 3 3 3 3

COM COM CSCI MUS PHIL

3000 3200 1041 1000 2090

Mass Media Interpersonal Communication Digital Literacy in a Global Society Introduction to Classical Music Principles of Logic

Total Credits: 15

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15

Junior Year Fall COM COM COM MULT PHYS

3250 3320 3340 2060 1020

Spring

Communication Research Persuasion Nonverbal Communication Modern Media Systems Astronomy

3 3 3 3 3

COM COM COM PHIL MARS PSY

3300 3770 3900 3651 2010 3155

Intercultural Communication Media Literacy Communication Theory Environmental Ethics Scientific SCUBA Diving Sports Psychology

3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15 Total Credits: 18

Senior Year Fall COM COM COM JOUR MULT

3010 3420 3670 3455 3475

Advanced Career Skills Business Communication Legal Communication Photojournalism Web Design

Spring 3 3 3 3 3

COM COM ADPR COM TIM

3950 4900 3200 3260 3320

Total Credits: 15

www.hpu.edu/communication

Communication Practicum Seminar in Communication Criticism Public Relations Writing Exploring Film Special Events Management

4 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 16 Total Credits: 126

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Journalism Program Why Study Journalism at HPU? The skills acquired in Journalism are useful in any field. Journalism can provide competency in gathering information; establishing veracity and credibility; clear, precise writing; skillful editing; a mastery of photography, video, audio, graphics and design; plus the ability to effectively present information in print, broadcast or d digital forms. These skills are valuable and will enhance any career.

Why Study Journalism in Hawai‘i? to

nts Some of the world’s fastest growing nations ons journalism stude es opportunities for vid pro a, m ala lam with the most dynamic economies are in Asia. sia. wspaper, the Ka nning student ne er digital media. Hawai‘i Pacific University, at the heart of HPU’s award wi oth in d an b we nt, on the be published in pri the Pacific Region, is ideally positioned to provide an American education in the center of an emerging Pacific-Asian economy. Also, HPU offers the intellectual and theoretical framework for humanities-based journalism study, and a faculty of professional journalists with many years of experience in print, broadcast and digital newsrooms.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW/OBJECTIVES Journalism is the gathering, interpretation, writing, editing, presentation and dissemination of information upon which we base our society’s decisions. Such information may be breaking news such as war or disaster, may provide insight into the triumphs and tragedies of the human condition, or offer important practical information to people about their daily lives. Students prepare for graduate study and careers in print journalism, broadcasting, photojournalism, online, digital or design. They learn to interview and gather data from multiple sources. They learn to present that data quickly, accurately, and fairly. They become cognizant of the effects of agenda-setting, bias, and gate-keeping of information vital to an informed public. The major goal of the HPU Journalism program is to help students become ethical communicators no matter what area of Journalism they undertake. This reflects the continuing, major transformational era that Journalism has been undergoing. This process continues to evolve at a rapid speed. Our program is based on the convergence of media in the multi-platform, digital age.

Students who major in journalism will be prepared to: • Think critically and write clearly, concisely, correctly, and in an appropriate style for print, broadcast, or Internet media • Demonstrate an understanding of basic journalism theory • Demonstrate an understanding of and an ability to apply principles and practices of journalism law and ethics, including development of personal standards and an analytical system for resolving ethical conflict • Demonstrate dynamic, effective, and persuasive oral, written, visual and digital communication skills • Demonstrate the ability to practice journalism and to function as reporters, writers, editors, photographers, videographers, and/or web, digital and graphic designers • Present information in all available media: print, radio, television, web or multimedia

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www.hpu.edu/journalism


HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE The Journalism program places a strong emphasis on internships with professional news media, government and professional communication organizations. Most of our majors take internships for academic credit in print, broadcast, magazine and digital media operation in Hawai‘i, on the Mainland or abroad. Many of our students choose to do a semester of study abroad. The practicum experience allows students to observe, understand and appreciate how a modern media organization works. It is extremely useful in allowing students to assemble résumés and professional portfolios, and also network with professionals in the field — skills vital to finding employment after graduation. On campus, we have the Kalamalama, our award-winning campus newspaper. Working as a Kalamalama staff member provides students the opportunity to get published in print, on the web, and in other digital media. The Kalamalama also offers training in video and photography.

CAREER OPTIONS The opportunities for Journalism are rapidly changing as the field undergoes a transformational stage not seen since the invention of the steam press. Times of change are times of opportunity. Nearly every field is looking for talented people who can gather, write, edit, present and disseminate credible, reliable information in a variety of formats. This provides a vast range of communication opportunities in the corporate, government, education, non-profits, and small business fields. Additionally, many of our students who continue their studies by earning a Master of Arts in Communication gain a competitive edge and find a rich variety of opportunities await them. s amalama, ha aper, the Kal sp w ne n nt ica de er m HPU’s stu ds from the A st place awar received 13 fir n. s Associatio Scholastic Pres

Working for the University newspaper has been an interesting and challenging experience that has stretched my abilities and taught me something new every day. From my creative writing ability, to my research skills, it’s yet another way HPU is

preparing me to achieve my fullest potential. – Susanne Haala Germany BA, Journalism ‘11

www.hpu.edu/journalism

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JOURNALISM CURRICULUM

A

B

C

Communication Skills

Global Systems

ED 2300 HIST 1717 JOUR 1100 WRI 1100, 1150

BIOL 1000, 2052 CHEM 1000 GEOG 1000 GEOL 1000 MARS 1000 PHYS 1000

COM 1000, 1200, 2500 ED 2301 Lower division modern language classes

CLST 2600 COM 1500, 2000, 2640 CSCI 1011 (DL) LAT 1100 MULT 1100 THEA 1400*

Values & Choices

World Cultures

AMST 1776 CLST 1000 ENG 2201*, 2203 ENVS 1030 HUM 3000 PHIL 2500 PSCI 2000 SWRK 2000

ARTH 2000*, 2100*, 2200* ENG 2101* GEOG 1500 HIST 2001 JADM 2000 MATH 2007 REL 1000

BIOL 1300 ECON 1000, 2010 ED 2000 ENG 2202, 2204, 2301* HIST 2111 HUM 1000 JADM 1000 PSCI 2500 SOC 2000 THEA 1000*

AL 1000 ANTH 2000 COM 2300 HIST 2402 HUM 1270 MUS 2101* REL 2001 SOC 1000 STSS 2601

ECON 2015 ENG 2000* HIST 2112, 2301 NSCI 2000, 2100 PHIL 1000 PSCI 1400

AL 2000 ARTS 1000*, 2150* BIOL 2170 ENG 2510*, 2520* GEOG 2500* HIST 2113, 2401 MUS 1000* REL 2151 THEA 2320

Research & Epistemology

COM 1400 WRI 1200

ECON 1010 GEOG 2000 HIST 2002 INTR 1000 MARS 1500 MULT 2060

CSCI 2611 MATH 1110, 1115, 1130, 1140, 1150, 2214, 2215 PHIL 2090

BIOL 1200,1500, 2010, 2030 CHEM 2050 CSCI 1041 (DL) ENVS 3000 HIST 2630 MULT 1050 PHYS 1020 SOC 2600

ENG 1500 HIST 2900 MATH 1123 PHIL 3731 PHYS 2030, 2050 PSY 1000 SOC 2100

Curriculum is periodically updated. Please visit www.hpu.edu/GenEd for the most current list of courses.

i. lower-division requirements general education common core (at least 45 semester credits) 1. Complete the general education common core consisting of one course in each of 15 common core categories. Take one course from each of the 15 boxes. If a course shown is a lower division requirement for this major, it can simultaneously fulfill both requirements. These potential overlaps are indicated parenthetically after the name of the course in the list of lower division major requirements. Extra courses from the same box in the table will apply to lower division requirements where applicable or be counted as unrestricted electives. 2. No more than two courses with the same alpha (the alphabetic prefix such as HIST or BIOL) may be applied toward the common core requirements. 3. Among courses chosen to meet these 15 requirements, choose one that meets each of the cross-theme requirements: • Digital Literacy (DL): Complete CSCI 1011 or CSCI 1041 or take the proficiency exam. • Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity: Complete any course marked with a “*” in the table.

14

www.hpu.edu/journalism


JOURNALISM CURRICULUM (CONTINUED) lower-division major requirements (18 semester credits) COM 2000 Public Speaking (Communication Skills C) COM 2300 Communication and Culture (World Cultures B) JOUR 1100 Writing for the Media (Communication Skills A) or JOUR 3000 Newswriting for Integrated Media MULT 2060 Modern Media Systems MULT 2460 Graphic Design MULT 2465 Video Production I

upper-division major requirements (36 semester credits) COM COM JOUR JOUR JOUR JOUR JOUR JOUR JOUR MULT MULT

3650 3950 3300 3400 3420 3455 3550 3500 4900 3360 3475

Media Ethics and Law Communication Practicum Reporting Editing Publication Design* Photo Journalism I Publication Production* The Journalist as Entrepreneur Seminar in Journalism Writing for Broadcast Introduction to Multimedia

Plus one of the following:

lower-division language requirements (8 credits) Two semesters of the same language: ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT or SPAN (A semester of a modern language meets Communication Skills B, while LAT 1100 meets Communication Skills C).

JOUR 3340 Sports Writing JOUR 3600 Electronic Journalism MULT 3700 Radio Broadcasting *May be repeated up to 9 total credits; however, only 3 credits may be counted toward major course requirements.

iii. unrestricted electives ii. upper-division requirements upper-division general education (6 semester credits)

The number of unrestricted elective credits will vary depending on the number of credits that overlap between the general education requirements and the major requirements, but students will need to earn enough college-level credits to reach a total of 124 semester credits.

upper-division research and writing (3 credits) One of the following: COM 3400 Communicating Professionally COM 3500 Technical Communication upper-division citizenship requirement (3 credits) Any Upper-Division Global Citizenship or Service-Learning course.

www.hpu.edu/journalism

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FOUR�YEAR PLAN FOR THE JOURNALISM MAJOR Below is a typical fall-spring sequence for a full-time student planning to complete a B.A. in Journalism in four regular academic years (no summers). Summer and/or winter courses could be taken to expedite the completion of the degree process. Please take this proposed 4-year plan as only a model. Completion of the major may depend on what courses are offered during a given semester.

Freshman Year Fall BIOL 1000 CSCI 1011 HUM 1000 JOUR 1100 Any Language

Spring

Introduction to Biology 3 Intro to Computer Information Systems 3 Introduction to the Humanities 3 Writing for the Media 3 ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT, or SPAN 4

COM 2000 GEOG 2000 MATH 1115 WRI 1200 Same Language

Public Speaking Introduction to Human Geography Survey of Math Research, Argument, and Writing ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT, or SPAN

3 3 3 3 4

Total Credits: 16

Total Credits: 16

Sophomore Year Fall COM ENG HIST MULT PSCI

2300 1500 2001 2060 2000

Spring

Communciation & Culture Ways of Reading History World Culture to 1500 Modern Media Systems Introduction to Politics

3 3 3 3 3

ARTS ECON JOUR MULT MULT PHYS

1000 2015 3550 2460 2465 1020

Introduction to Visual Arts Principles of Macroeconomics Publication Production Graphic Design Video Production I Astronomy

Total Credits: 15

3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 18

Junior Year Fall COM HIST JOUR JOUR MULT

3400 2002 3300 3455 3700

Spring

Communicating Professionally 3 Global Historical Experience since 1500 3 Reporting 3 Photojournalism I 3 Radio Broadcasting 3

COM JOUR JOUR JOUR JOUR

3650 3550 3400 3420 3500

Media Ethics and Law Publication Production Editing Publication Design The Journalist as Entrepreneur

Total Credits: 15

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15

Senior Year Fall ENG COM HIST MULT MULT

2000 3950 1717 3360 3475

Spring

Introduction to Literature Communication Practicum Reacting to the Past Writing for New Media Introduction to Web Design

3 3 3 3 3

ART COM ENG JOUR JOUR

1070 3300 2510 3600 4900

Total Credits: 15

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www.hpu.edu/journalism

Watercolor I and II 3 Intercultural Communication 3 World Literature 3 Electronic Journalism 3 Journalism Seminar 3 Total Credits: 15 Total Credits: 125


Multimedia Programs Why Study Multimedia dia at HPU? Our two Multimedia baccalaureate programs, B.A. in Multimedia Cinematic Production and B.A. in Integrated Multimedia, combine digital imaging, web design, audiovideo production and editing. In these programs, students learn highly sought after camera and computer skills through hands-on, project-based learning. Students will write, direct, produce, shoot, digitally manipulate, and publish their projects privately and publicly on the Web and other venues. Unlike other programs that might be more theoretical, these programs combine classroom instruction with practical application. Students will receive grounding in the history of modern media and critical discourse about their favorite TV shows, feature films, video games, and other emerging media and technolo-gies. We require students to address a full array of design n and production tools from digital imaging, to audio-video o production and nonlinear editing, to motion graphics, web b design and traditional photography. This allows students to become not only highly valued workers in productionnoriented industries, but self-sufficient, autonomous producers rs in their own right.

rough hands-on, computer skills th d an era cam er sought aft nts learn highly Multimedia stude . ing project-based learn

Why Study Multimedia in Hawai‘i? The islands of Hawai‘i are a renowned location for cinematic and television productions in part because of the varied topography and micro-climates available. Hawai‘i can represent tropical vistas, beach fronts, mountain forests, rain forests, jungles, swamps, desert landscapes, volcanic terrain and nearly everything in between. Plus, the island of O‘ahu has many thriving cultural communities and a rich variety of inhabitants and visitors to engage with from across the globe. Distinct cultural settings to draw inspiration from include town and country, (sub)urban, metropolitan, old world Chinatown, missionary and colonial era, tiki-culture, and the celebrated Honolulu music scene and nightlife. This multicultural setting is an excellent environment for aspiring producers, writers, visual artists, designers and storytellers. Furthermore, our Multimedia programs work closely with the professional community through lectures, screenings, exhibitions, production and broadcasting opportunities, and through our collaborations with diverse organizations like the Hawai‘i International Film Festival, Thinktech Hawaii and other partnerships.

Integrated Multimedia Program Overview The Integrated Multimedia degree prepares students to work and produce in online, mass media, information and entertainment industries. This major focuses on developing multiple media literacy competencies, analytic abilities and narrative skills. In this program, students develop mixed media portfolios and capstone projects. The applied audio-visual, graphical and online skills that students learn are formed by a foundation in communication and critical analysis, and an emphasis on visual and narrative design. Students are introduced to a comprehensive range of digital imaging and web design software and techniques, as well as audio-visual production and digital nonlinear editing. Curriculum is designed so that students create personalized and professional portfolio assets from their first semester of engagement. Specialized courses in motion graphics, mobile design, game design, industry internship, and writing for emerging media allow students to tailor their experience to relevant goals and aspirations.

www.hpu.edu/multimedia

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Multimedia Cinematic Production Program Overview The Multimedia Cinematic Production degree prepares students work and produce in the audio-visual, mass media, information to w and entertainment industries. The major focuses on developing multiple media literacy competencies, analytic abilities and mu narrative na skills. In this program, students can choose a capsto stone project focusing on a Creative Narrative Production or a Documentary Production. The program is both field an and studio-oriented, where students are required to work as individuals and in collaboration on a variety of creative and in fa fact-based projects. Students have the opportunity to write, p produce, shoot, edit and publish their original work, as well aas produce public service television and radio broadcasts. Capstone projects also allow students to interface with interC national competitions and festivals. n

APAN calibrate the GIG , Andrea Vold nt de stu ia ed tim ach. itos and Mul at Makapu‘u Be Professor Pete Br a interactive photo ram no pa a for it robotic un

HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE Production work often allows students to enter the Hawai‘ii community, where they engage in narrative productions, documentaries, professional web design, illustration, photography, television and radio production, competitive art and other creative activities. Students are required to write, design, and publish with laptops, mobile and tablet devices, as well as traditional methods, such as pen and paper, journals and other collaborative media. In the Integrated Multimedia program, an Internship Practicum is required and facilitated by the Department of Communication. Students choose a company in the community to work with. Past internships include Clear Channel Communication, Time-Warner Cable, Tom Moffat Productions, KHON-TV, KHNL-TV, KITV-TV, Thinktech Hawaii, multimedia production companies, advertising and PR agencies.

Multimedia stude nts (Mike Ang, Nicole Kato, Yu film on location kio Usami and in Chinatown for Chris Avery) the HPU@HIF Festival) Collabora F (Hawai‘i Inter tion. national Film

Several venues exist for our multimedia students to be able to exhibit and publish their work, including dedicated websites, International Film Festival collaborations, and the University’s First Look Mixed Media Exhibition at the end of the academic year. At First Look, students have the opportunity to exhibit 2-D and 3-D art, sculpture, digital imaging and photography in a downtown gallery setting; and exhibit their cinematic productions in a theatrical venue.

CAREER OPTIONS Our Multimedia programs prepare students to work in a wide array of industries and businesses, including traditional communications, information and entertainment, advertising and public relations, web design, graphic design, photography, television broadcasting, radio and journalism. Many of our students use their baccalaureate education to pursue graduate level degrees in such disciplines as Communication, Education, Cinematic Arts, Critical Studies, Interactive Design, Information and Computer Programming. Many of our students also find themselves in front of or behind the camera in broadcast journalism, working as designers, photographers, writers, and other creative and technical positions.

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www.hpu.edu/multimedia


INTEGRATED MULTIMEDIA CURRICULUM

A

B

C

Communication Skills

Global Systems

ED 2300 HIST 1717 JOUR 1100 WRI 1100, 1150

BIOL 1000, 2052 CHEM 1000 GEOG 1000 GEOL 1000 MARS 1000 PHYS 1000

COM 1000, 1200, 2500 ED 2301 Lower division modern language classes

CLST 2600 COM 1500, 2000, 2640 CSCI 1011 (DL) LAT 1100 MULT 1100 THEA 1400*

Values & Choices

World Cultures

AMST 1776 CLST 1000 ENG 2201*, 2203 ENVS 1030 HUM 3000 PHIL 2500 PSCI 2000 SWRK 2000

ARTH 2000*, 2100*, 2200* ENG 2101* GEOG 1500 HIST 2001 JADM 2000 MATH 2007 REL 1000

BIOL 1300 ECON 1000, 2010 ED 2000 ENG 2202, 2204, 2301* HIST 2111 HUM 1000 JADM 1000 PSCI 2500 SOC 2000 THEA 1000*

AL 1000 ANTH 2000 COM 2300 HIST 2402 HUM 1270 MUS 2101* REL 2001 SOC 1000 STSS 2601

ECON 2015 ENG 2000* HIST 2112, 2301 NSCI 2000, 2100 PHIL 1000 PSCI 1400

AL 2000 ARTS 1000*, 2150* BIOL 2170 ENG 2510*, 2520* GEOG 2500* HIST 2113, 2401 MUS 1000* REL 2151 THEA 2320

Research & Epistemology

COM 1400 WRI 1200

ECON 1010 GEOG 2000 HIST 2002 INTR 1000 MARS 1500 MULT 2060

CSCI 2611 MATH 1110, 1115, 1130, 1140, 1150, 2214, 2215 PHIL 2090

BIOL 1200,1500, 2010, 2030 CHEM 2050 CSCI 1041 (DL) ENVS 3000 HIST 2630 MULT 1050 PHYS 1020 SOC 2600

ENG 1500 HIST 2900 MATH 1123 PHIL 3731 PHYS 2030, 2050 PSY 1000 SOC 2100

Curriculum is periodically updated. Please visit www.hpu.edu/GenEd for the most current list of courses.

i. lower-division requirements general education common core (at least 45 semester credits) 1. Complete the general education common core consisting of one course in each of 15 common core categories. Take one course from each of the 15 boxes. If a course shown is a lower division requirement for this major, it can simultaneously fulfill both requirements. These potential overlaps are indicated parenthetically after the name of the course in the list of lower division major requirements. Extra courses from the same box in the table will apply to lower division requirements where applicable or be counted as unrestricted electives. 2. No more than two courses with the same alpha (the alphabetic prefix such as HIST or BIOL) may be applied toward the common core requirements. 3. Among courses chosen to meet these 15 requirements, choose one that meets each of the cross-theme requirements: • Digital Literacy (DL): Complete CSCI 1011 or CSCI 1041 or take the proficiency exam. • Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity: Complete any course marked with a “*” in the table.

www.hpu.edu/multimedia

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INTEGRATED MULTIMEDIA CURRICULUM (CONTINUED) lower-division major requirements (15 semester credits) CSCI MULT MULT MULT MULT

2761 1100 2060 2460 2465

HTML and Web Design Foundations of Multimedia Production Modern Media Systems Graphic Design Studio Motion Picture Production

lower-division language requirements (8 semester credits) Two semesters of the same language: ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT, or SPAN.

ii. upper-division requirements upper-division general education (6 semester credits) upper-division research and writing (3 credits) Any Upper-Division Research and Writing Course upper-division citizenship requirement (3 credits) Any Upper-Division Global Citizenship or Service-Learning course

upper-division major requirements (33 semester credits) Essentials: Take all of the following: COM COM MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT

3650 3950 3360 3400 3475 3510 3675 3750

Media Ethics and Law Internship Practicum Writing for New Media Design Systems and Portfolio Web Interface and Design Nonlinear Audio-Visual Editing Advanced Web Design Motion Graphics and Compositing

Writing: One course chosen from: JOUR 3000 Writing for Integrated Media WRI 3320 Scriptwriting Application: One course chosen from: ARTS JOUR MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT

3051 3455 3500 3560 3600 3651 3700 3780 4000 4010

Photography Photojournalism Cinematography Workshop Documentary Production Creative Narrative Production Game Design Radio and Audio Production Global Documentary Advanced Cinematic Production Postproduction Seminar

Capstone: One course chosen from: MULT 4702 Mobile Media Design MULT 4900 Multimedia Seminar

iii. unrestricted electives The number of unrestricted elective credits will vary depending on the number of credits that overlap between the general education requirements and the major requirements, but students will need to earn enough college-level credits to reach a total of 124 semester credits.

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www.hpu.edu/multimedia


MULTIMEDIA CINEMATIC PRODUCTION CURRICULUM Communication Skills

Global Systems

ED 2300 HIST 1717 JOUR 1100 WRI 1100, 1150

BIOL 1000, 2052 CHEM 1000 GEOG 1000 GEOL 1000 MARS 1000 PHYS 1000

A

B

C

COM 1000, 1200, 2500 ED 2301 Lower division modern language classes

CLST 2600 COM 1500, 2000, 2640 CSCI 1011 (DL) LAT 1100 MULT 1100 THEA 1400*

Values & Choices

World Cultures

AMST 1776 CLST 1000 ENG 2201*, 2203 ENVS 1030 HUM 3000 PHIL 2500 PSCI 2000 SWRK 2000

ARTH 2000*, 2100*, 2200* ENG 2101* GEOG 1500 HIST 2001 JADM 2000 MATH 2007 REL 1000

BIOL 1300 ECON 1000, 2010 ED 2000 ENG 2202, 2204, 2301* HIST 2111 HUM 1000 JADM 1000 PSCI 2500 SOC 2000 THEA 1000*

AL 1000 ANTH 2000 COM 2300 HIST 2402 HUM 1270 MUS 2101* REL 2001 SOC 1000 STSS 2601

ECON 2015 ENG 2000* HIST 2112, 2301 NSCI 2000, 2100 PHIL 1000 PSCI 1400

AL 2000 ARTS 1000*, 2150* BIOL 2170 ENG 2510*, 2520* GEOG 2500* HIST 2113, 2401 MUS 1000* REL 2151 THEA 2320

Research & Epistemology

COM 1400 WRI 1200

ECON 1010 GEOG 2000 HIST 2002 INTR 1000 MARS 1500 MULT 2060

CSCI 2611 MATH 1110, 1115, 1130, 1140, 1150, 2214, 2215 PHIL 2090

BIOL 1200,1500, 2010, 2030 CHEM 2050 CSCI 1041 (DL) ENVS 3000 HIST 2630 MULT 1050 PHYS 1020 SOC 2600

ENG 1500 HIST 2900 MATH 1123 PHIL 3731 PHYS 2030, 2050 PSY 1000 SOC 2100

Curriculum is periodically updated. Please visit www.hpu.edu/GenEd for the most current list of courses.

i. lower-division requirements general education common core (at least 45 semester credits) 1. Complete the general education common core consisting of one course in each of 15 common core categories. Take one course from each of the 15 boxes. If a course shown is a lower division requirement for this major, it can simultaneously fulfill both requirements. These potential overlaps are indicated parenthetically after the name of the course in the list of lower division major requirements. Extra courses from the same box in the table will apply to lower division requirements where applicable or be counted as unrestricted electives. 2. No more than two courses with the same alpha (the alphabetic prefix such as HIST or BIOL) may be applied toward the common core requirements. 3. Among courses chosen to meet these 15 requirements, choose one that meets each of the cross-theme requirements: • Digital Literacy (DL): Complete CSCI 1011 or CSCI 1041 or take the proficiency exam. • Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity: Complete any course marked with a “*” in the table.

lower-division major requirements (18 semester credits) MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT THEA

1100 2000 2060 2460 2465 2320

Foundations of Multimedia Production Introduction to Cinema Studies Modern Media Systems Graphic Design Studio Motion Picture Production Basic Acting for Stage and Screen

www.hpu.edu/multimedia

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MULTIMEDIA CINEMATIC PRODUCTION CURRICULUM (CONTINUED) lower-division language requirements (8 semester credits) Two semesters of the same language: ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT, or SPAN. (One semester of a modern language will satisfy Communication Skills B).

ii. upper-division requirements upper-division general education (6 semester credits)

upper-division major requirements (33 semester credits) COM MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT

3650 3360 3475 3500 3510 3750 4000

Media Ethics and Law Writing for New Media Web Interface and Design Cinematography Workshop Nonlinear Audio-Visual Editing Motion Graphics and Compositing Advanced Cinematic Production

Writing: One course chosen from: WRI 3320 Scriptwriting JOUR 3000 Writing for Integrated Media

upper-division research and writing (3 credits) Any Upper-Division Research and Writing Course upper-division citizenship requirement (3 credits) Any Upper-Division Global Citizenship or Service-Learning course

Concentration: One course chosen from: MULT 3560 Documentary Production MULT 3600 Creative Narrative Production Application: One course chosen from: ARTS COM JOUR MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT MULT

3051 3950 3455 3400 3470 3675 3700 3780 4010

Photography Internship Practicum Photojournalism Design Systems and Portfolio TV Studio Production Advanced Web Design Radio and Audio Production Global Documentary Postproduction Seminar

Media Analysis and Criticism: One course chosen from: COM 3260 Exploring Film COM 3770 Media Literacy ENG 3145 Nonfiction Film: Documentary, Docudrama and Historical Film ENG 3227 Hawai‘i and the Pacific in Film ENG 3330 Film Theory and Criticism MULT 3910 Selected Topics in Multimedia MULT 3950 Contemporary Cinematic Studies MULT 4100 Visual Culture and Media Theory MULT 4900 Multimedia Seminar PHIL 3260 Exploring Film

iii. unrestricted electives The number of unrestricted elective credits will vary depending on the number of credits that overlap between the general education requirements and the major requirements, but students will need to earn enough college-level credits to reach a total of 124 semester credits.

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www.hpu.edu/multimedia


FOUR‐YEAR PLAN FOR THE INTEGRATED MULTIMEDIA MAJOR Below is a typical fall-spring sequence for a full-time student planning to complete a B.A. in Integrated Multimedia in four regular academic years (no summers). Summer and/or winter courses could be taken to expedite the completion of the degree process. Please take this proposed 4-year plan as only a model. Completion of the major may depend on what courses are offered during a given semester.

Freshman Year Fall CSCI 1041 MATH 1115 MULT 1100 WRI 1100 Any Language

Spring

Digital Literacy Global Society Survey of Math Foundations of Multimedia Production Analysis & Writing Arguments ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT, or SPAN

3 3 3 3

ARTS 1000 BIOL 1000 PHIL 2500 WRI 1200 Same Language

4

Introduction to Visual Arts Introduction to Biology Introduction to Ethics Research, Argument, and Writing ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT, or SPAN

Total Credits: 16

3 3 3 3 4

Total Credits: 16

Sophomore Year Fall ARTH ENG MULT MULT SOC

2000 2000 2060 2460 2000

Spring

The Art of Asia Introduction to Literature Modern Media Systems Graphic Design Studio Social Problems and Policy

3 3 3 3 3

ANTH CSCI JOUR MULT MULT

2000 2761 3000 2465 3510

Cultural Anthropology HTML and Web Design News Writing: Integrated Media Motion Picture Production Non-linear Audio-Visual Editing

Total Credits: 15

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15

Junior Year Fall ADPR ARTS COM MULT MULT SOC

2500 2150 3650 3360 3475 2100

Spring

Creativity Intro to Design Media Ethics and Law Writing for New Media Web Interface & Design Fundamentals of Research

3 3 3 3 3 3

ADPR COM ENG MULT THEA

3250 3950 3330 3675 2320

Communication Media Research Communication Practicum Film Theory & Criticism Advanced Web Design Acting I: Basics

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15 Total Credits: 18

Senior Year Fall ARTS MULT MULT MULT MULT

3051 3400 3700 3750 4900

Spring

Photography Design Systems and Portfolio Radio and Audio Production Motion Graphics & Compositing Integrated Multimedia

3 3 3 3 3

ANTH ENG MULT MULT THEA

Total Credits: 15

www.hpu.edu/multimedia

3000 3227 3600 4702 3420

Is Global Citizenship Possible Hawai‘i and the Pacific in Film Creative Narrative Production Mobile Design Acting II: Fund of Scene Study

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15 Total Credits: 125

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FOUR‐YEAR PLAN FOR THE MULTIMEDIA CINEMATIC PRODUCTION MAJOR Below is a typical fall-spring sequence for a full-time student planning to complete a B.A. in Mulitmedia Cinematic Production in four regular academic years (no summers). Summer and/or winter courses could be taken to expedite the completion of the degree process. Please take this proposed 4-year plan as only a model. Completion of the major may depend on what courses are offered during a given semester.

Freshman Year Fall CSCI 1041 MATH 1115 MULT 1100 WRI 1100 Any Language

Spring

Digital Literacy Global Society Survey of Math Found of Multimedia Production Analysis & Writing Arguments ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT, or SPAN

3 3 3 3

ARTS 1000 BIOL 1000 PHIL 2500 WRI 1200 Same Language

4

Introduction to Visual Arts Introduction to Biology Introduction to Ethics Research, Argument, and Writing ARB, CHIN, FR, HAWN, JPE, KOR, LAT, or SPAN

3 3 3 3 4

Total Credits: 16

Total Credits: 16

Sophomore Year Fall ADPR ENG HIST MULT MULT

2500 2000 2001 2000 2460

Spring

Creativity Introduction to Literature History: World Culture to 1500 Introduction to Cinema Studies Graphic Design Studio

3 3 3 3 3

HUM MULT MULT MULT THEA

1000 2060 2465 3510 2320

Intro to the Humanities Modern Media Systems Motion Picture Production Non-linear Audio-Visual Editing Acting I: Basics

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15

Total Credits: 15

Junior Year Fall ANTH 3000 COM 3260 ENG 3330 MULT 3475 MULT 3500 WRI 3320

Spring

Is Global Citizenship Possible Exploring Film Film Theory & Criticism Web Interface & Design Cinematography Workshop Scriptwriting

3 3 3 3 3 3

COM HIST MULT MULT PHIL

3650 2900 3360 3510 3260

Media Ethics and Law The Historian’s Craft Writing for New Media Non-linear Audio-Visual Editing Exploring Film

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15

Total Credits: 18

Senior Year Fall ARTS COM MULT MULT MULT

3051 3000 3560 3750 3780

Spring

Photography Mass Media Documentary Production Motion Graphics & Compositing Global Documentary

3 3 3 3 3

JOUR MULT MULT PSCI THEA

Total Credits: 15

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www.hpu.edu/multimedia

3455 3470 4000 2500 3420

Photojournalism TV Studio Production Advanced Cinematic Production World Politics Acting II: Fund of Scene Study

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits: 15 Total Credits: 125


SELECT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ADVERTISING/PUBLIC RELATIONS, COMMUNICATION, JOURNALISM AND MULTIMEDIA PROGRAMS ADPR 2000 Introduction to Integrated Advertising & Public Relations: An introduction to the concept of strategic and integrated communication and provides an overview of the history, rationale and landscape of advertising, public relations related activities, illustrated by case studies and examples. The course includes a survey of integrated communication theory, techniques and applications including an exploration of specific campaigns and case studies and a basic hands-on introduction to copywriting and design. Prerequisite: WRI 1100 or WRI 1150. ADPR 2500 Creativity: This course brings to light the creative process as it lives in the advertising and public relations industry. Creativity will be explored through major theories and modern research in the field of creativity; case studies of creative individuals, organizations, and campaigns; and through creative elements of expression such as music, art, theatre, story, design, dance, and photography. At the end of this course students will have a foundation of ideation, creative strategy, and creative execution techniques. Prerequisite: WRI 100 or WRI 1150. ADPR 3320 Consumer Behavior: A course on consumer behavior that discusses various techniques for profiling a target market and analyzing decision-making strategies and buying behavior. The course explores demographics, psychographics, Values and Lifestyles System, PRISM, and high- and lowinvolvement decisions. It provides insight essential to marketing, public relations, and advertising campaign planning. Prerequisite: ADPR 2000, COM 3000, and WRI 1200. ADPR 3400 Media Strategies: This course introduces students to research, planning and relationship development with media outlets and their representatives who are vital to the development of effective strategic communication programs and campaigns. It includes lessons on how to analyze and evaluate both advertising and news/editorial media, how to plan a media program, and how to work with various media representatives. Prerequisite: ADPR 2000 and WRI 1200. ADPR 3700 Integrated Promotion Management: An overview of nonpersonal promotional strategies including planning, budgeting, media selection, message design, and timing. Case studies illustrate using mass media special events, in-store displays, advertising, public relations, and visual communication to affect consumer buying behavior. Industry dynamics, controversies, trends and implications are analyzed. Prerequisite: ADPR 2000 and WRI 2000. COM 1200 Foundations of Communication Studies: The course provides an introduction to the field of human communication studies and a foundation for further study within the discipline. It introduces the core concepts, essential skills, and central issues in the field. The course examines the history of the discipline, essential communication skills, key communication theories, and contexts such as intercultural, relational, group, organizational, rhetorical, and mediated communication.

are introduced, and critiques of presentations are provided. Prerequisite: WRI 1100 or WRI 1150. COM 2500 Sex, Gender, and Communication: This course examines the complexities of sex, gender, and communication in interpersonal relationships, educational environments, mass media, and the workplace. Students will study aspects of communication that influence individuals to behave in genderspecific ways, as well as sex differences in language use, conversational moves, and nonverbal behavior. Prerequisite: WRI 1100 or WRI 1150. COM 2640 Argumentation and Debate: Basic argumentation theory including burden of proof, logical analysis, research, strategies, and tactics of persuasive communication in the context of politics, business, and cultural venues; gathering and weighing evidence, reasoning, case construction, refutation; and presentation of public address and debate. Prerequisite: COM 1000 or 1200; any Communication Skills – A Course. COM 3000 Mass Media: An examination of the development of mass media and consideration of its interaction with technology. The course features specific media and considers contemporary research findings regarding the effects of media upon attitudes and behavior. Media strategies, messages, outcomes, and campaigns are all covered. Prerequisite: COM 1000 or COM 1200; WRI 1200. COM 3200 Interpersonal Communication: This course covers the theories, strategies, and outcomes of interpersonal communication. Topics include: principles and practices of communication, message development, and communication strategies. Contemporary research findings that contribute to an understanding of interpersonal communication are also covered, and opportunities to practice effective communication techniques are provided. Prerequisite: ADPR 2000, COM 1000, COM 1200, COM 2500, or JOUR 3000; any Communication Skills – A Course. COM 3250 Communication Research: This course is an introduction to the logic, concepts, process, and methods of quantitative and qualitative research. This course provides both theory and application. Basic statistics and data analysis are also covered. Emphasis is on primary research frequently used in the communication field. Prerequisite: Any Research & Epistemology – A Course. COM 3300 Intercultural Communication: An exploration of how culture influences the way we think, value, behave and view the world; and therefore, how culture both facilitates and impedes communication. Special emphasis is placed upon cross-cultural communiction. Prerequisite: Any Communication Skills – A Course.

COM 2000 Public Speaking: Instruction and practice in the principal modes of public speaking: interpretive reading, informational speech, persuasive speech, debate, and formal presentation with use of aids. Theories of oral communication

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SELECT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) COM 3650 Media Ethics and Law: A course designed to give students a basic understanding of what is legal and what is ethical when communicating through the media. Prerequisite: COM 3000 or JOUR 2000; WRI 1200. COM 3670 Legal Communication: This course brings the legal trial to the classroom, providing students an opportunity to incorporate an array of communication principles and skills with the experience of trial practice. Students are introduced progressively to key aspects of communication and litigation and participate in exercises that culminate in mock trials before a jury. Prerequisite: Any Research & Epistemology – A Course. COM 3680: Rhetorical Theory: This course provides a survey of major rhetorical themes and theories, including classical, symbolic, argumentation, critical, and non-Western approaches to rhetoric. Students will explore the relationship between rhetorical theory and practice, the contributions of rhetorical theory to the social world, and the potential for rhetorical studies to inform issues surrounding democratic governance, marginalized groups, social justice, and technology in society. Prerequisite: COM 1000 or 1200; COM 2000. COM 3900 Communication Theory: A course designed to give students a practical understanding of theories of the communication process from interpersonal relationships to mass media and advertising. Through hands-on projects and discussion, students apply theoretical constructs to media effects, advertising, persuasion, and motivation. Prerequisite: Senior standing; COM 3000, COM 3250, COM 3680 or COM 3900. COM 4900 Seminar in Communication Criticism: This course serves as a “capstone” course that allows senior communication students to use acquired skills on a longer in-depth paper. This course gives students the chance to use their chosen area of communication to create a portfolio-quality paper for graduate school and the job market. Prerequisite: COM 3000, COM 3250, and COM 3680; any Research and Epistemology – A Course. JOUR 3420 Publication Design: An introduction to the theory and practice of design for print publication. The course provides practical hands-on production experience in writing and editing copy and integrating it with graphics, photography, typography, and page formats. Students learn to create inviting and readable newspaper articles, pages, and sections that balance unity and variety and create reader interest and excitement. Prerequisite: JOUR 3000 and WRI 1200. JOUR 3455 Photojournalism: In this course, students learn the principles of photojournalism and how to accurately and meaningfully produce quality photos. Students use Adobe Photoshop software as they learn how to prepare photos digi-

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tally for journalistic display in print and online. To better learn photography principles and skills, students use “through-thelens” 35 mm cameras that allow manual exposure to control and scan their film, and convert their photos into digital form. Prerequisite: WRI 1200. MULT 1100 Foundations of Multimedia Production: This course introduces foundational software tools and writing systems used in modern multimedia communication and design. Instruction provides students with the technical know-how and context necessary to proceed in the multimedia program through software tutorials as well as the creation of physical and webbased portfolio material. The use of static image, composition, color, fonts and motion graphics will be explored through inclass instruction and home-based experimentation. MULT 2460 Graphic Design Studio: In this course, students learn graphic design principles and desktop publishing concepts design materials for their portfolio. Materials include advertisements, letterheads, logos, brochures, flyers, newsletters, posters, and pamphlets. Students receive instruction on the use of Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator software, and other pertinent programs to complete class projects. Principles of good design (emphasis, sequence, proportion, balance, and unity) will be taught, as well as principles for the use of typography, color, and photography, in publishing. Prerequisite: MULT 1100, CSCI 1011 or CSCI 1041. MULT 2465 Motion Picture Production: This course provides an introduction to digital video and audio production concepts and techniques. Theory is integrated with practical applications in motion picture analysis, video capture, lighting, audio production, and nonlinear editing. The course focuses on developing visual storytelling skills and fosters individual responsibility for course projects and deliverables in a collaborative environment. Prerequisite: WRI 1200. MULT 3475 Web Interface and Design: This lecture-lab combined course explores the theories of design and provides a basic introduction to the production and publication of multimedia Web content. Students will incorporate theory, interface design and advertising consideration to create projects ready for Web publication. Prerequisite: MULT 2460. MULT 3651 Game Design: Students review the design and theory behind classic games such as Tetris and Space Invaders, genre creators such as SimCity and Civilization; as well as modern techniques behind sophisticated games such as Quake, Grand Theft Auto and Red Dead Redemption. Students receive hands-on experience designing 2-D games in JavaScript/ HTML5 and 3-D games in systems such as the Unreal Engine. This course also briefly covers interactive narrative text adventures, mobile games and game artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: MULT 3475. MULT 3750 Motion Graphics and Compositing: Motion graphics are responsible for many effects found in movie trailers, opening film credits, television commercials, animated network identities and advertising of all types. This course instructs students on how to use one’s creativity to produce attention-grabbing designs and communication for film, television, and the Web using Adobe After Effects and other related software. Prerequisite: MULT 3750.


Faculty John Barnum, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Communication

Natalie Lewis, M.A. Visiting Instructor, Communication

Teaching and research fields: public relations, journalism, communication research.

Teaching and research fields: multimedia, graphic design, and web design.

Peter Britos, Ph.D. Director of Media Arts/Associate Professor, Communication

Marianne Luken, M.A. Instructor, Communication

Teaching and research fields: multimedia literacy, screenwriting, film and narrative theory.

Teaching and research fields: intercultural and interpersonal communication studies.

Dale Burke, D.Min. Assistant Professor, Communication, and University Chaplain

AnnMarie Manzulli, M.A. Visiting Instructor, Communication

Teaching and research fields: speech, interpersonal communication and religious studies.

Teaching and research fields: advertising and public relations.

Brian Cannon, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Communication Teaching and research fields: photojournalism and graphic design. Steven C. Combs, Ph.D. Professor, College of Humanities and Social Sciences Teaching and research fields: rhetoric, qualitative methods, mediation. Thomas Dowd, M.A. Visiting Instructor, Communication Teaching and research fields: debate and communication theory.

Daryl Orris, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Advertising and Public Relations Teaching and research fields: advertising, public relations, and integrated brand promotion. Malia Smith, Ed.D. Assistant Dean of General Education/Assistant Professor, Communication Teaching and research fields: public relations and advertising. Lewis Trusty, M.B.A., M.A. Instructor, Communication Teaching and research fields: photojournalism, video production and documentary filmmaking.

Matthew George, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Communication Teaching and research fields: cultural studies, gender studies and rhetoric. John Hart, Ph.D. Department Chair, Professor of Communication Teaching and research fields: media criticism, persuasion, rhetoric, argumentation, and debate.

Helen Varner, Ph.D. Professor Emerita, Communication James D. Whitfield, Ed.D. Professor, Communication Teaching and research fields: public relations, organizational communication, and journalism. John Windrow, M.A. Faculty Advisor/Instructor, Journalism

Serena Hashimoto, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Communication Teaching and research fields: psychoanalytic theory, cultural studies, and film studies.

Teaching and research fields: journalism, media law and ethics.

Larry LeDoux, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Communication Teaching and research fields: journalism and professional writing. JongHwa Lee, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Communication Teaching and research fields: intercultural and international communication.

www.hpu.edu/communication/faculty

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Undergraduate Programs

Value: Extraordinary.

• Accounting • Advertising/Public Relations • Anthropology • Asian Studies • Biochemistry • Biology - General Biology - Human and Health Science • Business (General) • Business Economics • Chemistry • Communication • Computer Information Systems • Computer Science • Diplomacy and Military Studies • Economics • Elementary Education • English • Entrepreneurial Studies • Environmental Science • Environmental Studies • Finance • Health Science • History • Human Resource Development • Human Resource Management • Humanities - Art History - Classical Studies - Philosophy - Religious Studies • International Business • International Studies - Globalization and Social Change - International Relations and Security - International Political Economy & Development

With tuition costs almost half the U.S. average for private universities, HPU is among the most affordable private universities in the nation. In fact, Bloomberg Businessweek states that HPU has the “Best Undergraduate Return on Investment” among Hawai‘i colleges and universities.

• • • • •

Hawai‘i Pacific University at a glance... Reputation: Outstanding. Outstanding A private, not-for-profit, coeducational, nonsectarian, postsecondary institution founded in 1965, HPU is consistently ranked among the best educational institutions in the nation. It is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). The Nursing Program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), and the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) and is approved by the Hawai‘i Board of Nursing. The Social Work program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). The University is recognized by the Hawai‘i Commission on Postsecondary Education.

Location: Stunning. Strategically located in the center of the Pacific Rim—the region with the fastest growing economies in the world—HPU provides an American education in an international setting. Cosmopolitan, culturally vibrant, and ethnically diverse, Hawai‘i is famous for its clean air and water and a population that enjoys the longest average life expectancy among the 50 states in the nation. In fact, Honolulu was recently ranked one of the safest and cleanest large cities in the United States.

Campus: Distinctive. Hawai‘i Pacific University combines the excitement of an urban downtown campus with the serenity of a residential campus set in the green foothills of O‘ahu’s Ko‘olau Mountains. The urban campus is located in downtown Honolulu, the business and financial center of the Pacific. Eight miles away, located in – Kane‘ohe, the Hawai‘i Loa campus is the site of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences and the College of Natural and Computational

Sciences. HPU affiliated Sc S ciences e HP es PU iiss also af ffi fili liated t d with w h th thee Oceanic Institute, an aquaculture research facility at Makapu‘u Point, that offers students research and hands-on opportunities. These three distinctive sites are conveniently linked by shuttle.

Student Body: Incredible. More than 7,000 undergraduate and 1,200 graduate students from all 50 U.S. states and more than 100 countries make HPU one of the most culturally diverse universities in the world. HPU’s unique vision is to maintain a student profile that is one-third from the mainland U.S., one-third from Hawai‘i, and one-third from around the globe.

Academic Programs: Comprehensive. HPU offers more than 50 undergraduate and 14 graduate degree programs in the areas of business administration, communication, liberal arts, and science, including several pre-professional programs.

Faculty: Accessible. Multicultural, diverse in their interests, and passionate about teaching, HPU faculty are renowned for the personal interest they take in each and every one of their students. HPU boasts more than 500 full- and part-time faculty from around the world with outstanding academic and professional credentials, ensuring that HPU students can easily access a world’s worth of knowledge and experiences. A vast majority of HPU faculty hold the highest degrees in their fields. The student/faculty ratio is 15:1, and the average class size is less than 25.

Hawai‘i Pacific University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution that prohibits discrimination against, and harassment of, any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, ancestry, marital status, disability, arrest and court record, or veteran status. Sex discrimination includes sexual harassment and sexual assault. For more information on how to report discrimination or harassment to HPU, please go to www.hpu.edu/studentlife and click on the link to the HPU Student Handbook.

• Journalism Justice Administration Management Marine Biology Marketing Mathematics - Applied Math - Engineering (3-2)

• Mathematics, continued - Mathematics Education - Pure Math • Multimedia - Cinematic Production - Integrated Multimedia • Nursing • Oceanography • Political Science • Pre-Chiropractic • Pre-Medical Program • Psychology • Public Administration • Social Work • Sociology • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages • Travel Industry Management • Theatre

Graduate Programs • Master of Arts in - Clinical Mental Health Counseling - Communication - Diplomacy and Military Studies - Global Leadership and Sustainable Development - Human Resource Management - Organizational Change - Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages • Master of Business Administration • Master of Education in - Elementary Education - Secondary Education • Master of Science in - Information Systems - Marine Science - Nursing • Master of Social Work

Hawai‘i Pacific University Office of Admissions • 1164 Bishop Street, Suite 200 • Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96813 • Phone (808) 544-0238 Toll-free U.S. and Canada: 1-866-CALL HPU • Fax (808) 544-1136 www.hpu.edu • Email: admissions@hpu.edu

Department of Communication Brochure  

Detailed information on the programs available in the Department of Communicaiton at Hawai'i Pacific University.

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