Issuu on Google+

#PHOTOGRAPHY The online photography magazine

17


issue 17 Curated by Genea Bailey and Daisy Ware-Jarrett


inside this issue... Taner Tumkaya

Robyn Tenniel

10

6

Superultraextra

Lars Plessentin

Michael Behlen

22

Clara Turchi Rose

ANA SANTOS

30

Etienne ClĂŠment

40

Rachel Woroner

34

Book review; Laura Lafon

46

Aimee newmarch

58

18

54

Andrew Mellor

66

72


Kyler Zeleny & Yanina

on the cover: Yonca KarakaĹ&#x;

76

Emily Porter

Natalie Kaplan

82

Justyna Procak

96

Carmen Rodriguez

Weronika Saran

100

NIGONOGRAPHY

108

al brydon

104

Kevin Novales

112

Marie-Laure S. Louis

122

90

116

photographers index

128

128


6

Robyn Tenniel PAINT IT WITH DESIRE


I went to Paris to study photography; it was in this city that I discovered the meaning of the words: fasion, style, colour and bodies. So I try to work with these words my daily, creating sometimes colorful and sometimes dark universes, always with bodies to push the limit between the nude and fashion. This project is the perfect example of my vision of fashion. The body becomes a style effect, something inanimate with seams, curves and colors.


10

Taner

Tumkaya Domestics

I’ve always escaped making statements and positioning myself. I believe that art embodies its own disappearance and that the artist himself is his own work. So I hope this rings a bell. For this series I worked with artist Kira Doutt, who can do make-up, rather than working with a “make-up artist”. During our preparation and discussions about the project the word “Domestic” was used a lot and I picked it as the title of the project.


18

Text


Lars Plessentin OM I have a deep interest in the opposing poles of naturally originated and artificially created structures. For that reason, I dedicated my work to analogue photography of landscapes and still lives with an artificial twist for many years. In my series entitled OM, I’d like to create new images of landscapes through radical – mostly technical – interventions into the development of photographic images. My goal is to show landscapes that challenge the imagination of the viewer by their associative and suggestive potential.


22

Superultraextra

art-duo Patryk Hadas and Eva Bold Criss-cross We’re an art-duo from generation of SUPER offers, ULTRA promotions and EXTRA sales. We’re fascinated with the visual language of commercials and mass-media related influences. We seek an ocean of imperfect dreams about perfect life. We want to find a place for ourselves in this sugar puddle, by creating our own “super-ultra-extra” world. Fruits packed in a mesh bag, on the supermarket shelf look better, fresher. Imperfections are hidden under colourful plastic packaging. Natural beauty is emphasized by unnatural cover – doesn’t it sound foolish?


30

Michael Behlen Drought City

Getting lost isn’t something that you can easily accomplish in today’s modern world. The constant bombardment of smart phones, computers, radio, and the like distract us from living our everyday life. I am not immune from the role electronic media plays in modern society.


I can however, control when I expose myself to it. To me that means searching for stillness in activities and pastimes that doesn’t involve a screen. I shoot instant film as my sole outlit to escape from the outside world.


I live in the Fresno, California, where the heart of the drought is happening. In 2013, we experienced the driest year on record for the state since the start of record-keeping keeping in 1895. With dwindling water supplies and inadequate conservation, we are in the start of a 1930’s dust bowl situation. Political blame is rampant on both sides of the  political spectrum including policies ranging from farmer’s wasting and using to much of our resources to environmentalists attempting to save certain fish. Though both parties are attempting to correct the  problem, the gridlock from opposing approaches is not making the  situation any easier.  Starting in 2014, I have been visiting the three surrounding reservoirs to document their lowering water levels. I decided I would start capturing these places with falling water levels in hopes of persevering their beauty. I settled on Expired Polaroid Type 669 Film for this project due to the blue cast it gives after being developed. It helped to compliment where the  water used to be and give us a feeling of hope. But with hope, comes sometimes a sense of the unknown.


34

ANA SANTOS Chämeleonidae 

I’m interested in questioning and reflecting on emotional limits as well as the indistinct boundaries and multiple polarities that delimit the reality of the human being in the environment he inhabits through aesthetic photographic experiences.      I pursue beauty through the solemnity of geometrical shapes. I take the synergy of the human body, space, the female figure and multiple identities as my conceptual base. 


40

Clara Turchi Rose Ashes


I understand the art-work as a biological organism, as an entity capable of response to stimuli, reproduction, growth and development, a system that is able of expansion and contraction, and that can cross borders (for example with biology, sociology, psychology etc) and share processes of production of knowledge that not necessarily are documentary or interpretative. Ashes is an open collection of found images which are the battleground of my artistic research on both the ontology and the aesthetics of the document, of memory and history. They are created by adding scraped-off photographic surface from other photographs (sometimes liquefied) onto vintage images to compose further imaginaries.


46

Etienne ClĂŠment


I build up stories combining either solid and verified historical events or mythological/biblical themes and outright pure invention. The outcome, a new story where the fact/fiction boundaries are blurred. My work investigates the legendary, creating narratives that are never being entirely believed by the viewer, but also never being resolutely doubted.


54

You Could Even Die For Not Being A Real Couple

An interview with Laura Lafon

A photo book about forbidden love, lost love in Kurdistan. Written by Lisa Gillies


Laura Lafon has taken on the task of asking questions about the topic of love. With her new book, ‘You could even die for not being a real couple’. Laura explores the boundaries of relationships and how they are perceived in other cultures. On her quest for answers, she finds forbidding notions of love and the way history has affected love in Kurdistan. Hi Laura, tell us a little bit about yourself, how you got into photography and what inspired you to do so? I am 27 and currently living in Brussels. I studied political sciences before practising photography and the topics I studied inclined themselves towards photography. I’m particularly interested in social and political issues like gender and culture. You’ve mentioned that you have a background in politics. How did you transition from that to photography and why? At first I wanted to be a journalist, that’s why I studied politics but I found that in documentary photography there was room to have more freedom and creativity. Times are also different and it is more

accepted that subjectivity is part of the work in photography. So does your political background influence your work? Totally. I am still really interested in political and social issues as I did quite a lot of sociology. I’m more interested in the connection between people and politics rather than politics themselves. Your work takes on a documentary style format of this quest for love. Have you taken inspiration from other photographers working in this style? I’ve been inspired by Alessandra Sanguinetti, Sergey Chilikov and Françoise Huguier but perhaps subconsciously as I feel my work is stylistically different to theirs! The topic of love is often looked into but yours takes a different look at the idea of forbidden love. Why does this intrigue you so much? When I arrived at first I began with just asking people about love with a simple question: What is love? I was surprised with the answers I received, espe-


cially when young people began talking to me about this forbidden love that was occurring. What led you to the personal decision to include self portraits of you and your partner in this series? As I was travelling with Martin Gallone, a sort of ‘friend with benefits’, the way we represented ourselves started to get questioned by other people. What was the relation we had to each other? Were we brother and sister? Were we married? Our relationship was really innocent and naïve at first when I decided to take self portraits of us. It was funny to pretend being together, but then we started to become the work and perform the real couple people there wanted us to be. Lets delve into about the significance of Kurdistan being the setting for this project? Are there any other countries you think this project may have worked? I wanted to represent the Kurdish people who are one of the biggest populations that live without a proper territory. They are divided into four countries (Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria) and have had to face oppression and massacre for many decades. In a fight for freedom and independence, the Kurdish people have integrated women’s rights struggles, considering that the patriarchy system cannot be compatible with their fight. We used to listen subjects from Middle-East dealing with terrible women’s rights situations so I was wondering how these Kurdish ideals of freedom and gender equality could exist within a territory marked by conservatism and strong patriarchal relations. I think this could easily be reproduced in other countries that face similar issues. During the process of creating this series, what made you choose the photobook format? As I work in analogue I discovered my images whilst scanning the films and realised then that it would work as a book. There were a lot of different languages in the corpus, mixing portraits, street photography, mise en scene etc. I started to mix them and the idea of a book came quickly to bring the story alive. You can see reference to a storybook, a travel diary or even a mani-

fest, it doesn’t seem to be one solid piece. The photobook also allows you to own an entire art project at home. Where there any obstacles you had to overcome photographing this series? When I was travelling there I was quickly confronted with forbidden situations that actually happened: unmarried couples meeting secretly at night, lonely girls walking on the streets, and so I decided to reproduce those situations. I had to face fear and restraint’s from people there accepting to reproduce them.

I’m more interested in the connection between people and politics rather than politics themselves.

“”

So what’s next for the future of your work after this series is completed? My book is now self-published thanks to Crowdbooks. I am hoping it will be well accepted by the public. Now I am working on a new project about Tales & Legends from the Mediterranean. The starting point of this project is to take the Mediterranean as a larger territory rather than a boarder, mixing myths and urban legends from different parts of the territory showing unity. I hope to re-enchant the demystification of the world. Thanks for talking to us Laura!

Lauras book was made viable by crowdfunding and is now available to buy online for €50 Check out more of Lauras work at

www.lauralafon.com


58

Rachel Woroner Emanu (Our Mother)

Through my lens-based practice, I examine matrilineal relationships within my family as they entwine with my heritage and ancestral affiliations. I work with cultural identity, and spirituality, developed through my own experiences, and the experiences of both of my grandmothers. Through photography I strive to gain an understanding of heredity, tradition, and identity. Drawing from the story of the biblical matriarch, Emanu explores the artist’s relationship with Judaism and gender. The story of matriarchal namesake servesas the backdrop for Emanu and allows the celebration of women spheres while examining ritual and religion, identity and spirituality, through the female form and a feminist lens.


66

Aimee Newmarch Eden

My work is about striving to capture the timeless beauty of the surrounding landscape through creative practice. Much of my practice finds inspiration in the portrayal of our relationship with the natural world. Eden is a photographic project aiming to depict the continuous alteration and deconstruction of the natural landscape through the manipulation of landscape scenes.The work considers the way in which we continue to manipulate and reconstruct nature, with the aid of artificial resources, to establish a working coexistence.


72

Andrew Mellor On the Fringe

My photography explores natural and man-made environments and the interaction between the two with concerns over how we use the landscape and the social and political issues surrounding it. Often exploring change and human impact. I am drawn to ordinary places, seeking to find interest in everyday spaces. Prior to the arrival of the tourist industry, the population of Benidorm numbered only 3,000 and its main economy was fishing. In the early 1950s the industry started declining. Faced with an economic struggle the town council approved the ‘Plan General de Ordinacion’, employing all the towns resources into tourism. A mass building programme was orchestrated to accommodate for the influx of visitors.


Tourism was the path to development yet it also contains the danger that development, will destroy the very thing people have come to enjoy. With tourism, it is not clear whether rapid development is in the locals’ economic interest. The proliferation of all-inclusive hotels has been the subject of much debate over the years with local businesses struggling to keep afloat. The infamous catchphrase “if you want to get pissed” show us your wrist certainly rings true, with the reasoning that if they have already paid why go out. “The fundamental characteristic of tourist activity is to look upon particular objects or landscapes which are different from the tourist’s everyday experiences” (Gaffey 2004). This series represents the possible effect the all-inclusive package holiday can have on a place whose reliance is almost solely on tourism. In reality, the social relations surrounding tourism are complex and must be negotiated, contested, and resisted. “Our experience of any landscape through the senses is inseparable from the social and psychological context of the experience” (Sopher 1979).


Georgia Georgia

Kyler Zeleny & Yanina

76

Georgia Georgia is an experimental collaboration between Canadian photographerresearcher Kyler Zeleny and Russian photographer Yanina Shevcheko. As a conceptual project, it aims to challenge the viewer’s understanding of place and placelessness, explored through the photographers’ collective approach as they photograph two vastly different spaces.


82

on the cover Yonca KarakaĹ&#x;


STAR CHILD - HYPERANTHROPOS


I studied photography and video art at Yıldız Technical University in İstanbul. As a rising emerging artist, I exhibited my artworks in art fair and Pg Art Gallery. I live and work in İstanbul, Turkey. Hyperanthropos “master race” is the next step on human evolution. Nietzsche in ubermench philosophy which Nazism misinterpreted as physically pure race, advocates that evolution of men should be completed in knowledge and moral wise. In his book “thus spoke zarathustra” Nietzsche defining the human as a strained string between an animal and superior human; says the human kind should constantly go beyond oneself to become closer to superior human. For a person to go beyond oneself, first he should accept the notion of human is a situation that has to be exceeded. Nietzsche sees that period between animal and superior human as a bridge to the superior human while looking down on the concept of human.


90

Natalie Kaplan Diss Placemat

I like to play games with what I see.  If I notice objects or things, sometimes people  that I like, I reorder them and then I document the new order.


96

Emily Porter Silhouettes

I’m a traveling photographer who was born and raised in Milwaukee, WI. My work has been printed in multiple publications including Esquire Russia and This Very Instant as well as exhibited in Australia, London, New York among others. I graduated from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. Travel. Cats. Coffee. Film. Books. In this project I was exploring the idea of the figure and how it correlates with figures in nature.


100

Justyna Procak Fairy in mysterious forest

As a designer I love to make women to look feminine and beautiful without wearing heavy gowns. My inspirations were natural textures, raw edges. The Silk Chiffon texture created unique detail, very natural, so when the model wore the dress in the forest, it almost looked like she belonged there. Our photoshoot took place in London forest back in January, basking in natural day light. The entire idea was formulated by our talented photographer, Justyna Procak. She saw this Silk Chiffon couture dress and a concept for a shoot was instantly born. “Fairy in mysterious forest�. The movement of Silk fabric created a surreal image of a flying fairy.


Model: Ruta Jankauskaskaite Designer: Monika Dolna


104

Weronika Saran Insomnia

Absence


Illness


trapped


dreaming

For me photography is a way of feeling, a perfect vehicle for separating yourself from the madness of the contemporary world. I treat each photograph as an enigma that can be solved in very different ways. For me photography does not exist to be admired, but to convey the unexplainable. Insomnia has been inspired by Ingmar Bergman’s Wild Strawberries. Dreams and memories accompany the main character during his journey into the menacing and puzzling world allowing him to once again experience his life from different perspective. Insomnia is a story about repressed memory and suffering of the young woman.


108


Carmen Rodriguez South Korea in Film

People fascinate me, from our individual nuances to the dynamics of communities we live in. My work is heavily inspired by patterns and routines within the mundane of everyday life. Although I work as a visual journalist in Brooklyn, New York now, I spent a year in South Korea shooting medium format film. As a photographer I aim to highlight cultures, and document our differences all the while celebrating all the ways in which we are all similar. Korea in Film is a project I started shortly after moving from Miami to South Korea. Shot on a Welta Welter with a 2.8 Tessar, I aimed to show snippets of everyday life and highlight qualities common to all of us such as friendship, consumerism, culture, and societal values.


112

NIGONOGRAPHY Magic of Film Photography

Initially the development of the technique I use to create my works came to me as a result of my persistent fascination with light. About 4 years ago I first started experimenting with laser and pieces of geometrically deformed cast glass in a small and entirely dark room. The results were mesmerizing; the room and all the objects in it basically disappeared into oblivion, and alive came a giant ghost made of light. The creature filled the space with its forms and mystical transformations. The slightest movement or change of angle where the laser hits the glass would entirely change the forms and shapes the light transforms into. Those experiments led me to the idea of creating images of figurative shapes where the figure itself disappears and what would be left is the symbolic image of the figure in light.


Gradually the laser was replaced by light and the tools I work with were adapted and “reinvented�, so I could achieve the desired results and create linear graphic images of bodies and objects. I suppose that my understanding of forms and proportions gained in a lifetime of work as a sculptor added to the mix and played an essential role in implementing my ideas. The choice of working with analogue technology is easily explained by my passion for antique analogue cameras, which I have been collecting since my early childhood. At no stage of the process do I employ any kind of digital technology, meaning that the images are purely analogue, taken with mid-format cameras (Hasselblad 501C, Hasselblad 501CM) and no kind of retouching with Photoshop is used afterwards. I personally like to think of my work as a symbiosis of figurative shapes, graphic illustrations and the photographic portrayal of their interaction.


116

Text


Book review:

‘Fear Of Missing Out V.II’ Reviewed by Chloe Parker

In an age where we have to “check in” on Facebook to prove going to the gym, where likes determine how successful an image is on Instagram and where filters on Snapchat have to be chosen carefully as they determine which stereotype you fall into, ‘Fear of missing out V.II’ has never been so important. Kevin Novales has created a second volume of his zine collection, expanding further on documenting our need to record and share every minute of our lives. Shooting on his Leica M6, Kevin Novales photographs have a faded, effortless appeal to them, all documenting his American life. Based in San Fernando Valley, the creator of Sleep Talk, Novales, surrounds himself with his love of zines as well as taking intriguing, tumblresque imagery. ‘Fear of Missing Out’ is a twenty-nine paged fanzine that contains images of people fixated with their mobile phones. There is no doubt that this is not just a simple concept, you suddenly begin to get annoyed, shouting at the anonymous people to look up from their phones into the real world. Yet we have all been guilty of this, and that’s the iconic thing. We are so obsessed with showing others whilst also trying to record our memories, but in actual fact our digital devices may diminish and affect these memories. Recording a concert is almost part of the concert experience itself, its second nature. Novales has drawn upon an important yet everyday encounter that our generation is in the midst of. The use of the unknown is used fully by Novales. We only see the backs of heads, none of the recordings from people of the night and we also do not get to see what or who the performance is at all. It makes you question how much these people really are aware of the event. The use of it being a zine and in monochrome helps us to comprehend the shear mass of images taken at every event, all generic yet each having some personal meaning. It also has a disposable feel to it, zines were originally handmade and expect to be thrown away, and perhaps Novales wants to show us the unimportant obsession of recording the night.


an interview with

Kevin Novales By Chloe Parker

‪#‎PHOTOGRAPHY‬ Magazine speaks to Kevin Novales, photographer, creator of zines and founder of Sleep Talk Press.

at a music festival. I was documenting how silly it was to be so far away from the stage but people constantly trying to get a great shot. Then spending the remainder of the set staring at their phone screens and constantly scrolling. Capturing these moments helped me document the festival going experience. It helped me view and understand that itching feeling you get when you haven’t shared anything on social media in the last two minutes. This is the second volume of ‘Fear of Missing Out’. How does this volume expand on from the first edition?

Can you please introduce yourself, who you are, where you’re from and what do you do? Hello! My full name is Kevin Daniel Novales. I’m a 28 year-old first generation Latino born in East L.A. Located and raised in the suburban sprawl of the San Fernando Valley. I work a 9-5 job in an archiving facility, dealing with videotape media. I take photos, buy books and create zines on my spare time. So how did your relationship with photography begin? It started when I failed to get into a film production program. I had an extra elective to take and so I decided on the easiest class, Intro to Photography. At that point the class was still an analogue based class. All the assignments had to be shot using slide film. I borrowed a Canon AE-1 and that was the camera started that started everything. What is ‘Fear of Missing Out’ and what are the purposes and your intentions for this body of work? Fear of Missing Out is a photozine of audience members taking photos of bands while on stage

I only had planned to make one zine but after seeing a girl holding two phones, I decided that was the cover and I needed to immediately start working on a second issue. The setting changed from a festival to smaller intimate venues. I thought people would be less inclined to be on their phones but I was completely wrong. Every time I went to a show I had a sea of phones in front of me. I kept finding myself watching the shows through the phone screens. It became so annoying that I decided to start documenting my experience again. I made a set of rules, if you lifted your phone more then twice or if you’re flash went off I would take your photo. The second volume is a continuation of the first with the added rules. I think you need to let people take at least one photo or video. Your love for zines is undeniable, but is there any reason why you decided to choose a zine format specifically for ‘Fear of Missing out V.II’? It seemed to be the best way of presenting the collection of photos. I had already made the first on into a zine; issue two would have to be made the same way. I could’ve posted them online but they would’ve been lost in the feed. I also wanted to make the second issue better then the first. I had people excited to see I had made a second issue they could pick up.


“I have noticed a slight pushback”


The zine format also helps me with editing down the selection of photos. I believe you have to selfedit all your work and making zines has helped me improve my editing skills. I also felt like I completely understood how to make zines and I need a new project to pick up. Having a photozine to flip through is nicer then viewing photos on a computer screen. The reach is smaller but handing over a zine to a person feels like the best thing to do. The need for us to capture every moment is shown evidently, but how do you personally feel when watching others staring at their phone screens rather than “being in the moment”? I think it’s totally fine, I prefer not to do that myself but it happens to the best of us. I kind of think staring into your phones is part of being in the moment. That’s the new way of experiencing shows and daily life in general. It’s the norm to have people nose deep into their phones and crowds really don’t mind it. I have noticed a slight pushback; people are becoming tiresome of annoying people on their phones. We aren’t the first generation to be to busy recording and photographing shows, we just happen to have an immediate outlet to share our experiences. One thing that stands out is the way you haven’t shown directly what the people are taking photographs of. You have hidden it in a way we have to search for clues within your image. Was this deliberate, and if so why? Since the beginning it’s been about the person on their phones, the bands don’t really matter and neither do the people around them. It helps that all the venues are extremely dark. I have to use a flash to get the picture. It helps further isolate them and makes you look for a recognizable point beyond the subject. I’m presenting a documentation of what I seeing directly in front of me. It helps get the point across that this is my view, bright phone screens peppered in front of me at all times. I also like that fact that the viewer has to really look at the image to make something out of it. I want people to slow down and really look at the photos and to think about what they’re seeing. Your works, including ‘Perfect Day’ and ‘Don’t mind me’, all have a very observation-

al feel to them. Is this an intentional style of photography you admire or do subconsciously? I would say it’s a combination of both; it started subconsciously and has slowly become more intentional. I was completely clueless when I first started taking photos. Trying to figure out what I liked, how to operate a camera and what it all meant to me. Once I found photographers and photos I really enjoyed, I fell further into this way of taking photos. Trying to emulate something that was impossible to recreate but finding and learning what my vision of my daily life is. Now I have better understanding of what I’m doing and what I want to accomplish when I make a photo. You shoot using a range of cameras including black and white film, Polaroid’s and slide film. Why is this? I’ve tried to narrow down my cameras to three main cameras, two 35mm cameras and one medium format camera. I like the flexibility of having either slide, black and white or colour negative film on me at all times. It’s just too difficult not to use all the amazing cameras that are out there. I find that I’m a terrible black and white photographer and that’s the reason I shoot it. I like the challenge of trying to figure out the best way of capturing a moment. Also picking up Ken Schles book Night Walk, made me want to shoot more black and white film. The same applies for shooting slide, colour negative and Polaroid film. I enjoy the challenges each film poses and their final outcome. However, colour film is what I prefer and enjoy exposing the most. ‘Sleep Talk’ is your zine and print based publishing house. Can you tell us more about how it began and what your aims from Sleep Talk are? It started after countless rejections from submission based group zines and numerous failed attempts at entering photo competitions. I had acquired enough photos in two years to make a couple zines. Said screw it, I’ll try to make my own zines. I started with a disastrously expensive colour photocopy zine. I made about five of them and gave them away to friends. The cost of producing it pushed me away from making zines. While out for food I came across a mom-andpop printing shop. They had best price, the best paper and best print quality that I had seen at the


time. That’s when Sleep Talk officially started. I spent a lot of time taking files to the print shop, trying to figure out how to make zines. I just want to keep making photos and creating zines. If I can sell a couple here and there that’s great but I just want to share as much work as possible and hope that people enjoy it. Do you believe there is an importance for independent publishing? There is a big importance for independent publishing. There has always been a place for it and will continue to have a place. People will gravitate towards it and there is something honest about independent publishing. Your love and passion of zines is undeniable. Are there any inspirations or special zines that you have? I’m always looking at zines, photo-books and work by other photographers. Viewing work by

others always inspires me to improve and to pick up my camera. I have one special zine; it’s the first zine I bought and the one that got me thinking about making zines. It’s a photozine by Jesse Pollock called Hotel Party. Can you give three pieces of advice for any future zine creators? Don’t be afraid to ask questions and just start making stuff. Stop talking about wanting to makes zines, just start working on one. Also YouTube it if you need extra help. With your publications gaining more and more success, do you have any future projects we can look out for? At the moment I’m working on follow-ups to some of my earlier zines. Working on new photos for volume three of Fear of Missing Out. Everything is still in the works but something will be out soon.

www.kevinnovales.com


122

al brydon Based on a False Story

I’m a UK based landscape photographer and currently reside in South Yorkshire. The landscape and the long departed people who lived and worked within it sing songs. I’m trying to learn to listen. Twenty rolls of exposed film lay forgotten in a drawer for fifteen or so years. I had no recollection of what I’d taken. I set about reexposing them in collaboration with my former self, blending one vastly different life with my current existence.


128

Marie-Laure S. Louis Laissez les bons temps rouler

I am a Mauritian fine art photographer based in France. During my teenage years I grew a fascination for the Deep South (U.S.A) and since 2014 I have been doing projects in and about the region inspiring myself. New Orleans cannot be described. It is out of place and time, it is unfathomable. If you let New Orleans, the city that grabs you making it hard to let go. Following the Big Easy means discovering the unknown and dangerous streets, opening yourself to its mysteries and forgetting whatever you learned about it‌


Issue index Michael Behlen - dontshakeitlikeapolaroid.com Al Brydon - al-brydon.com Etienne ClĂŠment - etienneclement.com Natalie Kaplan - nataliekaplan.carbonmade.com Justyna Procak - instagram.com/procakjustyna Carmen Rodriguez - carmenarmen.com Clara Turchi Rose - claraturchirose.com Marie-Laure S. Louis - marie-laurelouis.com Taner Tumkaya - tarfilms.com Andrew Mellor - andrewmellorphotography.com Aimee Newmarch - shotbyaimee.tumblr.com NIGONOGRAPHY - nigonografie.com Lars Plessentin - larsplessentin.de Emily Porter - emilyporterphotograph.com Ana Garrido Santos - anagarridosantos.com Robyn Tenniel - robyntenniel.com Rachel Woroner - rachelworoner.com Kyler Zeleny & Yanina Shevchenko - kylerzeleny.com & yaninashevchenko.com


www.hashtagphotographymagazine.co.uk facebook.com/hashtagphotography twitter & instagram @Hashtagphotomag


#PHOTOGRAPHY - Issue 17