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CELEBRATING 10 YEARS OF THE

2021

ULTIMATE GUIDE

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Contents 04 09 10 12 14 16 17 18 18 21 22 24 25 27 29 2

New For 2021 Why This Event Megève Come Early Event Village Event Overview Stage 1 Stage 2 Tignes Stage 3 Stage 4 Alpe d'Huez Stage 5 Serre-Chevalier Briançon Stage 6

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Auron Stage 7 Nice Introducing our on-event app Haute Route Nation Registration Day What To Take With You Feed Stations Bag Logistics Course Highlight #1 Course Highlight #2 Awards and Classifications Safety And Support Course Highlight #3 Partners in 2021


Covid Safety Protocol for 2021 Haute Route Events For over 12 months now, we have been working with expert authorities and using government guidelines to ensure we can provide a Covid-safe environment for our riders, suppliers and staff, plus still deliver all the support and services that makes the Haute Route events so special. We have now established a strict new protocol that that can be both flexible and reactive to the potentially rapidly changing public health situation, plus respect all national and local regulations. Our dedication to safety and support is part of our DNA and has been since the creation of the Haute Route in 2011. This year will be no exception.

HOW DID WE DESIGN THIS PROTOCOL? The first step is an analysis of the pandemic situation. A detailed protocol is then submitted to and agreed on by the local authorities.

HOW WILL THE EVENT BE AFFECTED BY COVID- 19 REGULATIONS? Our protocol for 2021 has been built around two different scenarios under which we will run the event and what effect these varying conditions will have on you.

WHAT DO I NEED TO BRING? We have specified all the requirements in the protocol, including what you will need to supply prior to or on event. This will include a face mask and either (1) a negative PCR test carried out no more than 48 hours before or, (2) a vaccination certificate, with the last vaccination taken at least 14 days

before the event or, (3) a medical certificate confirming the rider had COVID-19 in the last 6 months and has fully recovered.

HOW CAN I FOLLOW THE UPDATES ON THE PROTOCOL AND SCENARIO CHOSEN FOR THE EVENT? In the three months before each event, registered riders will be kept informed through the Rider Newsletter every two weeks. The final situation for each event will be announced two weeks before the start date.

CAN WE TRAVEL TO THE EVENT AND HOME AGAIN AFTERWARDS? We will be using the Rider Newsletter to inform you as well as possible about the specific situation in the country of the event.

READ THE FULL COVID SAFETY PROTOCOL HTTPS://ISSUU.COM/HAUTE_ROUTE/DOCS/HR_COVIDPROTOCOL_EN_V2 3


New for 2021 Welcome to the 2021 Haute Route Alps We've been working hard behind the scenes to make sure everything is in place so you can be part of the experience of a lifetime and celebrate 10 years of the Alps with us. Part of the process is the publication of this guide which we hope will motivate, inspire and excite you as you discover exactly what you have to look forward to. Wishing you the very best of luck with your final preparations! ON -EVENT APP: This year we welcome Ride with GPS to the family. The mobile app will now be your one stop shop for all the details ahead of your Haute Route event, from itineraries to route information and cut-off times.

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#NVcreativesolution

LIGHT AND AERO the all-rounder bike

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Celebrating 10

HAUTE RO

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0 years of the

OUTE ALPS

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Why This Event The Haute Route Alps is the highest, the toughest and the founding event in the Haute Route cycling series. Our Haute Route alumni describe it as a life-changing experience and we think you’ll agree after crossing the finish line in Nice.

Toughest amateur cycling race in the world

10 Year Anniversary Special

A unique Queen Stage

Bucket list climbs made famous by the Tour de France

A host of cols over 2,000m above sea level

A point-to-point adventure

A sell-out event that stays with you forever

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Megève INTRODUCING

A cycling paradise From valleys to mountains, Megève offers a variety of landscapes for cyclists to discover. Whether alone or with your family and friends, there are many roads and trails for you to explore. Want to know more about the beautiful region and its dedication to cycling? Read on…

Megève awarded ‘2-bicycle rating’ as part of the ‘Tour de France Cycle City’ label The Tour de France introduced a new label in 2021, recognising and rewarding cities that are active in hosting renowned cycling competitions as well as making cycling accessible to a greater number of people. Megève is proud to be part of the first list and is recognised as a cycling resort during the summer season.

Enjoy a cycling experience with cycling legend, Jean-Lou Paiani Megève is the perfect base camp to explore and climb some of the most beautiful passes of the Alps. If you decide you want to come

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back to explore further, former professional cyclist, Jean-Lou Paiani offers an exclusive tailor-made experience. Paiani guides you for two days or more on the mythical roads of the Tour de France, including emblematic passes such as Col des Aravis. To find out more, head to paiani-so.com

A local cycling club with the best routes Did you know that the Club des Sports de Megève is one of the few mountain villages that has a cycling club? 60 members, including 30 children and 30 adults, meet and train regularly to climb the surrounding passes. Imagine the local routes on offer!

Two wheeled offers for everyone In Megève you can find 7 bicycle stores that offer rentals, sales and repair services, alongside 6 activity providers who can accompany you on the many paths, roads and passes. If you fancy exploring via mountain bike, you can find 8 itineraries to try out as well as dozens of trails to ride in the heart of preserved nature and breathtaking panoramas facing Mont-Blanc!


11 CRÉDIT PHOTO : MICHAEL SCHWAB @THEBALLERINA


Come Early From mountain biking to canyoning or summer jazz, there is so much to do in Megève. If you have the opportunity to extend your stay and arrive a few days early, here are a few activities and places we recommend exploring in the area.

A BEAUTIFUL VILLAGE FACING THE MONT - BLANC

Your journey begins in Megève, with the beautiful environment inviting you to enjoy a rejuvenating stay! Discover our village with its narrow medieval streets and rich history, explore the lakes, the woods and the mountain summits, try our sports and wellness activities or let yourself be carried away by the music of our festive events.

MOUNTAIN BIKING AND LUNCH AT THE SUMMIT

Our bike rental and service providers will satisfy your desires to climb and descend the gentle and steep slopes surrounding the village of Megève. Whether you opt for an electric bike or mountain bike, make sure you stop at the top of Rochebrune. Here you will find alpine restaurants such as Sur Les Prés which offer great homemade dishes made with local and seasonal products. Bonus: dreamy panoramas with a view of Mont-Blanc!

A MOMENT OF RELAXATION Enter the world of Le Palais, the largest sports complex in the Alps. Here you will also find the indoor and outdoor Balnéoforme area, which includes sauna and steam rooms, massage beds and everything else you could possibly need to enjoy a moment of wellbeing. With a great view of the Megève hills, this is an experience to live and share with family or friends. 12


STROLL ALONG THE WATER Megève comes from the Latin "Mageva" meaning "in the middle of the waters" and offers a rich and varied landscape composed of valleys, mountains and forests, all centered around the same element: water. From the village, follow the paths along the waterways, stop at the historic site of the Calvaire, admire the beauty of the bridge at the Creux de Saint-Jean and encounter the magic of the Belle aux Bois waterfall before finishing with a picnic at the Lac de Javen!

AN EXPERIENCE IN CANYONING Let yourself be carried by the current of the water between the rocks of the Belle aux Bois canyon as you slide down the slides and jump into the clear water basins. Supervised by our white-water specialists, you will learn a lot from this fun activity which also requires some technical skills. The waterfall, 30 metres high, is a jewel in the heart of an enchanted forest that will allow you to cool down and enjoy the summer.

SUMMER JAZZ TAKES OVER MEGÈVE For two weekends in summer (17-18 July and 21-22 August), sweet melodies overtake the streets of the village. Music lovers can enjoy jazz tunes, with every street corner transmitting this musical heritage to as many people as possible and creating a beautiful atmosphere within the mountain village.

A GOLF COURSE IN THE MOUNTAINS At Mont d’Arbois, golf lovers can enjoy an 18-hole golf course that boasts extraordinary landscapes and panoramic views of the surrounding mountains. A great opportunity to play on the greens of the oldest high altitude golf course and feel like you are hitting your ball off into the mountains. 13


Event Village All riders are required to register at the Event Village on Saturday 21st August in Megève between 10:00am to 7:00pm. You also need to drop your bike box off here so that the Haute Route team can transport it for you during the event. Head to the Ride with GPS App to find out more about the Partners and Services that will be in the event village.

Activities in the event village

Boutique

Mechanical Assistance

Nutrition & Hydration

Demo's

Product Exhibition

Bike Rental

Bib collection

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Beers and Coffees


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Event Overview The flagship event of the Haute Route Cycling Series is a challenge like no other. The crown jewel in the Haute Route calendar gives you the rare opportunity to pin on a number and test yourself on many of the world’s most famous climbs as well as long, point-to-point stages. This year, highlights will include an extraordinary Queen stage, plus a time trial in one of cycling’s most celebrated destinations. *Please refer to the Ride with GPS app before the event for detailed information on each stage and updated timings.

R E G I S T R AT I O N D AY

S TA G E 4

Saturday 21st August

Wednesday 25th August

Event village in Megève Open from 10:00am to 7:00pm Welcome briefing at 7:00pm Pasta party at 8:00pm

ITT Bourg d'Oisans - Alpe d'Huez 15.5km | 1,150m+

S TA G E 5 S TA G E 1

Sunday 22nd August Megève – Côte 2000 110km | 3,100m+ (+8km to Megève)

Thursday 26th August

Alpe d'Huez - Col de Granon 86km | 3,000m+ (+13km to Serre Chevalier Briançon)

S TA G E 6 S TA G E 2

Monday 23rd August

Friday 27th August

Serre Chevalier Briançon - Auron 140km | 3,650M+

Megève - Tignes 109km | 3,450m+

S TA G E 7 S TA G E 3

Tuesday 24th August Tignes - Col de Sarenne 182km | 4,700m+ (+8km to Alpe d'Huez) 16

Saturday 28th August Auron - Col de Vence Nice 148km | 3,200m+ (+32km to Nice)


Stage 1 - Sunday 22nd August MEGÈVE – CÔTE 2000 1 1 0 K M | 3 , 1 0 0 M+ (+8km to Megève)

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Stage 2 - Monday 23rd August MEGÈVE - TIGNES 1 0 9 K M | 3 , 4 5 0 M+

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INTRODUCING

Tignes Downhill or uphill: in Tignes, everyone has their own way of riding!

highest road pass in Europe), Col du Petit Saint Bernard (2188 m) and Cormet de Roselend (1967 m).

Does sport run through your veins? If so, you will feel at home in the "natural playground" of Tignes! You may already be familiar with its XXL ski area which is linked with Val d'Isère in the winter but it is time to discover its summer side, which is just as supercharged and particularly attractive to bike lovers.

Do you also love to get out on the mountain bike and take your cycling off-road? Take on the trails and features of the linked Tignes - Val d'Isère Bike Park! Get kitted out in protective gear and the right bike then get ready to test your skills amongst a magnificent landscape. In total, there are nearly 200 kilometres of trails awaiting. So, whatever your level and whichever bike you opt for (downhill, mountain or electric mountain bike), have fun exploring!

Keen to strengthen your climbing legs? Take on the road to Tignes and relive the experience of the world’s best riders by covering the last kilometres of the 9th stage of the Tour de France 2021, between Tignes les Brévières (1550 m) and Tignes Val Claret (2100 m). Once the “warm-up” is over, why not tick off the legendary mountain passes near the resort: Col de l'Iseran (2764 m,

And because in Tignes sport never sleeps, take advantage of your stay and hike the trails of the Vanoise National Park, put on your crampons to summit the Grande Motte glacier, polish your swing on Europe’s highest 18-hole golf course, or even paddle around the natural lake on a stand-up paddle board.

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natural playground for all your sports desires Cycling - Hiking - Nautical activities - Golfing... 100% thrills to peaceful contemplation.

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Discover all of our activities at Tignes.net

© A.Parant

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Stage 3 - Tuesday 24th August TIGNES - COL DE SARENNE 1 8 2 K M | 4 , 7 0 0 M+ (+8km to Alpe d'Huez)

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Stage 4 - Wednesday 25th August ITT BOURG D'OISANS - ALPE D'HUEZ 1 5 . 5 K M | 1 , 1 5 0 M+

Time Trial procedure

Your start time is defined by your overall ranking following the previous stages and riders will set off in reverse order of the general classification. 1. Call times and start times published at the briefing after the previous stage and available online 2. Present yourself in the waiting area at your call time 3. Enter the Time Trial start pen 2 minutes before your start time 4. Enter the start ramp 20 seconds before your start

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Crédit photo : Laurent Salino / Alpe d’Huez Tourisme

Experience the big thrill

www.alpedhuez.com

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INTRODUCING

Alpe d'Huez Alpe d'Huez, open-air cycling stadium The first real attraction of the Oisans resort was not the Tour de France or the 68 Winter Olympics. In fact it was the silver hidden in the heart of the mountain that drew many nationalities to the village of Huez. Rich in the purest minerals, copper, zinc and coal were all mined with a high risk/reward ratio that sometimes, caused deadly avalanches on the steep slopes. Alpe d'Huez soon became a hotspot for winter sports. In 1936, its first ski lift came to life. Like the Giro and the Stelvio, the relationship between Alpe d'Huez and the Tour de France began in 1952 with a stage win by the legendary Fausto Coppi. Since then, and especially from the end of the 1970s, this small Alpine village has been a key landmark feature on cycling maps. As the Grande Loop (Tour de France) returned to the Alps, the Dutch victories multiplied (Zoetemelk, Kuiper, Winnen, Rooks, Theunisse). Since 1988, there has been no new victory but the Dutch supporters have not forgotten the good old days and always make a point of gathering together on bend n°7 during the event.

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The resort was then shunned for 25 years and it was not until 1976 that the Tour returned to Alpe d'Huez. 21 panels punctuate the rider's effort in a 14 km countdown over 1120 m of vertical drop. On average, nearly 400 cyclists climb the legendary ascent every day. According to legend, the bends in Alpe d'Huez were numbered to serve as landmarks for the snowploughs and to let them know where they were on the climb. Crossing the finish line in Alpe d’Huez is THE privilege. Beyond the memorable ascent, the rider who wins the stage in the Tour, has his name go down in history and will always be associated with one of the 21 laces of the legendary climb. It was in 1995 that the Italian Marco Pantani succeeded in climbing to the resort in 36 minutes and 40 seconds: an unequalled record! As an emblematic cycling destination, it seemed obvious to the Haute Route organisers that they should organise an exceptional race there!


Stage 5 - Thursday 26th August ALPE D'HUEZ - COL DE GRANON 8 6 K M | 3 , 0 0 0 M+ (+13km to Serre Chevalier Briançon)

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INTRODUCING

Serre Chevalier You have probably heard about these legendary mountain passes: Izoard, Galibier, Lautaret or Granon. All of them are situated in our country and Serre Chevalier Briançon is a real base camp for cyclists. Climbing these passes is the dream of every cyclist. There is nothing more satisfying than reaching the top of the Izoard Pass at 2,360m, passing by the famous Casse Déserte to discover the fascinating and almost moonlike scenery. You can also choose to conquer the Galibier Pass (2,645m) and the Lautaret (2,058m). Also known as the King of the Valley, this alpine giant pass offers a 360-degree view of the Barre des Ecrins and Meije glaciers, as well as the Combeynot or Cerces massifs. A truly breathtaking and unforgettable view.

And for cyclists fond of steep climbs, the Granon Pass (2413 m) is a real challenge and a must-see summit. The ascent starts from the village of Saint Chaffrey and is considered one of the most difficult passes in Europe. At an average gradient of 9.2%, it is easy to understand why but once you reach the summit you will be rewarded with a stunning and well-deserved view above the entire Serre Chevalier Briançon valley. The Grand Briançonnais offers an incredible choice of itineraries in contrasting landscapes amongst small winding roads, beautiful hairpins and exceptional panoramic. Serre Chevalier Briançon is cycling paradise. To find out more head to

Serre-chevalier.com

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Stage 6 - Friday 27th August S E R R E C H E VA L I E R B R I A N Ç O N - A U R O N 1 4 0 K M | 3 , 6 5 0 M+

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INTRODUCING

Auron Nestled in the heart of the French Alps, the resort town of Auron is famous for its authenticity and old-world charm.

During winter, Auron offers incredible terrain and exceptional landscapes with the authenticity of a real village.

Auron and surrounding villages of St Etienne de Tinée and St Dalmas le Salvage create the picture perfect backdrop for an adventure in the heart of the Mercantour mountains.

As the snow melts, the area becomes a mecca for mountain-lovers with everything from road biking, to hiking on the cards.

A true natural playground, the area offers endless opportunities for sporting expeditions, as well as cultural and wellness experiences.

© OFFICE DE TOURISME AURON

You will be bewitched by the charm of this genuine mountain village with a rich cultural heritage.

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Stage 7 - Saturday 28th August AURON - COL DE VENCE NICE 1 4 8 K M | 3 , 2 0 0 M+ (+32km to Nice)

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RACE THE WORLD FROM YOUR HOUSE

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INTRODUCING

Nice The land of sport and cycling The capital of the Côte d’Azur, Nice is the 5th largest city in France with 350,000 residents and the second largest tourist centre in the country with more than 5 million visitors per year. The city offers a unique setting and an exceptional climate, whilst also makes it the perfect location for sport and major international events. From IRONMAN and the Nice-Cannes Marathon, to the Euro football tournament in 2016 and the Women’s World Cup in 2019, Nice has hosted many major events and given sports fans around the world the opportunity to discover this beautiful location. The capital of the French Riviera will also set the stage and host exciting upcoming events such as French Rugby Championship semi-finals in 2022, the Rugby World Cup in 2023 and the Olympic Football competition 2024.

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With its roots in cycling, it is events such as the Tour de France Grand Départ in 2020 which further strengthens its position as an historic cycling venue. The landscape, between sea and mountains, creates the most beautiful natural stage and opportunity to showcase what it has to offer. The city was recently awarded a ‘3-bicycle rating’ as part of the ‘Ville à Vélo du Tour de France’ label, which recognises its ability to organise major events and help make cycling accessible to a greater number of people. The last two stages of the Haute Route Alps will be a chance for riders to experience the beauty of the region for themselves as they pass through the Mercantour Massif and up to the Baie des Anges via the famous Col de la Bonette. At 2,802 metres and as the highest road in Europe, it won’t just be the stunning views that take your breath away!


Introducing our on-event app In partnership with Ride with GPS, the Experience Package will provide you with event information and routes, alongside important updates such as start times, video briefing publication and much more. We will share the event-specific code with you in a Haute Route Alps newsletter ahead of the event.

Date Place

Stage 1

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The #1 Route Planner in the palm of your hand

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www.fbr.bike

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Haute Route Nation We are ordinary people doing extraordinary things together. We are the Haute Route Nation. The Haute Route Nation is more than a club. We are a global community of passionate cyclists brought together by a love for reaching new heights. We are ordinary people doing extraordinary things.

Partners Benefits

Get rewarded, and get your hands on exclusive deals

Training tips

We’ve teamed up with industry experts to bring you the best training advice

Rides & Rendez-vous

Training rides organised all over the world

A global network

A community of ambassadors and fellow riders to talk all things cycling

Head to Haute Route Nation to join the community.

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Registration Day *Registration Day itinerary and requirements dependant on latest health protocol. Any changes will be communicated.

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VILLAGE ARRIVAL – The event village will be open from 10:00am to 7:00pm. Before exploring the village and visiting partners’ and exhibitors’ booths, make sure you follow the steps outlined below. BIKE PARK – If you brought your bike with you to the village use the secure bike park while you complete the registration process. BIB COLLECTION – Once you have completed the Covid-19 requirements and had your temperature check, you may collect your bib, bike plate and Haute Route pack (you will need one form of photo ID) OFFICIAL PHOTO - Don’t forget to have your official Haute Route picture taken. BIKE PLATE – Once you’ve collected your registration pack, attach your bike plate on to your handlebars. It is forbidden to alter, cut or fold your bike plate. BIKE BOX – Attach your bike box tag to your bike box and bring your bike box to the dedicated trucks. Your bike box will be stored in a secured room throughout the event. You will not be able to access your bike box again until the final stage finish in Pau. WELCOME BRIEFING – Once you have completed all these steps and have visited our partner and exhibitor stands please ensure that you attend the mandatory Rider Briefing at 7:00pm. N.B: The Rider Briefing will be followed by the Event Supporter Briefing which is mandatory for friends and family following the event by car.

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PASTA PARTY – To start the Haute Route in the right way, make new friends over dinner at the Pasta Party, which will take place at 8:00pm.

Finally, don’t forget to pick up your bike if you used the bike park. There is no secure bike park overnight. 40


What To Take With You While every rider will have their own personal preference, this is a suggested list of what to take on the bike and in your backpack (dropped off at the start/collected at the finish of each stage):

ON THE BIKE

OFF THE BIKE

A windbreaker/gilet Water/drinks bottles Cereal bars, dried fruits, energy gels A pair of sunglasses A mobile phone in your waterproof pouch Spare inner tubes or sealant for tubeless tyre Tyre-levers A pump or a CO2 canister A multi-tool including chain tool

Haute Route ID Card Comfy clothes Shoes Tech Chargers Toiletries Towel Compression socks

NUTRITION

KIT * Helmet Jersey Shorts Base layers * Shoe covers * Jacket Thermal jacket * Gloves x2 Gilet

Cycling cap Beanie Sunglasses Arm warmers * Leg warmers Knee warmers Shoes Socks Buff

Bars Gels Electrolyte tablets Recovery drinks

PROTECTION Sun cream Chamois Cream

* Mandatory equipment to present upon registration process. 41


Feed Stations All feed stations throughout the Haute Route will be stocked with a variety of different products to help you fuel and hydrate for your ride. From a variety of drinks and energy products to sweet and savoury whole foods, there will be something to suit everyone’s taste. *Subject to latest health protocol requirements. Any changes will be communicated.

WATER

COKE

ELECTROLYTE DRINK

OTE ENERGY BARS

OTE ENERGY GELS

SAVOURY FOOD Cheese, ham, crackers, potatoes

SWEET FOOD Dried fruit, cakes, bananas, oranges

FEED STATION ETIQUETTE This is a cupless event. You must use your own bottles or cups to refill at the feed station. To ensure rider safety, please do not block the road, and use the bike racks providied rather than pulling up to the tables with your bike. For riders receiving external support from family, coaches, or tour operators, note that the feed station zones are the only points on the course where assistance is permitted.

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Bag Logistics

HOTEL

Drop travel bag in hotel lobby

FINISH

Collect backpack at finish

VILLAGE

Collect racebag

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START

Drop backpack and race bag at start

RIDE

RIDE

COL

Race bag available at predefined location

HOTEL

Collect travel bag in hotel lobby

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course highlight

#1

The 21 turns of the Alpe d’Huez The fabled Alpe d’Huez climb needs little introduction. With its 21 switchbacks, it has featured as a battleground for Tour de France riders since its inception in 1952 and is a mythical climb for any cyclist. Whether you are yet to tick it off your bucket-list or if you have already climbed it a handful of times, each ascent offers a different experience and a unique battle with mind and body. With a climb so steeped in history, where do we start when tasked with picking out three of our most memorable moments on the climb? From the first stage win by Coppi in 1952, to the clumsy photographer that knocked Guerini off his bike, there are plenty of unforgettable moments and tales of defiance to come from this paved road up to the ski resort. Here are our top picks:

1. Marco Panitini

When it is your turn to ride up the Alpe d’Huez hairpins from Bourg d’Oisans, make sure you check where you are on the climb when the clock reads 37 minutes and 35 seconds. Why? Because at this point, as part of the 1997 Tour de France, Marco Panitini had already crossed the line. That time still stands as the fastest ascent and although marred with drug controversy, there is no denying that Panitini was one of the most thrilling climbers in the sport, with his distinct riding style on the drops and a distinct personality to match. In the 2015 Tour de France, rider Nairo Quintana attacked the same climb in 39 minutes and 22 seconds. This is the 14th fastest time in the Tour’s history, and the only 46

rider to make it into the top 20 since the tighter doping controls.

2. Joop Zoetemelk

1976 was a good year for the Netherlands team. One notable performance was that of Joop Zoetemelk, who was the first Dutch rider to win the Alpe d’Huez stage. It was here that a tradition was born and since that moment, a pilgrimage of Dutch fans dressed in orange have descended on the climb to celebrate the Tour de France. At corner number seven you can find fans that are as committed to the party as Zoetemelk was to his attack on the climb. The fans also seem to have the endurance and stamina to match, with the ability to keep celebrating (and drinking!) without faltering for days. While we can’t order a mass of orange-clad fans to spur you on up the climb, it is worth visualizing and thinking of their all-out energy and infectious spirits as you pass the corner as it is sure to spur you on.

3. Luis Herrera

Imagine beating a professional rider up the Alpe d’Huez? That is exactly what Luis Herrera did in 1984. Aged just 23 and as part of an amateur team at the time, the cyclist became the first amateur in Tour de France history to win a stage, after beating the likes of Phil Anderson and Peter Winnen up the climb. From there, the rest is history, and the ‘little gardener’ from Colombia went on to have a strong professional career too. Let that be an inspiration to you as you take on the mythical climb, anything is possible….


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course highlight

#2

Bonette versus Galibier Described by Cyclist Magazine as ‘legshredding and life-changing in equal measure’, the Haute Route Alps is the highest and toughest event in our cycling series. Climbs like Col du Granon, Col du Lautaret and Col de Vars are just a few of the climbs that will take you to lofty heights above 2,000m, but that is only part of the story. We’ve got two climbs to trump them all.

is awarded to whoever reaches the highest point of the Tour de France first. In 2008, John-Lee Augustyn made it to the top of Cime de la Bonette first, winning the award before later crashing out on the descent.

Both reaching over 2,500m at the summit, we will leave it to you to decide which is the toughest and/or the most magnificent but we guarantee both will stick with you forever and allow you to see the world from an entirely new perspective.

Col de la Bonette Summit: 2,715m (Cime de la Bonette takes you to 2,802m) Average gradient: 6.6% Maximum gradient: 9% Length: 25km Ranking: #106 in the Alps What you’ll see: The top of the climb is a huge contrast from the green pastures, waterfalls and wildlife that joins you near the start. With your head in the clouds, it feels like an out of this world experience as the blackened terrain and exposed rocks remind you just how high up you are as you take in the panoramic views and alpine landscape. Interesting fact about the climb: Would you be the first to the top if you could earn €5,000 for it? The Henri Desgrange trophy 48

Col du Galibier Summit: 2,642m Average gradient: While the climb ‘officially’ starts from Valloire and gives an average gradient of 6.9%, most include the start from Saint-Michel-de-Marriene which involves ascending the Col du Télégraphe first before a short downhill section splits the two climbs. If you’re including this not-insignificant col then the average gradient is a deceiving 5.5%. Maximum gradient: 12% Ranking: #78 in the Alps


What you’ll see: Just like with the Bonette, you will begin to think you imagined the open meadows, streams and abundance of life at the start of the climb. Nothing but a distant memory, the snow-capped peaks, Interesting fact about the climb: When this climb first featured in the Tour de France, only three riders (Emile Georget, Paul Duboc and Gustave Garrigou) managed to get to the top without having to walk. Since then, it has featured in the Tour over 50 times, including the Tour’s highest ever summit finish in 2011 when Andly Schleck took victory after a 60km breakaway.

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Awards and Classifications All riders will be ranked in the following categories:

Solo Men

Solo Women

Men’s Team

Solo riders will also be ranked in the following age categories:

Women’s Team

Solo

Rules and regulations

It is important to be aware of and understand all of the Rules and Regulations of the Haute Route. This includes timekeeping, rankings, time limits, equipment, safety, medical and personal assistance, anti-doping and other topics. Please click here and read through this information before your event.

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30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

Mixed Team (comprising at least one woman and one man).

Every solo rider will appear in the General Classification, so whether you’re vying for the podium, trying to beat a friend or triumphantly make it to that famous finish line, your efforts will be on the record. An official prize ceremony will take place at the end of each day to celebrate the biggest stars of each stage.

18-29

Teams

Replacing the Duo format at all events this year, this new category has teams made up of 4-6 members, with men’s, women’s and mixed groups. The aim of the game: Each team will make their own strategy to get three of their riders to the finish line as fast as possible. Each Team category (Women’s, Men’s and Mixed) will be up for an award at the official Haute Route prize ceremony at every event. The ranking for Women’s and Men’s Teams will be based by cumulating the times of the three fastest members. The ranking for Mixed teams will also be established using the times of the three best members but must include the times from at least one woman and one man on each stage. Best of all, all riders who make up the teams will also be included in the individual rankings.


Safety And Support Organisation

CAR

Technical Assistance The official technical team are the only party authorised to provide assistance on the course outside of designated feed stations. Riders receiving outside assistance - mechanical or otherwise - are liable to penalties and ultimately disqualification. • Every participant is expected to be selfsufficient in the case of a puncture. • If you suffer a mechanical, please be patient and inform the closest course vehicle. Time waiting for technical assistance cannot be deducted from your race result. • Technical assistance will be available in the event village and at the start line.

Medical Assistance Available 24/7:

• Emergency Doctors • Professional Nurses

• Ambulances

Although there may be some bike shops close to the course, we recommend you bring specific spares including • • • •

A rear-mech hanger Allen keys specific to your bike Spare brake pads (front and rear) Inner tubes with the correct length valves, CO2 cartridges and a pump

Transition Some stages can include a transition after the stage to go from the finish line to the Event Village. Haute Route signage will be on the road. Roads will be open to traffic so you will have to respect the traffic rules. We recommend you wait for your friends or other members of the peloton and ride back as a group.

Medical Emergency

Emergency phone numbers and details can be found via the Ride with GPS app

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course highlight

#3

Cormet de Roselend "Following difficult weather and landslides forecast for tomorrow, the route has been modified”, said the Tour de France Race Director ahead of the 20th stage of the race last year. The day before saw Stage 19 dramatically cut short due to extreme hail, snow and mudslides further up the course whilst riders descended the Col d’Iseran in sunny conditions, blissfully unaware. Despite the chaos and confusion at the time, the truncated course and sudden changes served as a stark reminder that anything can happen when you’re racing amongst the mountains of the Alps, and that mother nature will almost always have the final say. But would Egan Bernal still have been able to hold onto his yellow jersey if both Stage 19 and 20 had played out in full? And which key parts of the course were the riders and spectators going to miss out on most? A major loss was the Category One climb of the Cormet de Roselend, set to feature in the original Stage 20 course. With a landslide blocking the path, this ascent was definitely a no-go, but armchair viewers around the world missed out on breathtaking views, wild scenery, winding roads and a stunning alpine lake at 1,600m. While we are sure the Tour de France riders would be too focused to register much of this beauty, they’d perhaps at least be grateful for the flatter section that accompanies the lake before the road kicks up again for the final approach to the cormet – a local word for summit. For Bernal, the 20.3km ascent and any accompanying attacks that might have 54

played out on it would probably do little to unsettle him. After all, his Team INEOS teammate, Geraint Thomas described Bernal as someone that was ‘born to climb’. The Colombian cyclist was also born and bred at altitude, meaning the climb up to the summit at nearly 2,000m would again play to his strengths. However, this climb has a history of drama and a yellow jersey has in fact been lost here before. During the 1996 edition of the Tour de France, Stéphane Heulot was reduced to tears on this climb and unable to go with the front riders. Suffering from a knee injury, he was later forced to abandon but he wasn’t the only one to crack that day with two of the favourites, Chris Boardman and Laurent Jalabert both seeming to come undone. Despite the action going up, it was the descent and what proceeded that sticks in everyone’s minds that year. It was after the summit at Roselend that Johan Bruyneel overshot a hairpin and disappeared over the side of a tree-lined gorge before miraculously climbing his way back out again relatively unscathed. When it is your turn to ride the descent, you may spot his name written in yellow on the floor where it happened – a reminder to ride safely and carefully down those twisting switchbacks which have witnessed many a crash over its Tour de France history. The Cormet de Roselend is a beautiful climb that has it all. While the landslide meant it had to sit out on the action in the 2019 race, we look forward to its return in this year’s Tour de France. Featuring in Stage


9, this is the first chance for the climbers to properly test their legs and showcase their talents across a mountainous profile which concludes with a summit finish atop Montée de Tignes. More importantly, Haute Route riders will also get the chance to test their legs across a very similar profile for Stage Two of the Haute Route Alps. Watch and learn…

The numbers Alps, French Elevation: 1194m+

Highest point: 1968 Max gradient: 11.3%

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Partners in 2021 Title Partner

Title Partner Haute Route Cycling Series

Global Partners

Official Global Virtual Community Partner

Official Global Route Partner

Continental Partners

Official Nutrition Partner

Official Performance Clothing Partner

Official Timekeeper partner

Official Charity Partner

Official Neutral Service Partner

Official Baggage Partner

Official Bike Rental Partner

Official Performance Helmets & Eyewear

Official Sport Beer Partner

Official Energy Management System Partner

Host Cities

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2021 COLNAGO HAUTE ROUTE SERIES 7 EVENTS • 5 COUNTRIES • 2 CONTINENTS Haute Route Watopia · 3 DAYS

Zwift

Haute Route Crans-Montana · 3 DAYS

Crans-Montana

Haute Route Pyrenees · 5 DAYS

Girona - Pau

Haute Route Alps · 7 DAYS

Megève - Nice

Haute Route Dolomites · 5 DAYS

Cortina d'Ampezzo - Bormio

Haute Route Ventoux · 3 DAYS*

Bédoin

Haute Route Brazil · 3 DAYS*

Florianópolis

February

11 - 13 June

6 - 10 July

22 - 28 August

31 August - 4 September

1 - 3 October

22 - 24 October

*Include a compact format

REACH NEW HEIGHTS 58

Profile for Haute Route

The Ultimate Guide to the 2021 Haute Route Alps  

Described by Cyclist Magazine as “leg-shredding and life-changing in equal measure”, the flagship event of the Haute Route Cycling Series is...

The Ultimate Guide to the 2021 Haute Route Alps  

Described by Cyclist Magazine as “leg-shredding and life-changing in equal measure”, the flagship event of the Haute Route Cycling Series is...

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