__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

$49M

6,815

I

Fundraising Highlights “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” These words from U.S. educator and author Helen Keller continue to ring true at HMS, where our circle of supporters this year swelled to 4,233. These generous alumni, friends, board members, volunteers, faculty, staff, foundations and corporations gave more than $315 million in fiscal year 2019— an annual fundraising record for HMS—to advance our mission in service to the world. The impact of this philanthropy has been tangible. We increased the number of scholarships, financial aid packages and fellowship funds for MD, MD-PhD, PhD and master’s students and boosted funding for postdoctoral researchers. We introduced the Sexual and Gender Minorities Health Equity Initiative, pioneered work in the field of global health and established endowed professorships that

recognize the accomplishments of their faculty incumbents. We launched the Therapeutics Initiative, began building the Ancient DNA Atlas of Humanity, explored the neurobiology of cannabinoids, and advanced fundamental and translational research that has implications for understanding the biology of aging and of conditions ranging from diabetes to neurodegenerative diseases. n

HMS GIVING hms.harvard.edu/giving

4%

6%

FY 2019 OPERATING REVENUE 13% n Research grants and contracts 38% n Endowment distribution for operations 7% n Other revenues* 15% 11% n Gifts for current use 39% n Rental income 24% 13% n Tuition (net)

Total

$308,095,466 $190,065,004 $124,978,428 $105,682,511 $45,350,422 $30,611,546 $804,783,377

38% 24% 15% 13% 6% 4%

* Includes continuing medical education, publications, service income and royalties 30%

7% 11% 39% 13%

30%

FY 2019 OPERATING EXPENSES n Personnel costs n Supplies and other expenses n Research subcontracts and affiliates n Plant

operations and interest

n Depreciation

Total

$295,520,624 $224,443,446 $97,397,873 $85,551,181 $50,261,386 $753,174,511

—Dean George Q. Daley PRODUCED BY THE HMS OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS AND EXTERNAL RELATIONS

39% 30% 13% 11% 7%

HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL

AS OF SEPTEMBER 2019

24%

Transforming the Future

I

15%

I 2019–2020

I

I

13% 38%

Dean’s Report

the leadership of our new Dean for Graduate Education Rosalind Segal, the program is uniting administration, support and academic oversight for the nine PhD and eight master’s programs. Future initiatives will ensure that students in all educational programs are vital members of the HMS intellectual community and that all benefit from outstanding, individualized educational experiences. Next year, the Harvard School of Dental Medicine will transition to new leadership following R. Bruce Donoff’s decision to step down after 28 years of service as HSDM dean. His successor will inherit a dynamic community committed to a broad vision for global and community health, steeped in scientific inquiry and dedicated to caring for patients’ overall health by focusing on the connection between oral health and systemic health. Our progress and achievements reflect a shared dedication to producing the knowledge and ideas that help us better care for and heal others as we work to alleviate suffering and improve health and well-being for all. n

I

$87,107,000

Nobel Prizes (cumulative) Physiology or Medicine, Peace 16 recipients National Academy of Sciences members (current) 80 National Academy of Medicine members (current) 152 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (current) 38 (4 Faculty Scholars, 33 Investigators, 1 Professor)

I

4% 6%$585M FY12-16

$87,107,000

(MD and master’s)

10

I

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Boston Children’s Hospital Brigham and Women’s Hospital Cambridge Health Alliance Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute Hebrew SeniorLife Joslin Diabetes Center Judge Baker Children’s Center Massachusetts Eye and Ear | Schepens Eye Research Institute Massachusetts General Hospital McLean Hospital Mount Auburn Hospital Spaulding Rehabilitation Network VA Boston Healthcare System

$97,603,850

10,425 Medical school living alumni:

I

Entering 2019: PhD 165 (165 HMS) DMD 35 master’s 135 (117 HMS, 18 HSDM) DMSc 9 Additional joint degree programs: MD-MBA; MD-MPH; MD-MPP

$97,603,850

I

I

Affiliates

$113,763,436

11,694

I

pay long-term dividends to humanity, we are promoting collaborative learning and exploration through support from the Dean’s Innovation Grants and the Therapeutics Initiative, as well as through the establishment of the I-Hub and the increased support for enabling technologies delivered through the Foundry. These efforts, along with programs such as our epigenetics, aging and autism initiatives, are empowering faculty and staff and keeping HMS in the vanguard of biomedical research. I’m pleased to report that HMS ended FY19 with a $52 million operating GAAP surplus—the first surplus in nearly a decade—largely due to the Blavatnik Family Foundation’s commitment and benefits from the long-term lease of the Harvard Institutes of Medicine building, executed at the end of FY18. In FY19, operating revenues totaled nearly $805 million, an increase of more than $101 million compared with the prior year. Fundraising gains, much FY FY FY of 10which09will be 08disbursed in the future, accounted for more than half of the improvement. Notably, the School’s research revenue grew by roughly 4 percent, from $297 million to more than $308 million. Total operating expenses increased by $11 million, to $753 million. Managing our expenses while growing our revenues is challenging, but I remain focused on solidifying the underlying FY FY FY 10 09 08 financial and administrative strength of the institution. As we pursue our important work toward financial sustainability, we will continue implementing our ambitious plans for the future, ensuring that HMS remains at the forefront of research, education, service and clinical care. $113,763,436

toral fellows) 9,255

I

This past year has been an exciting one for Harvard Medical School. Our faculty achieved substantially increased sponsored funding, and as mentioned previously, we had a successful accreditation site visit by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Medical Association. The outcome validated the diligent efforts of the more than 150 students, faculty and staff who participated in the year-long institutional self-study and strategic planning process, which provided a deeper insight into HMS and plotted a course for an even more successful future. The HMS medical education program received a strong endorsement from the LCME site-visit team. It is gratifying to know that the hard work and investments we made to implement the Pathways curriculum further bolstered our MD program. Countless hours were spent evaluating our curriculum, learning FY environment, advising programs, 11 student services, faculty development and finances. This extensive self-reflection resulted in a number of initiatives that will support continuous quality improvement efforts and help us strategically position the School to advance its educational and clinical care missions. All of this was achieved as the School moved closer to its goal of FY financial sustainability. To maintain11 our momentum, we will continue to rely on our close partnerships with leadership at the University and our affiliated hospitals and research institutions. The $200 million commitment from the Blavatnik Family Foundation is advancing fundamental, curiosity-driven research and catalyzing discovery and translation across HMS. Building on the principle that investments in our community will $ 94,685,992

712

I

MD applicants Admitted 227 (3.3%) MD entering 2019 165 (includes 14 MD-PhD) I Men 73 (44%) Women 92 (56%) Underrepresented in medicine (African American, Hispanic, Mexican American, Native American) 39 (24%) Asian 45 (27%)

I

Total students: MD I PhD 915 (912 HMS, 3 HSDM) I MD-PhD 190: basic sciences 165, social sciences 25 (total included in MD and PhD counts) I DMD 140 I DMD-PhD 1 (total included in DMD and PhD counts) I master’s 269 (220 HMS, 49 HSDM) I DMSc 39 I Trainees (residents and postdoc-

Financial Report

$ 94,685,992

HMS by the Numbers

Total faculty Tenured and tenure-track faculty on campus in 11 preclinical departments 184 Voting faculty on campus and at affiliates 6,154 Full-time faculty on campus and at affiliates 9,649

FY17 $116M


From the Dean

Discovery and Scholarship

IMAGES: GRETCHEN ERTL, BETHANY VERSOY AND NARA SHIN

Fireworks burst over Boston’s Fenway Park in fall 2018 in a salute to the thousands of Harvard Medical School alumni, faculty, students, staff and friends who have supported the School’s mission, helping HMS provide the leadership, knowledge and solutions that promise better health and well-being for all. The celebration marked the successful completion of an ambitious seven-year comprehensive campaign that raised more than $789 million, encompassing nearly 10,000 gifts and pledges. That night we also acknowledged a momentous $200 million commitment from the Blavatnik Family Foundation. It has been a year of inspiring progress, one in which Professor William G. Kaelin Jr. was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, becoming the 16th HMS faculty member to receive a Nobel Prize. Each day, through curiosity-driven research and the development of therapies and tools to diagnose, prevent and treat disease, we make great strides in transforming health care. With a robust strategic plan, an inspiring diversity statement and a refreshed mission statement in hand, the HMS community aspires to excellence in discovery and scholarship, service and leadership, and teaching and learning. We are fostering greater collaborations across HMS and the Boston biomedical ecosystem, advancing technologies that propel research breakthroughs and building on a culture of diversity, inclusion, empowerment and integrity that makes HMS a force for good in the world.

Harvard Medical School discoveries are advancing science and setting the stage for widespread improvements in human health and well-being. Artificial intelligence algorithms that expose 3D protein-folding structures; gene-editing advances that prevent inherited hearing loss with no detectable off-target effects; detection of molecular anomalies underlying sporadic Alzheimer’s disease; and elucidation of the factors that drive age-related immunity loss—these are just a few of the breakthroughs made this year at HMS. The newly established Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School has strengthened our 11 basic and social science departments—including our new Immunology and Microbiology departments, established in response to era-defining challenges in biomedicine—and helped intensify our efforts to recruit the best faculty and trainees from around the globe. We have catalyzed collaborative discovery by deepening our investments in fundamental

research and enhancing our data science and computational biology capabilities. Our Therapeutics Initiative will foster a richer ecosystem for research and inquiry while advancing therapeutics education to more effectively translate basic science insights into novel treatments that will help patients live longer, healthier lives. Components of the initiative include the I-Hub, which is building teams to address difficult problems in human disease. Within the I-Hub, the Therapeutics Graduate Program is modernizing PhD training in the biosciences and providing students with real-world experience in drug discovery and development. The Quadrangle Fund for Advancing and Seeding Translational Research (Q-FASTR) and the Dean’s Innovation Grants provide seed funding to spur promising translational and therapeutics projects; the Laboratory of Systems Pharmacology and the Harvard-MIT Center for Regulatory Science are reinventing how medicines are developed and evaluated. We established the Foundry to strengthen our core-platform technologies and expertise, thus ensuring community access to cuttingedge research tools, and we introduced the Translator program to move advanced translational projects to proof-of-concept to attract interest from our partners in biopharma. The 10,000-square-foot Blavatnik Harvard Life Lab Longwood, beginning construction in early 2020, will incubate late-stage translational projects with high potential to become biotech and life sciences companies by connecting researchers with industry to help solve some of the more intractable health challenges of our time. Meanwhile, Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center continues to serve local and national research communities by offering courses and educational programs, research consulting, tools for study design and collaboration on clinical trials, guidance on regulatory issues and pilot funding for novel, high-impact projects—all available to trainees, fellows and faculty.

MORE RESEARCH NEWS hms.harvard.edu/news/discovery

Service and Leadership Diseases driven by factors such as the global climate crisis and dire socioeconomic conditions do not respect international borders. Members of the HMS community are bringing medical education, research and resources to health care providers worldwide, sharing the most effective methods for delivering care affordably and equitably. In Rwanda this year, I witnessed the launch of the world’s first medical school dedicated to global health equity, where HMS faculty have helped lead efforts to address shortages of health care providers and researchers in low-resourced settings. In Lima, Peru, HMS researchers are using computer-aided x-ray detection equipment to conduct mass screenings for tuberculosis. Over the past five years at our Center for Global Health Delivery in Dubai, we taught more than 3,300 health care researchers from 92 countries: topics included surgery, mental health, infectious diseases, obesity and nutrition. Closer to home, HMS faculty are analyzing ways to lower U.S. health care spending, working to improve the quality and safety of patient care and helping to guide national health care policy. Investigators in our Department of Biomedical Informatics are developing computational tools that will improve our ability to use data-based evidence more effectively while assuring strict privacy. Our Office for External Education reaches millions in more than 100 countries across six continents by providing information on health and medicine, clinical research and

practice, and biomedical science to business and science leaders, clinicians and health care professionals, pre-health career learners, and patients and families. By connecting HMS faculty and students with medical, academic, pharmaceutical and technology leaders among our alumni, our External Education programs are fostering partnerships that are generating translational and educational opportunities. From opioid education programs in Ohio to HMX courses used by medical schools in Mexico to executive education programs that bring participants inside our health care ecosystem, we are making the vast knowledge and expertise of more than 1,000 participating HMS faculty available to the world. A sweeping renovation is planned for the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine to revitalize facilities, provide enhanced technologies and increase gathering spaces for students, faculty and the greater Harvard Longwood community. On the West Quad, more than $50 million in renovations are planned to optimize space for existing research departments while creating a home for the Blavatnik Harvard Life Lab Longwood.

A screening tool developed in Monica Colaiácovo’s lab shows genetic disruptions in worm egg cells after exposure to common chemicals.

Teaching and Learning This spring we graduated our first class of students who completed all four years of our innovative Pathways curriculum. During the School’s successful accreditation site visit earlier this year, members of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education lauded HMS for its pioneering pedagogical approach that resulted in increases in student partnership, engagement and achievement. Part of an ongoing digital transformation on campus, the Education Data Warehouse is identifying our most successful teaching practices, allowing for continuous curriculum quality improvements. Investment in this integrated system, which is designed to track teaching and learning outcomes, has set the stage for myriad possibilities for empirical educational research, program evaluation and faculty teaching support. We are strengthening engagement with our more than 11,000 faculty members, both on the Quad and at our affiliated hospitals and research institutions, ensuring that they have a stronger voice in governance. To do this, we have created a detailed process for faculty participation on standing committees, and we have improved communication between the Faculty Council and the faculty at large. We have reinforced our expectations for high standards of teaching commitment, professionalism and integrity. We are working to certify consistent, uniform professional assessments that provide a clear path for career advancement and familiarity with all expectations by requiring annual faculty career conferences. A separate initiative is enhancing

data management surrounding faculty recruitment, retention and diversity efforts. We have also increased our support for financial aid. HMS already provides one of the most generous need-based programs in the country, granting more than $24 million annually in scholarship funds, but this year we enhanced our program so that full-need MD students are guaranteed scholarships to cover both tuition and mandatory fees, significantly reducing student debt and underscoring our pledge that admitted students from all backgrounds are able to pursue their goals at HMS. Because biomedical knowledge and discoveries are increasing exponentially, we are teaching future physicians and scientists to be critical thinkers, able to adapt to the accelerating pace of discovery and the burgeoning demands of science and medicine while remaining responsive to the needs of all patients. This approach means making certain that the HMS community reflects the diverse patient populations we serve and that HMS remains a place where every individual feels empowered to contribute and achieve. To this end, we are critically assessing issues of culture, communication, infrastructure, community and accountability. The Dean’s Innovation Awards are helping to advance our goals for medical and graduate education, diversity and inclusion, and administrative efficiency. We are working to increase underrepresented faculty in our classrooms and labs, in our leadership and at our affiliated hospitals, where the vast majority of our faculty and clinical fellows work. This year, HMS accepted an entering class of medical students from seven countries, 56 percent of whom are female. Nearly 25 percent of our new MD students are from populations underrepresented in medicine, 27 percent are Asian and 15 percent self-identify as LGBTQ, making this the most diverse class in our history. In advance of its 50th anniversary, the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology program, a historic partnership between the two schools, is undertaking a curriculum review that will help this preeminent program continue to set the standard for training world-class physician-scientists for the next half-century. A record number of candidates applied to our PhD programs last year. Under


From the Dean

Discovery and Scholarship

IMAGES: GRETCHEN ERTL, BETHANY VERSOY AND NARA SHIN

Fireworks burst over Boston’s Fenway Park in fall 2018 in a salute to the thousands of Harvard Medical School alumni, faculty, students, staff and friends who have supported the School’s mission, helping HMS provide the leadership, knowledge and solutions that promise better health and well-being for all. The celebration marked the successful completion of an ambitious seven-year comprehensive campaign that raised more than $789 million, encompassing nearly 10,000 gifts and pledges. That night we also acknowledged a momentous $200 million commitment from the Blavatnik Family Foundation. It has been a year of inspiring progress, one in which Professor William G. Kaelin Jr. was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, becoming the 16th HMS faculty member to receive a Nobel Prize. Each day, through curiosity-driven research and the development of therapies and tools to diagnose, prevent and treat disease, we make great strides in transforming health care. With a robust strategic plan, an inspiring diversity statement and a refreshed mission statement in hand, the HMS community aspires to excellence in discovery and scholarship, service and leadership, and teaching and learning. We are fostering greater collaborations across HMS and the Boston biomedical ecosystem, advancing technologies that propel research breakthroughs and building on a culture of diversity, inclusion, empowerment and integrity that makes HMS a force for good in the world.

Harvard Medical School discoveries are advancing science and setting the stage for widespread improvements in human health and well-being. Artificial intelligence algorithms that expose 3D protein-folding structures; gene-editing advances that prevent inherited hearing loss with no detectable off-target effects; detection of molecular anomalies underlying sporadic Alzheimer’s disease; and elucidation of the factors that drive age-related immunity loss—these are just a few of the breakthroughs made this year at HMS. The newly established Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School has strengthened our 11 basic and social science departments—including our new Immunology and Microbiology departments, established in response to era-defining challenges in biomedicine—and helped intensify our efforts to recruit the best faculty and trainees from around the globe. We have catalyzed collaborative discovery by deepening our investments in fundamental

research and enhancing our data science and computational biology capabilities. Our Therapeutics Initiative will foster a richer ecosystem for research and inquiry while advancing therapeutics education to more effectively translate basic science insights into novel treatments that will help patients live longer, healthier lives. Components of the initiative include the I-Hub, which is building teams to address difficult problems in human disease. Within the I-Hub, the Therapeutics Graduate Program is modernizing PhD training in the biosciences and providing students with real-world experience in drug discovery and development. The Quadrangle Fund for Advancing and Seeding Translational Research (Q-FASTR) and the Dean’s Innovation Grants provide seed funding to spur promising translational and therapeutics projects; the Laboratory of Systems Pharmacology and the Harvard-MIT Center for Regulatory Science are reinventing how medicines are developed and evaluated. We established the Foundry to strengthen our core-platform technologies and expertise, thus ensuring community access to cuttingedge research tools, and we introduced the Translator program to move advanced translational projects to proof-of-concept to attract interest from our partners in biopharma. The 10,000-square-foot Blavatnik Harvard Life Lab Longwood, beginning construction in early 2020, will incubate late-stage translational projects with high potential to become biotech and life sciences companies by connecting researchers with industry to help solve some of the more intractable health challenges of our time. Meanwhile, Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center continues to serve local and national research communities by offering courses and educational programs, research consulting, tools for study design and collaboration on clinical trials, guidance on regulatory issues and pilot funding for novel, high-impact projects—all available to trainees, fellows and faculty.

MORE RESEARCH NEWS hms.harvard.edu/news/discovery

Service and Leadership Diseases driven by factors such as the global climate crisis and dire socioeconomic conditions do not respect international borders. Members of the HMS community are bringing medical education, research and resources to health care providers worldwide, sharing the most effective methods for delivering care affordably and equitably. In Rwanda this year, I witnessed the launch of the world’s first medical school dedicated to global health equity, where HMS faculty have helped lead efforts to address shortages of health care providers and researchers in low-resourced settings. In Lima, Peru, HMS researchers are using computer-aided x-ray detection equipment to conduct mass screenings for tuberculosis. Over the past five years at our Center for Global Health Delivery in Dubai, we taught more than 3,300 health care researchers from 92 countries: topics included surgery, mental health, infectious diseases, obesity and nutrition. Closer to home, HMS faculty are analyzing ways to lower U.S. health care spending, working to improve the quality and safety of patient care and helping to guide national health care policy. Investigators in our Department of Biomedical Informatics are developing computational tools that will improve our ability to use data-based evidence more effectively while assuring strict privacy. Our Office for External Education reaches millions in more than 100 countries across six continents by providing information on health and medicine, clinical research and

practice, and biomedical science to business and science leaders, clinicians and health care professionals, pre-health career learners, and patients and families. By connecting HMS faculty and students with medical, academic, pharmaceutical and technology leaders among our alumni, our External Education programs are fostering partnerships that are generating translational and educational opportunities. From opioid education programs in Ohio to HMX courses used by medical schools in Mexico to executive education programs that bring participants inside our health care ecosystem, we are making the vast knowledge and expertise of more than 1,000 participating HMS faculty available to the world. A sweeping renovation is planned for the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine to revitalize facilities, provide enhanced technologies and increase gathering spaces for students, faculty and the greater Harvard Longwood community. On the West Quad, more than $50 million in renovations are planned to optimize space for existing research departments while creating a home for the Blavatnik Harvard Life Lab Longwood.

A screening tool developed in Monica Colaiácovo’s lab shows genetic disruptions in worm egg cells after exposure to common chemicals.

Teaching and Learning This spring we graduated our first class of students who completed all four years of our innovative Pathways curriculum. During the School’s successful accreditation site visit earlier this year, members of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education lauded HMS for its pioneering pedagogical approach that resulted in increases in student partnership, engagement and achievement. Part of an ongoing digital transformation on campus, the Education Data Warehouse is identifying our most successful teaching practices, allowing for continuous curriculum quality improvements. Investment in this integrated system, which is designed to track teaching and learning outcomes, has set the stage for myriad possibilities for empirical educational research, program evaluation and faculty teaching support. We are strengthening engagement with our more than 11,000 faculty members, both on the Quad and at our affiliated hospitals and research institutions, ensuring that they have a stronger voice in governance. To do this, we have created a detailed process for faculty participation on standing committees, and we have improved communication between the Faculty Council and the faculty at large. We have reinforced our expectations for high standards of teaching commitment, professionalism and integrity. We are working to certify consistent, uniform professional assessments that provide a clear path for career advancement and familiarity with all expectations by requiring annual faculty career conferences. A separate initiative is enhancing

data management surrounding faculty recruitment, retention and diversity efforts. We have also increased our support for financial aid. HMS already provides one of the most generous need-based programs in the country, granting more than $24 million annually in scholarship funds, but this year we enhanced our program so that full-need MD students are guaranteed scholarships to cover both tuition and mandatory fees, significantly reducing student debt and underscoring our pledge that admitted students from all backgrounds are able to pursue their goals at HMS. Because biomedical knowledge and discoveries are increasing exponentially, we are teaching future physicians and scientists to be critical thinkers, able to adapt to the accelerating pace of discovery and the burgeoning demands of science and medicine while remaining responsive to the needs of all patients. This approach means making certain that the HMS community reflects the diverse patient populations we serve and that HMS remains a place where every individual feels empowered to contribute and achieve. To this end, we are critically assessing issues of culture, communication, infrastructure, community and accountability. The Dean’s Innovation Awards are helping to advance our goals for medical and graduate education, diversity and inclusion, and administrative efficiency. We are working to increase underrepresented faculty in our classrooms and labs, in our leadership and at our affiliated hospitals, where the vast majority of our faculty and clinical fellows work. This year, HMS accepted an entering class of medical students from seven countries, 56 percent of whom are female. Nearly 25 percent of our new MD students are from populations underrepresented in medicine, 27 percent are Asian and 15 percent self-identify as LGBTQ, making this the most diverse class in our history. In advance of its 50th anniversary, the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology program, a historic partnership between the two schools, is undertaking a curriculum review that will help this preeminent program continue to set the standard for training world-class physician-scientists for the next half-century. A record number of candidates applied to our PhD programs last year. Under


From the Dean

Discovery and Scholarship

IMAGES: GRETCHEN ERTL, BETHANY VERSOY AND NARA SHIN

Fireworks burst over Boston’s Fenway Park in fall 2018 in a salute to the thousands of Harvard Medical School alumni, faculty, students, staff and friends who have supported the School’s mission, helping HMS provide the leadership, knowledge and solutions that promise better health and well-being for all. The celebration marked the successful completion of an ambitious seven-year comprehensive campaign that raised more than $789 million, encompassing nearly 10,000 gifts and pledges. That night we also acknowledged a momentous $200 million commitment from the Blavatnik Family Foundation. It has been a year of inspiring progress, one in which Professor William G. Kaelin Jr. was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, becoming the 16th HMS faculty member to receive a Nobel Prize. Each day, through curiosity-driven research and the development of therapies and tools to diagnose, prevent and treat disease, we make great strides in transforming health care. With a robust strategic plan, an inspiring diversity statement and a refreshed mission statement in hand, the HMS community aspires to excellence in discovery and scholarship, service and leadership, and teaching and learning. We are fostering greater collaborations across HMS and the Boston biomedical ecosystem, advancing technologies that propel research breakthroughs and building on a culture of diversity, inclusion, empowerment and integrity that makes HMS a force for good in the world.

Harvard Medical School discoveries are advancing science and setting the stage for widespread improvements in human health and well-being. Artificial intelligence algorithms that expose 3D protein-folding structures; gene-editing advances that prevent inherited hearing loss with no detectable off-target effects; detection of molecular anomalies underlying sporadic Alzheimer’s disease; and elucidation of the factors that drive age-related immunity loss—these are just a few of the breakthroughs made this year at HMS. The newly established Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School has strengthened our 11 basic and social science departments—including our new Immunology and Microbiology departments, established in response to era-defining challenges in biomedicine—and helped intensify our efforts to recruit the best faculty and trainees from around the globe. We have catalyzed collaborative discovery by deepening our investments in fundamental

research and enhancing our data science and computational biology capabilities. Our Therapeutics Initiative will foster a richer ecosystem for research and inquiry while advancing therapeutics education to more effectively translate basic science insights into novel treatments that will help patients live longer, healthier lives. Components of the initiative include the I-Hub, which is building teams to address difficult problems in human disease. Within the I-Hub, the Therapeutics Graduate Program is modernizing PhD training in the biosciences and providing students with real-world experience in drug discovery and development. The Quadrangle Fund for Advancing and Seeding Translational Research (Q-FASTR) and the Dean’s Innovation Grants provide seed funding to spur promising translational and therapeutics projects; the Laboratory of Systems Pharmacology and the Harvard-MIT Center for Regulatory Science are reinventing how medicines are developed and evaluated. We established the Foundry to strengthen our core-platform technologies and expertise, thus ensuring community access to cuttingedge research tools, and we introduced the Translator program to move advanced translational projects to proof-of-concept to attract interest from our partners in biopharma. The 10,000-square-foot Blavatnik Harvard Life Lab Longwood, beginning construction in early 2020, will incubate late-stage translational projects with high potential to become biotech and life sciences companies by connecting researchers with industry to help solve some of the more intractable health challenges of our time. Meanwhile, Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center continues to serve local and national research communities by offering courses and educational programs, research consulting, tools for study design and collaboration on clinical trials, guidance on regulatory issues and pilot funding for novel, high-impact projects—all available to trainees, fellows and faculty.

MORE RESEARCH NEWS hms.harvard.edu/news/discovery

Service and Leadership Diseases driven by factors such as the global climate crisis and dire socioeconomic conditions do not respect international borders. Members of the HMS community are bringing medical education, research and resources to health care providers worldwide, sharing the most effective methods for delivering care affordably and equitably. In Rwanda this year, I witnessed the launch of the world’s first medical school dedicated to global health equity, where HMS faculty have helped lead efforts to address shortages of health care providers and researchers in low-resourced settings. In Lima, Peru, HMS researchers are using computer-aided x-ray detection equipment to conduct mass screenings for tuberculosis. Over the past five years at our Center for Global Health Delivery in Dubai, we taught more than 3,300 health care researchers from 92 countries: topics included surgery, mental health, infectious diseases, obesity and nutrition. Closer to home, HMS faculty are analyzing ways to lower U.S. health care spending, working to improve the quality and safety of patient care and helping to guide national health care policy. Investigators in our Department of Biomedical Informatics are developing computational tools that will improve our ability to use data-based evidence more effectively while assuring strict privacy. Our Office for External Education reaches millions in more than 100 countries across six continents by providing information on health and medicine, clinical research and

practice, and biomedical science to business and science leaders, clinicians and health care professionals, pre-health career learners, and patients and families. By connecting HMS faculty and students with medical, academic, pharmaceutical and technology leaders among our alumni, our External Education programs are fostering partnerships that are generating translational and educational opportunities. From opioid education programs in Ohio to HMX courses used by medical schools in Mexico to executive education programs that bring participants inside our health care ecosystem, we are making the vast knowledge and expertise of more than 1,000 participating HMS faculty available to the world. A sweeping renovation is planned for the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine to revitalize facilities, provide enhanced technologies and increase gathering spaces for students, faculty and the greater Harvard Longwood community. On the West Quad, more than $50 million in renovations are planned to optimize space for existing research departments while creating a home for the Blavatnik Harvard Life Lab Longwood.

A screening tool developed in Monica Colaiácovo’s lab shows genetic disruptions in worm egg cells after exposure to common chemicals.

Teaching and Learning This spring we graduated our first class of students who completed all four years of our innovative Pathways curriculum. During the School’s successful accreditation site visit earlier this year, members of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education lauded HMS for its pioneering pedagogical approach that resulted in increases in student partnership, engagement and achievement. Part of an ongoing digital transformation on campus, the Education Data Warehouse is identifying our most successful teaching practices, allowing for continuous curriculum quality improvements. Investment in this integrated system, which is designed to track teaching and learning outcomes, has set the stage for myriad possibilities for empirical educational research, program evaluation and faculty teaching support. We are strengthening engagement with our more than 11,000 faculty members, both on the Quad and at our affiliated hospitals and research institutions, ensuring that they have a stronger voice in governance. To do this, we have created a detailed process for faculty participation on standing committees, and we have improved communication between the Faculty Council and the faculty at large. We have reinforced our expectations for high standards of teaching commitment, professionalism and integrity. We are working to certify consistent, uniform professional assessments that provide a clear path for career advancement and familiarity with all expectations by requiring annual faculty career conferences. A separate initiative is enhancing

data management surrounding faculty recruitment, retention and diversity efforts. We have also increased our support for financial aid. HMS already provides one of the most generous need-based programs in the country, granting more than $24 million annually in scholarship funds, but this year we enhanced our program so that full-need MD students are guaranteed scholarships to cover both tuition and mandatory fees, significantly reducing student debt and underscoring our pledge that admitted students from all backgrounds are able to pursue their goals at HMS. Because biomedical knowledge and discoveries are increasing exponentially, we are teaching future physicians and scientists to be critical thinkers, able to adapt to the accelerating pace of discovery and the burgeoning demands of science and medicine while remaining responsive to the needs of all patients. This approach means making certain that the HMS community reflects the diverse patient populations we serve and that HMS remains a place where every individual feels empowered to contribute and achieve. To this end, we are critically assessing issues of culture, communication, infrastructure, community and accountability. The Dean’s Innovation Awards are helping to advance our goals for medical and graduate education, diversity and inclusion, and administrative efficiency. We are working to increase underrepresented faculty in our classrooms and labs, in our leadership and at our affiliated hospitals, where the vast majority of our faculty and clinical fellows work. This year, HMS accepted an entering class of medical students from seven countries, 56 percent of whom are female. Nearly 25 percent of our new MD students are from populations underrepresented in medicine, 27 percent are Asian and 15 percent self-identify as LGBTQ, making this the most diverse class in our history. In advance of its 50th anniversary, the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology program, a historic partnership between the two schools, is undertaking a curriculum review that will help this preeminent program continue to set the standard for training world-class physician-scientists for the next half-century. A record number of candidates applied to our PhD programs last year. Under


$49M

6,815

I

I

AS OF SEPTEMBER 2019

I

Fundraising Highlights “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” These words from U.S. educator and author Helen Keller continue to ring true at HMS, where our circle of supporters this year swelled to 4,233. These generous alumni, friends, board members, volunteers, faculty, staff, foundations and corporations gave more than $315 million in fiscal year 2019— an annual fundraising record for HMS—to advance our mission in service to the world. The impact of this philanthropy has been tangible. We increased the number of scholarships, financial aid packages and fellowship funds for MD, MD-PhD, PhD and master’s students and boosted funding for postdoctoral researchers. We introduced the Sexual and Gender Minorities Health Equity Initiative, pioneered work in the field of global health and established endowed professorships that

I

recognize the accomplishments of their faculty incumbents. We launched the Therapeutics Initiative, began building the Ancient DNA Atlas of Humanity, explored the neurobiology of cannabinoids, and advanced fundamental and translational research that has implications for understanding the biology of aging and of conditions ranging from diabetes to neurodegenerative diseases. n

HMS GIVING hms.harvard.edu/giving

4%

6%

FY 2019 OPERATING REVENUE 13% n Research grants and contracts 38% n Endowment distribution for operations 7% n Other revenues* 15% 11% n Gifts for current use 39% n Rental income 24% 13% n Tuition (net)

Total

$308,095,466 $190,065,004 $124,978,428 $105,682,511 $45,350,422 $30,611,546 $804,783,377

38% 24% 15% 13% 6% 4%

* Includes continuing medical education, publications, service income and royalties 30%

7% 11% 39% 13%

30%

FY 2019 OPERATING EXPENSES n Personnel costs n Supplies and other expenses n Research subcontracts and affiliates n Plant

operations and interest

n Depreciation

Total

$295,520,624 $224,443,446 $97,397,873 $85,551,181 $50,261,386 $753,174,511

—Dean George Q. Daley PRODUCED BY THE HMS OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS AND EXTERNAL RELATIONS

39% 30% 13% 11% 7%

HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL

the leadership of our new Dean for Graduate Education Rosalind Segal, the program is uniting administration, support and academic oversight for the nine PhD and eight master’s programs. Future initiatives will ensure that students in all educational programs are vital members of the HMS intellectual community and that all benefit from outstanding, individualized educational experiences. Next year, the Harvard School of Dental Medicine will transition to new leadership following R. Bruce Donoff’s decision to step down after 28 years of service as HSDM dean. His successor will inherit a dynamic community committed to a broad vision for global and community health, steeped in scientific inquiry and dedicated to caring for patients’ overall health by focusing on the connection between oral health and systemic health. Our progress and achievements reflect a shared dedication to producing the knowledge and ideas that help us better care for and heal others as we work to alleviate suffering and improve health and well-being for all. n

I

24%

Transforming the Future

Nobel Prizes (cumulative) Physiology or Medicine, Peace 16 recipients National Academy of Sciences members (current) 80 National Academy of Medicine members (current) 152 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (current) 38 (4 Faculty Scholars, 33 Investigators, 1 Professor)

I

15%

I 2019–2020

I

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Boston Children’s Hospital Brigham and Women’s Hospital Cambridge Health Alliance Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute Hebrew SeniorLife Joslin Diabetes Center Judge Baker Children’s Center Massachusetts Eye and Ear | Schepens Eye Research Institute Massachusetts General Hospital McLean Hospital Mount Auburn Hospital Spaulding Rehabilitation Network VA Boston Healthcare System

13% 38%

Dean’s Report

(MD and master’s)

10

Entering 2019: PhD 165 (165 HMS) DMD 35 master’s 135 (117 HMS, 18 HSDM) DMSc 9 Additional joint degree programs: MD-MBA; MD-MPH; MD-MPP

$87,107,000

10,425 Medical school living alumni:

I

I

Affiliates

4% 6%$585M FY12-16

$87,107,000

11,694

Total faculty Tenured and tenure-track faculty on campus in 11 preclinical departments 184 Voting faculty on campus and at affiliates 6,154 Full-time faculty on campus and at affiliates 9,649

I

I

I

$97,603,850

I

$97,603,850

I

I

$113,763,436

I

I

pay long-term dividends to humanity, we are promoting collaborative learning and exploration through support from the Dean’s Innovation Grants and the Therapeutics Initiative, as well as through the establishment of the I-Hub and the increased support for enabling technologies delivered through the Foundry. These efforts, along with programs such as our epigenetics, aging and autism initiatives, are empowering faculty and staff and keeping HMS in the vanguard of biomedical research. I’m pleased to report that HMS ended FY19 with a $52 million operating GAAP surplus—the first surplus in nearly a decade—largely due to the Blavatnik Family Foundation’s commitment and benefits from the long-term lease of the Harvard Institutes of Medicine building, executed at the end of FY18. In FY19, operating revenues totaled nearly $805 million, an increase of more than $101 million compared with the prior year. Fundraising gains, much FY FY FY of 10which09will be 08disbursed in the future, accounted for more than half of the improvement. Notably, the School’s research revenue grew by roughly 4 percent, from $297 million to more than $308 million. Total operating expenses increased by $11 million, to $753 million. Managing our expenses while growing our revenues is challenging, but I remain FY FY FY focused on solidifying the underlying 10 09 08 financial and administrative strength of the institution. As we pursue our important work toward financial sustainability, we will continue implementing our ambitious plans for the future, ensuring that HMS remains at the forefront of research, education, service and clinical care. $113,763,436

I

This past year has been an exciting one for Harvard Medical School. Our faculty achieved substantially increased sponsored funding, and as mentioned previously, we had a successful accreditation site visit by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Medical Association. The outcome validated the diligent efforts of the more than 150 students, faculty and staff who participated in the year-long institutional self-study and strategic planning process, which provided a deeper insight into HMS and plotted a course for an even more successful future. The HMS medical education program received a strong endorsement from the LCME site-visit team. It is gratifying to know that the hard work and investments we made to implement the Pathways curriculum further bolstered our MD program. Countless hours were spent evaluating our curriculum, learning FY environment, advising programs, 11 student services, faculty development and finances. This extensive self-reflection resulted in a number of initiatives that will support continuous quality improvement efforts and help us strategically position the School to advance its educational and clinical care missions. All of this was achieved as the School moved closer to its goal of FY financial sustainability. To maintain11 our momentum, we will continue to rely on our close partnerships with leadership at the University and our affiliated hospitals and research institutions. The $200 million commitment from the Blavatnik Family Foundation is advancing fundamental, curiosity-driven research and catalyzing discovery and translation across HMS. Building on the principle that investments in our community will $ 94,685,992

712

I

MD applicants Admitted 227 (3.3%) MD entering 2019 165 (includes 14 MD-PhD) I Men 73 (44%) Women 92 (56%) Underrepresented in medicine (African American, Hispanic, Mexican American, Native American) 39 (24%) Asian 45 (27%)

I

Total students: MD PhD 915 (912 HMS, 3 HSDM) MD-PhD 190: basic sciences 165, social sciences 25 (total included in MD and PhD counts) DMD 140 DMD-PhD 1 (total included in DMD and PhD counts) master’s 269 (220 HMS, 49 HSDM) DMSc 39 Trainees (residents and postdoctoral fellows) 9,255

Financial Report

$ 94,685,992

HMS by the Numbers

I

FY17 $116M


$49M

6,815

I

I

AS OF SEPTEMBER 2019

I

Fundraising Highlights “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” These words from U.S. educator and author Helen Keller continue to ring true at HMS, where our circle of supporters this year swelled to 4,233. These generous alumni, friends, board members, volunteers, faculty, staff, foundations and corporations gave more than $315 million in fiscal year 2019— an annual fundraising record for HMS—to advance our mission in service to the world. The impact of this philanthropy has been tangible. We increased the number of scholarships, financial aid packages and fellowship funds for MD, MD-PhD, PhD and master’s students and boosted funding for postdoctoral researchers. We introduced the Sexual and Gender Minorities Health Equity Initiative, pioneered work in the field of global health and established endowed professorships that

I

recognize the accomplishments of their faculty incumbents. We launched the Therapeutics Initiative, began building the Ancient DNA Atlas of Humanity, explored the neurobiology of cannabinoids, and advanced fundamental and translational research that has implications for understanding the biology of aging and of conditions ranging from diabetes to neurodegenerative diseases. n

HMS GIVING hms.harvard.edu/giving

4%

6%

FY 2019 OPERATING REVENUE 13% n Research grants and contracts 38% n Endowment distribution for operations 7% n Other revenues* 15% 11% n Gifts for current use 39% n Rental income 24% 13% n Tuition (net)

Total

$308,095,466 $190,065,004 $124,978,428 $105,682,511 $45,350,422 $30,611,546 $804,783,377

38% 24% 15% 13% 6% 4%

* Includes continuing medical education, publications, service income and royalties 30%

7% 11% 39% 13%

30%

FY 2019 OPERATING EXPENSES n Personnel costs n Supplies and other expenses n Research subcontracts and affiliates n Plant

operations and interest

n Depreciation

Total

$295,520,624 $224,443,446 $97,397,873 $85,551,181 $50,261,386 $753,174,511

—Dean George Q. Daley PRODUCED BY THE HMS OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS AND EXTERNAL RELATIONS

39% 30% 13% 11% 7%

HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL

the leadership of our new Dean for Graduate Education Rosalind Segal, the program is uniting administration, support and academic oversight for the nine PhD and eight master’s programs. Future initiatives will ensure that students in all educational programs are vital members of the HMS intellectual community and that all benefit from outstanding, individualized educational experiences. Next year, the Harvard School of Dental Medicine will transition to new leadership following R. Bruce Donoff’s decision to step down after 28 years of service as HSDM dean. His successor will inherit a dynamic community committed to a broad vision for global and community health, steeped in scientific inquiry and dedicated to caring for patients’ overall health by focusing on the connection between oral health and systemic health. Our progress and achievements reflect a shared dedication to producing the knowledge and ideas that help us better care for and heal others as we work to alleviate suffering and improve health and well-being for all. n

I

24%

Transforming the Future

Nobel Prizes (cumulative) Physiology or Medicine, Peace 16 recipients National Academy of Sciences members (current) 80 National Academy of Medicine members (current) 152 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (current) 38 (4 Faculty Scholars, 33 Investigators, 1 Professor)

I

15%

I 2019–2020

I

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Boston Children’s Hospital Brigham and Women’s Hospital Cambridge Health Alliance Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute Hebrew SeniorLife Joslin Diabetes Center Judge Baker Children’s Center Massachusetts Eye and Ear | Schepens Eye Research Institute Massachusetts General Hospital McLean Hospital Mount Auburn Hospital Spaulding Rehabilitation Network VA Boston Healthcare System

13% 38%

Dean’s Report

(MD and master’s)

10

Entering 2019: PhD 165 (165 HMS) DMD 35 master’s 135 (117 HMS, 18 HSDM) DMSc 9 Additional joint degree programs: MD-MBA; MD-MPH; MD-MPP

$87,107,000

10,425 Medical school living alumni:

I

I

Affiliates

4% 6%$585M FY12-16

$87,107,000

11,694

Total faculty Tenured and tenure-track faculty on campus in 11 preclinical departments 184 Voting faculty on campus and at affiliates 6,154 Full-time faculty on campus and at affiliates 9,649

I

I

I

$97,603,850

I

$97,603,850

I

I

$113,763,436

I

I

pay long-term dividends to humanity, we are promoting collaborative learning and exploration through support from the Dean’s Innovation Grants and the Therapeutics Initiative, as well as through the establishment of the I-Hub and the increased support for enabling technologies delivered through the Foundry. These efforts, along with programs such as our epigenetics, aging and autism initiatives, are empowering faculty and staff and keeping HMS in the vanguard of biomedical research. I’m pleased to report that HMS ended FY19 with a $52 million operating GAAP surplus—the first surplus in nearly a decade—largely due to the Blavatnik Family Foundation’s commitment and benefits from the long-term lease of the Harvard Institutes of Medicine building, executed at the end of FY18. In FY19, operating revenues totaled nearly $805 million, an increase of more than $101 million compared with the prior year. Fundraising gains, much FY FY FY of 10which09will be 08disbursed in the future, accounted for more than half of the improvement. Notably, the School’s research revenue grew by roughly 4 percent, from $297 million to more than $308 million. Total operating expenses increased by $11 million, to $753 million. Managing our expenses while growing our revenues is challenging, but I remain FY FY FY focused on solidifying the underlying 10 09 08 financial and administrative strength of the institution. As we pursue our important work toward financial sustainability, we will continue implementing our ambitious plans for the future, ensuring that HMS remains at the forefront of research, education, service and clinical care. $113,763,436

I

This past year has been an exciting one for Harvard Medical School. Our faculty achieved substantially increased sponsored funding, and as mentioned previously, we had a successful accreditation site visit by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Medical Association. The outcome validated the diligent efforts of the more than 150 students, faculty and staff who participated in the year-long institutional self-study and strategic planning process, which provided a deeper insight into HMS and plotted a course for an even more successful future. The HMS medical education program received a strong endorsement from the LCME site-visit team. It is gratifying to know that the hard work and investments we made to implement the Pathways curriculum further bolstered our MD program. Countless hours were spent evaluating our curriculum, learning FY environment, advising programs, 11 student services, faculty development and finances. This extensive self-reflection resulted in a number of initiatives that will support continuous quality improvement efforts and help us strategically position the School to advance its educational and clinical care missions. All of this was achieved as the School moved closer to its goal of FY financial sustainability. To maintain11 our momentum, we will continue to rely on our close partnerships with leadership at the University and our affiliated hospitals and research institutions. The $200 million commitment from the Blavatnik Family Foundation is advancing fundamental, curiosity-driven research and catalyzing discovery and translation across HMS. Building on the principle that investments in our community will $ 94,685,992

712

I

MD applicants Admitted 227 (3.3%) MD entering 2019 165 (includes 14 MD-PhD) I Men 73 (44%) Women 92 (56%) Underrepresented in medicine (African American, Hispanic, Mexican American, Native American) 39 (24%) Asian 45 (27%)

I

Total students: MD PhD 915 (912 HMS, 3 HSDM) MD-PhD 190: basic sciences 165, social sciences 25 (total included in MD and PhD counts) DMD 140 DMD-PhD 1 (total included in DMD and PhD counts) master’s 269 (220 HMS, 49 HSDM) DMSc 39 Trainees (residents and postdoctoral fellows) 9,255

Financial Report

$ 94,685,992

HMS by the Numbers

I

FY17 $116M

Profile for Harvard Medical School

Dean's Report 2019-2020  

Harvard Medical School Annual Report

Dean's Report 2019-2020  

Harvard Medical School Annual Report