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SelectCuts community, regulators and all their neighbors know it and any hard-earned trust that may have been achieved is out the window. As we all know in our industry, trust is important, hard to achieve, and easy to lose. Again, why are we loggers? I believe it is because we enjoy the challenge, because we do something that many can criticize but few can actually do. We enjoy actually accomplishing something every day and associating with people who have a strong work ethic. In a world where so many people sit in offices answering a phone or some other equally boring job, our job is never boring. Another question that must be asked is why we see so few people coming into this industry. While there are many simple reasons, I believe it also has to do with the attitude and expectations of the new breed of large forest landowners. Timberland historically was owned by people who respected it and had a long-term vision of forest management. More often than not, today timberland is considered a commodity and managed by accountants. In some instances the owning entity has little or no connection with the ground, shows no respect for the people who do the work on it and don’t seem to understand or chose to ignore how their management decisions impact the land and the communities that depend on it. Issues like these help keep a logging business owner from staying optimistic about the future, and this in turn trickles down to employees. The trend of loggers being considered as nothing more than a line item on the profit/loss ledger will exacerbate logging infrastructure weakness going forward. Loggers daily face various issues, which range from safety, productivity, transportation, and finding work, to name a few, but in the end those who call themselves loggers always find a way to get the job done. This can-do spirit is not found in every occupation and in most cases cannot be taught. I feel very fortunate to have grown up with and continue to work side-by-side with loggers, both in my home state and across the nation. While some may call me crazy, I believe that managing a renewable resource regardless of its challenges is the right thing to do and it is just another reason why I am proud that I chose to be a logger.

Perforex Forest Services Starts Apprentice Program Perforex Forest Services has begun its first-ever paid apprenticeship training program for truck drivers and logging equipment operators. The seven selected apprentices will undergo 12-month, paid classroom and on-the-job training and certification. Partnering with Perforex in the program are RoyOMartin and Cen- ➤ 54

Anderson is president of the American Loggers Council and he and his father Mike own and operate Anderson Logging, Inc. based in Fort Bragg, Calif. The American Loggers Council is a non-profit 501(c) (6) corporation representing professional timber harvesters in 30 states. Visit amloggers.com or phone 409-625-0206.

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015

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