__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Global Community Cookbook Celebrating Cultural and Culinary Diversity


Culinary Journey South America

Celebrating diversity with traditional foods

1

North America

2

Pandebono

23

Bannock

3

Ceviche

24

4

25

Pemmican

5

Patacones

26

Poutine

6

Peruvian Tamale or Tamal Criollo

27

7

Pastel de Choclo or Corn Cake

28

Chakalaka

8

Rocoto Relleno

29

Kabsa

9

Spicy Guinea Pig with Potatoes or Picante de Cuy con Papas

30

10

Australasia

31

Vareniki

12

Bush Tomato Damper

32

Rhubarb Pie

13

Bush Dukkah

33

Pumpkin Fritters and Caramel Sauce

14

Bunya Nut Pesto

34

Alsatian Apple Pie

16

Coat of Arms Pie with Bunya Nuts

35

Lamb Bunny Chow

17

Warrigal and Spinach Feta Pie

36

Mopani Worms Stew or “Mashonzha�

18

Thank you

37

Deboned Leg of Lamb

19

Moose Meatloaf

Africa, Europe, and the Middle East

Tahchin Morgh

Biryani

20

Puca Picante or Spicy Puka

22


Celebrating diversity with traditional foods Traditions are the passing down of customs and beliefs from generation to generation. They are deep in meaning, rich in history, powerful in identity, and celebratory of culture. Culinary traditions are one of the ways we tell stories of the past. Fresh, seasonal ingredients highlight the requisite for sustainability. The culinary landscape powerfully respecting the balance of existence, the magnitude of nature, and the harvest of our planet. Food is an expression of cultural identity. We grow up enjoying the food of our respective cultures. It becomes a part of our identity and we often associate food from our childhood with memories, our families, and feelings of warmth and belonging. But our world is in a constant state of change. Our climate is changing and so are the resources we use. With globalization and human migration, cooking highlights a way of preserving culture when moving to new places. Certain traditional ingredients may not always be readily available, creating the need to alter certain dishes but in so doing, creating new flavors and stories. Join us on this culinary adventure, where we explore the traditional flavors and techniques of our employees, our clients, and our community partners in our commitment to diversity, inclusion, and cultural recognition. While the recipes within are not entirely representative of each and every culture, they offer a glimpse into the diversity of the regions that Hatch operates in. We hope this cookbook lets you revel in some new tastes while offering a greater awareness and perspective of the origins of our global Hatch family.

Global Community Cookbook

1


North America

The origins of North America are deeply rooted in Indigenous history–a history rich in respect for our planet and its natural resources. As such, the roots of Indigenous cooking are deeply reliant on our land, our water, and our skies. Crops are harvested, supplemented by the ability to hunt, fish, and gather–all intrinsically connected to the climate, region, and season. Indigenous Peoples have formed the history of Canada and the United States and continue to play an important role in the strength of our nations, and the development and future of these regions. Culinary traditions tell these stories and promise to honor the heritage and contributions of these communities. Canada prides itself on being a mosaic–a multicultural landscape that symbolizes the national embrace of diversity and inclusion. In fact, “diversity is our strength” is the Canadian mantra. While many cultural foods in Canada go back to Indigenous beginnings, it is a nation unique in its circumstances due to the immigrants shaping the culinary scene. In North America, multiculturalism is on the menu. 2

Global Community Cookbook


Bannock

Francis Erasmus, Woodland Cree of Northern Alberta

Preparation time: Cooking time:

10 minutes

30 minutes

Our story

As part of the Erasmus family belonging to the Woodland Cree of Northern Alberta, bannock has been a traditional bread made for generations. It was passed down to the younger generation to my niece, Allison, the oldest of my nieces and nephews and we have never put it into a recipe until now!

INGREDIENTS:

INSTRUCTIONS:

5 cups flour

• Preheat oven to 350°F.

1 tbsp. baking powder

• Mix all the dry ingredients in a bowl.

a dash of salt

• Make a well in the middle of your bowl and gradually add 2-3 cups of water.

a dash of sugar

• Mix slowly until very soft.

2-3 cups water

• Dump mixture onto a surface to knead. • Bake the bannock in the oven for 30 minutes or until golden brown.

Global Community Cookbook

3


Moose Meatloaf

Tannis Geddes, Mathias Colomb First Nation

Preparation time: Cooking time:

20 minutes

50 minutes

INGREDIENTS:

Our story

In late fall, trapping and hunting becomes the primary activity. Many disperse to family traplines and cabins handed down through generations. In addition to trapping, wood-cutting resumes, and nets are placed under the ice to fish until the cold and darkness of mid-winter preclude fishing activities. In mid-winter, most residents are confined to the village. Some hunters continue to hunt moose, caribou, and small game on short daytrips and in the vicinity of the village.

1 1/2 lbs. ground venison or moose 1 tsp. minced onion 1 cup milk 1 egg

• Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix all ingredients together.

1 1/2 tsp. salt

• Place in a greased 9x5x3 inch loaf pan.

1 clove of garlic (minced)

• Bake for 50 minutes or until internal temperature is 150°F.

1 cup oatmeal

4

INSTRUCTIONS:

Global Community Cookbook


Pemmican Justice Noon, Canada

Preparation time: Cooking time:

20 minutes

8 hours

INGREDIENTS: 1 kg. ground bison 3/4 cup dried Saskatoon berries 2 cups rendered fat

Our story

Pemmican was the most important Indigenous Canadian food. It was vital for surviving the long winters and it provided the necessary proteins and vitamins. Fur traders started trading for Pemmican, buying it in sewn bison hide bags in 41 kilogram lots. It became vital to the trade routes in Canada for local consumption and for sale to the British Navy. INSTRUCTIONS: • Spread the meat out thinly on a baking sheet to dry at 180°F for at least 8 hours in the oven, or until crisp. • Grind the dried meat into powder. Grind the dried berries. Heat the fat until liquid. • Add liquid fat to the meat and dried berries and let cool. Cut into squares or roll into balls. • Store in a dry place and it will last you for years.

Global Community Cookbook

5


Poutine

Etienne Brochu, Canada

INGREDIENTS: 200 g. of fried “potatoes” 150 g. of cheese curds or cheese “droppings” ¾ cup brown or BBQ sauce (optional)

Our story

In my family, we used to regroup all family members together each Sunday night, including grandparents, uncles, aunts, and cousins to eat poutine together. Warning that this meal can be addictive–do not consume this meal more than two times per day, but for greatest enjoyment, eat this meal every day. You will likely have the best time of your life. INSTRUCTIONS: • Place the delicious pieces of cheese curds in the bottom of a plate.  • Carefully spread the fried “potatoes” over the cheese.  • Drizzle everything with the succulent sauce.  • Enjoy!

6

Global Community Cookbook


Africa, Europe, and the Middle East

Africa, Europe, and the Middle East are each, respectively, a melting pot of ethnicities, languages, and traditions. Exploring the rich, aromatic flavors of the Middle East draws parallels to the locally available ingredients and traditions of African cuisine–both regions celebratory of gathering and the social aspect of food bringing people together. The region boasts variety–everything from traditional hearty meals to fresh herbs and powerful spices. Further north, one’s culinary experiences vary with each country within the continent. If you’ve fantasized about eating your way through Europe, you’re not alone. It’s a region rich in history, but also in a multitude of culture and as a result, cultural dishes.

Na zdrowie! Bon appetit! Smakelijk eten! Global Community Cookbook

7


Chakalaka

Sibongile Kubheka, Johannesburg, South Africa

Preparation time: Cooking time:

10 minutes

25 minutes

INGREDIENTS: 1 green pepper 1 red pepper

Our story

Growing up in Soweto, it has been customary to serve chakalaka whenever we braai meat. It is a relish that is synonymous with a braai. According to some sources, chakalaka may have originated in the townships of Johannesburg or in the gold mines surrounding Johannesburg, when Mozambican mineworkers coming off shift cooked tinned produce (tomatoes, beans) with chili to produce a spicy relish with a Portuguese flair to accompany pap.

1 large onion 2 garlic cloves  1 tsp. ginger

INSTRUCTIONS:

2 green chilies (or more) 

Put oil in your pan, add onions, and cook until soft. Add curry, garlic, ginger, peppers, green chilies. Stir and cook for 5 minutes. Add carrots and mix gently. Allow to cook for 5 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add salt to taste. Add baked beans and warm through.

6 large carrots, grated 3 tbsp. oil 1 cup baked beans in tomato sauce 2 tbsp. mild curry salt, to taste

8

Global Community Cookbook

There are a number of variations to the recipe. Some people add tomatoes to the recipe. Others add mixed vegetable curry instead of baked beans. This recipe is best served with pap, garlic rolls, or potato salad along with braai meat.


Kabsa

Mousa Amery, Abu Dhabi, UAE

Our story

INGREDIENTS: 500 g. chicken with bones

1 tbsp. salt (to taste)

400 g. basmati rice, soaked in water for 25-30 minutes

1 chopped tomato

6 tbsp. cooking oil whole spices (1 cinnamon stick, 3 green cardamoms, 3 cloves, 2 bay leaves, dried black lime) 1 chopped onion 1 tbsp. garlic, minced 1 tbsp. tomato paste

2 whole green hot chilies 1 tsp. cumin powder 1 tsp. coriander powder 1/2 tsp. black pepper 1 tbsp. kabsa spices 1 cube of chicken stock toasted almonds and coriander leaves to garnish

Kabsa is the national dish of Saudi Arabia. It is made of rice and chunks of any type of protein (chicken, lamb, or fish). The name “kabsa” came from cooking all the ingredients in one pot. However, the recipe of kabsa has evolved and every family has their own twist in making it. In our household, kabsa is always our go-to comfort food after a busy day, but it is also served during holiday gatherings, weddings, and family occasions. I learned how to make kabsa when I was studying abroad in the United States. Being away from my home country meant being away from my family and my mom’s cooking. But, after many trials and Skype calls with my mom, I finally learned how to make it! This dish made my days feel much closer to home with every bite. Therefore, I wanted to share this recipe with everyone to enjoy it as much as most of us here in Saudi do!

INSTRUCTIONS: • Sauté the whole spices in 3 tbsp. of oil to release aroma. • Add the onions and garlic and sauté until slightly browned. • Add the chicken and sauté for 5 minutes. • Add the tomatoes, tomatoes paste, spices, cube of chicken stock, dried lime, and two green chilies and mix everything well. • Add 1/2 Liter of hot water and simmer for 30 minutes until the chicken is thoroughly cooked. • When chicken is fully cooked, separate the chicken from gravy and set aside. • Mix the rice with gravy and simmer until rice is cooked and fluffy. • On a heated pan, add 3 tbsp. of oil and sear the chicken to give it a nice crust. • Serve the kabsa on a platter and garnish with the toasted almonds and coriander. Global Community Cookbook

9


Tahchin Morgh Atefeh Saberi, Iran

Baking time: Serves:

1 hour 15 minutes

8

You will need one 9x13x2 glass baking dish and one rectangular platter larger than the baking dish.

INGREDIENTS:

Rice

Chicken

4 cups uncooked basmati rice (one can substitute 1 cup with jasmine rice for added aroma)

3 ½-4 lbs. skinless chicken thighs and/or drumsticks (about 8-10) ¾ tsp. salt ¾ tsp. ground black pepper 1 medium yellow onion, peeled and cut into several pieces 1 ½ cups cold water

1 cup plain low-fat yogurt 1 large egg ⅛ tsp. saffron powder (optional, but highly recommended) 6 tbsp. vegetable oil, divided (1 tbsp. for TahDig mixture and 5 tbsp. for the baking dish) 5 tbsp. butter 3 tbsp. cold butter, cut into small cubes

Our story

Iran, and particularly my hometown, Mashhad, are known to produce the world’s finest saffron, this magical spice. Tahchin, combined with saffron scent and color, plays a special role in glorifying Iranian tables, particularly in familial gatherings and special occasions like marriage ceremonies. And not everyone can make it well! My grandma was definitely one of the best! This dish reminds me of her, our family gatherings at her place, my cousins sitting around the tablecloth (sofreh) and the fights over the tahdig (the crispy lower layer of tahchin). Still today, every time I visit home, my mom makes sure to include tahchin in her list of dishes to make during my stay. Hope you get the time to make it, make it well, and enjoy it as much as I do!


INSTRUCTIONS: • To cook the chicken, add the skinless chicken pieces to a stockpot with a good lid that will not allow too much moisture loss. Add salt, pepper, the cut onion, and 1 ½ cups water. Bring it to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium low and cook for about 1 ½ hours, or until the chicken falls apart very easily with a fork. • Remove the chicken from the stockpot and set aside to cool. • If there is more than 1 cup of broth in the stockpot, bring it to a boil and let it boil for 3-5 minutes, or until it is reduced to 1 cup. Turn off the heat. Pour the reduced broth into a medium bowl, smash the cooked onions with a fork and set aside. • When the chicken is cool enough to handle, take all the meat off the bone in large chunks. Mix the meat with broth until it is well coated. Chill the meat and broth mixture in the refrigerator for at least 30-40 minutes, or until the broth solidifies. (This step may be done up to 3-4 hours in advance.) • To make the rice, rinse rice until the water runs clear. Place rice in a large pan filled with water. Add some salt and let it cook. Once cooked, set aside. • To make the Tahchin, place the oven rack at the lowest setting. Preheat oven to 400°F. • In a medium bowl whisk together 1 egg, 1 cup yogurt, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, and the optional saffron. Stir in 2 cups of the par-cooked rice with a rubber spatula and mix until all the rice is coated. Set aside. • Add 5 tablespoons of vegetable oil and 5 tablespoons butter to a 9x13x2-inch glass baking dish. Place the dish in the preheated oven for 3-5 minutes, or until all the butter melts and starts sizzling. Watch very closely so the oil does not get too hot and cause a grease fire. • Using mittens, transfer the baking dish to a heat-proof surface. • Layer by adding the rice and yogurt mixture to the baking dish and spread evenly to cover the bottom of the dish. Spread half of the remaining rice evenly on top of the yogurt mixture. Stir the chilled chicken and broth well and arrange evenly on top to cover all of the rice layer. And for the fourth layer, add the rest of the rice on top of the chicken, and press gently with the palm of your hand. • Arrange the cold butter cubes on the rice layer with equal distance from each other. • Cover the baking dish with a sheet of heavy-duty aluminum foil and seal the sides by pressing the aluminum foil to the dish. Use a sharp knife to cut one slit on each corner and then a few in the center of the dish. • Bake on the lowest rack for 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until the lowest portion of the sides of Tahchin are golden brown. Do not overbake; the bottom will bake darker than the sides. Since oven temperatures vary, you may have to adjust the baking time. If the lower sides are not golden brown, return the Tahchin back to the oven until it is golden brown. • Remove the baking dish from the oven, remove the aluminum foil. Run a knife along the sides of the baking dish to release the Tahchin. Place a large rectangular platter or a shallow baking sheet on top of the dish. Use mittens and hold both the platter and the glass dish and invert the Tahchin. Let the Tahchin sit on the counter and cool for 10 minutes. • Noosh-e-jaan! Global Community Cookbook

11


Vareniki

Oxana Bystrova, Russia

INGREDIENTS:

Pastry 2 eggs salt

Our story Vareniki are believed to have originated in Ukraine. Originally vareniki came from Turkey (Düşbərə) but got modified and being derived from Ukrainian “вар”(var) “boiling liquid”, indicating boiling as the primary cooking method for this kind of filled dumpling. It may be stuffed with mashed potatoes, fried onions, cheese, all sorts of berries or fruits – whatever it is, it is delicious. Russians often serve it (as a dessert) especially during big family events as in my family.

1 glass cold water 500-600 g. flour

Filling cherries (fresh or frozen) sugar

INSTRUCTIONS:

Filling

Pastry

• Mix cherries with sugar.

(every family has its own secret for it) • Combine eggs and flour. • Add salt and water. Knead the pastry for 10-15 minutes. • Let stand for 15-20 minutes under a wet tea towel.

• Roll out pastry. • Cut circles from pastry (around 5-7 cm in diameter). • Place the stuffing on the circle (about 1 teaspoon). • Stick edges together. • Put the vareniki in boiling water and boil for around 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally with a tablespoon (do not to let the vareniki stick together).

Приятного аппетита! Finger-licking dish!

12

Global Community Cookbook

• Serve with cream or butter.


Rhubarb Pie Marina Troubitsyna, Russia

INGREDIENTS:

Dough 260 g. flour 120 g. butter 74 g. sugar 1 egg yolk 1-2 tbsp. sour cream salt

Filling 400 g. rhubarb 2 eggs 200 g. sour cream 70 g. sugar pinch of cinnamon tbsp. of rice or wheat flour

Our story

One cannot imagine a Russian tea party without pies and jam! Since my childhood, I remember thickets of this plant, and the flavory cold compotes on a hot day and aromatic pies for tea. Rhubarb contains many vitamins and micronutrients. In fact, rhubarb roots were the most valuable crude medicine in Europe in the late Middle Ages. Nowadays, rhubarb can be found in many gardens and is not considered something outlandish. However, several centuries ago, the roots of rhubarb were highly valued and rhubarb was among the ten major exported goods of Russia!

INSTRUCTIONS: • Sift flour into a bowl. Add sugar and a pinch of salt. Stir the dry mixture with a beater. • Grate cold butter directly into the flour. Quickly mix flour with oil until crumbs start to form. • Add egg yolk and sour cream. • Knead the dough very quickly. Do not knead for a long time. Put the dough in a plastic bag and place it in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. • Take the cooled dough out of the fridge, put it into a mold and distribute it on the bottom and sides of the mold. Pierce the bottom of the dough with a fork. Heat the oven to 375ºF and bake the dough base for 10 minutes. • Rinse the rhubarb stems, peel, and cut into medium pieces, sprinkle with a spoon of sugar, set aside for 10 minutes. • Mix eggs, sour cream, vanilla sugar, cinnamon, and flour. • Put the chopped rhubarb into a dough tartalette and pour mixture. • Bake for 20-30 minutes at a temperature of 356°F until it browns slightly. • It is important to cool the pie a little before serving. • Add some powdered sugar on top for decoration. Global Community Cookbook

13


Pumpkin Fritters and Caramel Sauce Amanda Jansen Van Vuuren, Johannesburg, South Africa

Preparation time: Cooking time:

15 minutes

30 minutes

INGREDIENTS:

Caramel Sauce

Fritters

1 cup sugar

1 cup flour

60 ml. margarine

1 cup steamed pumpkin

1 cup hot water

25 ml. sugar 2 tsp. baking powder 1 egg 50 ml. milk Oil for frying, approximately 1 Liter

14

Global Community Cookbook

1 cup milk 25 ml. custard powder

Our story Pumpkin fritters, or “pampoenkoekies” as we know them, are made by my family for gatherings and special occasions–no wonder I have such fond memories of this dish! It is not just about the taste, which is wonderful, it is about the feeling of love that comes with it. This is my great grandma’s recipe that has come all the way from way back when, even before I was a small little girl with ponytails and big eyes full of dreams about what I was going to be when I grow up. I remember being in my grandma’s kitchen on the counter watching in wonder as my “ouma” transformed pumpkin into these mouthwatering little pumpkin balls drenched in syrup as her mother had taught her, and her mother before that, which has been passed on from daughter to daughter.  Recently it was my pleasure to pass it on to my granddaughter who loves cooking as much as I do! It reminds me when I was young and the world was my oyster! This recipe means that I will always have memories, no matter what life throws at me, the feeling of being part of a wonderful, loving family and being able to carry this forward to my family and their families. Long live the pumpkin fritter!


INSTRUCTIONS: • Start by steaming the pumpkin until soft enough to mash. You can mash this the day before and leave in the fridge. • For the sauce, melt the margarine and sugar together on medium heat and cook until golden brown (caramel color). It will start to crystalize first, then the oil and the sugar will separate, and it will it start to caramelize. • Remove from stove and immediately start adding the hot water little bit by little bit (it will splatter–be careful, use gloves) while stirring well. Stir until it becomes a thin sauce. Add the custard powder into the milk and mix well so it is smooth and add to the thin sauce in the pot and stir until thick and creamy. Leave to cool down slightly. • Heat enough oil to medium (the fritters must have enough room to turn on their own). Note it must not be too hot otherwise it will burn the fritters. You will know the oil is the right temperature when you drop some batter and it sizzles and swells out immediately. • Mix all the dry ingredients together, add pumpkin, egg, and milk and place spoonfuls in the hot oil to fry until golden brown. • Take out and place on paper towel to soak up excess oil and then put in serving bowl and spoon some sauce over it. Start with the next batch until all is fried, throw the rest of the sauce over and serve warm. Remember this is a deed of love, take your time for the best results!


Alsatian Apple Pie Pierre Schnell, France

INGREDIENTS:

Dough 250 g. flour 125 g. butter pinch of salt 1 tbsp. sugar 1 egg

Our story

This pie brings back memories of my childhood when early autumn came and you would have to wear a sweater in the morning before the sun would warm up the day and we would have a tasty vegetable soup followed by the apple tart for lunch. With autumn being harvest season, as well as coming from Alsace, it reminds me of harvesting grapes at my uncle’s farm for wine making. I think that the smell of warm apples and cinnamon is heartwarming and brings back great memories.

water (50 ml.)

Garnish 6 beautiful apples (firm) 200 ml of 35% cream

INSTRUCTIONS:

1 egg

• Preheat oven to 425°F.

1 tbsp. maple syrup 1 bag vanilla sugar pinch of cinnamon (or more to taste)

• Prepare the dough by mixing all ingredients (the ball of dough must come off the bowl). Place in the fridge for 30 minutes. Cut the apples into 12 quarters. • Roll out the dough in a pie dish and arrange the apples on top in a circle. Sprinkle with cinnamon and bake for 20 minutes. • Mix the cream, egg, maple syrup, and vanilla sugar in a bowl. • After 20 minutes, take the tart out of the oven and pour the mixture over the apples. Bake for another 25 minutes at 425°F.

16

Global Community Cookbook

Laissez refroidir et dégustez.


Lamb Bunny Chow Nishana Ramsunder, Johannesburg, South Africa

Preparation time: Cooking time:

30 minutes

2 hours

INSTRUCTIONS: • Add olive oil/ghee to your pot and heat it up, add the mustard seeds and wait for it to pop (you will hear the sound). Add the cinnamon sticks, cardamom pods, bay leaves, and jeera seeds. Let this simmer for a minute or until you can smell the aroma of the spices.

Our story

A bunny chow is created when a delicious curry is placed in the hollowed-out center of half a loaf of bread. Bunny chow is a part of my hometown’s DNA. I grew up in Durban and come from a lineage of indentured laborers brought to South Africa from India in the 1860s to work in the sugar cane fields in the province now known as KwaZulu Natal. There are many different stories around the origin of the bunny chow, but my family knows it as having originated from the caste of Indian businessmen who sold the curry, “bania”, and the slang for food, “chow.” It was inexpensive to make and designed to be eaten with your hands, providing the community with an affordable and convenient meal. You will now find that there are various curries that you could buy in a bunny chow. A classic is the lamb bunny chow. My mum taught me the recipe for a lamb curry, and I have made it my own. I hope you enjoy my fourth-generation version!

INGREDIENTS:

2 tbsp. garam masala

Salad Ingredients

Lamb Curry

1 tbsp. of soomph (fennel) powder

2 medium carrots, grated

¼ cup olive oil or ghee

1 kg. lamb (leg pieces cut into smaller pieces)

1 thinly sliced small onion

• Add your lamb to the pot and mix well.

1 tsp. mustard seeds

a packet of curry leaves

• Add your grated tomatoes and the ½ of soomph powder and an additional 5 curry leaves. Leave the lamb to simmer for an hour, checking in frequently to stir it and add additional water should it require it.

2 cinnamon sticks

2 tbsp. of mixed garlic and ginger

2 finely sliced green chilies

• Add 6 curry leaves into the pot. Chop your onion and add this to the pot and let it cook until it browns. Add your mixed masala and garam masala and garlic and ginger to the pot. Give this a good stir. If it starts to touch add a little water.

• After an hour, peel and cut your potatoes and add them into the pot. Cook this until it is soft, adding water as appropriate. Once the potatoes are soft, chop coriander and add to the curry. • Cut the loaf of bread in half and scoop out the insides of the bread. Fill it with the lamb curry and garnish with chopped dhania. The traditional accompaniment to bunny chow is a simple carrot, onion, and chili salad.

1 onion, chopped

3 bay leaves 4 elachi (cardamom) pods 1 tsp. jeera (cumin) seeds ¾ cup mixed masala

3 grated tomatoes 4 potatoes a bunch of dhania (coriander) 1 loaf of unsliced bread (white bread is traditional)

Dressing 4 tbsp. of vinegar ¼ tsp. salt 1 tsp. sugar ¼ tsp. black pepper ½ tsp. olive oil

Mix well into the carrots and leave it to soak for an hour. Global Community Cookbook

17


Mopani Worms Stew or “Mashonzha” Hulisani Mukwevho, Johannesburg, South Africa

Preparation time: Cooking time:

10 minutes

30 minutes

INGREDIENTS: 250 g. Mopani worms 1 medium onion 2 medium tomatoes 5 ml. sunflower oil pinch of salt  1 diced chili

INSTRUCTIONS: • Boil dried Mopani worms until they are soft and tender, about 15 minutes. The water should be evaporated. If not, drain and then add oil and diced onions. Fry for a few minutes, then add tomatoes, salt, and chilies until a desired gravy is made. • Serve Mopani worms warm, with mielie meal pap. 18

Global Community Cookbook

Our story

The Mopani worms dish is a Venda heritage dish. It is very high in protein and an affordable source of nutrition. Mopani worms are healthy in nutrients and contain three times the amount of any protein. The dish originated in Limpopo where people would go to Mopani area to collect live worms from the Mopani trees and they dry them on site with fire, then bring them home. This dish is so important to me because my grandmother, who is now passed, taught me how to cook Mopani worms in the mid-1970s. Growing up in a previously disadvantaged community, Mopani worms would be a desired dish as we could not afford to eat meat daily. The day that we had Mopani worms were happy days, we would sing traditional songs, dance, and my grandmother “Gogo” would tell us old stories with all her grandchildren sitting around the fire/boma warming us up. These are my happy childhood memories.


Deboned Leg of Lamb Petro Britz, Johannesburg, South Africa

Preparation time: Cooking time:

15 minutes, plus 24 hours for marinating

1 1/2 - 2 hours

INGREDIENTS: 1 leg of lamb, deboned 500 ml. buttermilk 1 cup coarse salt 1 cup coarse pepper 2 tbsp. crushed garlic ¼ cup lemon juice ¼ cup honey ½ cup butter

Our story Because this is a very expensive cut of meat, it is something we only do on Christmas Day when we are together with our kids. I got this recipe years ago from a colleague at a year-end function.  Since then, this is something the whole family looks forward to, it is always a pleasure to see the kids keep coming back for more meat.  INSTRUCTIONS: • Marinate the leg of lamb for 24 hours in the buttermilk. If the buttermilk does not cover the lamb, just make sure you turn it every 8 hours, let it marinate in the fridge. • Take out leg of lamb, wipe clean with paper towel. Pack the salt and pepper all around the leg (thick layer).  • Make a basting sauce by melting butter and adding honey, garlic, and lemon juice. Braai leg of lamb on a hot fire, basting the lamb every time you turn it. Cook for 1.5 to 2 hours depending on how wellcooked you like your lamb. • Serve with salads or cooked veggies.

Global Community Cookbook

19


Biryani

Our story

Noura Alahmad, Abu Dhabi

Preparation time: Cooking time: Serves:

Growing up in the gulf region, I have seen how this simple dish brings people together across such a wide range of occasions–the dish is often served on large platters where the group gathers around to each take a piece.

1 hour

45 minutes

5

INGREDIENTS:

Tomatoes

Basmati rice

Cloves

Chicken

Bay leaves

Turmeric powder

Garlic

Black pepper

Ginger

Curry powder

Salt

Biryani spices

Vegetable oil

Coriander powder

Curry leaves

Cinnamon stick

Fresh mint

Cardamom pods

Fresh coriander

Onion

Red and orange food coloring

20

Global Community Cookbook

Biryani is a dish originating from the Indian sub-continent but has since been adopted into many of the different regional cultures, each adding their own twist to it and bringing their local flavor.

The dish is served at weddings, funerals, meetings, in private or business settings (biryani is a common occurrence even on the field during execution mandates to celebrate construction milestones!). I’ve since come to associate biryani, not only with a culture-wide symbol of traditional get-together, but also with a positive connotation of conversation, sharing, and social well-being. There are at least fifteen different variations of biryani and within each variation there are minor difference with quantities, cooking time, spices, and condiments. This specific recipe comes from our Emirati neighbors and is generally acknowledged to be the local flavor of biryani. Biryani is often cooked in large batches, and the specific method of cooking and spicing is something grandmothers, mothers, and cooks have in their mind, but never quantified exactly, which is why this recipe is a best effort.


INSTRUCTIONS:

Chicken preparation:

Assembly and layering:

Rice preparation:

• Wash the chicken.

• Soak the basmati rice for one hour.

• Cut it into smaller pieces (optional).

• At the bottom of a deep pot, add vegetable oil (just enough so that rice does not stick).

• Bring the water to a boil. In the pot of water, add:

• Marinate the chicken with half a teaspoon of each of the following:

• 1 stick of cinnamon • 7 cardamom pods • 5 cloves • 3 bay leaves • Salt, to taste • Vegetable oil • Add the drained basmati rice to the boiling water. • Cook the rice over medium to high heat until it is only half done (approximately 7 minutes). • Drain the rice and put it aside.

• Biryani spices • Turmeric • Black pepper • Curry • Coriander powder • Salt • Pan fry the chicken with vegetable oil, just until it starts turning red and put it aside.

• Before adding the half cooked white rice, drizzle on top of it a small teaspoon of: • Red food coloring powder • Orange food coloring powder • The rice and chicken will be layered in the pot in the following way: • Add a little bit of rice to cover the bottom of the pot • Add half the chicken and chicken mixture • Add the rest of the rice • Add fresh coriander on top (optional)

• Pan fry, with vegetable oil, 5 small chopped onions in another pan.

• Add 7 tablespoons of hot vegetable oil on top of the rice

• Once the onions become translucent, add the following:

• Cover the pot with aluminum foil and the pot cover

• 7 mashed cloves of garlic and ginger shavings (to taste) • 2 chopped tomatoes • Chicken (that was previously set aside)

• Keep it on low heat for 45 minutes • Garnish the biryani with roasted cashew nuts and fresh coriander and serve!

• Half a spoon each of the spices that were used to marinate the chicken • 9 curry leaves • 1 cup of boiling water • Chopped fresh mint (to taste) • Chopped fresh coriander (to taste) • Cover the pan and keep it for 20 minutes on low heat, stirring every 5 minutes. • Once the 20 minutes are over, add chili flakes, to taste. Global Community Cookbook

21


South America

South American cuisine has many influences as a result of the region’s ethnic fusion–a cultural cornucopia. It is a culture heavily rooted in sustainable practices and the use of the land. Native populations cultivated a wide variety of plants that have become staples in traditional dishes we’ve come to know today. Dominant flavors include hot peppers, salsas, maize, and root vegetables. But equally as important as the ingredients, part of South America’s culinary identity lies in the preparation of dishes. An example of this is asado–a ceremony of smoking meat–where friends and families come together to celebrate. Kitchens are recognized as a place of bonding where families often cook together and pass down culinary traditions from generation to generation. Whether it’s Argentinian empanadas or Chilean corn pies, South American dishes have garnered international fame owing to their bold flavors.

Did someone say ceviche? 22

Global Community Cookbook


Pandebono

Caterin Castro Arango, Medellìn, Colombia

Our story

INGREDIENTS: 250 g. salty cheese 125 g. yucca starch

During the time of conquest and colonization, the production of wheat flour was not enough to supply the demand for bread of the inhabitants of the different regions. This situation, combined with the tradition of the local natives in the cultivation of corn, yucca, or potato, motivated the inclusion of flours of different forms of starch, giving rise to Colombian doughs. The example we want to highlight is the pandebono, whose antecedents can effectively be traced from the first bread in times of conquest and whose main element is yucca or cassava which is said belonged to Indigenous cultures such as the Huitotos and the Tucanos. Pandebono is a typical example of Colombian cassava-based cuisine.

milk 30 g. cornstarch

INSTRUCTIONS:

15 g. white sugar

• Put the salty cheese in a mixer and mix it until it becomes soft in texture and behaves like a dough.

1 egg

• Add the cornstarch and the yucca starch to the mixer and mix until it has a blended consistency. • Take the egg and whisk it before adding it to the mix.

• Do a texture test by making a little ball that when you press down on with your finger, it does not show any crevices around the print. If it does, just add a little more milk. • Divide the dough in equal portions, approximately 50 g, and form little balls with each. • Place the pandebonos on a non-stick oven tray.

• Add the white sugar and blend well.

• Press down on each ball with a fork, leaving a fork print on the surface.

• Add milk, spoon by spoon, and mix until a consistent cream texture is obtained.

• Bake in the oven for 12 minutes, at 480°F.


Ceviche

Ovidio Ascencio, Peru

Our story INGREDIENTS: 1 1/2 lbs. any fresh white fish, salmon, or trout, boned, diced

Cebiche (ceviche) is a national dish of Peru. Originally created by fishermen as a way to eat part of their catch during long days at sea, cebiche uses the acid in lime juice to “cook” the fish. I use fresh boned salmon, cod, halibut, or trout to prepare the cebiche, but you can use other local fish of your preference.

1/2 small red onion, halved and slivered

INSTRUCTIONS:

3/4 cup lime juice

• Rinse diced fish in cold water and dry thoroughly. Note: it is recommended to use fresh fish, but if you have frozen fish it is recommended to defrost only in a bowl covered with water.

1 tsp. salt, plus additional salt for rinsing 1 habanero chile, seeded, halved, and thinly sliced (optional) 1 tbsp. ají amarillo sauce (optional) 1/2 cup cilantro leaves, chopped 1 orange sweet potato (such as Garnet or Jewel), boiled, peeled, and sliced 1 cob sweet corn, boiled and cut into 4 pieces 4 butter lettuce leaves

24

Global Community Cookbook

• Rinse slivered red onion in cold water with some salt and dry thoroughly. • In a large bowl, combine lime juice with salt. Then, add the fish first to marinate for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, add red onion, habanero (if using), and ají amarillo sauce (if using). Combine. • Just before serving, stir in cilantro. Divide between two bowls and serve with sweet potato, corn, and lettuce leaves on the side.

Peruvian pantry: Ají Amarillo is a yellow chile with a slightly sweet flavor and plenty of heat. Available in jars or as a puréed sauce at many Latin markets.


Puca Picante or Spicy Puka Kimberly Ludena, Lima, Peru

Preparation time: Cooking time: Serves:

40 minutes

70 minutes

4

INGREDIENTS: 1/2 kg. pork belly 1/2 kg. boiled potatoes bacon 1 medium onion, chopped 2 garlic cloves, chopped 1/4 cup of panca hot pepper sauce 50 g. ground peanuts 1/2 beet, cooked cumin, pepper, and salt, to taste mint

Our story

A must in Ayacucho kitchens for its simplicity and flavor. While traveling on the road to Ayacucho in the Andean heights, you will always find restaurants on the way that serve this delicious dish and even more if it is during Holy Week, the week between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. INSTRUCTIONS: • Cut the pork belly into small pieces and boil it for 30 minutes with some mint and salt. • Drain and set aside the meat pieces. Keep the broth. • Brown the bacon in oil (crackling/chicharrón style) and set aside the pieces. • Add the chopped onion, ground garlic, and the seasoning to the same oil, brown for 5 minutes and add the blended panca bell pepper sauce. • Blend the ½ beet, add it and cook for 5 minutes more. • Add the broth in which the pork was cooked, and the cooked potato cut into medium cubes. • Add the ground peanuts while mixing and let it boil for 5 more minutes. • Serve with rice and zarza onions (a mix of finely chopped purple onion, lime juice, chili, pepper, and salt) and sprinkle with chopped mint.

Global Community Cookbook

25


Patacones

Janeth Igarza, Lima, Peru

INGREDIENTS: 4 green plantains 1 cup vegetable oil 1 tsp. salt

Our story

The name patacón comes from various Colonial Era Spanish and Portuguese silver coins. In the north of Peru, where plantains are abundant and part of the daily diet, these are called patacones. They are usually eaten as an accompaniment for typical meat and fish dishes, similar to the role of bread, French fries, or rice in many Western dishes. This famous dish is made from the giant, green ones, popularly known as the mature ones that are most commonly consumed.

INSTRUCTIONS: • Cut the tips off the plantains and cut each into 2 or 3 pieces. Make a lengthwise slash on the skin and peel. Cut into 2-inch pieces. • Heat oil in a sauté pan over high heat. Precook the plantains, but do not let them color. You only want to partially cook them, about 2 minutes per side. Remove from the pan and drain on paper towels. Reserve oil. • With the bottom of a glass, a cup, or a cleaver, press every piece of plantain to make it almost flat. Do not break them. Put them aside at this point, at room temperature, and fry them hours later. • When ready to serve, reheat the oil and deep-fry the plantain slices until golden. Patacones should be crispy on the outside. Drain on paper towels, sprinkle with salt, and serve at once.

26

Global Community Cookbook


Peruvian Tamale or Tamal Criollo Patricia Olmedo, Lima, Peru

Preparation time: Cooking time:

40 minutes

2 hour

INGREDIENTS:

Filling

2 kg. white corn or ground corn for tamales

peanuts

1/2 kg. vegetable shortening

black olives chicken or pork Irish lace

1/2 tsp. of pepper

salt

4 tsp. panca hot peppers

Wrapping

100 g. annatto, whole and fried

thread

chicken and pork broth

The Peruvian tamale is a dish made from corn and has been known to exist since pre-Columbian times. It has a vast Afro-Peruvian and Peruvian highland legacy. Memories around the family kitchen as nighttime began, grinding the corn, preparing the dough and forming a production chain to wrap the tamales made this recipe become a family tradition.

boiled eggs

1/2 tsp. of cumin

50 g. of Irish lace

Our story

banana leaves INSTRUCTIONS: • For the dressing, heat the butter, add the panca hot pepper and pepper, annatto, cumin, Irish lace and salt to taste. Remove the Irish lace. • Pre-cook the ground corn with the chicken and pork broth while stirring constantly and mix with the dressing. • To assemble the tamale, place the banana leaf on the table, place the dough in the center, add the filling and close with the string. • Place the prepared tamales in a pot, placing more leaves at the bottom to avoid burning the tamales. Pour hot water until it covers the tamales and let it boil until the water is consumed (approximately 2 hours of boiling). • Serve with zarza onions (made of red onion, lemon, oil, ground chili pepper, parsley, and salt to taste). Global Community Cookbook

27


Pastel de Choclo or Corn Cake Nora Retamal Jofré, Santiago, Chile

Serves:

6

INGREDIENTS: 8 small onions 3/4 kg. of sirloin top or tip, or any other low-fat meat cut 100 g. raisins

Our story

I learned this traditional Chilean recipe from my mother when I was a child. I remember that the preparation of the corn pie was a family event, where everyone participated in its preparation; some chopped the onions, others prepared the meat, others set up the plates. But the heaviest work was carried out by those who prepared the cake, in those years the technology of today did not exist, and the corn had to be crushed by hand, using giant stone mortars, built especially for this purpose.

5 medium-sized corn cobs 1 large chicken breast, cooked and chopped 12 olives 3 hard-boiled eggs oregano, sugar, pepper, and salt, to taste 2 basil leaves

INSTRUCTIONS:

Pino: • Chop the onions into small squares and cook them in a pot with oil until they start to become translucent. In a separate pot, cook the meat, also chopped, with a little oil, until it is ready. Once ready, mix the onion with the meat, and add the raisins, a pinch of oregano, chili pepper to taste, and salt. Continue cooking until the meat is well cooked.

Corn Cake: • Slice the corn and put it through the blender, with two basil leaves. Then cook it in a pot, with sugar to taste, until it takes on a bright color. • The assembly of the cake is made in clay plates. In each one, place the pino, add two olives, half a hard-boiled egg, and a piece of chicken, and cover it with the corn pastry. Finally, sprinkle the cake with a little bit of sugar. • Put the plates to the oven at 350°F until pasty is golden. This can be done in a clay oven or a traditional oven. • The meal is best served with a good Chilean red wine.

28

Global Community Cookbook


Rocoto Relleno Estefani Choque, Lima, Peru

INSTRUCTIONS:

Rocoto Relleno:

Our story

If there is one food in the kitchen that makes us all afraid, it’s the “Rocoto.” This small fruit is so powerful that with just one bite, it makes you cry. However, in Arequipa, the brave and creative cooks came to dominate it and now it is one of the main tourist attractions. Behind a Rocoto Relleno, is the strength of a country.

INGREDIENTS:

1/4 tsp. sugar

Potato Gratin

Rocoto Relleno

2 tbsp. peanuts, toasted and ground

2 lbs. waxy potatoes, boiled, peeled, and sliced into thick pieces

10 rocotos 1/2 cup sugar 1/3 cup vegetable oil 6 tbsp. aji panca paste 1 lb. Sirloin tips, finely cut into small squares 2 bay leaves 2 lbs. red onions, diced

1/2 tsp. dried oregano

1 tbsp. black raisins

8 oz. queso fresco (fresh white cheese) in thick slices

7 eggs

1 tsp. aniseed

5 black olives, seeded

1 can unsweetened evaporated milk salt and pepper, to taste

• To tame the heat of the rocotos, cut the top of each one and using a spoon scrape the seeds and ribs from the inside. Be very careful, it is wise to use gloves to protect your hands and wash them well when you finish. DO NOT touch your eyes! • Put the rocotos in a saucepan with water to cover, a tablespoon of sugar, bring to a boil, turn off the heat, discard the water. Add more fresh water and repeat this operation three times. Drain and cool the rocotos. Reserve. • Meanwhile, in a saucepan over high heat, warm the oil, add the aji panca paste, beef, and bay leaves. When cooked, add the onion, ¼ teaspoon sugar, salt, and pepper. • Add the oregano, olives, hard-boiled eggs, parsley, raisins, salt, and pepper. • Fill the rocotos with this mixture. Accommodate in a rectangular or square pyrex or baking pan. • In a bowl, beat one egg with one can of evaporated milk, salt and pepper, and pour over the rocotos. • Beat two eggs until very thick and put a tablespoon over each rocoto. Then cover with the reserved tops. • Bake for 35 minutes at 350°F. Serve with the potato gratin.

Potato Gratin: • Butter a baking pan or a pyrex, make one layer of potato slices, cover with queso fresco and a sprinkling of aniseed. Repeat three times. • In a bowl, whip the four eggs until very thick, add evaporated milk, salt, and pepper. Pour over the potatoes and cheese. • Bake at 350°F oven until golden and thick. Global Community Cookbook

29


Spicy Guinea Pig with Potatoes or Picante de Cuy con Papas​ Karina Chavez, Lima, Peru

INSTRUCTIONS:

Our story

It is a typical dish from Cajamarca, located in the northern highlands of Peru. It is closely related to the popular festivities of this region. It is necessary to mention that guinea pig meat is a valuable source of protein and considered superior to other meats.

Guinea Pig: • Wash the guinea pig and season with salt only. • Rub the outside of the guinea pig with lemon; this allows it to be a little crispier at the time of frying. • Fry the guinea pig in a pan with 1 cup of oil for 5 minutes and then turn it over to let it fry for 5 more minutes.

INGREDIENTS: 1 guinea pig, gutted

Potatoes:

1 kg. potatoes, boiled

• In a frying pan, put the leftover oil from frying the guinea pig and 1 teaspoon of ground garlic, and let it brown.

boiled potato broth 1 cup oil 1/4 kg. ground panca hot pepper 1 tsp. ground garlic 1 lemon

• When the ground garlic is golden, add 1/4 kg. of ground panca hot pepper. When it turns golden, add salt, the broth in which the potatoes were boiled, and 1 kg. of boiled potatoes. Mix it and let it boil for 4 minutes.

salt, to taste 1 onion

Salad:

a pinch of peppermint

• Cut the onion into long pieces and rinse it with a little bit of salt to avoid a very strong taste. • Add peppermint, lemon, and a few drops of oil. Mix.

30

Global Community Cookbook


Australasia

Australasia offers a unique blend of culinary contributions due to its vast immigration and resulting integration of cultures from around the world, including a diverse Aboriginal demographic and Asian influences. The region is vibrant in its diversity, identifying with almost three-hundred different ancestries. The region’s history comes through in its outlook and treatment of food. Native botanicals are incorporated into everyday dishes, underlining high respect for the planet’s natural resources. It is a region that celebrates the values and heritage of Aboriginal communities, drawing inspiration from the stories behind them. Australia is a nation of migrants. In fact, more than one in four Australians was born overseas, adding diversity to not only the country, but to the cookbooks that you’ll find on household shelves.

Global Community Cookbook

31


Bush Tomato Damper Fransie Bloem, Brisbane, Australia

Our story

Damper is a traditional Australian soda bread, historically prepared by early Australians and travelers. Over twenty years ago, my family and I moved to Australia from South Africa. We were in a new country and finding our footing between a mixture of our deep South African culture and the refreshing Australian culture. INGREDIENTS: 3 cups self-rising flour, plus ¼ cup extra to dust the surface 1 cup powdered milk 200 ml. The Dilly Bag Bush tomato relish (or any other relish of choice)

It was not long until we found damper, or more to the point, damper found us. Sitting amongst the gumtrees where the koalas can be heard in the distance, we were introduced to this traditional Aussie dish. Something so simple to compliment a barbecue, or as the South Africans call it, braai. This freshly homemade bread has now become a must, as we seldom braai without it on the side. It is something that says, “you’re home now.” INSTRUCTIONS: • Sift dry ingredients and add the relish and soda water if you need it.

1/2 cup soda water

• Very quickly combine and dust surface with extra flour and knead.

bit of butter

• Cut into 10 and individually roll into 10 balls. • Rub butter on top of each ball. • Bake in a moderate to hot oven for 10 minutes or until brown.


Bush Dukkah

Dale Chapman, Queensland, Australia

INGREDIENTS: 2 tbsp. sunflower seeds 2 cups Macadamia nuts 1 tbsp. anise myrtle  3 tbsp. coriander seeds 1/4 cup pepitas

3 tbsp. sesame seeds (white)  1 tbsp. cumin  1 tbsp. sweet paprika 1 1/2 tsp. salt and pepper, to taste 3 tbsp. Macadamia nut oil

Aunty Dale Chapman founded her business, My Dilly Bag, to celebrate the Australian Aboriginal culture through sharing delicious Australian native foods, yarning, and traditional knowledge. My Dilly Bag works sustainably with Aboriginal communities by providing a platform to develop, market, and distribute Aboriginal products, empowering communities to maintain their traditions, creating new income streams, and celebrating culture.

Our story

Thoughtful agriculture and land management enabled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples to survive for millennia. Aunty Dale Chapman works sustainably with Aboriginal communities and non-Indigenous farmers to create an ethical supply chain of native produce such as anise myrtle and Tasmanian pepper used in this dukkah recipe. There are six native myrtle plants in Australia that Dale uses regularly including cinnamon, lemon, rose, curry, honey, and anise myrtle. Anise myrtle tastes like black licorice. Contemporary uses include marinades, ice cream, beverages, and confectionary. Tasmanian pepper has warm peppery, sweet, and delicate notes with a hint of eucalyptus flavor. Dale and her family are developing new innovative ways to sort the leaves from the corns of this delicious pepper. Traditionally, Aboriginal people would sit and yarn (chat) while sorting through as this manual task takes a considerable amount of time. INSTRUCTIONS: • Gently roast the Macadamia nuts and sunflower seeds in a pan, on a low heat until toasted. Set aside.  • In the same pan, slowly roast the sesame seeds, coriander seeds, and cumin seeds until toasted and aromatic.  • Place Macadamia, sunflower, sesame, coriander, cumin, and anise myrtle into blender and pulse. Do not over-blend, leave chunky!  • Add Macadamia nut oil to the pan. Heat gently. Add all the other ingredients to the pan and heat gently.

Chef’s note: Alternatively, you can leave it dry with no oil. Leave to cool and keep stored in a glass jar.

Global Community Cookbook

33


Bunya Nut Pesto Dale Chapman, Queensland, Australia

INGREDIENTS:

Bunya Nut Pesto 50 g. basil leaves 1 cup cooked Bunya nuts, chopped 1 clove garlic 1 cup olive oil, plus extra 2 tbsp. oil 2 tbsp. parmesan cheese salt and pepper, to taste

Creamy Bunya Pasta 200 g. cooked pasta of your choice 4 tbsp. of Bunya nut pesto (above) 100 ml. cream 1/4 cup wine

34

Global Community Cookbook

Our story

The pinecones of the Bunya Pine contain many nutritious kernels which are high in protein. They taste like chestnuts or potatoes, so are referred to locally as nuts. Aunty Dale Chapman resides in Gubbi Gubbi Country which is where Aboriginal people gather to celebrate the harvest of Bunya pinecones and have done so for thousands of years. The festival would attract tribes from all states and territories of Australia to celebrate the abundance of food and opportunity to exchange knowledge and goods. People would travel for months to take part in the festivities. The traditional process of harvesting the cones was to use a lawyer cane. The harvester would use the vine to climb the tree and knock down the cones. Fresh cones straight off the tree are sweeter than those that drop naturally. Dale’s family and many other Indigenous families have enjoyed this ancient nut as a cherished ingredient in many dishes.

INSTRUCTIONS:

For the pesto: • Remove Bunya nuts from shell and cook for 20 minutes in hot water until tender, refresh in cold water, and set aside to cool nuts. When cool, place in food processor and granulate until it is the texture of couscous. • In a blender, blend basil and garlic with oil. • Add Bunya nuts and blend for 6 seconds. • Add grated parmesan cheese, salt, and pepper to taste.

For the pasta: • In a large pan add pesto, wine, and cream. • Add cooked pasta and toss to coat the pasta with the creamy pesto sauce. • Serve with hot damper and Macadamia nut butter.


Coat of Arms Pie with Bunya Nuts Dale Chapman, Queensland, Australia

Did you know?

Emu and kangaroo are on the coat of arms of Australia because both animals can only move forward, representing a progressive country. For Aunty Dale, the emu is her family totem, from her grandfather’s side. This totem represents pride, self-control, honor, peace, harmony, and respect. It is one of the Australian Indigenous astrological star constellations which spiritually connects the waterways. When Dale was growing up, she had kangaroos and wallabies as pets. One of Dale’s pet kangaroos would sneak into the kitchen, rock back and forth on his big tail and reach for the family’s loaf of bread. He then would get his co-conspirator, Wendy the wallaroo, and she would stuff it in her pouch to eat later.  Dale now uses kangaroo meat for her events, sourced from the only Indigenous-owned avetour in Australia. INGREDIENTS:

Native Spice Mix:

1 sheet ready rolled puff pastry

2 tbsp. ground lemon myrtle

200 g. kangaroo meat

20 g. of whole bush tomatoes

200 g. emu leg meat

2 tbsp. of Dorrigo pepper

1 cup raw Bunya nuts, chopped in half

6 anise myrtle leaves

INSTRUCTIONS: • Dice the meat into ½ inch cubes. Roll the meat in the native spice blend with 50 ml. of oil. Heat your pot or grill plate until it is very hot, then brown off the meat and spices. • Drain off any liquid and keep it for the sauce. Place meat in a separate bowl. • Place the vegetables and the Bunya nuts into the pot and sauté for a few minutes. • Add the meat to the vegetables in the pot. Add the tomato relish or salsa and the leftover juice.

2 potatoes

4 tangy ironbark leaves (or 2 bay leaves)

2 carrots

2 tbsp. of curry powder

• If using a pressure cooker, bring t low heat for 1½ hours or if baking in the oven, cover over with foil and leave to braise for 2½ hours or until meat is tender.

1 stick of celery, diced

3 tbsp. instant gravy powder

• When meat mixture is tender, place in a ramekin and top with puff pastry.

500 ml. tomato relish or salsa

Mix all the spices together.

• Return to the oven until golden brown. Global Community Cookbook

35


Warrigal and Spinach Feta Pie Dale Chapman, Queensland, Australia

INSTRUCTIONS: • Preheat oven to 350°F.

INGREDIENTS:

½ cup chopped fresh parsley

• Lightly oil a 9x9 inch square baking pan.

3 tbsp. olive oil

2 eggs, lightly beaten

• Heat 3 tbsp. olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat.

1 large onion, chopped

½ cup ricotta cheese

1 bunch green onions, chopped

1 cup crumbled feta cheese

2 cloves garlic, minced

8 sheets filo pastry

• Stir in spinach, Warrigal greens, and parsley, and continue to sauté until spinach is limp, about 2 minutes.

500 g. spinach, rinsed and chopped

¼ cup olive oil

• Remove from heat and set aside to cool.

500 g. Warrigal greens, blanched and squeezed (important)

Our story

Warrigal greens are Australia’s native spinach. The plant tolerates most types of soils and can be found in the hinterland or on the beach. Its name comes from the Wiradjuri word for “dog” as its seed resembles little puppy heads. It has a distinctive hardy triangle-shaped leaf and makes an excellent spinach substitute. It was among the first native plants to be recognized for its food potential by Europeans. Captain Cook fed it to his crew to prevent scurvy. While it does contain soluble oxalates like spinach, this can easily be removed by steaming or blanching the leaves and discarding the water. With this technique, Warrigal greens provided critical nutrition and saved many lives. Aunty Dale Chapman grows Warrigal greens in her garden, which is able to be harvested all year round. Due to its adaptability to grow in all environments, this has been a staple vegetable for families across Australia for thousands of years.

• Sauté onion, green onions and garlic, until soft and lightly browned.

• In a medium bowl, mix together eggs, ricotta, and feta. Stir in spinach mixture. • Lay one sheet of filo pastry in prepared baking pan, and brush lightly with olive oil. Lay another sheet of filo pastry on top. • Brush with olive oil, and repeat process with two more sheets of filo. The sheets will overlap the pan. • Spread spinach and cheese mixture into pan and fold overhanging dough over filling. • Brush with oil, then layer remaining four sheets of filo pastry, brushing each with oil. • Tuck overhanging dough into pan to seal filling. • Bake in preheated oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until golden brown. • Cut into squares and serve while hot.

Chef’s note: Lightly blanch the Warrigal green leaves for 3 minutes to remove oxalates. Drain and refresh in cold water to retain the green color, squeeze well, and follow recipe. If you have excess Warrigal greens growing in your garden, you can process as above and freeze in ice cubes for easy use. 36

Global Community Cookbook


Thank you for sharing your story with us! We would like to express our sincerest appreciation to all the individuals who provided recipes, shared their stories, opened their kitchens, and helped in any way to support the creation of this publication. We hope this collaboration of cuisine and culture inspires you to learn more about the unique heritage, traditions, and diversity of our global neighbors.


Profile for HatchGlobal

Global Community Cookbook: Celebrating Cultural and Culinary Diversity  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded