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HAVERFORD SCHOOL Today

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HAVERFORD SCHOOLToday

HAVERFORD SCHOOL TODAY Annual Report


BRING IT

OME

Haverford/EA Day 2018 Nov. 9 & 10 @ The Haverford School On the docket: HSPA Pancake Breakfast • Golf • Cross-Country Water Polo • Soccer • Football Redemption A notable salute Led by choral director and Upper School music teacher Mark Hightower, The Haverford School Notables grace center stage at the 130th Commencement ceremony in June to lead the School community in the traditional singing of the alma mater: O Haverford, dear Haverford / Thou guide of tender days, / To thee within these honored walls / We lift our hymn of praise / Here on the threshold of our years / With all the future free, / Our youthful hearts and powers we bring / And dedicate to thee.

for more information visit haverford.org/EADay2018


2017-18

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l a u n n A ort Rep

features Commencement 2018 Alumni Weekend 2018

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departments Around the Quad 4 Arts 7 Athletics 9 Parents 20 Alumni 21 annual report Operating Budget Highlights Letter from the Board Chairman Capital Gifts Maroon & Gold Society Gifts to the Endowment Alumni Giving The Brownlow Society Parent Giving Senior Class Gift The Quarter Century Club Faculty & Staff, Grandparents, Parents of Alumni, & Friends Honorary & Memorial Gifts Corporations & Foundations Pennsylvania Tax Credit Programs The Heritage Society Special Thanks spotlights Nafis Smith ’99 Thad Fortin ’77, P ’09 E. Todd and Amy Briddell, P’22 ’29 Andrew Helber ’12

28 30 31 32 35 47 58 59 64 65 66 70 75 77 78 79 33 42 56 63

cover photos Front: Graduating seniors celebrate in the Quad after the 134th Commencement. Inside front: Second-grade students walk three miles carrying gallons of water as part of the Walk for Water service project. Back: The Form II Rite of Passage takes students from Haverford to Philadelphia to New Jersey and marks the transition from Middle to Upper School.

HAVERFORD SCHOOL Today


Upcoming Events » haverford.org/calendar April October APR OCT

Upper HSPA&Fall Middle Festival School

29 18 Spring QuadConcert

Location: Theater 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Time: 7:30 p.m. - 9:15 p.m.

Let’s Hear it for the Boys: Patrons’ Party 7-9 p.m. MAY Alumni Weekend OCT Middle School Cabaret 2-3 & Arts Festival 2014 19-20 Centennial Hall MAY HSPA Recycle Sale 7 p.m. 8 Location: Circle OCT Time: 7:30 - 11:30 a.m. Series Best fora.m. Boys Speaker 25 Michael Baime HSPA Fling Ball Spring Auditorium Location: Quad 7 p.m. Time: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

November

December

Let’s Hear it for the Boys: Party & Auction Field House

HSPA Perfect Present 4-5 Multipurpose Room

NOV

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OCT

May 19

Haverford/EA Day and HSPA 10 Pancake Breakfast The Haverford School NOV

NOV Upper School fall play: 16-18 “An Enemy of the People” Centennial Hall

NOV

Notables Reunion Concert

21 Centennial Hall

DEC

8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. DEC Winter Choral Concert 10 Centennial Hall

7 p.m. DEC Toys for Tots Notables Concert 12 The Big Room

7 p.m. DEC Winter Instrumental Concert 13 Centennial Hall

7 p.m.

7:30 p.m.

John A. Nagl, D.Phil. • assistant headmaster Mark Thorburn Brian McBride ’82 • chief financial officer David S. Gold managing editor Jessica Welsh • editors Dawn Blake and Emily Chahar alumni editor Andrew Bailey ’02 • layout/design Emma E. Hitchcock headmaster

associate headmaster

Andrew Bailey ’02, Dawn Blake, Zoë Blatt, Emily Chahar, Ann Glavin, Andrew Grossman ’96, Jordan Hayman, Emma E. Hitchcock, Connor Hullhorst, Lisa Martin, Rachel McGinn, Patrick McNally, Dan Miller, Jill Miller, Mike Nance, Deb Putter, Jim Roese, George Scarino, Cindy Shaw, Linda Walters, Jessica Welsh, and George Wood ’75 photographers

printer

Intellicor Printing LLC, Lancaster, Pa.

Lower School, 450 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, PA 19041 Jessica Welsh, Director of Marketing and Communications; 484-417-2764; jwelsh@haverford.org editorial office contact

Thank you to everyone who contributed to this publication. Special thanks to: Amy and E. Todd Briddell, Thad Fortin ’77, Andrew Helber ’12, and Nafis Smith ’99. special thanks

Please email address changes to Disty Lengel at dlengel@haverford.org, or send by mail to 450 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, PA 19041. address changes

Haverford School Today magazine is published for alumni, parents, grandparents, and friends of The Haverford School. Nonprofit postage paid at Southeastern, PA, and additional mailing offices. If you wish to reprint any portion of this publication, please request permission in advance. Copyright © 2018 The Haverford School (all rights reserved).

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Fall 2018

board of trustees, 2018-19

Jennifer Paradis Behle P’20 Oray B. Boston Jr. P’17 Caroline R. De Marco P’20 ’22 Randall T. Drain Jr. ’01 Thaddeus J. Fortin ’77, P’09 Maurice D. Glavin ’83, P’14 ’16 ’20 William C. Hambleton William T. Harrington P’24 ’24 John F. Hollway P’18 Jason W. Ingle P’22 Barbara Klock P’23 ’23 Jeffrey F. Lee ’95 George B. Lemmon Jr. ’79, P’12 ’19, Treasurer Joshua R. Levine ’94 Michael S. Lewis ’99 John J. Lynch P’10 ’12 Christopher J. Maguire P’16 ’19 Wade L. McDevitt P’28 ’30 Sharon S. Merhige P’16 ’18, Secretary H. Laddie Montague ’56 Jonathan R. Morgan ’03 John A. Nagl, Headmaster Jennifer N. Pechet P’15 ’17 Amy T. Petersen P’15, Vice Chair Ravindra Reddy ’90 Peter A. Rohr P’12 ’13 ’15 G. Bart Smith ’95, P’28 ’30 Dorothy S. Walker P’22 ’24 ’27 John C. Wilkins Jr. ’95 William C. Yoh ’89, P’18 ’24, Chairman


FROM THE HEADMASTER

Always striving By John A. Nagl, D.Phil.

Dear Fords Nation, One of my favorite moments of every Alumni Weekend is the Service of Remembrance at which we honor those alums who have fallen in the past year. Organized by the 50th Reunion Class, each service reflects something of the character of that class and its era. There are tears and laughter as classmates are remembered with the brotherly fondness that is one of the best attributes of this great School. At this year’s Service of Remembrance, the Class of 1968 eulogized those who it has lost over the decades. One graduate’s story was particularly poignant to the members of the class, and to me. Leonard Collins ’68 was the second African-American graduate of The Haverford School. (The first was George “Porgie” Smith ’67.) Leonard graduated from Brown and then from Columbia Law, had a successful career as an attorney, and had four children with his wife, Ruth Ann. At the Service of Remembrance, members of the Class of 1968 recalled Leonard’s intelligence, his courage, and his grace under pressure, and several apologized for not being as supportive of Leonard as perhaps they could have been during his time at Haverford. Fifty years after Leonard’s graduation, The Haverford School is a very different place. About one-third of our boys today are people of color, and the School is a far more welcoming place for them than it was for Leonard and Porgie. But there are still many challenges associated with differences of any kind as an adolescent, and that is as true at Haverford as it is at any of the great institutions of our nation. For many years Haverford has been fortunate to have educators serve the School as Director of Community, a position intended to make all boys and their families feel welcome. That role is currently ably filled by Donta Evans, a McDonogh School graduate who also serves as our Middle School Admissions Director. Donta also directs one of the programs of which I am most proud, our Middle Grades Partnership Philadelphia (MGPP), which brings a few dozen boys who attend Philadelphia public schools to our campus for two weeks in the summer to work on math and English and art. We are very fortunate that some graduates of the MGPP are now attending Haverford, and we look forward to increasing the scope and scale of that effort over time. As our student population has become increasingly diverse, there is more work making everyone feel welcome than even a man as talented as Donta can handle. To help smooth the path for all of our boys, this past year I appointed Upper School history teacher Brendon Jobs as the School’s first Director of Diversity and Inclusion. Brendon will work across all three divisions to help

us be more intentional in our efforts to diversify our student body and our faculty, and to ensure that all boys feel included in the life of the School and all perspectives are heard. My own philosophy on diversity and inclusion was formed, as was so much of my worldview, by my service in the United States Army, one of the first institutions in America to integrate and still a leader in this area. In the Army, we like to say that everyone is green. There is no place for intolerance in a foxhole, and when my soldiers took actions to ensure my safety and my survival in combat, they didn’t check on my race or religion or orientation first. They took care of their Army battle buddy, and I tried hard to take care of them. I’m now privileged to take care of the boys, the families, and the faculty and staff that comprise our great community. The boys will grow up to lead a world that looks very different from the America of today, and we’re dedicated to ensuring that they’re ready. I’m confident that Brendon’s leadership of our pre-k-12 diversity and inclusion program will be an important part of their preparation, and I hope you will join me in supporting all of us in the vitally important work of making every Haverford boy feel safe, supported, and valued. Go Fords!

Upper School teacher Brendon Jobs (far right), leading a Form IV Modern World History class, is the School’s first Director of Diversity and Inclusion.

haverford.org

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AROUND THE QUAD

Edward R. Hallowell Literary Lecture: Mark Bowden Journalist and author Mark Bowden discussed the state of American journalism for the 20th annual Edward R. Hallowell Literary Lecture on April 24. He also visited English and journalism classrooms and spoke at an Upper School assembly. Bowden has spent more than 40 years reporting, including for The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Atlantic, and Vanity Fair.

He has also written 13 nonfiction books. During the lecture, he spoke about the power of journalism, discussed the current mass media culture, and shared his advice on how to be an informed citizen. “One of the things I’ve always loved about journalism is that it throws me into completely different worlds and situations, constantly,” he said. “The job of reporting is to find out what you don’t know.” Bowden is best known for his book, Black Hawk Down, which later became a movie. But the story, which began as a series of articles in The Philadelphia Inquirer, has humble beginnings. “I’m just a guy who works in an office in my basement, and I decided that I wanted to write a story about the Battle of Mogadishu,” he said. “That battle, which is universally referred to as the Black Hawk Down episode … would now be on any list of the most significant American military engagements in the past 20 years.” “This is not because of me, but because of the tremendous power of writers and journalists to focus attention on specific things that otherwise might be overlooked,” Bowden said. “This is the great advantage of having a multiplicity of platforms, lots of newspapers and magazines and networks, because ideally you’re getting a lot of creative, intelligent journalists who are deciding what’s important, what’s

PALS service project

IV Former Ryan Ngo and Benji Bacharach ’18 spent time this summer in Washington, D.C., working as camp counselors with PALS, an organization that seeks to foster friendship and independence among young adults with Down syndrome. Ryan and Benji have been working with the organization for two years, and continue to be inspired by the people they met and relationships they form. 4

Fall 2018

interesting, and what we need to know as a society.” Unfortunately, Bowden said, the technology of delivering news has run ahead of the profession of reporting, “which has had some very alarming and damaging consequences.” “None of what is out there on the Internet or on social media – or very little of it – is regulated or edited for fairness or accuracy,” he said. Bowden gave audience members advice to navigate in this world of mass media. “When you read a story, and I emphasize the word read, pay attention to where it came from. Ask yourself: Is there actual reporting that went on in this story? Did somebody get up from behind their desk? I think to be a good citizen today, you have to do something more than read headlines on your cell phone or believe what floats up on your Facebook feed, or the headlines that you hear on TV and radio. You have to invest a little bit of yourself in order to be adequately informed, and you have to do so with a critical eye. “Don’t pretend to know more than you do. Assume, instead, that you know too little. In my experience, it’s rare that finding out something new doesn’t change your whole understanding about what happened.”

“I came to PALS to understand the perspectives of those with special needs,” said Ryan. “During my week with my buddy, I learned to feel empathy for him and his family’s struggles, but most importantly, I learned that he is a normal kid like me. The mission of PALS is not only to create a transformative experience for the campers, but for the volunteer counselors as well, so that they can spread the message of love and empathy for all.” Benji is an ambassador for PALS, assisting with counselor recruiting and fundraising. “PALS creates an inclusive environment and allows you to be more accepting of others,” he said. “You get so close to someone so different yourself, and I think that’s really cool. I think the neatest thing that PALS does is the Congratulations Project. You sit down one-on-one with your camper and help them write a letter to a mother of a newborn with Down syndrome. Instead of it being consolatory, it’s congratulatory. Connections like this are just magical.” Ryan and Benji are working with the School’s Service Board to help generate more interest in PALS. “I strongly encourage my fellow classmates to volunteer at PALS,” said Ryan. “Not only will they experience something new, they will build stronger bonds with each other. I cannot promise that the work will be easy, but I can attest that the PALS experience is one that will build us all into better men.”


AROUND THE QUAD

in the classroom

Soaring seniors VI Formers embark on senior projects over the three weeks leading up to Commencement. Below, three members of the Class of 2018 share their experiences. Read their full reflections on The Big Room blog at haverford.org/blog.

David Aspinall ’18 interned at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary “The Vocation Office at St. Charles reaches out to young Catholic men in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and beyond, offering various programs and spiritual guidance to help them consider the priesthood. I had a variety of enriching projects that I contributed to, and I had the pleasure of working with kind coworkers with whom I truly connected. During my high school career, I have uncovered my passion for the study of theology, which was the inspiration behind my internship. My project also allowed me to be a positive leader, understand the importance of serving others, and find joy through service.”

Bobby Stratts ’18 photographed London “During eighth and ninth grade, I went to The American School in London and fell in love with the city. I was very pleased I had the chance to go back and re-experience it all over again, except this time I could document it. I was able to explore the different cultures spread across the cityscape of London, documenting people and places that make each part of the city distinctly different from one another. One part of my project was to photograph sports for my old school. I wanted to see what it was like through the other side of the lens, to be the one to capture moments that I had only viewed as an athlete. The director of athletics approached me and invited me to help him with the website of an upcoming sports tournament. My photos of the games were published online to the school’s website.”

Grayson Potter ’18 built a boat “Led by Assistant Headmaster Mr. Thorburn, I teamed up with John Nelligan ’18 and Tyler Roland ’18 to build a rowboat. This project was one of the greatest experiences I have ever had in Haverford’s hallowed halls. The thing that made this project so valuable to me was pushing through the adversity. There were many times when we as a group got frustrated when the measurements didn’t make sense or the cuts were not perfect, and we had to calm each other down. It was truly a great bonding experience. I valued the hard work that was in front of me and did not shy away as I had before. Instead, I faced it head-on, and pushed through one challenge at a time. We came out with a piece of art.”

haverford.org

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AROUND THE QUAD

Science teachers present at NSTA STEM Forum

Upper School science teachers Daniel Goduti and Carol O’Brien presented at the 7th annual National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) STEM Forum & Expo in Philadelphia in July. Goduti and O’Brien shared best practices from their classrooms at Haverford with high school science teachers, administrators, and education researchers from around the country. Goduti presented on Global Impacts of Infectious Disease, an elective biology course that he developed at Haverford. VI Formers research one of approximately 20 Neglected Tropical Diseases and develop a digital campaign aimed toward doctors, clinicians, and others in the field to generate awareness and eventually reduce or even eradicate the diseases. “The course’s curriculum focuses on

the intersections of molecular and cellular biology, microbiology, immunology, physiology, ecology, epidemiology, and principles of public health,” Goduti said. “I wanted to share this work because I thought other teachers might want to do similar things, but also to get feedback and ideas from colleagues.” O’Brien’s presentation, “Try Everything Access to All: Projects in Physics Classes that are Conceptual, Problem-Based, and Advanced,” highlighted how to make physics more accessible. She shared how she focuses her introductory class at Haverford on problem-based units and concepts that apply to real-life circumstances such as driving, sports, amusement park rides, and movie sound effects. Some of the group projects in her

In the classroom

Coding, cryptography, and war History Department Chair Hannah B. Turlish and Upper School math teacher Katharine Hudson collaborated on a workshop about computer coding and World War II. “We focused on designing challenging yet achievable hands-on activities that could, as closely as possible, recreate the work of pioneering female coders during World War II,” said Turlish. In a 45-minute pilot workshop, students were given several encrypted messages that they had to begin to decipher. “It was an exercise in role-play to enrich their understanding of that point in history, and of wartime code breakers,” Turlish said. “In addition, we believe that computer coding will open doors to many potential careers and pursuits for our students.” Turlish and Hudson hope to expand their workshop into a series of classes where the students will engage in several historically accurate simulations, including the coding of computers. 6

Fall 2018

class involve data collection and analysis with sensors, video analysis, voiceovers, building optical and musical instruments, and creating photojournals and digital portfolios, which “help students develop transferable communication and teambuilding skills as well as improve skills that cut across the science curriculum,” she said. “These conferences let me figure out if the things we think are best for our boys, or best for learning in general, are on track with what other strong schools are doing,” she said. “21st century classrooms are constantly changing with the needs of the learners, and the uncertain (in a good way) future that they must be prepared to tackle. I want to share ideas, hear what others think are best practices, and continue to evolve in my own classroom.”


ARTS

Making music :

The Lower School Conservatory recitals showcased student musicians performing on a variety of instruments, including piano, violin, trombone, cello, trombone, and guitar.

Amazing mazes Sixth-grade students in Nancy Agati’s art class are challenged to draw, design, create, and solve their own wooden marble mazes. “The assignment presents an opportunity for each boy to think as a designer and to build a game that is difficult yet solvable,” said Agati. “Students are asked to consider the different thought processes involved in solving a puzzle or maze, compared to those of creating and building one.” Students begin by drawing their ideas in pencil and tape, followed by creating a small cardboard model to envision the three-dimensional form. Each student is given a wooden base and chooses from an assortment of scrap wood and various materials from which to make walls, paths, tunnels, ramps, and even secret passageways. The first maze project was developed in 2001. Since then, it has evolved to allow students to work with woodworking tools, including the recently installed scroll saw and band saw in the Middle School art studio. Agati and fellow art teacher Nathan Pankratz collaborated to give each sixth-grade student an opportunity to explore every possible definition of a maze. “The results were amazing, as we saw mazes with trap doors, moving parts, multi-levels, and loop-di-loops,” said Agati. “The boys had a great time challenging their peers as they tested out each other’s work.”

Playwrights

IN PROGRESS

Playwrights in Progress featured five plays written, directed, acted, and produced by Form II students: “Boi” written and directed by Andrew Johnson; “Argentina, right Wing, Awww It’s Di Maria,” written and directed by Jake Brewington; “The Courage of a Soldier,” written and directed by Edmund Cayley; “Sinking Brick,” written and directed by Bram Schork; and “A Football Life,” written and directed by Wells Benson, this year’s Haverford School Playwrighting Award winner. “A Football Life” Brady never quite fit in. In fact, he has been bullied for years by the same boy. Enter Vance, a tough, popular guy who has the teachers fooled. Brady knows better, and he’s sick of being Vance’s punching bag, so he joins the football team to try to improve his reputation. Will he be able to build his confidence enough to tackle the issues with his bully or will he still be the one getting tackled? haverford.org

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ARTS

Haverford School Arts Festival 2018 The 8th annual Haverford School Arts Festival, held during Alumni Weekend May 3-5, featured a variety of events showcasing student and alumni work across a broad range of artistic fields – painters, photographers, sculptors, filmmakers, graphic designers, architects, animators, illustrators, ceramicists, glass blowers, and more. This year’s art exhibit showcased works by alumni (including featured artist author/illustrator Tom Booth ’02), students, and family members, as well as performances by musicians, actors, and singers.

Culture manifested: Theater I Dialects

“The Have-fo-d School” was being practiced and perfected as part of Dialects, Darren Hengst’s Theater I elective. Students chose between a British cockney accent and New York City working-class accent. “Studying dialects teaches students to be more aware of the sounds coming out of their mouths,” said Hengst. “When they play a character with a dialect, students are pushed to get outside of themselves. Going beyond memorizing lines and into experimenting with sounds and the way your mouth moves really stretches our students.” Hengst also believes that studying dialects opened the class to important conversations about different cultures. “We’ve studied the Southern dialect in the past, and talked about the way of life in the South, and how culture manifests itself in speech. In acting, this can give us clues about the personality of the character.” 8

Fall 2018


ATHLETICS

Spring Sports Wrap-Ups Baseball Head coach: Bob Castell Overall record: 15-12 League record: 4-6 League finish: 3rd place Team captains: Justin Meyer, Isaiah Winikur Individual accomplishments: All-Inter-Ac First Team – Justin Meyer, Pat Toal All-Delco First Team – Justin Meyer All-Delco Second Team – Isaiah Winikur All-Delco Honorable Mention – Sean Clark, Zak Summy, Pat Toal All-Main Line First Team – Justin Meyer, Isaiah Winikur All-Main Line Second Team – Pat Toal All-Main Line Honorable Mention – Zak Summy, Sean Clark, Alex Andrews Carpenter Cup – Justin Meyer, Pat Toal, Isaiah Winikur • Season series sweep against Germantown Academy, while splitting series contests with Inter-Ac rivals Episcopal Academy and Penn Charter • Claimed victories in seven out of nine one-run, hard- fought contests • Beat Conestoga, Harriton, Penncrest, and Devon Prep • Team advanced to semi-finals of PAISAA tournament in three of past four years • Justin Meyer joined the 100 Hit and 100 RBI Club this season, accumulated over his four-year career • Senior group of players, including Justin Meyer (University of Richmond), Isaiah Winikur (Towson University), Grady Nance (Washington University in St. Louis), Tommy Bagnell, and Nick Holtz, will be missed

Crew Head coach: Jonathan Stephanik Team captains: Jack Costello, David McKay, Tim Scheuritzel Accomplishments: Stotesbury Cup Regatta Freshman Quad – 3rd place Junior Quad – 3rd place Varsity Four – 5th place PSRA City Championships Freshman Quad – 4th place Junior Quad – 2nd place

Varsity Four – 1st place Junior Four – 3rd place SRAA Nationals Freshman Quad – 5th place Junior Quad – 3rd place Varsity Four – 1st place • • • • •

Six boats made the finals at PSRA City Championship (Freshman Quad, Freshman Double, Junior Single, Junior Four, Junior Quad, Senior Four) Four boats made the finals at Stotesbury Cup Regatta (Freshman Quad, Junior Double, Junior Quad, Senior Four) Four boats qualified for SRAA National Championships (Freshman Quad, Junior Four, Junior Quad, Senior Four); three boats made the finals Varsity Four won at Nationals for the first time in more than 15 years With 20 fewer athletes on the team compared to last year, the team showed a lot of promise and several underclassman and novices stepped up to fill important roles

haverford.org

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ATHLETICS

Lacrosse Head coach: John Nostrant Overall record: 16-4 League record: 5-0, 1-1 in tournament League finish: 1st place, regular season, 2nd place standings Team captains: Payton Hollway, T.J. Malone, Luke O’Grady Individual accomplishments: All-Inter-Ac: T.J. Malone, Peter Garno, Gavin Burke, Ryan Niggeman, Harrison Fellheimer, Ed King, Adam Salvaggio, Scott Deck, Payton Hollway All-Delco First Team – Ryan Niggeman, Gavin Burke, T.J. Malone All-Delco Second Team – Harrison Fellheimer, Chris Tsetsekos, Peter Garno, Luke O’Grady All-Delco Honorable Mention – Scott Deck, Payton Hollway, Ed King, Adam Salvaggio All-Main Line First Team – Luke O’Grady, Ryan Niggeman, T.J. Malone All-Main Line Second Team – Gavin Burke, Harrison Fellheimer, Chris Tsetsekos, Peter Garno All-Main Line Honorable Mention – Scott Deck, Payton Hollway, Ed King, Adam Salvaggio

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Fall 2018

• • • • •

The Fords’ only loss in-state was to Malvern in the final of the Inter-Ac tournament The team beat every competitor in league play and was the No.1 seed going into this year’s tournament Unlike other years, the tournament winner wins the league; Haverford fell to Malvern 17-13 The season was highlighted with wins over national powers McDonogh, Gilman, and St. Paul’s, as well as local power LaSalle College High School Haverford returns a good nucleus of players but will miss the leadership and work ethic of the Class of 2018

Tennis Head coach: Antonio Fink Overall record: 9-3 League record: 5-0 League finish: 1st place Team captains: John Welsh, Grayson Potter Individual accomplishments: All-Main Line First Team Singles – Nick Chakraborty, Grayson Potter, John Walsh All-Main Line First Team Doubles – Emilio Fink and Julius Golz


ATHLETICS

• Attended National High School Tennis Invitational in Newport Beach, Calif. • Finished top 15 in the nation • Placed fifth in New England Mid-Atlantic Invitational (doubles) • Captured ninth consecutive Inter-Ac Championship • Completed another undefeated Inter-Ac season with notable out-of-state victories in New Jersey and California

Track & Field Head coach: Luqman Kolade Overall record: 3rd place Team captains: Will Merhige, Mark Gregory, Ben Stallworth, Sam Lindner Individual accomplishments: All-Delco First Team – Daiyaan Hawkins, Petey Lemmon, Dan Whaley All-Delco Second Team – 4x100m Relay: Daiyaan Hawkins, Tyler Seward, Ben Stallworth, Dan Whaley) All-Delco Honorable Mention – Mark Gregory, Will Merhige, Tyler Seward, Ben Stallworth Daiyaan Hawkins – 1st place, 100m and 200m, Inter-Ac Championship; 1st place, 100m and 2nd place, 200m,

PAISAA Championship Dan Whaley – 1st place, 400m, Inter-Ac Championship; 2nd place, 400m, PAISAA Championship Mark Gregory – 2nd place, 800m, Inter-Ac and PAISAA Championships Petey Lemmon – 2nd place, shot put, PAISAA Championship 4x100m Relay (Daiyaan Hawkins, Tyler Seward, Ben Stallworth, Dan Whaley) – 1st place, Inter-Ac and PAISAA Championships 4x800m Relay (Khalil Bland, Lleyton Winslow, A.J. Sanford, Mark Gregory) – 1st place, Inter-Ac and PAISAA Championships • • • •

School records were posted in the 400m by Dan Whaley, 1600m by Will Merhige, and 4x800 by A.J. Sanford, Khalil Bland, Lleyton Winslow, and Mark Gregory Team posted strong results throughout the season with highlights at the Penn Relays, Henderson Invitational, Inter-Ac Championship, and PAISAA Championship Hawkins and Whaley led scoring for the Fords at the Inter-Ac Championship by adding both individual and relay titles to their names (100m, 200m, 400m, 4x100m) The Fords won the inaugural 4x800 at the Inter-Ac Championship, setting a league record time haverford.org

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COMMENCEMENT

Commencement 2018

The Class of 2018 (Front row, from left) Liam Francis James, Myles Avery Ford, Lamont Daniel Lucas, Matthew Noah Baumholtz, Grant Hershorn Sterman, William Taylor Henderson, Xavier Matthew Segel, Robert Dexter Morris Manganaro, Benjamin Logan Stallworth, James Karl Ives, Patrick Loughran Farley, Parker Christian Gravina, Robert Kaho Chen, Cameron Francis Hanssens, Justin Lee Meyer, Thomas John Bagnell IV, and Michael Feng; (second row) Troy Anthony Gibbs-Brown, Jack Alexander Burton, Mark Edward Gregory, Tyler Barrington Burt, Tyler Isaiah Campbell, Kharon Damon Randolph, Grey Irving Rumain, Tyler John Roland, Benjamin Dante Warden, Richard Calder Buonocore, Emilio José Fink, Grady Punch Nance, William Andrew Merhige, Patrick Joseph Rodden II, Thomas Joseph Malone, Jonathan R. Hanson, Derrick Otis Hampton, Timothy Eric Carlson, Chase James McCollum, Michael Wesley Clymer Jr., and Nicolas Luis Tellez; (third row) Gaspard Matthieu Marie Vadot, Timothy G. Scheuritzel, Gabriel A. Deane, Joseph Gray D’Ignazio, Niklas Konstantin Golz, Christian Kelm Arakelian, Michael Richard Schlarbaum, John Michael Nelligan, Jackson Foster Spahr, Benjamin S. Bacharach, Graham Harrison Haabestad, William Robert Rhodes, Grayson Luke Potter, Peter Charles Miller, Scott Howard Deck, Samuel Luke O’Grady, Isaiah Andrew Winikur, David Sutcliffe Aspinall, Joseph Matthew Brennan, Charles Stewart Cordisco, and Norborne Gee Smith IV; (fourth row) John Bevins Comai, Nicholas Jackson Holtz, Robert C. Gibson Jr., Tucker McBride Desperito, Julius Lennard Golz, Robert White Soslow, Stuart Hopkins Berlinger, Samuel Marcus Lindner, Matthew Ryan Tucker, Mark Andrew Farmer Jr., Alexander William Ciardi, Harrison Scott Fellheimer, Samuel Ralph Turner, William Courtlandt Yoh Jr., Thomas Edward Brooks Jr., Michael Scott Pilkington, John Chewning Denious, Frank Raymond Zepka, Anthony Michael Reginelli, and Eusha Rahman Hasan; (back row) Myles Mason Scott, Matthew John LaRocca, William Henry Baltrus, Ra’sean A. Nichols, Nasir I. Smith, Paul Spencer Davis, Ryan Anthony Sanfilippo, Payton Kingsbury Hollway, David Dewey McKay, Colin Hurlbrink, Edward William King, Marvin Mbogo Mwangi, John Alsip Walsh, Alessandro Roberto Boratto, Zachary John Mattiola, Miska Nikolai Abrahams, George Robert Stratts Jr., Jack Patrick Costello, Xavier William Dorn, Kyle Oming Wagner, Luke Michael Egan, Aidan Finley Mantelmacher, and Samuel Hatch Baker.

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Fall 2018


COMMENCEMENT

College matriculation 95% admitted to one of their top three college choices 29% Lifers or Super Lifers

Top award winners Winners of The Haverford School’s most prestigious awards were announced at the 134th Commencement on June 8 in the Field House: (from left) Grant Sterman received The Daniel S. Newhall II ’20 Plaque, given to the young man with the highest scholastic standing in the graduating class among the winners of the School letter in any sport; Justin Meyer received The Frank C. Roberts III Cup, given to that member of the graduating class who has shown true sportsmanship in working and playing squarely, in being a good loser and graceful winner, and in making and keeping friends; Samuel Turner received The Alumni Association Key Man Award, which goes to that graduating senior who has demonstrated outstanding traits of character, scholarship, intelligence, and leadership, as well as enthusiasm in all school activities; T.J. Malone received The Frederick C. Peters II ’68 Prize, which honors a member of the graduating class whose leadership has made the School happier for his presence and whose loyal service to Haverford has inspired in his fellow students a more generous vision of good citizenship; and Eusha Hasan received The Phi Beta Kappa Association of Philadelphia Award, given to that member of the graduating class who excels in his scholastic record and who possesses inherent character and integrity.

Class of 2018 Lifers and Super Lifers More than 29 percent of the Class of 2018 has attended The Haverford School since pre-kindergarten (Super Lifers) or kindergarten (Lifers): (front row, from left) Grant Sterman, Super Lifer; Will Henderson, Lifer; Xavi Segel, Super Lifer; Robert Manganaro, Super Lifer; Ben Stallworth, Super Lifer; and James Ives, Lifer; (second row) Tyler Roland, Lifer; John Nelligan, Super Lifer; Ben Warden, Super Lifer; Cal Buonocore, Super Lifer; Emilio Fink, Super Lifer; Grady Nance, Super Lifer, and Will Merhige, Lifer; (third row) Mike Schlarbaum, Super Lifer; Jackson Spahr, Super Lifer; Benji Bacharach, Super Lifer; Graham Haabestad, Super Lifer; Will Rhodes, Super Lifer; Grayson Potter, Super Lifer; and Peter Miller, Super Lifer; (back row) Robb Soslow, Super Lifer; Stuart Berlinger, Super Lifer; Sam Lindner, Super Lifer; Matthew Tucker, Super Lifer; Andrew Farmer Jr., Super Lifer; Alex Ciardi, Super Lifer; Harrison Fellheimer, Super Lifer; Samuel Turner, Super Lifer; and Will Yoh Jr., Lifer.

14% recognized by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation

Amherst College (2) Brandeis University Brown University Carnegie Mellon University Case Western Reserve University Clemson University (2) Colby College Colgate University College of the Holy Cross Columbia University Connecticut College Dartmouth College (2) Dickinson College (2) Denison University Drexel University (3) Duke University Fordham University Franklin & Marshall College (4) Hampton University Hobart College Holy Family University Howard University Indiana University Ithaca College Lafayette College (3) Lehigh University McGill University Miami University New York University Occidental College Pennsylvania State University (2) Princeton University Providence College Roger Williams University Skidmore College Stanford University (2) Susquehanna University Temple University (3) Texas Christian University (2) Towson University Trinity College U.S. Military Academy U.S. Naval Academy University of Chicago (2)

University of Colorado (2) University of Hartford University of Michigan (2) University of Notre Dame University of Pennsylvania (7) University of Richmond (4) University of South Carolina University of Southern California University of St Andrews University of the Sciences University of Virginia (3) University of Wisconsin Ursinus College Vanderbilt University Villanova University (2) Wake Forest University (4) Washington and Lee University Washington University (3) West Chester University Williams College Yale University

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Commencement speakers On June 8, Haverford conducted its 134th Commencement ceremony and graduated 102 members of the Class of 2018. Retired U.S. Army Brigadier General Kimberly C. Field gave the Commencement address on the privilege of service, while Student Body President Robb Soslow reflected on his 14 years at Haverford. Speech excerpts are below; visit haverford.org/commencement2018 for the full remarks, photos, and videos.

Kimberly C. Field “I am absolutely delighted and honored to speak to you young men today on a topic dear to me. That topic is: service is the greatest privilege in life. “This past Veterans Day, I put that idea out for discussion in the opinion section of the Washington Post – that piece prompted Dr. Nagl’s request to speak to you. In short, I claimed that in response to “thank you for your service,” an appropriate response might be, “it was my privilege.” And “thank you for yours.” Veterans are trusted, thanked, compensated, respected, and even admired. Our service allows us to operate way up in Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to a place of esteem, even self-actualization. We are privileged to have had this opportunity. “But the thanks we veterans receive has always made me uncomfortable and I couldn’t quite put my finger on why – after all, didn’t our service come with sacrifice? “I thought back to when I was 27 – five short years out of college. I was commanding a Military Police company in Somalia, just prior to the time of Blackhawk Down. Our mission was to provide armed escort for food moving from the port of Mogadishu to the interior of the country. Somalia was in the middle of a civil war and a famine. “I recalled a sunny afternoon when my patrol heard a firefight behind us. We immediately turned our three gun-trucks around and came upon what any American would consider a horrifying scene: an overturned banana truck, people shot, maimed, and bleeding. As I was treating gunshot wounds, it struck me that no one was crying. There was no hysteria. There was unbelievable calm; death was an 14

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everyday part of life. These people knew sacrifice. “This idea of “service?” This environment was all about survival. It hit me why I felt uncomfortable when people thanked me. I had seen so many people who would have given anything to serve the way I was privileged to serve, to receive all those intangibles I could feel from serving. “Now, having said that, service takes many forms. Those Somali clan elders are still – to this day – trying hard to meet the needs of their families. The cashier at supermarket who is steadfastly cheerful in the face of her customers’ impatience and her own hardships, is serving. So where is the privilege beyond the obligation to just be nice? It is this: those of us who are offered the opportunity to achieve our potential and earn the trust and admiration

of our fellow man – and most importantly, are rightfully pleased with the man in the mirror – are privileged. Those of us who can relatively easily do as Aristotle suggests when he answered the question, “what is the essence of life?” with, “to serve others and to do good,” are just plain lucky. You have extraordinary opportunity to do that on a scale the Somali elder and the cashier cannot. What a privilege.” Robb Soslow ’18 “In many ways we are here to say goodbye to a lifetime. For us young men, four years is a lifetime. After just learning what meaningful and fulfilling relationships are, we are to say farewell to all of the budding ones we have made. After just learning what meaningful experience means, we are to say goodbye to the place that gave it


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all to us. After today, that life is no longer ours. We are to move on to bigger and better things, but for now that goodbye will leave an absence in our hearts. As I learned in high school, there are some things you simply cannot replace. “I have always considered the greatest privilege of my life to be my family: my brilliant and overly-charismatic father, my mother, whose love can sometimes be categorized as neurosis, and my brother, who got the best qualities from both of them. But the greatest gift of my life has always been Haverford, which my grandparents gave to me. Through Haverford, I, and all of my classmates, have been able to be a part of something greater than ourselves. We are more than young men. We are brothers, we have been shaped by the vision of the School, and we were prepared for life. There has been

no greater gift than to have been able to spend 14 years here, to have been shaped, to have been surrounded by my brilliant and caring classmates, to have loved my teachers and have my teachers sometimes love me. “We have all achieved much here. But we rarely think about how much Haverford played a part in our success. Haverford was the first place to realize our passions and turn them into real, tangible success. “But I would hate to paint Haverford as a fluffy and soft place: it is not. Part of what these graduates share is the struggle, the stress, the fight. All of have learned a small bit about failure here. We have learned that failure is a part of life and that everyone, at some point, must fail. I have tried hard to fail often here. I walked today, so I guess I didn’t fail too badly. “All men must fail, but Haverford men

do not give up. We are to become the men in the arena, we are to strive valiantly, and if we are to fail, we are to fail while daring greatly. “And what is not mentioned in that brilliant Theodore Roosevelt speech is that there is more than the man in the arena and the critic. For every man in the arena, there was the person who taught that man how to fight. For every thing I learned about music, Hightower taught me more about how to live. For every paper Keefe squiggled on, he taught me more about how to love. Thank you, faculty, for without you we would have never learned how to fight.”

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Middle School award winners Four Haverford School II Formers received the Middle School’s top awards during closing exercises on June 5. Bram Schork received the Michael J. Cunningham Award, named in memory of Haverford School Dean of Faculty, longtime teacher, coach, and former Middle School Head who died of cancer in 2001. The award is presented annually to that member of the Middle School who excels in his ability to meet scholastic and athletic challenges and whose bearing combines both self-respect and sensitivity to the feelings and ideas of his fellow students. Ben Springer received the William Denning Shaler Dickson Award, named in memory of Bill Dickson, longtime Middle School math teacher, coach, and Associate Dean of Student Affairs who died of cancer in 2003. This award, which also represents qualities cherished by Dickson, is presented annually to that member of the eighth-grade class who over the course of his Middle School years has demonstrated his commitment to personal growth on the playing field, in the classroom, on stage, and

Winners of The Haverford School’s top Middle School awards are (from left) II Formers Bram Schork, Noble De Marco, Quinn Luong, and Ben Springer.

in his interactions with others. The Jack Berrettini ’09 Award was given to Noble De Marco, presented annually to that member of the eighth-grade class who best exemplifies the characteristics of Jack Berrettini, a former member of the Class of 2009 who died in 2003, as voted by his classmates and teachers. This student demonstrates integrity, kindness, loyalty, and respect for others, building meaningful relationships with both his classmates and

teachers. The Thomas Worth Award was given to Quinn Luong, presented annually to that member of the eighth-grade class who recognizes and encourages the best in his fellows, distinguishes himself by the creativity he brings to the Middle School community, and is an eager participant in and enthusiastic supporter of all school efforts and activities.

Lower School award winners During Haverford School Lower School closing exercises on June 4, awards were presented to outstanding students. The Edward I. Haupt Memorial Award recognizes improvement in reading in first and second grades and was presented to first-grader Luke Erskine and secondgrader Mason Freitag. The Ben W. Malone ’93 Citizenship Award is given to the most outstanding citizen of second grade. This year’s recipient was Ali Torabi. Fourthgrader Graham Costello received The William “Will” A. Corey ’08 Positive Attitude Award, which is presented to the student from the upper two grades who best exemplifies determination in studies, on the playground, or in striving for general improvement. The Davis R. Parker Award recognized Ian Rosenzweig, and is awarded 16

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Award winners are (front row, from left) second-grader Ali Torabi, second-grader Mason Freitag, and first-grader Luke Erskine; (back row) fifth-graders Henry Bernstein, Brady Cross, and Ian Rosenzweig. Not pictured: fourth-grader Graham Costello.

in fifth grade for outstanding interest and enthusiasm in social studies. The Haverford Citizenship Award is given to the most outstanding citizen of the class, and was presented to fifth-grader Henry Bernstein.

The Marie Tyler Memorial Award was presented to fifth-grader Brady Cross, who was recognized as the most outstanding student of the class.


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Major athletic award winners

The 2017-18 major sports award winners are: (front row, from left) V Former Luke Kania, VI Former Alex Ciardi, VI Former Jonathon Hanson, and VI Former Will Merhige; (back row) VI Former Isaiah Winikur, VI Former Sam Lindner, VI Former Alex Boratto, and V Former Ben Gerber.

Eight scholar-athletes received major sports honors during the fifth annual Haverford School Athletic Awards Ceremony on May 23. The Michael F. Mayock Jr. ’76 Award for Exceptional Individual Athletic Achievement was presented to VI Former Alex Boratto. Occasionally, a Haverford School student’s individual accomplishments in athletics are so consistently excellent that he merits special acknowledgement. This studentathlete’s outstanding achievement has been distinguished by exceptional athletic accomplishment, humility, and grace. V Former Luke Kania received The Yale Cup, which is awarded annually to the student, not necessarily the athlete, who has done the most to promote athletics in the School.

VI Former Sam Lindner received The Tyler L. Groseclose III ’69 Captain’s Cup, which is awarded annually to that captain of a varsity sport whose leadership, ability, and enthusiasm has been an inspiration to his teammates and to the School. The J. Sanders Haas ’41 Trophy was awarded to VI Formers Alex Ciardi and Jonathon Hanson. It is given to the outstanding manager(s) of any Haverford School athletic team. The Charles J. Rainear II ’34 Memorial Shield is awarded annually to the best all-around athlete. The recipient was VI Former Isaiah Winikur. VI Former Will Merhige received The John J. Gallagher Jr. ’69 Athletic Achievement and Spirit Award, which is presented to that senior who, in the

eyes of his coaches, possesses many of the same qualities as John J. Gallagher ’69 who lettered in football, basketball, and lacrosse, and who was an inaugural Athletic Hall of Fame member. The recipient is a three-sport athlete and a gracious winner who achieves success with humility and who embodies John’s qualities of perseverance, leadership, team play, and commitment to excellence. V Former Ben Gerber received The James “Kip” Taviano ’13 Memorial Locker and Pin, which is awarded each year to the rising senior student-athlete who best personifies the characteristics that Kip embodied: sportsmanship, friendliness, humor, loyalty, dedication, heart, and compassion for his teammates and others.

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Honors Day award winners (Front row, from left) V Former Mickey Fairorth, VI Former Xavi Segel, VI Former Robbie Chen, III Former Cyril Leahy, III Former Ryan Ngo, VI Former Ben Stallworth, V Former Robert Esgro, III Former Agustin Aliaga, V Former Garrett Johnson, VI Former Eusha Hasan, and VI Former Matthew Brennan; (second row) VI Former John Comai, VI Former Tyler Burt, VI Former Grant Sterman, V Former Neetish Sharma, V Former Jackson Overton-Clark, VI Former Gaspard Vadot, VI Former Tyler Campbell, IV Former Yan Graf, IV Former Jonny Sonnenfeld, IV Former Carson De Marco, III Former Nathan Tai, and VI Former Mike Schlarbaum; (third row) V Former Dan Whaley, V Former Calvin Costner, VI Former Ed King, VI Former Jack Denious, VI Former Benji Bacharach, VI Former John Nelligan, V Former David Hurly, V Former Yiheng “Intel” Chen, V Former Thomas Russell, IV Former Caleb Reed, IV Former Alexander Greer, V Former Nick Chimicles, V Former David Pomeroy, and V Former Nick Chakraborty; (back row) V Former Nick Biddle, V Former Ben Gerber, VI Former Samuel Turner, VI Former Matthew Tucker, VI Former Zach Mattiola, VI Former T.J. Brooks Jr., V Former Carson Rooney, V Former Jeff Pendergast, V Former Aidan Leavy, V Former Christian Ray, VI Former Spencer Davis, III Former Reed Halpert, V Former Kwaku Adubofour, V Former Will Vauclain, and VI Former Sam Lindner. Not pictured: V Formers George Maguire, Will Clark, and Vincent Corradetti.

The Robert L. Finch Art Award

The Haverford School Theater Award

Francis White 1910 Scholar

Garrett Lee Johnson

Paul Spencer Davis

Nicholas Biddle

The Peter A. Chamberlain Award

The Thomas Worth Thespis Award

D.A.R. Prize

Vincent T. Corradetti George Thomas Maguire

Jeffrey Richard Pendergast

Jackson Ward Overton-Clark

The Robert U. Jameson Debate Award

Frank E. DeSimone, Esq. Mock Trial Award

Rhode Island School of Design Award

Grant Hershorn Sterman

Zachary John Mattiola Samuel Ralph Turner

William Emerson Clark Aidan J. Leavy The Peter Lund Toebe ’98 Memorial Award

Caleb Thomas Reed The Lewis-Wright Award

Robert Kaho Chen The Edward Hilary Reuss III ’38 Memorial Prize

David Michael Hurly The Music Technology Prize

Michael Richard Schlarbaum The Lewis G. Smith 1910 Memorial Prize

Samuel Ralph Turner The Norman Mailer Literary Award

Michael Richard Schlarbaum The Stephen B. Knowlton Prize

Gaspard Matthieu Marie Vadot

Carson Dean Rooney

The Robert U. Jameson Memorial Prize

The Centennial Hall Award for Technical Theatre

The IV Form History Prize

John David Pomeroy 18

The Paul B. Rochberg ’63 Memorial Creative Writing Prize

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Tyler Isaiah Campbell Jonathan Sonnenfield

History Department Prize

John Bevins Comai The Joseph P. Healey Award

Grant Hershorn Sterman The William Wallace Prize

Matthew Ryan Tucker The Maurice L. Clancy Memorial Prize

Thomas Edward Brooks Jr. The Eastern and Western Languages Award

Eusha Rahman Hasan The Linguistics Prize

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The John C. Lober ’20 Prize

The William A. Corey ’08 Memorial Award

The Donald J. McBride Award

Grant Hershorn Sterman

Calvin C. Costner

Benjamin S. Bacharach

Rudolph H. Blythe Jr. ’59 Computer Award

The John E. Krout ’37 Memorial Award

The Robert Gillin Jr. ’81 Memorial Prize

Nicholas A. Chimicles

Robert Treanor Esgro

Benjamin Logan Stallworth

The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia Prize in Economics

The Severinghaus Global Scholar Award

The Harvard Club of Philadelphia Award

Joseph Matthew Brennan Yan Lin Graf

Michael R. Fairorth

Samuel Ralph Turner High Scorer on the AMC Mathematics Exam

Nathan Tai Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Medal

Michael R. Fairorth The Robert C. Rugg Memorial Prize

Samuel “Reed” Halpert Cyril Leahy The Antoine Lavoisier Chemistry Prize

Nikhil Chakraborty The Barton Sensenig Science Prize

Xavier Matthew Segel The James L. Dunn ’38 Prize

Eusha Rahman Hasan The Class and School Spirit Award

Form III Samuel “Reed” Halpert Form IV Kwaku Adubofour Form V Christian Kuepper Ray Form VI John Chewning Denious and Samuel Marcus Lindner

The Thomas A. Newhall 1917 Memorial Prize

Ryan Ngo The Thomas D. Harrison Jr. Memorial Prize

Agustin Aliaga Nathan Tai The William Edward Gwinn ’86 Memorial Prize

The University of Chicago Book Award

William Elliot Vauclain The University of Pennsylvania Book Award

Yiheng “Intel” Chen The Williams College Book Award

Thomas Scobey Russell The Princeton Book Award

Alexander Harrison Greer

Neetish Sharma

The William G. Warden II ’21 Memorial Prize

Wake Forest University Book Award

Daniel O’Keith Whaley

Nicholas A. Chimicles

The Cecile B. Jarvis Award

The University of Virginia Book Award

Carson Alexander De Marco

Benjamin Morris Gerber

The Frank R. Ewing Jr. Oar Award

The Yale Book Award

Tyler Barrington Burt

Jackson Ward Overton-Clark

National Merit Scholarship Winners

U.S. Service Academy Book Award

Samuel Hatch Baker Grant Hershorn Sterman Samuel Ralph Turner

Edward William King – West Point John Michael Nelligan – Naval Academy Prep School

Water polo team earns The Gordon B. Hattersley Jr. ’48 Award The Haverford School water polo team received the Gordon B. Hattersley Jr. ’48 Award, given to the varsity sports team with the highest academic average. The award was presented during the fifth annual Athletic Awards Ceremony and honors the memory and generosity of Gordon B. Hattersley Jr., who made a $1.3 million challenge grant to The Campaign for Haverford in 1999 along with his wife, Beverly. Members of the water polo team include (front row, from left) Coach Sean Hansen, III Former Jack Deppen, V Former J.R. Leitz, VI Former John Nelligan, V Former David Pomeroy, and Coach Kevin Van Such; (back row) V Former Nicholas Biddle, V Former Jason Chen, VI Former T.J. Brooks, IV Former Matej Sekulic, and II Former Bram Schork.

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PARENTS

HSPA Annual Luncheon The Haverford School Parents’ Association (HSPA) held its annual meeting and luncheon at Aronimink Golf Club on May 9. The theme, “The World is Your Oyster,” was woven throughout the event that was chaired by Christine Dehney and Beth Stone, along with a committee of volunteers. The day included a board meeting, boutique vendor shopping, and lunch. The Haverford School Notables entertained the crowd with a variety of song selections. During the luncheon, HSPA Chair Ann Glavin presented Headmaster John Nagl with a check that represented funds raised throughout the school year by the HSPA to benefit The Haverford School. It was a perfect spring event to honor the HSPA volunteers as well as the senior class parents.

(clockwise) Members of The Haverford School Parents’ Association Finance and Executive Committee (from left): Vice Chair Dorothy Walker, Ways and Means Barbara Cooper, Second Vice Chair Alicia Payne, Chair Ann Glavin, and Treasurer Jennifer Ballenger. Upper School parents Maggie Kaplan and Susan Scauzzo. Event co-chairs Christine Dehney and Beth Stone. Senior moms Jeannette Smith, Missy Deck, and Sunny Meyer.

Haligoluk dedication and appreciation recognition The Class of 2018 presented the Haligoluk Dedication Award to Matt Green (left), outgoing Head of Upper School, and recognized Dr. Bill Ehrhart (right), Upper School English/ history teacher, with the Appreciation Award.

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ALUMNI

Alumni Weekend 2018 Alumni Weekend events included the Golden Fords Luncheon, with its newest members (Class of 1968); the 7th Form mentoring session with the V Form; an Upper School assembly where Matt Gillin ’85 received the Distinguished Alumnus Award and Ken Brier ’68 received the Alumni Service Award; and an Alumni Art Exhibition and Reception along with the Annual Alumni Reception in the Arts Wing of the Upper School. Saturday’s highlights included the Service of Remembrance, Alumni Family Brunch, Alumni and Family Barbecue, and the Reunion Class Parties.

Reunion classes

’48 The Class of 1948: (front row, from left) Joan Repetto, Seny Birkinbine, Margaret Mason, and Tony Mason; (back row) Doug Wearn, Phil Repetto, John Knox, John Birkinbine, and Ted Chasteney.

’53 The Class of 1953: (front row, from left) Dave Biddle and Scott Tuttle; (back row) Steve Hibbs, Bob Girvin, and Jay Goldenberg.

Members of the Class of 1963 who attended their Class Reunion included Oivind Baekken, Bill Gaunt, Edward Kaier, Gordon Keen, Saul Levit, Bob Melikian, Rick Mellor, John Oehrle, Jim Oram, Arild Oyen, Ted Pollard, Steve Stack, Steve Shaffer, Clint Swift, David Wilson, and Alan Wood.

’63

’58 The Class of 1958: (front row, from left) John Haslett, Fred Wentz, Cliff Keevan, Jim Affleck, Harvey Bartle, Albert Oehrle, Evan Chandlee, and Headmaster John Nagl; (second row) Drew Mozino, Nils Vogt, Phil Hepburn, and Tony Crane; (third row) Jerry Aldrich; (fourth row) Bob Morris, Jeff Odiorne, and Ted Wagner; (fifth row) Bill Ertel, Michael Fox, Fred Meinke, and Todd Colfelt; (back row) Klaus-Peter Klaiber and Bill Hyland. Not pictured: Louis Ricker.

’68 The Class of 1968: (from left) George Lonsdorf, Bo Baird, Ken Lowry, Corrin Strong, Steve Page, David Parsons, Steve Swift, Bill Thorkelson, Fred Whelan, John Kidd, Ken Brier, George “Spike” Crawford, Carter Schelling, Sabin Colton, Ted Peters, Dave Bullock, John Fitzgerald, Phil Price, Bill Saylor, Chris Koprowski, John Silverthorne, George McDonald, and Headmaster John Nagl.

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’73 The Class of 1973: (front row, from left) Craig McCarter, Tom Christie, Bill Ferguson, Steve Fritz, Jeff Swarr, and host Arlin Green; (back row) Alec Arader, Peter Lindquist, Jeremy Abelson, Rich Gorman, Peter Krumbhaar, Eric Hildebrandt, Bob Roche, and Headmaster John Nagl. Not pictured: John Middleton, Turner Smith, Mike Whelan, Frank Moriarty, Vince Evangelisti, Rusty Mansel, Curtis Schelling, and John Ward.

’83 The Class of 1983: (front row, from left) Chris Kent, Brian Crochiere, Headmaster John Nagl, Randy Morgan, Maurice Glavin, and John Brazer; (back row) Hentzi Elek, Art Bell, Jay Osterholm, Head of Middle School Jay Greytok, Bruce Hauptfuhrer, and Eric Thal.

’93 The Class of 1993: (front row, from left) Avery Cook, Michael Rush, Matt Wright, Keith Clevens, Michael Keech, Headmaster John Nagl, and Jim Morris; (middle row) Chris Keating, Nathaniel Williamson, Collin Bell, Tosh Belsinger, Kevin Wolov, Lathrop Nelson, and Geoff Stewart; (back row) John McCarron, Josh McWilliams, Andrew Callahan, Alex Alday, Mark Kulesa, Dixon Gillis, and Alex Young.

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’78 The Class of 1978: (from left) Gail and John Alessandroni, Mary Ellen and Keith Cockerham, Dan Speare, Michael Shaw, Joe and Melissa Fabiani, Maura and Kevin Burke, Dan Walsh, and Chris Duffy.

’88 The Class of 1988: (front row, from left) Kyle Lissack, George Keszeli, Rich Phillips, Marc Abruzzese, Bernie Halfpenny, Charles Zulli, Todd Wolov, Bruce Hopper, George Raleigh, and Walter Son; (middle row) Adam Resnick, Gregg Miller, Stanley Ching, Matt Hessinger, Peter Gillin, Jamie Schrotberger, Don McBride, Jack Kirkpatrick, J.W. Howard, and George Mann; (back row) Greg Piasecki, Brian Bernhardt, John Nolen, James Tecce, J.T. Straub, Mike Letulle, Bill Hagner, and John Bartholdson.

’98 The Class of 1998: (from left) J.T. Ligget, Bob Farington, Kevin Madden, John Patterson, Mike Hennessey, Dave Thorkelson, Jon Burling, Haig Didizian, John Stevens, Mike Ramsburg, Doug Tyre, John Ulrich, Mike Goldfarb, Nash Waterman, Paul Rosenberg, Sean Meehan, Mike Reese, and Jeff Watkinson.


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’03

’08

The Class of 2003: (from left) Chris Didizian, Neal Follman, Mike Volpe, Greg Murray, Jerre Lieberman, and Jeff Richman. Not pictured: Jon Morgan and Doug Rosenberg.

The Class of 2008: (front row, from left) Tom Bowman, Jack Shine, Mark Eckert, Andrew Shine, and Andrew Block; (middle row) Joe Smith, Kurt Watkinson, Greg Walsh, Will Howley, Spencer Ellers, Chris Noell, Drew Close, Matt Scheuritzel, and Cory Siegfried; (back row) Ben Moser, Morgan Young, Andrew Antar, Alex Melikian, and J.D. Hall.

Class Notes submissions Update your classmates on the latest news and happenings.

’13 The Class of 2013: (front row, from left) Kiran Jagtiani, Chris Weiner, Andrew Weiner, Sam Bloch, and Roby Burch; (middle row) Fisher Pressman, Grayson Sessa, Michael Zivik, and Ben Grobman; (back row) Erich Prince, Decquan Freeman, Drew Field, Jordan Lieb, Alex Dubow, Steve Fitzgerald, and James Tarte. Not pictured: Alex Dawejko and Jack Kling.

Submissions are due Nov. 15 to abailey@haverford.org or online at haverford.org/classnotes.

7th Form Mentorship Program Alumni who spoke with V Formers as part of the 7th Form Mentorship Program during Alumni Weekend included (front row, from left) Josh Eife ’07, Thomas Lindberg ’07, and Avery Cook ’93; (middle row) John Brazer ’83, Morgan Young ’08, and Neil DeRiemer ’64; (back row) Director of Leadership Programs Bill Brady, David Bullock ’68, David Parsons ’68, Brian Crochiere ’83, and Director of Alumni Relations Andrew Bailey ’02.

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ALUMNI

Golden Fords Luncheon

Golden Fords Luncheon attendees from around the globe: (from left) Arild Oyen ’63, Norway; Nils Vogt ’58, Norway; Klaus-Peter Klaiber ’58, Australia; and Oivind Baekken ’63, Spain

(From left) Scott Tuttle ’53, Bob Girvin ’53, and John Scott ’49

Alumni Reception

1998 alumni: (front row, from left) Mike Reese and Doug Tyre; (back row) John Stevens, Mike Ramsburg, Dave Thorkelson, Kevin Madden, Nash Waterman, J.T. Ligget, and Jeff Watkinson

Roby Burch ’13, Brian Crochiere ’83, and Drew Mozino ’58

Brian McBride ’82, Associate Headmaster for External Affairs and Enrollment Management; Wade Bennett ’81, and Austin Hepburn ’75

Art Department Chair Chris Fox and Jeff Odiorne ’58

Jack and Andrew Shine ’08

Alumni & Family Barbecue

Geoff Stewart ’93, Gregg Miller ’88, Director of Alumni Relations Andrew Bailey ’02, and Rick Troncelliti ’10

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Tony Mason ’48, Ted Chasteney ’48, and Jim Buck ’77


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Alumni honorees

Before the start of Alumni Weekend, The Haverford School Alumni Executive Council presents the Distinguished Alumnus Award and the Alumni Service Award at an Upper School assembly.

2018 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS AWARD MATT GILLIN ’85 Matt Gillin ’85 has been an active entrepreneur and pioneer for nearly 20 years, widely recognized for turning innovative ideas into successful businesses. He is the CEO of Relay, a technology company that connects trusted brands with people through direct mobile communication. He also served as the CEO for Ecount Inc., a corporate prepaid card company he co-founded, then sold in 2007 to Citi. Gillin is an innovator. He holds multiple patents and is an award-winning executive, including being named PACT’s IT Innovator of Excellence, The Philadelphia Inquirer’s Most Innovative Entrepreneurs, Temple Fox School of Business Information Technology Innovator, Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year, Philadelphia Business Journal Top 40 under 40, Eastern Technology Council CEO of the Year, and the Walter M. Aikman Entrepreneur of the Year. Outside of work, Gillin was instrumental in establishing The Haverford School’s Donald J. McBride Scholarship program. He also was involved in Haverford’s Leadership Council and serves on the Board of Trustees at The Shipley School, Woodlynde School, SpeakUp!, and AIDS Alive. While at Haverford, Gillin played football, basketball, and lacrosse. He was part of The Haverford School 1985 lacrosse team that was inducted into the Haverford School Athletic Hall of Fame in 2014. They had a 14-2 overall record and were undefeated

in the Inter-Ac and in Pennsylvania, winning the third State Championship in Haverford history. Gillin holds a B.A. from Denison University. The Haverford School Alumni Association presents its Distinguished Alumnus Award to an alumnus who has achieved a level of prominence in his chosen profession and in service to his community to country. The association looks to honor an individual who has been recognized publicly for his achievements, and who has exhibited the kind of intellectual, moral, and professional character that can inspire Haverford School students, alumni, and the community.

2018 ALUMNI SERVICE AWARD KEN BRIER ’68 Ken Brier ’68 is a partner with Castle Drawbridge, a real estate development company. He founded and served as Chairman of the Board and President of Sealord LLC and Sealord Holdings Inc. The company was publicly traded and listed on the NASDAQ market. In 1998, it merged with The Zurich Group of Companies, in Zurich, Switzerland. In 2003, a management-led team, including Brier, repurchased the company and began operations as Sealord LLC. He served as President and Chairman of the Board of Mountbatten, Inc. and worked in real estate development and education. Brier has served The Haverford School extensively, as a member of the Board of Trustees from 2001-14, as a Class Chairman, and as a reunion committee member. He earned the U.S. Army’s Humanitarian Service Medal and Bronze Star Medal, among other service awards. He has served on the boards of several organizations, including Hoxie Harrison Smith Foundation, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Rosemont College, Lankenau Hospital Foundation, and Pennsylvanians for Effective Government. Following his graduation from Haverford, Brier received a B.A. from Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, an MBA from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, a Master of Public Administration from Harvard University; and a diploma in Strategic Studies from United States Army War College. The Alumni Service Award is presented to “those alumni who have demonstrated loyalty and commitment to The Haverford School and its community through extraordinary effort and dedication.” haverford.org

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ALUMNI

The 30th Annual John L. “Doc” Thomas ’23 Memorial Golf Classic

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More than 100 alumni, parents, and friends of The Haverford School participated in the 30th Annual Golf Classic at Rolling Green Golf Club in Springfield on May 14, vying for the John L. “Doc” Thomas ’23 Memorial Trophy and the Patrick G. Laughlin ’86 Memorial Trophy. The foursome of Andrew Bailey ’02, John Eremus ’01, Matt Fell ’02, and Don Ware ’02 won the “Doc” Thomas Trophy, awarded to the team with the lowest gross score. The Patrick G. Laughlin ’86 Memorial Trophy (low net) was awarded to Paul Barnes ’06, Sean Halloran ’05, Chris Ryan ’07, and Kyle Wharton ’07. Cal Buonocore ’18 won the Scott Smith ’43 Longest Drive award and Bill Thorkelson ’68 received the Straightest Drive award. Jeff Potter, Haverford School Health and Physical Education

Department Chair, earned the Joseph T. Cox Closest to the Pin award, while Steve Kania ’86 won the Closest to the Pin contest on Hole No. 14. Lead Sponsors were Firstrust and Sodexo; other sponsors included EuroMotorcars Devon, David Dodge Chrysler Jeep, Janney Montgomery Scott LLC, Pennsylvania Trust, Southwinds Capital LLC, M&M Displays Inc., Newmark Grubb Knight Frank commercial real estate services, Cornerstone Family Office LLC, the Laughlin Family, Argosy Strategic Partners, and The Haverford School Alumni Association. The event raised more than $30,000; proceeds will be allocated to both the John L. “Doc” Thomas ’23 Memorial Scholarship Fund and The Haverford School Athletic Endowment Fund.

The winners of the John L. “Doc” Thomas ’23 Memorial Trophy for the lowest gross score are (from left) Don Ware ’02, Matt Fell ’02, John Eremus ’01, and Andrew Bailey ’02, with Headmaster John Nagl (center).

The 30th Annual “Doc” Thomas Golf Classic Patrick G. Laughlin ’86 Memorial Trophy winners for lowest net score are (from left) Kyle Wharton ’07, Sean Halloran ’05, Paul Barnes ’06, and Chris Ryan ’07.

Alumni events Oct. 18 | 6-9 p.m. New York City Alumni Reception Convene 810 Seventh Ave. Oct. 25 | 6-9 p.m. Washington, D.C. Alumni Reception Old Ebbitt Grill Nov. 9 | 7-9 p.m. Alumni Haverford/EA Day kick-off party Nostrant Pavilion 26

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Fall 2016

Nov. 10 Haverford/EA Day The Haverford School Nov. 21 | 7:30 p.m. Notables Reunion Concert Centennial Hall Nov. 22 | 9-11:30 a.m. Thanksgiving Breakfast & Sports The Haverford School

Stay in touch Visit haverford.org/alumnidirectory to update your information or to connect with classmates. Use the keyword search to find fellow Fords who attended your college alma mater, live in your area, or work for a particular company. Logging in is simple: your username is your first and last name followed by the two-digit class year (e.g., harryhaverford91). Click “forgot password” if you need to reset your password, or contact helpdesk@haverford.org for assistance.

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R T n rfo or ol 8 l R rf 01 S 0 n o H l n e 20 o S T H rt ll - T Re fo 17 ol Ha R Sc 01 An r po oo rd S d S hoo ual 7-18 hoo 7-18 ual aver -20 cho he ual rd t -2 - An The epo ord 7-18 l - A ave Rep cho 17-1 nua ave t -2 cho The nua ford rt -2 l - A The Rep rford 17-1 ol - ave l Re Scho 017- nua Hav rt - Sch r c n fo r n e r H a S 1 n r H l o d o 8 1 8 n T c 0 n 1 l o o H 0 o n R rf 2 S l fo rt e er erfo d S - An -20 rd S -20 - An he H po rd S -18 - An ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave -20 cho he nua rd rt -2 - A The epo ord 17-18 l - A ave Rep cho 17-1 nua av t -2 Sch The nnu ford rt - l - A Th Rep rfor 17-1 e fo 17 H r l 1 a R r v l o 0 o o 18 l t R rf T n S c 0 r t n o H l n T fo e S l H rt o l Ha erfo hoo por erf por oo -18 al R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 - A ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord t -2 l - A The epo ford 17-18 l - A ave Rep cho 17- nua Hav rt -2 Sch r o l e f u 1 a T n c e ch 17 0 n o H a t R n H T e av f v c c T R r S l n o r S 17 rt l o 8 Ha rd S al R e H al R d S -20 Ann he H por rd S -18 - An verf epo hoo 7-18 al R aver -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 l - A aver epo cho 17-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The ep ford 17-1 T l R rf 01 S 8 T An rf H or l o o 18 l R er 20 o a c 01 0 nn o H lR S R nu H rt Sc T nn rfo rt ol l - T Re fo 17 fo nu Th nu or rt er - An -18 - An verf epo hoo 7-18 ual aver -20 choo he H ual rd S t -2 - An The epo ord 7-18 l - A ave epo cho 17-18 nua ave t -2 cho The nua ford rt -2 l - A The ep ford 17-1 ol - ave Rep cho 017- nua Hav rt - Sch S 2 n e H al S 8 1 n r r H or l o d 1 a R c l o o H lR S n H o 18 l R er 0 o R l T nn fo rf 0 n rt S 17 18 oo -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he epo ord -18 l - A ver epo hoo 17-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The ep ford 17-1 l - A ave Rep cho 17- nua Hav rt -2 Sch The nnu ford ort - l - A Th Rep rfor 017o 8 a R r T n c 0 n r l o H l R n T f S c S H r n o rt f o l e 17 t 0 o o 8 or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo -18 ual R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S t -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 - A aver epo cho 17-18 ual ave t -2 cho The nua ord rt -2 l - A The ep ford 17-1 l - A ave Rep cho 17-1 nua Hav rt -2 Sch T R S 20 n e S 8 1 n rf r l o d 17 n Ha rt a R c l o o 18 l R er 0 oo H al rf 0 nn H or ol H l R S Sc T nn fo 18 fo 17 er -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 l - A ver epo hoo 17-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The ep ford 17-1 l - A ave Rep cho 17- nua Hav rt -2 Sch The nnu ford rt - l - A Th Rep rfor 17e 0 o 7 t a R T c 0 n r l o o H 8 R n T f c r S l H r n o r f o l e S 1 t n 0 o o 8 or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo -18 al R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S t -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 - A aver epo cho 17-18 ual ave t -2 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The ep ford 17-1 l - A ave Rep cho 17-1 nua Hav rt -2 Sch T R rf T n rf S 20 n e S 1 r l o d 17 nu Ha rt a R c l o o 18 l R er 0 oo H al 0 0 nn H or ol H l R S Sc T nn fo fo 17 er -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 l - A ver epo hoo 17-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The ep ford 17-18 l - A ave Rep cho 17- nua Hav rt -2 Sch The nnu ford rt - l - A Th Rep rfor rt -2 e f r o 8 a R r T n c 0 n r l o o H R n H T f c S l n o rt l r e S 17 t o o 8 or rd S -18 T - An verf epo oo -18 al R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S t -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 - A aver epo cho 17-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The ep ford 17-1 l - A ave Rep cho 17-1 nua Hav epo ave T n rf H lS 20 n e H al T R rf S 1 r l a R l o o 18 l R er 0 oo ch 17 nu Ha rt 0 nn H r ol H l R S lR Sc T nn fo fo 17 er -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 l - A ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The epo ford 17-18 l - A ave Rep cho 17- nua Hav rt -2 Sch The nnu ford rt - l - A Th nua The hoo e f o 18 n 1 a T n c 0 n r o o H R n H T f c R r S l n n o r c S 17 t 8 rt l o o 8 or rd S -18 T - An erf epo oo -18 al R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 - A aver epo cho 17-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The ep ford 17-1 l - A ave Rep cho 17- l - A 17-1 rd S l - A T n rf S 20 o H al T R rf S 1 H r u l 0 o l o o 0 oo o 18 l R er av R ch 17 nu Ha rt 0 nn ol H l R S Sc T nn fo rt fo 17 er -20 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 l - A ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 - A The epo ford 17-18 l - A ave Rep cho 17- nua av rt -2 Sch The nnu ford rt - cho rt -2 verf cho Ann e f H o l 1 a R T n h n o c 0 n r o S o H n H T f S c R r S l a r S 17 t o rt l 8 or rd S -18 T - An erf epo oo -18 al R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 - A aver epo hoo 17-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The ep ford 17-1 l - A ave Rep ord ep e H ord ool ool T n rf H al T R rf S 1 H r n fo rt l h rf l o 0 oo o 8 7 l R Th rf ch av R ch 17 nu Ha rt l R er ol H l R Sc 0 nn rf Sc T fo er -201 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 - An ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua rd rt -2 - A The epo ford 17-18 l - A ave Rep cho 17-1 nua av rt -2 Sch The nnu ave nua -18 ave d S d Sc ave e f H o 1 a R T n h n o c r l o H n H T c R n 17 r r 0 S l 0 H n r H 17 fo o S 17 H rt l 8 t ol 8 or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo 7-18 ual R aver -20 hoo he H ual rd S t -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 l - A aver ep cho 17-1 ual ave t -2 cho The nua ord rt -2 l - A The Rep ford 17-1 l - A he l - A -20 The erfo erfo The -20 T o t T R rf S c T 1 n rf o H r n fo r o l 1 v l 0 oo o 8 7 a c 0 nn l o H R t n lR S H rt fo av er er -201 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he po rd S -18 - An ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua rd rt -2 - A The epo ford 17-18 l - A ave Rep cho 17-1 nua av rt -2 Sch 7-18 cho por 17-18 e H e Ha 17-18 por cho 1 l 8 l R er 0 oo H l S Re 0 Th c Th nn fo ort l 8 T Re rfo 017 ol Ha l R Sc 01 nn H or S 20 An e H po d S 8 T An rfo po h 20 Re d S 201 t o 0 S r 1 a T d o 2 d e r 2 r l 2 o d e e 2 a v h r o 1 e a h l r 1 l A r o rd -18 - A ve ep ho 7- ua v u p - a fo t - f a rt -2 ch The nu ford rt - l - Th Re rfor 17- ol - Hav l Re Sch 017 nnu Ha rt Sc Th nn rfo ort ol - 8 T l Re erfo rt - rfo ua rt 7-18 -18 rt u 1 r r l r 7 a c R n fo er -201 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he H po rd S -18 - An ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave -20 cho he nua rd rt -2 - A The epo ford 17-18 l - A ave Rep cho 17-1 nua av epo ave Ann epo 201 2017 epo Ann ave epo ave l 8 l R er 0 c Th nn fo ort l o e H al d S 20 An e H l R e H l - l R rt - t - l R l - e H l R e H l T l Re rfo 017 ol Ha l R Sc 01 nn H ort S 8 T An rfo po t o S o r 1 o r 2 8 a o d r ua oo Th ua h oo h ua Th oo u o rd -18 - A ve ep ho -1 ua ve -2 ho he ua rd t -2 - A he ep or 7-1 l - ave e ch 17- ua av t - ch Th nu or rt o o T l T n p 7 a rt T R c T n n p nn ch 8 H r n fo r l S 1 n rf o l o 8 7 1 a c 0 nn o H R n rf e lR S fo ch n ch nn er -201 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he H po rd S -18 - An ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave -20 cho he nua rd rt -2 - A The epo ord 17-18 l - A ave Rep cho 17-1 - An 17-18 d S l - A al R l Re - A d S 17-1 - An 17-18 d S l - A e rfo 17 ol Ha l R Sc 01 a ol or 0 ol o o l 8 l R rf 0 l t r o r o c Th nn fo rt T S 0 o H n T f S l n H u u r l 0 0 t u o R o o o r S 2 n o r 1 e a 2 f n f f 0 o 2 o rd -18 - A ver epo hoo -18 ual ve -2 ho he ua rd t -2 - A he ep ord 7-18 l - A ave ep cho 17- ua av t -2 ch The nu ord rt - ho t - er cho An nn ho er t - ho rt -2 ver cho Ann A a rt T R c T r av S n fo r r S 1 n rf o Sc l l 7 17 n a R c 0 nn H o H S rf lR S fo a - A Sc av or Sc er -201 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he H po rd S -18 - An ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave -20 cho he nua rd rt -2 - A The epo ord 17-18 l - A ave Rep rd epo e H ord ool ool rd e H ep rd epo e H ord ool ool e fo 17 1 a R h n R h R h l c R rf 0 T n c f f o H l n T fo o fo h l R fo fo S fo h h H rt o rt l t h h ol or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo -18 ual R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S t -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 l - A aver ep cho 17-18 ual ave t -2 cho The nua aver nual 18 T aver Sc Sc aver 18 T nua aver nual 18 T aver Sc Sc aver a rt T R c T n fo r S 1 n r l 7 17 n a R c rd rd H rd rd H l o H n n rf lR S 0 7- n 7fo 7- H 7- H nn H er -201 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he H po rd S -18 - An ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave -20 cho he nua rd t -2 - A The epo ord 17-18 l - A he Hl - A 201 he erfo erfo he 201 l - A he Hl - A 201 he erfo rfo he 201 e fo 17 1 h n - o - o l T v T v a R rf 0 T n T c T o T o o R n T fo r ol S c H rt o rt l v ve T t or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo -18 ual R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S t -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 l - A aver epo cho 17-18 ual ave t -2 cho 7-18 cho ort 7-18 Ha Ha 7-18 port cho 7-18 cho ort 7-18 Ha Ha 7-18 port cho 7 T R S 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 l 17 n Ha rt Sc T nn fo a R S S c l o H lR S S S e e rf ep 1 he he ep 1 he he 0 nn H or fo 17 er -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he epo ord -18 l - A ver epo hoo 17-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The ep ford -20 ord al R t -20 18 T 18 T t -20 al R ord -20 ord al R t -20 18 T 18 T t -20 al R ord -20 a R r T n c R n T f S c r r u u H r n u u o rt f l r r rt rf rt rf rt rf 17 t rf rf o or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo -18 ual R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S t -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 - A aver epo cho 17-18 ual ave epo ave Ann epo 017 017 epo Ann ave epo ave Ann epo 017 017 epo Ann ave epo ave T R 1 r l 17 n Ha rt a R c -2 -2 R -2 -2 R l H R H R R R rf H H H 0 nn H R ol H l R S Sc T nn fo fo 17 er -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 l - A ver epo hoo 17-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 l - A The ual The ool ual ort ort ual ool The ual The ool ual ort ort ual ool The ual The ool n 8 h nn ep ep nn ch 18 h nn ep ep nn ch 18 S 8 T An erf po oo 18 nn 18 t Sc T nn rfo ort ol 8 T l Re erf 017 oo Ha al R Sc 20 nn e H or r c c ch nn n nn 8 1 d 1 o rd -18 - A ve ep ho -1 a av -2 ch he nu ord rt - l - A Th ep for 17- l - av Re ch 17 - A 17- d S l - A al R al R l - A d S 17- - A 17- d S l - A al R al R l - A d S 17- - A 17-1 d S l - A a 7 u 1 a R r 0 r 0 l c l l r r r l R r T n S 0 o H l n f S H rt u u fo 17 u 0 0 er -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 l - A ver epo hoo 17-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ord rt -2 hoo t -2 erfo hoo nn nnu hoo erfo t -2 hoo t -2 erfo hoo nn nnu hoo erfo t -2 hoo t -20 erfo hoo nn e f c c c a T n A A A A A A c c c r r c c c R n H T f c v v v r v r v r n o rt l r S 17 t or rd S -18 T - An verf epo oo -18 al R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S t -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 - A aver epo rd S epo Ha rd S ol - ol - rd S Ha epo rd S epo Ha rd S ol - ol - rd S Ha epo rd S epo Ha rd S ol - ol l 7 h a e e e e e u T R rf 1 r l R fo R fo 1 a R R h R h R h l c fo ho o fo h fo ho o fo h fo ho o fo o H l R fo n Sc T nn fo H rt fo 17 er -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 l - A ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave t -20 cho he nua ver ual 18 T ver Sc Sch ver 18 T ual ver ual 18 T ver Sc Sch ver 18 T ual ver ual 18 T ver Sc Sch ver e f n n a d d a d d a d d 1 a a a T n a n n n c a a a R n H T c n o r S 17 t rt l or rd S -18 T - An erf epo oo -18 al R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he epo ord 7-18 - A e H - An 017 he H rfor rfor he H 017 - An e H - An 017 he H rfor rfor he H 017 - An e H - An 017 he H rfor rfor he H 017 T R rf 1 l -2 ol -2 ol -2 ol -2 T ve ve T -2 T ve ve T -2 T ve ve T l av R ch 17 nu Ha rt Th l Th l ol Th l Sc T nn fo rt fo 17 er -20 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 l - A ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave t -20 cho -18 hoo ort -18 Ha Ha -18 ort cho -18 hoo ort -18 Ha Ha -18 ort cho -18 hoo ort -18 Ha Ha -18 ort cho e f c c c 1 a R h n o c p p p p 17 e p 17 e p 17 e n H T c r e e e S 17 t 17 17 17 rt l 17 17 17 17 or rd S -18 T - An erf epo oo -18 al R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 - An he epo ord -20 rd S l Re -20 Th Th -20 l Re rd S -20 rd S l Re -20 Th Th -20 l Re rd S -20 rd S l Re -20 Th Th -20 l Re rd S -20 T R rf n fo rt l l t 7 av R ch 17 nu Ha rt fo ua rt fo ua rt fo ua rt fo Sc T -18 -18 rt -18 -18 rt -18 -18 rt ua fo t ua fo t ua fo t fo er -201 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he po ord -18 - An ver epo hoo 7-18 ual ave por aver nn epo 017 017 po nn aver por aver nn epo 017 017 po nn aver por aver nn epo 017 017 po nn aver por aver e f e -A H e -A H e -A H 1 e e e e a R h n o A c l n H T c 2 2 2 17 rt l t -2 -2 -2 -A R -A R -A R or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo 7-18 ual R aver -20 hoo he H ual rd S t -20 - An he ual R he Hool ual ort ort - ual Rool he ual R he Hool ual ort ort - ual Rool he ual R he Hool ual ort ort - ual Rool he ual R he H ol T n c T n fo r l 1 T n T n T n T h T h T h T ho n l 7 a c n n n p p p p p p R n n n n h h h H rt fo er -201 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he po rd S -18 - An ver epo hoo 7-18 An 7-18 Sc - An l Re l Re - An Sc 7-18 An 7-18 Sc - An l Re l Re - An Sc 7-18 An 7-18 Sc - An l Re l Re - An Sc 7-18 An 7-18 Sc - An e fo 17 1 la R h n o c l T c 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 a a a a rt l a a a l l l rd rd rd lt llrd l rd l rd l rd l or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo 7-18 ual R ver -20 hoo he H ual rd S t -20 hoo -20 rfo hoo nnu nnu hoo rfo -20 hoo -20 rfo hoo nnu nnu hoo rfo -20 hoo -20 rfo hoo nnu nnu hoo rfo -20 hoo -20 rfo hoo nnu fo 017 ol Ha l R Sc 201 nn Ha ort Sc 8 T Ann erfo or Sc ort ave Sc - A - A Sc ave ort Sc ort ave Sc - A - A Sc ave ort Sc ort ave Sc - A - A Sc ave ort Sc ort ave Sc - A - A r e -2 ho e ua rd e p A rd -1 l - av Rep rd ep e H rd ool ol rd e H ep rd ep e H rd ool ol rd e H ep rd ep e H rd ool ol rd e H ep rd ep e H rd ool ol h n o c o o o o o o o o rt l - Th e fo 17 o o o o R R R o o o o t R R R R or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo -18 ual R ver -20 hoo he H ual verf ual 8 Th verf Sch Sch verf 8 Th ual verf ual 8 Th verf Sch Sch verf 8 Th ual verf ual 8 Th verf Sch Sch verf 8 Th ual verf ual 8 Th verf Sch Sch verf fo 017 ol Ha l R Sc 017 nn Ha ort Sc 8 T Ann Ha nn 17-1 Ha ord rd Ha 17-1 nn Ha nn 17-1 Ha ord rd Ha 17-1 nn Ha nn 17-1 Ha ord rd Ha 17-1 nn Ha nn 17-1 Ha ord rd Ha 17-1 r e -2 ho e ua rd d -1 o e o e 2 - A he ep o e o A A A A A A A f f f f e e e e f f f f e r e e e e 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 r r r r r r r r h h h h n o rt h -2 h -2 h -2 h -2 h l h l h l h l l c l l l e l e e T e e e e fo 17 l t -2 T -2 T -2 T -2 Th e or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo -18 ual R ver -20 hoo -18 T hoo ort -18 Hav Hav -18 T ort hoo -18 T hoo ort -18 Hav Hav -18 T ort hoo -18 T hoo ort -18 Hav Hav -18 T ort hoo -18 T hoo ort -18 Hav Hav -18 T ort hoo a rt c 7 c 7 c 7 c 7 c 7 l c c c c 7 17 n 7 7 a R 7 7 c p p p p p 17 e p 17 e p 17 e p 17 e fo e e e e er -201 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he H po rd S -201 rd S l Re -20 Th Th -201 l Re rd S -201 rd S l Re -20 Th Th -201 l Re rd S -201 rd S l Re -20 Th Th -201 l Re rd S -201 rd S l Re -20 Th Th -201 l Re rd S -201 e fo t h n c a fo t a fo t a fo t a fo t a a a a T o o o o o o rt 18 18 t 18 18 t 18 18 t 18 18 t l t t t t t or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo -18 ual R ver por verf nnu por 017- 17- por nnu ver por verf nnu por 017- 17- por nnu ver por verf nnu por 017- 17- por nnu ver por verf nnu por 017- 17- por nnu ver por verf a e a a a a e 2 e 2 e 2 e 2 a a a a a 7 17 n e e e a R e A A A A A A A A A c l fo 20 e 20 e 20 e 20 e er -201 hoo e H ual rd S -20 - An he H al R he H ol - al R rt - rt - al R ol - he H al R he H ol - al R rt - rt - al R ol - he H al R e H ol - al R rt - rt - al R ol - he H al R e H ol - al R rt - rt - al R ol - he H al R e H ol h n o o o o o o o o u u u u u u u u u u T u T u Th o u Th o o T u Th o o T o T o T o o T c o rt l t or rd S -18 T - An verf epo hoo -18 Ann -18 Sch Ann Rep Rep Ann Sch -18 Ann -18 Sch Ann Rep Rep Ann Sch -18 Ann -18 Sch Ann Rep Rep Ann Sch -18 Ann -18 Sch Ann Rep Rep Ann Sch -18 Ann -18 Sch Ann 17 a R c l d d d d 17 17 17 17 17 d l - al al l 17 d l - al al l 17 d l - al al l 17 d l - al al l 17 d l - al fo 17 er -20 hoo he H ual rd S -20 ool -20 rfor hoo nnu nnu oo rfor -20 ool -20 rfor hoo nnu nnu oo rfor -20 ool -20 rfor hoo nnu nnu oo rfor -20 ool -20 rfor hoo nnu nnu oo rfor -20 ool -20 rfor hoo nnu n h h h h h t h t h t h t h t e e e e e c e c e c e c e c t t t t n o rt t or rd S -18 T - An verf epo d Sc por Hav d S ol - A l - A d Sc Hav por d Sc por Hav d S ol - A l - A d Sc Hav por d Sc por Hav d S ol - A l - A d Sc Hav por d Sc por Hav d S ol - A l - A d Sc Hav por d Sc por Hav d Sc ol - A l - A e e or o oo or e e or o oo or e e or o oo or e e or o oo or e e or o oo or a R or l e Re or e Re or e Re or e Re or fo 17 er -20 hoo he H ual erf ual R 8 Th verf Sch Sch verf 8 Th ual erf ual R 8 Th verf Sch Sch verf 8 Th ual erf ual R 8 Th verf Sch Sch verf 8 Th ual erf ual R 8 Th verf Sch Sch verf 8 Th ual erf ual R 8 Th verf Sch Sch verf 8 v v v v v c 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t n n n n a a a a a or rd S -18 T - An e Ha Ann 017- e H ford ford e Ha 017- An e Ha Ann 017- e H ford ford e Ha 017- An e Ha Ann 017- e H ford ford e Ha 017- An e Ha Ann 017- e H ford ford e Ha 017- An e Ha Ann 017- e H ford ford e Ha 017fo 017 ol Th ol - t -2 Th ver ver Th t -2 ol - Th ol - t -2 Th ver ver Th t -2 ol - Th ol - t -2 Th ver ver Th t -2 ol - Th ol - t -2 Th ver ver Th t -2 ol - Th ol - t -2 Th ver ver Th t -2 ol r e -2 ho 18 ho or -18 Ha Ha -18 or ho 18 ho or -18 Ha Ha -18 or ho 18 ho or -18 Ha Ha -18 or ho 18 ho or -18 Ha Ha -18 or ho 18 ho or -18 Ha Ha -18 or ho c c c c c c t 7 7 7 7 7 c c c c c or rd S 2017 d S Rep 201 The The 2017 Rep rd S 2017 d S Rep 201 The The 2017 Rep rd S 2017 d S Rep 201 The The 2017 Rep rd S 2017 d S Rep 201 The The 2017 Rep rd S 2017 d S Rep 201 The The 2017 Rep d S 2017 r l l l r l r l r r r r l l l l l -

THE HAVERFORD SCHOOL

Annual Report

2017-18


REVENUES Tuition $33,750,132 Annual gifts in support of operations The Haverford Fund $1,718,892 PA Tax Credit Programs $1,320,997 The Haverford School Parents’ Association grants* $180,000 Annual gifts subtotal $3,219,889 Endowment income used for operations $3,024,617 Other sources $2,576,239 Total revenue

$42,570,877

EXPENSES

OPERATING BUDGET

Highlights

Compensation Faculty/Staff salaries ($15,536,618) Benefits ($4,701,452) Compensation subtotal ($20,238,070) Tuition Assistance ($7,871,150) Physical plant ($4,782,550) General & administrative ($1,615,923) Instructional ($2,060,445) Depreciation ($3,444,068) Total expenses ($40,012,206) Annual surplus (before capital projects and principal payments) $2,558,671 Capital projects and principal payments $2,404,522

GIFTS TO OPERATIONS The Haverford Fund Alumni $1,399,287 Current parents $1,070,318 Parents of alumni $378,548 Grandparents $60,096 Friends $131,641 The Haverford Fund subtotal $3,039,890 The Haverford School Parents’ Association gift $191,676 Other $234,585 Gifts to operations subtotal

$3,466,151

CAPITAL GIFTS

Unrestricted $1,788,921 Endowment $1,405,341 Facilities $347,075 Capital gifts subtotal

$3,541,337

TOTAL GIFTS $7,007,488

*This figure represents only the portion of the Parents’ Association’s contributions that were used to offset operating expenses paid for from funds raised in the prior year.

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Fall 2018


125 students received tuition assistance

through the Pennsylvania Tax Credit Programs.

64 students received $450,000

named, donor-funded scholarships.

roof for Centennial Hall

$68,000

sound system for Ball Auditorium

$ 930,000 (over three years) new drainage system and turf/track replacement for Sabol Field

35 faculty and staff

Your gift in action

members are pursuing graduate funding.

23 faculty members received funding for summer professional development.

38%

of the Class of 2018 participated in a global studies program abroad.

haverford.org

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Dear Haverford Parents, Alumni, Students, Faculty, Staff, and Friends, Greetings fellow members of the Haverford community. This is my fourth letter to you providing a financial update and recap of your Board of Trustees’ focus areas. I’m pleased to report that our school had another successful year. We met our enrollment projections, our endowment is the highest it has ever been, and we were able to make capital investments in the School’s infrastructure that will support the boys for many years to come. The largest driver of our financial results is, by far, the tuition you pay. The Board recognizes and appreciates the sacrifices you have made. Having watched my oldest son graduate in June (and being blessed to speak at the ceremony and – along with my wife – hand him his diploma), I can attest to the value our family has received. Haverford played an enormous role in making the young man we recently dropped off at college who he is. The return on your family’s Haverford investment doesn’t end on graduation day; it begins. The Board also thanks everyone who contributed so generously to The Haverford Fund and our annual giving, capital, and HSPA initiatives during fiscal year 2017-18. You helped us raise more than $3M in operating support for the School and $6.3M overall. Your philanthropic support provides the additional operating resources needed to retain and develop extraordinary educators, deliver outstanding programs for our boys, and make a Haverford School education possible for families who contribute to our shared mission of preparing boys for life. Similar to last year, national demand for independent school education remains softer in Lower School than in Middle and Upper School. Haverford is not immune to this trend, and we continue to support Dr. Nagl and school leadership in building

a Lower School program and faculty that are the best in the area. We are excited about the enhancements taking place! In addition to overseeing the financial health of the School, which includes leading fundraising efforts and setting investment strategies for our $77M endowment, your Board’s focus areas include three critical priorities. First, our plan is that by the end of this school year, we hope to commence the last major facet of a two-decades-in-the-making campus master plan when we demolish and rebuild the Middle School. Given the high quality teaching that already occurs there, we are eager to create an even better experience for our boys in those critical “boys-to-men” years. Second, this fall we embarked on a new strategic planning process, designed to guide Haverford into our next phase of education and life preparation. In partnership with the administration, faculty, alumni, parents, and students, we are assessing the strengths and improvement opportunities of our program, exploring current and future pedagogical best practices, and developing a vision and implementation plan to ensure a successful evolution of our school. Lastly, your Board continues to work hand-in-hand with Dr. Nagl and his leadership team – who in turn work hand-inhand with the community – on our character development and citizenship programs, equipping our boys and young men with the values, the decision making skills, and the coping strategies not simply to survive, but to thrive in the world ahead. We strive to create a community that is not just diverse, but inclusive. It is incumbent on all of us as members of Fords Nation to treat each other with respect and to recognize and value the differences we all bring. We also expect all current parents to support fully the School’s Drug & Alcohol Policy so that our boys remain safe and maximize their physical, mental, and emotional development. Thank you all again for your wonderful support of The Haverford School. I look forward to seeing you on campus.

William C. Yoh ’89, P’18 ’24 Chairman, Board of Trustees 30

Annual Report 2017-18


What inspired you to reconnect with the School?

What made your Haverford experience most impactful?

Nafis Smith ’99 What do you hope to accomplish as a member of the Alumni Executive Council (AEC)? My hope for my time on the AEC is to play at least a small part in helping Haverford alumni realize the value in engaging with the broader alumni community. I would also like to see an increase in marketing and programmatic strategies to diversify the demographics of the alumni community, and to encourage engagement with and giving back to Haverford. Going to Haverford absolutely changed the trajectory of my life, and I’m certain this is true for others. So, I believe it’s important that we strive for inclusion in all facets of the Haverford experience. Why do you support The Haverford Fund? Supporting Haverford and its mission of preparing boys for life, as well as helping students afford the School’s tuition, are the main drivers. Haverford does an exceptional job teaching boys and helping them grow academically, athletically, and in the arts. Allowing access to the Haverford experience to boys from broader, more socioeconomically diverse backgrounds only serves to enrich that experience.

“Give it absolutely everything you have, and protect your dream from negative people and influences. And then once you’re successful, figure out how to help someone else achieve their dream.”

When I initially arrived at Haverford for Upper School, I struggled academically, but I had the support of some phenomenal teachers who helped me ultimately be successful. I often think of my experiences as an athlete. The Haverford crew team is world-class, and it was a privilege to row under the coaching of Jim Barker and Craig Hoffman ’73. The lessons of commitment, hard work, and working as a team to achieve a goal are principles that still guide me to this day. Winning a few national titles was also just a lot of fun! I was also fortunate to be part of a successful cross-country team that won a few state championships and Inter-Ac titles. Through Mr. Pearson’s German class, I was able to travel to Germany with my classmates and participate in a summer exchange program. This was the experience of a lifetime! It was my first time on an airplane. Getting to speak the language, experience the culture firsthand, and make some lifelong friends are some of my most treasured memories. What advice do you have for the next generation of Fords? If you have very strong desire, a dream to be a lawyer, doctor, computer programmer, teacher, or whatever – chase your dream. Give it absolutely everything you have, and protect your dream from negative people and influences. And then once you’re successful, figure out how to help someone else achieve their dream.

GIVING SPOTLIGHT : THE HAVERFORD FUND

After having kids, I began to think a lot about experiences and individuals that positively impacted me the most, and many of those experiences occurred while I was at Haverford. Whether it was time, money, or other resources, there were a lot of people who were responsible for helping me attend Haverford. My life might have turned out very differently without the School. So, I decided that it was time to start giving back to the School that gave me so much.

Nafis Smith ’99 is Head of Taxable Money Markets at Vanguard, where he has worked since 2003. He earned a B.A. in economics from Cornell University, where he also rowed lightweight crew. Gifts to The Haverford Fund support all areas of the School — academic, arts, and athletic programs, student activities, faculty and staff enrichment, service learning and leadership programs, tuition assistance, and more. To discuss your pledge or gift in support of The Haverford School, please contact Cindy Shaw, Director of The Haverford Fund, at 484-417-2788 or cshaw@haverford.org.

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What do you believe are the defining elements of a Haverford School education?

GIVING SPOTLIGHT : DONALD J. MCBRIDE SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Haverford challenges and stretches you academically, artistically, athletically, and socially. It is a competitive environment, but in a good way. Not in a way that creates winners and losers, but in a way that encourages you to compete with yourself to be your best. If you can compete at Haverford, then you will probably do well in college and in your profession. Also, the teachers and coaches at Haverford were very impactful for me. They all knew you, knew your work, knew your strengths and weaknesses, and knew how to motivate you. There was never a back row at Haverford, because the classes were small. We got personal attention, and that’s still the same today. There’s a lot to be said about knowing the teacher or coach, and that teacher or coach knowing the student. Why should others consider supporting the School?

Thad Fortin ’77, P’09 What do you hope to accomplish in your role as the Development Committee Chairman? This is my first chairmanship since being on Haverford’s Board of Trustees, and I am drawing on my current experience as Development Committee Chairman at Ithaca College. My priority in this role at Haverford is to raise awareness of the need for scholarships. Our goal is a long-range one; it is to set the School up for success over the next 100 years and help Haverford continue to stand out, as it has over its history. Scholarships, which take many forms, play a role not just in attracting top students, but also in retaining our current families. I believe that we need to continue to focus on and embrace diversifying our community in this way. What inspired you to give to the Donald J. McBride Scholarship Fund? I came to Haverford in ninth grade and the onboarding program wasn’t nearly as robust as it is today. Don McBride, who was Dean of Students at the time, understood that Haverford was a different environment for us academically and socially, and he helped us. Don never gave me a pass, but he always gave me a second chance. That was critical for me to be able to be a student at Haverford for those four years. When I look at what that allowed me to do after I left Haverford ... it was a significant building block in the success I’ve had. The Donald J. McBride Scholarship Program allows Haverford to attract highly qualified students and also to retain those students during their years at Haverford. It’s an all-around scholarship that hopes to bring out the best in promising students who cannot otherwise afford the education.

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The need for scholarship is greater than it ever has been. The cost to educate at Haverford has gotten significantly higher; the out-ofclassroom costs, clubs and activities, athletics, security, facilities, faculty … today, all of these are necessary for student success. In order to stay competitive in a well-balanced and diverse environment, we need to be aware of the increasing role that scholarships and tuition assistance play throughout independent schools and in higher education. Being a student in the ’70s and a parent in the late-2000s, I’m amazed by how good Haverford is, and we always strive to be better. My colleagues on the Board are very passionate and diligent, and are working to set up the School for longterm success. We need those who have had the fortune of being professionally successful to think of Haverford in their philanthropic activities, so that we can prepare the next generation of young men. Thad Fortin ’77 is a director and consultant with several companies. He spent much of his career as CEO of Haas Group International, a chemical management company. Fortin earned a B.S. from Ithaca College and is a member of The Haverford School’s Board of Trustees. Fortin and his wife, Mindy, are lead donors to the Donald J. McBride Scholarship Fund and The Haverford Fund. The Donald J. McBride Scholarship Fund provides exceptional students a life-altering opportunity to receive a Haverford School education. The Scholarship rewards talent, achievement, and promise in the arts, athletics, and classroom, with particular emphasis placed on character, leadership, and contributions to the community. It is named in honor of Don McBride, who served the School for 25 years as a basketball coach, Dean of Students, and Head of Upper School. To discuss your pledge or gift in support of The Donald J. McBride Scholarship Fund, please contact George C. Wood ’75, Senior Director of Major Gifts, at 610-331-1637 or gwood@haverford.org.


GIVING SPOTLIGHT : THE HAVERFORD FUND

What is a defining element of Haverford?

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Haverford is true to its core virtues. One of our sons was awarded the “perseverance” award in kindergarten; the School is continually finding new ways to teach and carry out the things it believes in. We think that is an important part of our sons’ education. One of our favorite Haverford traditions is the seniors walking the kindergartners through the Walk of Virtues on the first day of school. It’s a demonstration of the brotherhood. My father is an alumnus of the Class of 1962 and he still attends EA Day with his Haverford friends – the bonds are truly lifelong. On Grandparents’ Day, our son wore my father’s old Haverford football jersey, and that was really memorable. The virtues, the friendships … they transcend time.

photo by Rachel McGinn

E. Todd and Amy Briddell P’22 ’29 What inspires you to support Haverford, from The Haverford Fund to EITC? As parents of four children, including three young boys, we deeply value The Haverford School’s mission to shape remarkable boys into truly exceptional young men filled with character and compassion, and to provide leadership experiences and a worldclass academic foundation. This invaluable mission of preparing our boys for life’s limitless adventures cannot be sustained without the exceptional leaders, educators, parents, and community support that are cornerstones of the School. We are honored to serve and to give to ensure that the incredible leaders of the School have the necessary resources to fulfill this mission today and for tomorrow. Truly, there is no greater gift or responsibility greater than caring for our community’s children. Why did your family choose Haverford? When we decided to look at Haverford for our first son, we knew it was the right place as soon as we stepped onto campus. The Lower School administration, teachers, and staff listened to us and they cared about our family. We now have two sons at the School, and they are completely different. One boy is quiet and respectful, and the other is outgoing and physical. From the get-go, Haverford embraced them both for who they were and met them where they needed – academically, physically, and emotionally. The School also provides every boy with resources and opportunities to help him find out who he is and what he wants out of life. The liberal arts education and the variety of activities that are available – robotics, crew, Model UN – allows each boy to find what works for him. Every day, my boys are happy and want to go to school. As parents, we are grateful for that. Fall 2018

“This invaluable mission of preparing our boys for life’s limitless adventures cannot be sustained without the exceptional leaders, educators, parents, and community support that are cornerstones of the School.”

How do you believe Haverford will help your sons in college and beyond? We believe Haverford is dedicated to educating the whole boy. Academically, the boys are challenged and the variety of classes provided as they advance in grade is extremely diverse. In addition, I have been a part of events and activities such as SpeakUp! and Empty Bowls that provide the boys with safe places to discuss current issues students are experiencing and also provide them with the opportunity for community service. We feel when the time comes, our boys will be prepared to thrive in college and in life. E. Todd Briddell is Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer at CenterSquare, a global investment management firm. Amy Briddell served on the Haverford Leadership Council 2015-18, on the HSPA Finance and Executive Committee 2017-19, and in various HSPA volunteer roles. Gifts to The Haverford Fund support all areas of the School – academic, arts, and athletic programs, student activities, faculty and staff enrichment, service learning and leadership programs, tuition assistance, and more. To discuss your pledge or gift in support of The Haverford School, please contact Cindy Shaw, Director of The Haverford Fund, at 484-417-2788 or cshaw@haverford.org.


Your mother and grandmother also contributed to the fund. Has Michael Stairs had an enduring impact on your family?

GIVING SPOTLIGHT : MICHAEL STAIRS CONCERT FUND

Stairs became ingrained in my life, and the lives of so many others. My family knew the way he impacted my life, and they also felt a personal connection to him. This fund seemed like a fitting way for us all to honor Stairs. I am grateful to my family for continually supporting what I am interested in and what brings me joy – music. What are your hopes for the future of the music program at Haverford?

Andrew Helber ’12 What was the most influential aspect of your Haverford School education? There are very few places where you’re able to really excel in lots of different things and get an amazing breadth and depth of experiences. Haverford does the three As: academics, athletics, and arts, to the highest degree. I think that’s what defines my Haverford experience … being able to swim and play water polo (which I help coach at Haverford today), perform in the plays and musicals, sing, and have an amazing academic education. I didn’t have to decide between any of these things; I could do it all, and I could do it all to my fullest potential. That was the best part about my 13 years at Haverford. Having this diverse set of experiences forms a more interesting person – someone who is able to converse about different things, to have a wide array of interests, and to connect with more people in more significant ways. What inspired you to support The Michael Stairs Concert Fund? First and foremost, I wanted to help honor Stairs. He is someone who – for me and for dozens of others in his various communities (Church of the Redeemer, Philadelphia Orchestra) – took an interest in other people, got to know them, and cared about them tremendously. He was part of our musicals at Haverford and supported us both with his presence and by leading the orchestra. He instilled in us a love of music and taught us how to be great. What other high schools offer the opportunity to take music class with the principal organist for the Philadelphia Orchestra? I would have never been a music major in college were it not for him, and I’m still singing. I’m very thankful for that. Stairs was lifechanging for me, at Haverford and beyond.

Music has been very influential for me. It taught me how to collaborate with others, the value of hard work, and the importance of making sacrifices for the things you care about. It wasn’t until recently that I fully realized the strength of the relationships that are formed through music … it’s a community that you don’t find in a lot of other places. Music has brought me hours and hours of joy and fun and has taught me to think in different ways, to analyze things, to ask questions. While very few people will become professional musicians, I think music is so prominent in our culture that it’s necessary to be exposed to music and to have some level of musical education. The Michael Stairs Concert Fund, which will bring an annual musical performance to Haverford’s community, is a good next step for the School. Haverford offers the Arts Festival and incredible musicals and theater productions. By adding a concert, students and their families will be exposed to a professional artist in classical, jazz, rock ’n’ roll, or contemporary music. If this concert inspires one kid to explore composing or to go onto YouTube to see someone playing a particular instrument … if it helps someone find their passion, I will be fulfilled. Andrew Helber ’12 was a Lifer at Haverford. He began singing in Lower School and was a member of the Middle School Celebrantes, The Notables, and the Glee Club. He earned a bachelor’s degree at Princeton University, where he toured the world as part of the Nassoons a cappella group. He is enrolled in medical school at the University of Pennsylvania. The Michael Stairs Concert Fund will annually bring to campus a nationally recognized musician to spend time in a master class with Haverford music students and perform a concert in Centennial Hall. The aim of the fund is to celebrate music as an academic discipline as well as a source of inspiration and joy for Haverford students, alumni, and parents. To discuss your pledge or gift in support of The Michael Stairs Concert Fund, please contact Jeff Day, Director of Development, at 484-4177052 or jday@haverford.org.

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Alumni Executive Council Mr. Andrew A. Bailey, ’02, Director of Alumni Relations Dr. Samuel T. Barnett III ’65 Mr. Dyrika T. Cameron ’96 Mr. Lucas A. Clark IV ’01 Mr. Avery C. Cook ’93 Mr. Robert T. Corcoran ’82 Mr. Henry J. Faragalli III ’86 Mr. Richard Z. Garrity ’01 Mr. Branton H. Henderson III ’74 Mr. Peter W. Hennessey ’95, Secretary Mr. Austin B. Hepburn Jr. ’75 Mr. Harrison P. Jacobs ’91 Mr. Jack H. Kirkpatrick Jr. ’88, Vice President Mr. Joshua R. Levine ’94, President Mr. Thomas M. Lindberg ’07 Mr. Gregory Z. Murray ’03 Mr. Lathrop B. Nelson III ’93 Mr. A. Grant Phelan ’85 Mr. Neil S. Rankin ’89 Mr. Michael B. Reese ’98 Mr. John R. Silverthorne ’68 Mr. Nafis T. Smith ’99 Lt. Cmdr. Eric W. Stetson ’87 Mr. George C. Wood ’75 Mr. Geoffrey M. Wright ’01

Young Alumni Committee Mr. R. Christopher Aitken Jr. ’07 Mr. Christopher J. Ambrogi ’09 Mr. Nathan H. Arronson ’12 Mr. Gregg J. Aruffo ’05 Mr. Nicholas J. Dodds ’07 Mr. Kevin R. Eberly ’09 Mr. Samuel B. Henderson ’12 Mr. Thomas M. Lindberg ’07, Chairman

John L. “Doc” Thomas ’23 Memorial Golf Classic Committee Mr. Andrew A. Bailey ’02, Co-Chairman Mr. Charles J. Euler Jr. Mr. Henry J. Faragalli III ’86, Co-Chairman Mr. Matthew A. Fell ’02 Mr. Robert T. Hastings ’86 Mr. Joshua R. Levine ’94 Mr. John H. Thacher Jr. ’62 Mr. George C. Wood ’75

Athletic Hall of Fame Committee Mr. F. Scott Addis ’74 Mr. P. Christopher Arcuri ’94 Mr. Andrew A. Bailey ’02, Director of Alumni Relations Mr. John B. Begier ’83 Mr. Michael J. Bradley ’79 Mr. Jonathan P. Coffin ’72

` deceased

Dr. Mark T. Coffin ’67 Mr. Brian C. Crochiere ’83 Mr. Perry Dodge ’86 Mr. Michael E. Edelman ’78 Mr. Brian L. Ertel ’94 Mr. Kevin J. Ertel ’94 Mr. Henry D. Fairfax ’99 Dr. Scot A. Fisher ’74 Dr. William W. Fortenbaugh ’54 Mr. John T. Gillin Jr. ’81 Mr. David Groverman ’70 Mr. John S. Haldeman II ’72 Mr. John J. Haslett II ’58 Mr. Ralph E. Howe ’59 Mr. Samuel P. Howe III ’56 Mr. Clifford W. Keevan Jr. ’58 Mr. Lothrop Lee Jr. ’54 Mr. Thomas H. Lewis Jr. ’41 ` Mr. J. Peter Lindquist ’73 Mr. N. Scott MacBean ’66 Mr. John F. Mangan ’55 Mr. Christopher B. Maxey ’80 Mr. Daniel J. Mayock ’82 Mr. Mark R. Mayock ’80 Mr. Michael F. Mayock Jr. ’76 Mr. Brian McBride ’82 Mr. Mark P. Micolucci ’84 Mr. Matthew Micolucci ’86 Mr. John S. Middleton ’73 Dr. John A. Nagl, Headmaster Mr. James K. Nesbitt ’73 Mr. Daniel W. Newhall ’87 Mr. John C. Nostrant, Director of Athletics Mr. Frederick C. Peters II ’68 Mr. Jeffrey L. Pfaeffle ’64 Dr. Robert H. Potts Jr. ’66 Mr. Michael J. Purcell ’75 Mr. Alfred Rauch Jr. ’57 Mr. Kevin M. Silva ’93 Mr. W. Scott Smith Jr. ’43 Mr. W. Whitney Smith Jr. ’62 Mr. David S. Stilley ’92 Mr. John F. Stoviak ’69 Mr. Henry M. Stringer ’66, Co-Chairman Mr. C. Sanford Tuttle ’56 Mr. Peter R. Unger ’74 Mr. Gerhard T. van Arkel ’79, Co-Chairman Mr. Michael A. Viola ’96 Mr. William B. Ward Jr. ’55 Mr. George C. Wood ’75 Mr. Alexander B. Yarnall ’85 Mr. Charlton Yarnall III ’74 Mr. James W. Zug Jr. ’87

Haverford Leadership Council Ms. Ann M. Aerts Mrs. Tania M. Alexander Mrs. Marje S. Armstrong Mrs. YooMi Astley Mr. Adam K. Besvinick ’05 Mr. Damien C. Blair ’91 Mrs. Amy C. Briddell Mr. William T. Caddell Jr. ’91 Mrs. Lynann T. Cimino Mr. George T. Corrigan Jr. Mr. William G. Costin IV ’85 Mr. Jesse J. Daniels ’92

Special T hanks to our Volunteers for their selfless efforts on behalf of The Haverford School.


Mr. Hans R. Davies ’95, Co-Chairman Mr. Francis A. DeSimone ’05 Mr. Thaddeus J. Fortin ’77 Mr. Jeffrey R. Grieb ’95 Mr. Azeez Hayne Mrs. Jennifer L. Herrmann Mr. Garth G. Hoyt ’89 Mr. Imani D. Hutty ’04 Mrs. Michelle M. Kelly Mrs. Arlene M. Kim Ms. June A. Leavy Mr. Thomas M. Lindberg ’07 Ms. Eugenie G. Logue Mrs. Quincy B. McCoy Mr. Wade L. McDevitt Mr. Jonathan R. Morgan ’03 Mr. Paul C. O’Grady ’85 Mr. Marcus E. O’Rourke Jr. Mr. Jeffrey R. Pendergast Dr. Lindsey M. Pierce Mrs. Tracy L. Steele Mr. George R. Stratts Mrs. Anne R. Sullivan, Co-Chair Ms. Ivy Sun Mr. Fitz Daniel T. Tepper ’12 Mr. David W. Thorkelson ’98 Mr. G. Nash Waterman ’98 Mrs. Merritt Weber Mrs. Ashley S. Whamond Mr. Kyle W. Wharton ’07 Mrs. Ginny S. Williams Mr. Roland Yang ’10 Mrs. Shannon M. Zeller

2017-18 Haverford School Parents’ Association Finance and Executive Committee Mrs. Ann M. Glavin, Chair Mrs. Dorothy S. Walker, Vice Chair Mrs. Alicia C. Payne, Second Vice Chair Mrs. Jennifer S. Ballenger, Treasurer Mrs. Carolyn C. Harkins, Assistant Treasurer Mrs. Amy C. Briddell, Recording Secretary Ms. Traci Overton, Corresponding Secretary Dr. Barbara A. Cooper, Ways and Means Standing Commitees Mrs. Shannon S. Sanfilippo, Gala 2017 Mrs. Kristen Vollmer, Gala 2017 Mrs. Leigh Ross, Gala 2018 Mrs. Melissa F. Stamps, Gala 2018 Mrs. Cay Holmes, Campus Decorations Mr. Patrick T. McNally, External Communications Mrs. Kim M. Keszeli, HSPA Notes Mrs. Natalia McDade, HSPA Store Mr. David P. Kelleher, Father/Son Event Ms. Jonelle R. McDaniel, Fundraising Projects Mrs. Debra Wood, HS/EA Day Chair 2017 Mrs. Quincy B. McCoy, HS/EA Day Assistant and Chair 2018 Dr. Claudia F. Baldassano, Parent Event Mrs. Marybeth A. DiNubile, Parent Event Mrs. Jennifer News Garzia, Perfect Present Mrs. Erica T. Goodwin, Perfect Present Mrs. Tatiana Borden, Spring Fling Dr. Karen B. Fuscaldo, Spring Fling

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Class Parents Mrs. Jody M. Nazarian, pre-kindergarten Mrs. Elizabeth A. Berger, kindergarten Mrs. Stephanie M. McDermott, grade 1 Mrs. Melinda J. Berkman, grade 2 Mrs. Amber V. Dixon, grade 3 Mrs. Deborah M. Putter, grade 4 Dr. Allison J. Brucker, grade 5 Mrs. Caroline D. Linz, grade 5 Mrs. Anne D. Ford, grade 6 Mrs. Shannon M. Zeller, Form I Mrs. Heather M. Kohl, Form II Mrs. Lindsey Page, Form II Mrs. Andrea C. Pettibone, Form III Ms. Sharonda Smith-Sims, Form III Ms. Christine M. Dehney, Form IV Mrs. Beth C. Stone, Form IV Dr. Ellen A. Delea, Form V Mrs. Sheryl L. Parente, Form V Mrs. Susan Farmer, Form VI Mrs. Terri Rhodes, Form VI

Senior Class Gift

Members At Large Mrs. Donna C. McNally Mrs. Jill S. Ravenscroft Mrs. Hayley G. Wada

Moms’ Coffee Hosts

Past Chair Mrs. Stephenie K. Tellez

Parent Ambassador Program

Chair Ex Officio Ms. Laurie M. Dennis Mrs. Kim M. Keszeli Mrs. Nancy C. Krell Mrs. Susan M. Reisbord Mrs. Terri Rhodes

Parent Haverford Fund Ms. Martha E. Ortiz, Co-chair Mr. Philip S. Rosenzweig, Co-chair

Committee Members Mr. E. Scott Ballenger Mr. Robert T. Hastings ’86 Ms. Tyra L. Holland Mrs. Kimberly S. Niggeman

Mr. and Mrs. Gerry Farley, Co-chairs

Committee Members Mr. Nicholas W. Manganaro Mr. and Mrs. George R. Stratts Mr. and Mrs. William C. Yoh ’89

Dads’ Coffee Hosts Lower School Mr. Philip S. Rosenzweig Mr. Donald Tyson Middle School Mr. Kanti Somani Mr. Timothy W. Wood Upper School Mr. Thomas J. Bagnell III Mr. A. Grant Phelan ’85

Ms. Ann M. Aerts Dr. Marion Brewington Mrs. Gayle F. Yoh

Mr. E. Scott Ballenger Mrs. Delia H. Biddison Mrs. Ardis A. Costello Mrs. Lesley G. Coulson Dr. Nicholas A. DiNubile Mrs. Amber V. Dixon Mrs. Anne D. Ford Mrs. Lisa L. Getson-Brown Mrs. Alison M. Hastings Mr. Sam L. Kachidza Mrs. Kim M. Keszeli Mrs. Victoria H. Kreider Dr. Sean R. McDade Mr. Patrick T. McNally Mrs. Deborah M. Putter Mr. Christopher Rippie Mr. Barry R. Shatzman Mrs. Dorothy S. Walker Mrs. Debra Wood Mrs. Shannon M. Zeller


BRING IT

OME

Haverford/EA Day 2018 Nov. 9 & 10 @ The Haverford School On the docket: HSPA Pancake Breakfast • Golf • Cross-Country Water Polo • Soccer • Football Redemption A notable salute Led by choral director and Upper School music teacher Mark Hightower, The Haverford School Notables grace center stage at the 130th Commencement ceremony in June to lead the School community in the traditional singing of the alma mater: O Haverford, dear Haverford / Thou guide of tender days, / To thee within these honored walls / We lift our hymn of praise / Here on the threshold of our years / With all the future free, / Our youthful hearts and powers we bring / And dedicate to thee.

for more information visit haverford.org/EADay2018


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HAVERFORD SCHOOL TODAY Annual Report

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Haverford School Today Fall 2018  

The commencement and annual report issue.

Haverford School Today Fall 2018  

The commencement and annual report issue.