ACE c4 s27

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Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 5.Bd3 d5 6.Nf3 c5 7.0-0 dxc4 8.Bxc4 Bd7!? [Diagram

Antalya Chess Express

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2012 MayÄąs Cilt 4, SayÄą 27

Sorumlu EditĂśr/YayÄąncÄą: Dr Harun Taner

EditĂśrden Anand – Gelfand dĂźnya satranç birinciliÄ&#x;i maçĹ, 11. ve 12. oyunlarÄąn yeniĹ&#x;mezlikle sonuçlanmasÄąndan sonra 6 – 6 bitti. Rakipler sadece birer oyunda birbirlerine karĹ&#x;Äą ĂźstĂźnlĂźk saÄ&#x;layabildiler; 10 oyunda yeniĹ&#x;emediler. DĂźnya birincisi yarÄąnki hÄązlÄą ve yÄąldÄąrÄąm tempoda oynanacak eĹ&#x;itlik bozma karĹ&#x;ÄąlaĹ&#x;malarÄą ile belirlenecek.

This unusual move was introduced by David Bronstein 55 years ago and later regularly used by Victor Korchnoi and Ratmir Kholmov. As in the main line 8. ..cxd4 9. exd4 b6, in which Anand faced serious problems in game 9, Black is going to develop his bishop to the long diagonal but here he is not in a hurry to give way for the opponent's dark-squared bishop. On the other side, the c6–square may give White some extra possibilities...]

Dr Harun Taner, 29 mayÄąs Antalya

WCh 11

9.a3 [9.Qe2 is the main alternative but it might be a transposition to the same line; while 9.dxc5 has been played in the first Bronstein encounters: 9...Bc6 10.Nb5 a6 11.Nbd4 Bxc5 12.Bd2 (12.b3 Bd5 13.Bxd5 Qxd5 14.Bb2 Nbd7 15.Rc1 Rac8 16.Ne2 Be7 with a draw was the game S.Furman - D.Bronstein, USSR-ch (round 12) Moscow 1957) 12...Bd5 13.Rc1 Be7 14.Qb3 Nbd7 15.Bb4 Bxb4 16.Qxb4 Qb6 17.Qxb6 Nxb6 18.Bxd5 Nbxd5 , again with a draw, T. Petrosian – D. Bronstein, USSR-ch (round 14) Moscow 1957.] 9...Ba5!? [Black can keep his bishop, not being worried about his c5–pawn.]

Gelfand 8. ‌ Fd7 den sonra dĂźĹ&#x;ĂźnĂźrken

Gelfand,Boris (2739) − Anand,Viswanathan (2799) [E54] WCh Moscow (11), 26.05.2012 [Scherbakov,Ruslan,Taner,Harun]

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Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

novelty.] [9...cxd4 10.axb4 dxc3 11.bxc3 Qc7 12.Bd3 e5 (taking the c3–pawn by 12...Qxc3 would be risky - after 13.Ba3& White's initiative would be annoying) 13.Qc2 gave White the edge in the game A. Lesiege - V. Korchnoi, Montreal 2004; In case of 9...Bxc3 10.bxc3 Bc6 White can try to grab another bishop by 11.Ne5!? and if 11...Bd5 then 12.Be2 (12.Bd3!? Nbd7 13.Nxd7 12...cxd4 13.cxd4 Qxd7 14.f3*) (13.exd4!?) 13...Nc6 and here in the game M. Taimanov - R. Wade, Buenos Aires 1960 White could have maintained a slight edge by 14.Nxc6 Bxc6 15.f3 ]

[In case of 11...Nbd7 White would think about 12.d5 exd5 13.Nxd5 with better chances. The game L. Szabo - R. Kholmov, Leningrad 1967 continued 13...Nb6 14.Nxb6 Qxb6 and here White could have seized the initiative by the energetic 15.b4! (15.Ne5 Ba4 was fine for Black) 15...cxb4 16.axb4 (16.Ne5!?) 16...Bxb4 17.Bb2Ă–; The routine 11...Qe7 12.Bd2 promises White a small but stable advantage, according to tournament practice. 12...Bxf3 13.Qxf3 Nc6 14.dxc5 Qxc5 15.Bf1 Qe7 16.Be1 Rac8 17.g3 Bxc3 18.Bxc3 Nd5 19.Be1 Rfd8 20.Rac1 Rc7 21.e4 Nb6 22.Rxd8+ Qxd8 23.Qc3 e5 24.Qc2 Rc8 25.Bh3 Rb8 26.Bb4 Nxb4 27.axb4 Qd6 28.Qc7 Qxc7 29.Rxc7 Kf8 30.Bf1 Na8 31.Rc5 f6 32.f4 exf4 33.gxf4 Re8 34.Bb5 Rd8 ½â€“½ (34) MARIO1962,R (2376)FUY,H (2448) Engine Room 2011]

10.Qe2 [After 10.dxc5 Bxc3 11.bxc3 Qa5 White's broken pawn structure could hardly allow him to hope for advantage.] 10...Bc6 [Diagram

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12.bxc3 Nbd7 [Black is in time to prevent Nf3–e5 and secure a solid position of his bishop on c6.] 13.Bd3 [An attempt to build a pawn chain in center by 13.Nd2?! favoured Black: 13...Nb6 14.Ba2 Na4Ö and White is under pressure.] 13...Qa5!? [Diagram

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Black has put his bishops on rather unusual positions. Is Anand going to exchange both of them for the opponent's knights, as he did in the previous black game?! Hard to believe as it would be too good for White...] 11.Rd1 Bxc3! [The right time to part with one of the bishop to decrease his opponent's influence in the center. By the way, this is a 1315


Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

20.Bxc4 Qe7!? (20...Nxe4 is also playable though far more risky: 21.Bb4 Qa4 22.Qe1!? (22.Be7!? Re8 (22...Qa5!? 23.Bxd8 Rxd8 24.Ra1 Qb6 25.Qa2*) 23.Ra1 Qxa1 24.Rxa1 Rxe7 ) 22...Nb6 23.Bd3 (23.Ra1 Qxa1 24.Rxa1 Nxc41) 23...Nf6 24.Bc2 Qa6 25.Ra1 (25.Ne5!?) 25...Ba4 (25...Qc4?! 26.Bxh7+ Nxh7 27.Rxc4 Nxc4 28.Ne5) 26.Ne5 Qb5 27.Be7 Re8 28.Bxa4 Nxa4 29.Bxf6 gxf6 30.Rcb1 Qd5 31.Ng4 (31.Qe3 fxe5 32.Qg5+ Kf8 33.Qh6+ Ke7 34.Qh4+ Kf8=) 31...Qg5 32.Rb3 Nb6 33.Rg3 Kf8 34.Qb1Ö and White keeps the initiative though Black is not so bad) 21.Bb4 Qe8 22.Bd3´ Thanks to his strong pawn center and very active pieces White keeps excellent control over the position but Black is solid enough. These brief analysis show that the pawn push 14. e4!? would have posed more problems for Black but at the same time we could easily understand Gelfand's reasonings to reject such complications. Being already seriously behind in time he could judge from quick Anand's play that it could still be a part of his opponent's home preparations...]

An interesting though a double-edged approach.] [13...Be4 seemed to be a decent choice but after 14.c4 followed by Bc1–b2 White's strong bishop on the long-diagonal would still kept Black under some pressure.] 14.c4 [With only two games to play in the match Gelfand does not want to take any risk.] [14.e4!? looked fairly interesting. White could have seized the initiative but in some lines he had to sacrifice a couple of pawns: 14...Qxc3 15.Bd2! (15.Bb2 Qa5) 15...Qb3 and now: 16.Rab1 a) 16.dxc5!? e5 (16...Nxc5?! 17.Bb4) 17.Be3; b) 16.Rdc1!?; c) 16.e5!? Nd5 17.Rdb1 Qa4 18.Rc1! (18.Bxh7+? Kxh7 19.Ng5+ Kg8 20.Qd3 18...cxd4 N7f6 21.exf6 Nxf6∓) (18...Rfc8!?) 19.Rc4 Qb3 20.Nxd4 Qb2 21.Rb1 Qxa3 22.Rb3 Qa2 (22...Qa1+?! 23.Bc1 Nf4 24.Bxh7+ Kxh7 25.Qc2+ Kg8 26.Ra3 Ne2+ 27.Qxe2 Qb1 28.Rb3 Qa1 29.Rh3&) 23.Rc1Ö; 16...Qa4 17.Rdc1 Rfd8 (17...cxd4? 18.Rc4&) 18.Rc4 Qxa3 19.Rcc1!? (19.Rc3 Qa5 20.Rxc5 Qc71) 19...c4!? (19...cxd4?! 20.Bb4 Qa4 gives White a choice between winning a piece and a queen: 21.Rc2 (21.Be7 Re8 22.Ra1 Qxa1 23.Rxa1 Rxe7 24.Nxd4) 21...Bxe4 22.Bxe4 Nxe4 23.Qxe4 Nf6 24.Qd3 with a certain advantage though the outcome is still far from clear)

14...cxd4 15.exd4 Qh5 [This is a good point behind Black's queen's manoeuvre to a5. Otherwise it would be not so easy to find a good square for the queen inside of Black's camp while White would have gotten more chances to apply a typical strategy in the positions with "hanging pawns", connected with central and kingside activity, involving the thematic d4–d5 pawn push...] 16.Bf4 Rac8 [Diagram

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Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

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] 21.Rd3 [21.Bf1!? might have been more promising but Black was okay: 21...f6 (21...Nc3?! was futile: 22.Rd3 Nxa4? 23.Rg3! g6 24.Rga33 as has been pointed by Konstantin Sakaev) 22.Bf4 a6!? (22...Nc3 was still risky though Black would be able to hold on. For example, 23.Rdc1 (or 23.Rd3 Nxa4 24.Rda3 Rxd4 25.Be3 Re4 26.Bxa7 b6 (26...Nb2?! 27.R3a2) 27.Rxa4 Bxa4 28.Rxa4 b5 29.Ra1 bxc4˘) 23...Nxa4 24.d5 exd5 25.cxd5 Bd7 26.Bc7 Re8 27.Rab1 b5 28.Rxb5 Bxb5 29.Bxb5 Re4 30.d6 Nb6 and so on) 23.a5 Nd6 24.Rac1 Nf5„ with a good play.] 21...f6 22.Bf4 Be8 23.Rb3 [In case of 23.c5 Black could have forced further simplifications: 23...e5 24.dxe5 Rxd3 25.Bxd3 Nxc5 26.Bc4+ Bf7 (Sakaev).]

] 17.Ne5 [In the approaching time trouble Gelfand goes for simplifications but the main reason was, of course, that he had not found other clear ideas to pose problems for Black. For example, if Black had played ...b7–b6 then White would have thought about a-pawn advance but here it would be just harmless...]

23...Rxd4 24.Be3 Rd7 [Diagram

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17...Qxe2 18.Bxe2 Nxe5 19.Bxe5 Rfd8 [The ending is acceptable for Black.] 20.a4 [20.f3!? was worth considering but then Black could have stopped opponent's Queen-side play by 20...Nd7 21.Bg3 Nb6] 20...Ne4 [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + + + + ! + "+" " + +# $+ + + + & ' + +! "" "( ) * +*+ ,- . /012345678

] [Black also had 24...Nc5 25.Rxb7! Nxb7 26.Bxd4 Nc5 27.Be3 a5 and White's cpasser should not be dangerous; 24...Rd7 25.Bxa7 Nc5 with a good play is more reliable so after retreat of the rook the players agreed to a draw.] ½-½ 1317


Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

Gelfand,Boris (2727) − Anand,Viswanathan (2791) [E54]

till now nothing new, we are in the 9th game of the match.]

WCh Moscow (11), 26.05.2012 [Chess Evolution,Taner,Harun]

8...Bd7! [and here comes the novelty! I think a very smart decision by Anands team. The move 8...Bd7 is a very rare move and also completely forgotten. Almost never has been played on a top level - and actually the move might be even objectively a very interesting idea! Other advantage of the move is, here are no forced lines and we are in the 11th game of the match. It is clear, that both players are very tired and probably are not able anymore to find a deep refutation of some tricky line.]

[Finally Anands team is on the top and managed to surprise Gelfand in the opening, which gave him big advantage in time and probably self-confident as well. After reaching a minimally better endgame for White, Gelfand is pushing himself into troubles, by leaving only 15 minutes on the clock for the last 16 moves and at the end already a bit unpleasant position - in this moment Anand offers a draw. Strange - oh, yes. There is only one big question remaining, has Anand made a bluff by playing 13...Qa5 on which White could have played 14. e4! In case Yes -a great bluff! Very brave! In case not, I do not see how Black can avoid troubles.]

9.a3 [Played after a long thinking.] [A logical move like 9.Bd3 meets by 9...cxd4 10.exd4 Bc6 is probably nothing for White. The main Black problem in the isolany structures is the bishop on c8. Now it is already on c6, so in my opinion Black should be fine here.; 9.Bd2 would be countered by the same 9...cxd4 10.Nxd4 Nc6 Black finished his development, which means - he is doing fine!; 9.d5 this move would be a clear mistake 9...Bxc3! 10.dxe6 Bxe6 11.Bxe6 fxe6 12.bxc3 Qxd1 13.Rxd1 Ne4 and we are in an endgame, which can never be better for White. The White pawn structure a2–c3 will give Black always a good counter play!]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 [Just as in the 9th game Anand is choosing the Nimzo, and I guess here it was already clear, that Anands team has prepared something new.] 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 5.Bd3 d5 6.Nf3 c5 7.0-0 dxc4 8.Bxc4 [Diagram

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9...Ba5 [Quickly played by Anand.] [Another option would have been 9...Bxc3 10.bxc3 Bc6 Black wants to play Nbd7 and Qa5 after which position should be OK 11.Ne5! here is the key! Black is not in time for Nbd7, which should guarantee an edge for White. 11...Bd5 12.Be2! and again 1318


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Black can not play 12... Nbd7 because of 13.c4! Be4 14.f3!] 10.Qe2 [10.dxc5 would destroy White's structure 10...Bxc3 11.bxc3 Qa5 Black is fine.] 10...Bc6 [Diagram

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Till here, Anand spent not more than 5 minutes - whether his opponent more than 45.] 13.Bd3 [a very logical move. White wants to mobilze his central pawns. The main idea is to push e4!] 13...Qa5!? [Diagram

After 8...Bd7, this is development of the pieces.]

the

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logical

[After 10...Nc6 the bishop on d7 stands a bit strange, White can continue simple with 11.Rd1] 11.Rd1 [Finally White threats to take on c5] 11...Bxc3 [11...Nbd7? would be a big positional mistake 12.Bd2! now the move is getting very strong, since after 12...cxd4 13.Nxd4 Black can not avoid Nxc6, which gives the bishop pair and a clearly better position for White.]

a very risky move by Black - which was actually instantly played by the World Champion - seems like, he still follows his preparation.]

12.bxc3 Nbd7 [Diagram

[The normal response would have been 13...Be4 which might give White some 1319


Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

advantage after 14.Bxe4 Nxe4 15.Qc2! a very important and not obvious move at all, White is forcing Black into making weaknesses 15...Ndf6 (it would be nice for Black to play 15...Nef6 but after 16.e4 Whites position is a bit better) 16.c4 Qc7 17.Bb2 and White is doing slightly better, the Black knights are somehow "half pinned" and White got several ideas connected with d4–d5 move.]

leading to a worse position as well after 19.Qe4! N5f6 20.Qh4 hxg5 21.Bxg5! a cool and strong move 21...Ne4 no other defence against the mating threats 22.Bxe4 Bxe4 23.Qxe4 and I think that White got pretty good chances here to be clearly better) 19.Qg4 with a very dangerous attack.; 14.Bd2 Be4!= would solve all Blacks problems. White doesnt got the "key" move Qc2]

14.c4 [Gelfand "trusts" the preparation of Anand, but the move c4 clearly shows, that Black is doing fine now.]

14...cxd4 [I think this move is by far not forced, but Black got a clear plan in his head] [14...Rfd8 is looking normal as well, now on 15.Bb2 (15.Bd2 Qc7 and Black is fine as well) 15...cxd4! is already much stronger, the bishop on b2 is standing clearly worse than on f4 - in comparison to the game]

[14.e4! this is the move, I have been very curious about! Can Black take now on c3!? In case not - White reached everything he could. 14...Qxc3 there is no way back (14...c4 is looking nice but 15.Bc2 Qxc3 16.Rb1! a very strong move-even if not an easy one. White wants to play Rb4 now and catch the Queen by Bb2 next. 16...Qa5 17.e5 Nd5 18.Qxc4 winning back the pawn, and it is getting obvious, that White is doing much better. White is going to launch an enormous attack against the king.) 15.Bd2 Qb3 and we are in the critical position. White got many options now, but let us focus on the main 2 of them 16.a4! (also 16.Rab1!? Qa4 17.Rdc1! seems to give White quite a dangerous initiative. White wants to play Rc4, followed by e5 and dxc5 so the rook from c4 is getting into the attack on the Black king. To be honest, I could not find an easy solution for Black here, but the position requires further analyses.) 16...Qb6 the only move to save the Queen, White wanted to play Rdb1 17.e5 Nd5 18.Ng5 and White is starting the direct attack (18.Qe4!? is a very strong alternative 18...g6 19.Qh4 Black can hardly hold the threats.) 18...g6 (18...h6

15.exd4 Qh5 [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + + + + + +" " + +# $ " +!+%+ & ' + +Q "" "( ) * !*+ ,- . /012345678 the idea of Black is not to take on Bxf3 Qxf3 Qxf3 gxf3 after which White would have a better endgame, but to prevent White from playing Ne5 without the exchange of the Queens.] 16.Bf4 Rac8 [in this position Gelfand had a deep thought and went down to 40 minutes.] 1320


Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

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17.Ne5 [and the plan of Black is coming true. The future endgame is not a dangerous one. White is having a bishop pair - yes, but the pawns c4–d4, are rather weaknesses than strengths without the queens on board.. In this case, there are no potential attacking ideas against the black king.] 17...Qxe2 18.Bxe2 Nxe5 19.Bxe5 Rfd8 [Diagram

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the bishop is changing its diagonal! In this position from his last 30 minutes Gelfand thought for about 15 and played] 23.Rb3 [23.f3 would lead probably to a little bit worse but drawish position : 23...Nd6 24.Bxd6 Rxd6 25.c5 Rdd8 26.Kf2 and the king on e3 stands perfectly. White should hold the draw.; 23.c5? would be a serious mistake 23...Bg6! and White has no decent defense against Nxc5! 24.Rad1 Nxc5! 25.dxc5 Bxd3 26.Bxd3 Rd5 27.Kf1 Rcxc5 Black gets 2 pawns and a rook for the 2 bishops. White is probably not lost, but he must definitely suffer a lot for the draw.]

and we reached an endgame, where I thought, that probably we will see a very early handshake, but some action is still ahead!] 20.a4?! [a very risky move for White. Probably Gelfand missed the 22th move of Black.] [20.f3 to prevent the Ne4 ideas. 20...Ne8 followed by Kf8–Ke7 maybe f6, or maybe Nd6–Nf5. Position is drawish. (20...Nd7 is an original idea 21.Bf4 Nb6 is also interesting, trying to create pressure against the central pawns by Ba4–b3) ] 20...Ne4 21.Rd3 [To prevent c3, but on the other hand it leaves the c4 pawn without its guide. The World Champion immediately makes use it.]

23...Rxd4 24.Be3 Rd7 [Diagram

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[A nice line appears after 21.Ra3 f6 22.Bf4 Bxa4! and Black is better 23.Rxa4?? Nc3 a monster fork!] 21...f6 22.Bf4 Be8! [Diagram 1321


Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

5.Bd3 d5 6.Nf3 c5 7.0-0 dxc4 8.Bxc4 Bd7 [Diagram

and maybe the most surprising move of the game - a draw offer by Black! So strange, why now? Black is already doing slightly better and White had only 13 minutes left for the next 16 moves. Gelfand was a bit upset as well, that from his nice-looking position, suddenly he is slightly worse...These are the mysteries of the WCC match! :).]

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[the game could have continued by 24...Rd7 25.Bxa7 Nc5 26.Rb4 (26.Bxc5 Rxc5 Black is slightly better, due to his better pawnstructure.; 26.Rb5 Rd2! 27.Rxc5 Rxc5 28.Bxc5 Rxe2 is of course drawish, but Black could have pressed for a while.) 26...Nd3! 27.Bxd3 (27.Rb3 Ne5) 27...Rxd3 28.Rxb7 Bxa4 29.c5 Bc6 30.Rb8 Rxb8 31.Bxb8 Rc3 32.Bd6 g5 Such kind of endgame could have arose, where Black can improve a lot on his position by Kf7–g6, h5, g4, and e5, while White has to wait passively. But of course this kind of advantage should not be enough to win.]

Instead of ...b6–Bb7 Black plays ...Bd7– Bc6. One of the differences is that Black can preserve his bishop pair after a3, playing ...Ba5 and later ...Bb6 or c7.] 9.a3 Ba5 [0.37/0] 10.Qe2 [0.28/0] [10.dxc5 structure.]

½-½

Bxc3

destroying

White's

10...Bc6 [0.31/0] 11.Rd1 [0.14/0] Bxc3 [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + + +! " + +# $ " "%+ & ' " +Q "" "( ) * !*+ ,- . /012345678

Gelfand,Boris (2727) − Anand,Viswanathan (2791) [E54] WCh Moscow (11), 26.05.2012 [Milos,Gilberto,Taner,Harun] [At this point we have a match of two games and taking risks is more difficult. Let's see how Anand plays the last game. He is more experienced than Gelfand in world championship matches and he already beat Karpov in the last game of a match when he needed. Unfortunately he later lost that match in the rapid game tiebreaks.]

A novelty! Usually Black plays ...Qe7 or Nbd7 here. 0.16/0]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 1322


Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

knights with a dynamic pawn structure. For the public this continuation would have been much more interesting but no one wants to chance losing at this point of the match.]

[11...Nbd7 12.d5 exd5 13.Nxd5 Nb6 was played in Knaak-Yussupov 1991.] 12.bxc3 [0.16/0] Nbd7 [0.14/0] 13.Bd3 [0.12/0] Qa5 [0.36/0] [13...Be4 controlling e4 was the normal move.] 14.c4 [0.29/0]

17.Ne5 [0.22/0] Qxe2 [0.25/0] 18.Bxe2 [0.21/0] Nxe5 [0.32/0] 19.Bxe5 [0.22/0] Rfd8 [Diagram

[14.e4 looks good, but Black can accept the pawn. 14...Qxc3 15.Bd2 Qb3 and the queen escapes.] 14...cxd4 [0.24/0] 15.exd4 [D

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Now the position is very balanced and a draw is clear. 0.40/0]

This is the second Nimzo of the match and in both games Anand has chosen the same pawn structure with the same pieces remaining. 0.25/0]

20.a4 [0.16/0] Ne4 [0.09/0] 21.Rd3 [0.02/0] f6 [0.00/0] 22.Bf4 [0.04/0] Be8 [0.05/0] 23.Rb3 [0.00/0] Rxd4 24.Be3 Rd7

15...Qh5 [This is the complementary idea behind Qa5. Now Black exchange queens or can take on f3 weakening White's pawn structure. 0.64/0]

½-½

16.Bf4 [0.38/0] [16.Ng5 Qxe2 17.Bxe2 is about equal.; 16.Ne5? Qxe2 17.Bxe2 Nxe5 18.dxe5 Nd7 is better for Black.] 16...Rac8 [0.37/0] [16...Bxf3 17.gxf3 is possible, riskier, and more difficult to evaluate. White's structure is a disaster but two bishops are better than

Gelfand – Anand basĹn toplantĹsĹnda

1323


Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

49.Qe4 Kg7 1/2–1/2 Gelfand,B (2727)Anand,V (2791)/Moscow RUS 2012]

Gelfand,Boris (2739) − Anand,Viswanathan (2799) [E54]

9.a3 [9.Qe2 was expected by Kramnik.]

WCh Moscow (11), 26.05.2012 [Pein,Malcolm,Crowther,Mark,Taner,Ha run]

[9.dxc5 Bc6 10.Nb5 a6 11.Nbd4 Bxc5 12.b3 (12.Bd2 Bd5 13.Rc1 Be7 14.Qb3 Nbd7 15.Bb4 Bxb4 16.Qxb4 Qb6 17.Qxb6 Nxb6 18.Bxd5 Nbxd5 1/2–1/2 Petrosian,T-Bronstein,D/Moscow 1957/ URS-ch) 12...Bd5 13.Bxd5 Qxd5 14.Bb2 Nbd7 15.Rc1 Rac8 16.Ne2 Be7 1/2–1/2 Furman,S-Bronstein,D/Moscow 1957/URSch; 9.Qe2 cxd4 10.exd4 Bc6 "Vlad [Kramnik] was absolutely certain this would happen after Boris finished thinking. And then a game will ensue." - Svidler. 11.Rd1 Nbd7 12.Ne5 Nb6 13.Bd3 Rc8 14.Bg5 Be7 15.Nxc6 bxc6 16.Rac1 Nfd5 17.Bxe7 Qxe7 18.Bb1 Nxc3 19.Rxc3 g6 20.g3 Rfd8 21.h4 Rd6 22.Be4 Qd7 23.Rdc1 Rxd4 24.Bxc6 Qd6 25.R3c2 Rd8 26.Bg2 Rd2 27.Rxd2 Qxd2 28.Rc2 Qxe2 29.Rxe2 Rd1+ 30.Kh2 Kf8 31.b3 Ke7 32.Rc2 Nd5 33.Rc5 Rd2 34.Ra5 Rxf2 35.Kg1 Rb2 36.Rxa7+ Kf6 37.g4 h6 38.Ra5 Ne3 39.g5+ Kg7 40.Be4 Nf5 41.Ra7 h5 42.Bxf5 gxf5 43.Ra6 Kg6 44.Ra4 f6 45.Ra6 fxg5 46.hxg5 Kxg5 47.Rxe6 Rxa2 48.Re3 f4 49.Rc3 Kg4 50.b4 h4 51.b5 h3 52.b6 Rb2 53.b7 Rxb7 54.Ra3 Rb1+ 55.Kh2 Rb2+ 56.Kh1 f3 57.Ra8 Rb1+ 58.Kh2 f2 59.Rf8 Rb2 60.Kh1 Kg3 0–1 (60) Feige,M (2402)-Krivoborodov,E (2499) Schwarzach 2010]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 5.Bd3 d5 6.Nf3 c5 7.0-0 dxc4 8.Bxc4 Bd7 [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + + ! " + +# $+ % "%+ & '" " + "" "( ) * !Q+*,- . /012345678 A Bronstein creation from the Russian Championship of 1957 where he got a couple of quick draws. Catching Gelfand completely by surprise he thought for about 35 minutes.] [8...cxd4 was game 9. 9.exd4 b6 10.Bg5 Bb7 11.Qe2 Nbd7 12.Rac1 Rc8 13.Bd3 Bxc3 14.bxc3 Qc7 15.c4 Bxf3 16.Qxf3 Rfe8 17.Rfd1 h6 18.Bh4 Qd6 19.c5 bxc5 20.dxc5 Rxc5 21.Bh7+ Kxh7 22.Rxd6 Rxc1+ 23.Rd1 Rec8 24.h3 Ne5 25.Qe2 Ng6 26.Bxf6 gxf6 27.Rxc1 Rxc1+ 28.Kh2 Rc7 29.Qb2 Kg7 30.a4 Ne7 31.a5 Nd5 32.a6 Kh7 33.Qd4 f5 34.f4 Rd7 35.Kg3 Kg6 36.Qh8 Nf6 37.Qb8 h5 38.Kh4 Kh6 39.Qb2 Kg6 40.Qc3 Ne4 41.Qc8 Nf6 42.Qb8 Re7 43.g4 hxg4 44.hxg4 fxg4 45.Qe5 Ng8 46.Qg5+ Kh7 47.Qxg4 f6 48.Qg2 Kh8

9...Ba5 [0.37/0] [9...cxd4 Was Kramnik's prediction.] 10.Qe2 [0.28/0] Bc6 [0.31/0] 11.Rd1 [D

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+ + + + + + + + +! " + +# $ " % "%+ & ' " +Q "" "( ) * !*+ ,- . /012345678

+ + + + + + + + + + +! " + +# $ " " "%+ & ' + +Q "" "( ) * !*+ ,- . /012345678

0.14/0]

"So far the guess the move percentage of the super-GMs in this position is close to zero. The whole sequence that has appeared on the board has not been predicted by anybody." - Svidler talking about the press room discussion of this game so far. Nbd7 left Kramnik and Svidler "completely lost" as to what Anand is doing. 0.14/0]

11...Bxc3 [0.16/0] [11...Qe7 12.Ne5 (12.Bd2 Bb6 (12...Bxf3 13.Qxf3 Nc6 14.dxc5 Qxc5 15.Bf1 Qe7 16.Ne4 Nxe4 17.Qxe4 Bxd2 18.Rxd2 Rfd8 19.Rc2 Rd5 1/2–1/2 Donner,JKholmov,R/Havana 1965/MCD) 13.dxc5 Qxc5 14.b4 Bxf3 15.gxf3 Qh5 16.f4 Ng4 17.f3 Nf6 18.Kh1 Nc6 19.Rg1 Rad8 20.Rg5 Rxd2 21.Qxd2 Qxf3+ 22.Qg2 Qxe3 23.Rxg7+ Kh8 24.Rg3 Qd4 25.Qe2 Qxf4 26.Rf1 Qh4 27.Qf3 Bd4 28.Rh3 Qg4 29.Ne2 Be5 30.Qxg4 Nxg4 31.Bxe6 Nf6 32.Bb3 Ne4 33.Bc2 Nf6 34.Rhf3 Kg7 35.Rf5 Bb2 36.Rb1 Nd4 37.Rxb2 Nxe2 38.Bd3 1–0 Iotov,V (2321) -Cheparinov, N/Plovdiv 2004/CBM 098 ext) 12...Nbd7 13.Nxc6 bxc6 14.Na4 Bc7 1/2–1/2 Schweber,S-Damjanovic,M/Buenos Aires 1970/ MCD]

[12...Ba4 "We thought this whole point of this move order was to play 12...Ba4. Using the fact that there are no really good squares for the rook on the d-file." - Svidler. 13.Re1 Nc6 planning Na5 with a typical complex Nimzo-position. Kramnik and Svidler thought, "Ah this is the point as to why Vishy is doing what he is doing."] 13.Bd3 [0.12/0] Qa5 ["He still hasn't spent 10 minutes on entire sequence. So it is safe to assume he's still doing what he knows is best. Not just feels is best but knows is best is my point." - Svidler on Anand. 0.36/0]

12.bxc3 [0.16/0] 14.c4 [0.29/0] Nbd7 [Diagram [14.Bb2 Be4 White's position can be a bit dull with one of his bishops. Black takes the light squares, prepares e6–e5 and has no problems; 14.e4!? Was my first thought 1325


Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

14...Qxc3 15.Bd2 Qb3 Involves risk for both sides]

Malcolm Pein 0.22/0] 17...Qxe2 [0.25/0] 18.Bxe2 [0.21/0] Nxe5 [0.32/0] 19.Bxe5 [0.22/0] Rfd8 [0.40/0]

14...cxd4 [0.24/0] [14...Be4 Also a plan to remove one of the 2Bs]

20.a4 [Coming to a5 to cramp the queenside. If Black plays b6 his pawn can become weak 0.16/0] 20...Ne4 [0.09/0]

15.exd4 [0.25/0] Qh5 [Black hopes the presence of his queen will neutralise any attacking chances for White. White has to be a bit better here but not much 0.64/0]

21.Rd3 [0.02/0] f6 [0.00/0]

16.Bf4 [0.38/0]

23.Rb3 [0.00/0] Rxd4 24.Be3 Rd7 [D

22.Bf4 [Gelfand 30 mins to Anand 1hr 9 mins. 0.04/0] 22...Be8 [0.05/0]

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + "+"+ + +# $+*+ ! + & ' + +! "" "( ) * + + ,- . /012345678

Rac8 [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + + + + + +" " ! +# $ " +!+%+ & ' + +Q "" "( ) * +*+ ,- . /012345678

Gelfand 13 minutes Anand 1 hr 4 minutes. Drawn on Anand's proposal.] ½-½

Again played quite quickly. 0.37/0] 17.Ne5 [The time situation will play a huge influence on Boris Gelfand's choice of moves from now on. This commits to a position which Gelfand will be able to play quickly. "Wow, either Boris was a little unnerved by the opening surprise or just wants to grind on in a position of safety. I guess he did not like the Bxf3 option for Black and he was way behind on the clock and wants to avoid very complex play" -

Gelfand,Boris (2739) − Anand,Viswanathan (2799) [E54] WCh Moscow (11), 26.05.2012 [H2Aq,Taner,Harun] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 5.Bd3 d5 6.Nf3 c5 7.0-0 [Diagram

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+ + + + + + + + + " " + +# $+ %! "%+ & '" " + "" "( ) * !Q+*,- . /012345678

Aronian: That's a very interesting move from Vishy. I've never seen it before, but I've got a sneaky suspicion that something similar was played during the first game of the Spassky-Fischer match in Reykjavik. The one where Fischer went h2. I can't remember the exact sequence of moves, but something tells me that that's what it is. It's an extremely interesting move and you can tell it's the World Championship, that it's the strongest players in the world out there, and that they have a great deal of very serious ideas.]

] 7...dxc4 [7...Nc6 8.a3 Ba5 9.Ne2 dxc4 10.Bxc4 Bb6 11.dxc5 Qxd1 12.Rxd1 Bxc5 13.b4 Be7 14.Bb2 Bd7 15.Rac1 Rfd8 16.Ned4 Nxd4 17.Nxd4 Ba4 18.Bb3 Bxb3 19.Nxb3 Rxd1+ 20.Rxd1 Rc8 21.Kf1 Kf8 22.Ke2 Ne4 23.Rc1 Rxc1 24.Bxc1 f6 25.Na5 Nd6 26.Kd3 Bd8 27.Nc4 Bc7 28.Nxd6 Bxd6 29.b5 Bxh2 30.g3 h5 31.Ke2 h4 32.Kf3 Ke7 33.Kg2 hxg3 34.fxg3 Bxg3 35.Kxg3 Kd6 36.a4 Kd5 37.Ba3 Ke4 38.Bc5 a6 39.b6 f5 40.Kh4 f4 41.exf4 Kxf4 42.Kh5 Kf5 43.Be3 Ke4 44.Bf2 Kf5 45.Bh4 e5 46.Bg5 e4 47.Be3 Kf6 48.Kg4 Ke5 49.Kg5 Kd5 50.Kf5 a5 51.Bf2 g5 52.Kxg5 Kc4 1–0 (56) Spassky,B (2660)-Fischer,R (2785) Reykjavik 1972] 8.Bxc4 Bd7 [

9.a3 Ba5 10.Qe2 Bc6 11.Rd1 Bxc3 [D

+ + + + + + + + + +! " + +# $ " "%+ & ' " +Q "" "( ) * !*+ ,- . /012345678 Novelty]

+ + + + + + + + + ! " + +# $+ % "%+ & '" " + "" "( ) * !Q+*,- . /012345678

[11...Nbd7 12.d5 (12.Bd2 Rc8 13.dxc5 Bxf3 14.Qxf3 Ne5 15.Qe2 Rxc5 16.Bb5 Rc8 17.Rac1 a6 18.f4 Ng6 19.Bd3 Qe7 20.Ne4 Rxc1 21.Rxc1 Bxd2 22.Qxd2 Rd8 23.Nxf6+ Qxf6 24.Qc3 Qxc3 25.Rxc3 f5 26.Kf2 Rd7 27.Ke2 Ne7 28.e4 Kf7 29.exf5 exf5 30.Bc4+ Ke8 31.h3 Nd5 32.Rf3 Ke7 33.g3 g6 34.Rd3 Nf6 35.Re3+ Kd8 36.Be6 ½â€“½ (36) Schmidt,G (2473)-Hribersek,J (2336) ICCF Email 2005) 12...exd5 13.Nxd5 Nb6 14.Nf4 Qc7 15.Ba2 Rae8 16.Bd2 Bxd2 17.Rxd2 Ne4 18.Rc2 Qe7 19.Rac1 Ba4 20.b3 Bc6 1327


Antalya Chess Express c4 s27

21.Nd2 Nd7 22.Bb1 Qg5 23.Nf1 Re7 24.Qd1 Rfe8 25.f3 Nef6 26.Nh3 Qh6 27.Rd2 Ne5 28.Nf2 Bb5 29.f4 Ng6 30.Bd3 Bxd3 31.Rxd3 b6 32.Rd8 Nh4 33.Ng4 Qg6 34.Nxf6+ Qxf6 35.Qd7 Kf8 36.Rxe8+ Rxe8 37.Rd1 g6 38.Qxa7 Qc6 39.Rd2 Ra8 40.Qd7 Qxd7 41.Rxd7 Rxa3 42.Nd2 Ke8 43.Rd5 Nf5 44.g4 Ne7 45.Rd3 f5 46.g5 b5 47.Rd6 Ra2 48.e4 Rc2 49.e5 Nc8 50.Rd3 c4 51.bxc4 bxc4 52.Rd4 c3 53.Nb3 Nb6 54.Rb4 Nd5 55.Rb8+ Ke7 56.Rb7+ Kd8 57.e6 Kc8 58.Rb5 Nxf4 59.Nd4 Rd2 60.Rc5+ Kd8 61.Nf3 Rb2 62.Nd4 Rb1+ 0–1 (62) Knaak,R (2515)-Jussupow,A (2605) Hamburg 1991; 11...Qe7 12.Bd2 Bxf3 13.Qxf3 Nc6 14.dxc5 Qxc5 15.Be2 (15.Bf1 Qe7 16.b4 Bc7 17.Na4 Ne5 18.Qe2 Rad8 19.Be1 h5 20.Nc5 Bd6 21.Nb3 g5 22.Nd4 g4 23.f4 gxf3 24.gxf3 Ng6 25.Kh1 Nd5 26.f4 Qf6 27.Bg2 Bb8 28.Rac1 Ndxf4 29.Qf2 Nd5 30.Qxf6 Nxf6 31.Bxb7 Ng4 32.Nc6 Rxd1 33.Rxd1 Nxe3 34.Rc1 Bf4 35.Rc5 f5 36.Nxa7 Rf7 37.Rb5 Nc2 38.Bf2 Nxa3 39.Rb6 Kh7 40.Nc8 Nc4 41.Rb5 Rd7 42.Ba6 Rd1+ 43.Kg2 Ne3+ 44.Bxe3 Bxe3 45.Rb7+ Kh6 46.Kf3 Re1 47.Nd6 Ne5+ 48.Kg2 Rg1+ 49.Kh3 Ng4 50.Nf7+ Kg6 51.Nh8+ Kg5 52.Nf7+ Kf6 53.Be2 Rh1 54.Kg2 Rxh2+ 55.Kf1 Rh1+ 56.Kg2 Rg1+ 57.Kf3 h4 0–1 (57) Furman Semen-Osnos Viatcheslav 1964) 15...Qe5 16.Rac1 Rfd8 17.b4 Bb6 18.Rc2 Rac8 19.Rdc1 Rc7 20.Nb5 Rxd2 21.Rxd2 Nd4 22.Nxc7 Nxf3+ 23.gxf3 g5 24.Rdc2 Kg7 25.Bf1 a6 26.Bg2 a5 27.bxa5 Qxa5 28.Rc3 h5 29.Bh3 Kg6 30.Bf1 Kh6 31.Nb5 Nd5 32.Rb3 Qd2 33.Rcb1 Bc5 34.R3b2 Qa5 35.Bc4 Nf6 36.Rd1 b6 37.Rbd2 g4 38.f4 Qa4 39.Bd3 Nd5 40.Re1 h4 41.Bf1 g3 42.hxg3 hxg3 43.Nd4 Qa5 44.Nf3 Qc3 45.Kh1 gxf2 46.Rxf2 Nxe3 47.Rd2 Ng4 48.Kg2 Qf6 49.Rde2 Qf5 50.Kg3 Nf6

51.Rh2+ Nh5+ 52.Rxh5+ Qxh5 53.Bd3 Qd5 54.Be4 Qa2 55.Rh1+ Kg7 56.Rh7+ Kg8 57.Rh2 Qxa3 58.Re2 Bd6 59.Rd2 Qc5 60.Bb1 Qb4 61.Rd4 Bxf4+ 62.Rxf4 Qxb1 63.Ra4 b5 64.Rg4+ Kf8 65.Kf2 Qc2+ 66.Kg3 Qc3 67.Kf2 b4 68.Rd4 b3 69.Rd1 b2 0–1 (69) Deep Sjeng 3.0 64–bit 4CPU (3025)-Spark 1.0 64–bit 4CPU (3116) CCRL 2011] 12.bxc3 Nbd7N [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + + + +! " + +# $ " " "%+ & ' + +Q "" "( ) * !*+ ,- . /012345678 ] [12...Qc7 13.Bd3 Be4 14.a4 Nbd7 15.h3 Rfd8 16.Ba3 Rac8 17.Nd2 Bxd3 18.Qxd3 h6 19.Rac1 a6 20.Qc2 cxd4 21.exd4 Nb6 22.Bc5 Nbd5 23.c4 b6 24.cxd5 Rxd5 25.Nb3 bxc5 26.Nxc5 Qd8 27.Qd3 a5 28.Nb3 Rb8 29.Rc5 Ne4 30.Qxe4 Rxb3 31.Qc2 Rb8 32.Qd2 g5 33.Rc4 Kg7 34.f4 Qd6 35.fxg5 Rxg5 36.Qc2 Rb4 37.Rd3 Rd5 38.Kh1 Qf4 39.Rd1 h5 40.Qc3 Rxc4 41.Qxc4 Qd6 42.Qd3 Qb4 43.Qg3+ Kf8 44.Rf1 Qxa4 45.Qf4 Qd7 46.Rf3 Qe8 47.Qf6 Rb5 48.Kg1 Rb1+ 49.Kh2 Rb7 50.Qh6+ Ke7 ½â€“½ (58) Vt100,R (2428)Druideruiter,R (2468) 5m + 0s, rated 2009] 13.Bd3 Qa5 14.c4 cxd4 15.exd4 Qh5 16.Bf4 Rac8 [Diagram

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Z0] [24...Rd7 25.Bxa7 Nc5 26.Bxc5 Rxc5 27.a5 Rdc7 28.f3 Kf8 29.Rb6 e5 30.Kf2 Bg6 31.g3 Ke7 32.Ra2 Bf7 Houdini Aquarium (0:01:49) +0.02|d24] ½-½

Gelfand,Boris (2727) − Anand,Viswanathan (2791) [E54] WCh Moscow (11), 26.05.2012 [Prado,Oscar de,Taner,Harun]

] 17.Ne5 Qxe2 18.Bxe2 Nxe5 19.Bxe5 Rfd8 20.a4 Ne4 [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + + + + ! + "+" " + +# $+ + + + & ' + +! "" "( ) * +*+ ,- . /012345678

[11a partida del Mundial y es la Ăşltima partida de Gelfand con blancas.] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 [D

+ + + + + + + + + " " + +# $+ % " + & '" " + "" "( ) * !Q,-! %*. /012345678

] 21.Rd3 f6 22.Bf4 Be8 23.Rb3 Rxd4 24.Be3 Rd7 [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + "+"+ + +# $+*+ ! + & ' + +! "" "( ) * + + ,- . /012345678

Anand repite la Nimzoindia y Gelfand vuelve a jugar la variante Rubinstein,veremos quiĂŠn se desvĂ­a primero respecto a la 9a partida.] 4...0-0 5.Bd3 d5 6.Nf3 c5 7.0-0 dxc4 8.Bxc4 Bd7!? [Diagram

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+ + + + + + + + + ! " + +# $+ % "%+ & '" " + "" "( ) * !Q+*,- . /012345678

13.Bxd5 Qc7 14.Bxc6 Qxc6 15.a3 (15.Bd2 Bxd2 16.Rxd2 Nf6 17.Rad1 Qe6 18.a3 Qe7 19.h3 Rfd8 20.Qb5 Rxd2 21.Rxd2 Rc8 22.a4 g6 23.Qc4 Rc7 24.Qf4 Kg7 25.Ne5 h5 26.g4 hxg4 27.hxg4 b6 28.Rd1 Qe6 29.Kg2 Re7 30.Rh1 Ng8 31.Nf3 Qd5 32.Kg3 f6 33.g5 fxg5 34.Qxg5 Qxg5+ 35.Nxg5 Nf6 36.Rh4 Re5 37.Nf3 Re7 1/2โ 1/2 (37) Del Rio de Angelis,S (2521) -Georgiev,K (2662) Marrakesh MAR 2010) 15...Ba5 16.b4 Bc7 17.Bb2 Rad8 18.Rac1 b6 19.Qc4 Rfe8 20.Rd5 Qe6 21.Ng5 Qg6 22.h4 h6 23.Nf3 Qe6 24.Rcd1 Nf6 25.Bxf6 Qxf6 26.Rxd8 Rxd8 27.Rxd8+ Qxd8 28.bxc5 Qd1+ 29.Qf1 Qb3 30.Qc1 bxc5 31.Nd2 Qd3 32.g3 Ba5 33.Nc4 Bc3 34.Qf1 Qc2 35.Qg2 Qd1+ 36.Qf1 Qc2 37.Qg2 Qd1+ 38.Kh2 Qd3 39.Qa8+ Kh7 0โ 1 (39) Beliavsky,A (2667)-Korchnoi,V (2579) Paks HUN 2004) 11.Bd2 Bxf3 12.Qxf3 Nc6 13.Be1 cxd4 14.exd4 Rad8 15.Qe3 Ba5 16.Bb5 Nb4 17.Rac1 Bb6 18.Na4 Nbd5 19.Qb3 Bc7 20.g3 Rc8 21.Bf1 Bb8 22.Bg2 Rxc1 23.Rxc1 Rd8 24.Nc5 b6 25.Nd3 h6 26.Rc4 Qe8 27.Qc2 Ne7 28.a4 Nfd5 29.Ne5 Rc8 30.Rxc8 Qxc8 31.Qxc8+ Nxc8 32.Nc6 Bd6 33.b4 Kf8 34.b5 Ke8 35.Kf1 f6 36.Ke2 Kd7 37.Kd3 a6 38.Kc4 axb5+ 39.axb5 Bf8 40.Bxd5 Nd6+ 41.Kd3 exd5 42.Bb4 h5 43.h3 g6 44.Bxd6 1/2โ 1/2 (44) Neverov,V (2562) -Jussupow,A (2645) Ohrid 2001]

Y aquรญ estรก la sorpresa de Anand que elige una variante secundaria y poco jugada, en la 9a partida jugรณ 8....cxd4. Ad7 ha sido jugada por jugadores como Yusupov y Korchnoi. Tras pensar 40 minutos!! Gelfand se decide por esta lรณgica jugada, parece que la elecciรณn de Anand le cogiรณ por sorpresa.] 9.a3 [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + + ! " + +# $ " % "%+ & ' " + "" "( ) * !Q+*,- . /012345678

9...Ba5 [9...cxd4 10.axb4 dxc3 11.bxc3 Qc7 12.Bd3 e5 13.Qc2 Re8 14.Nd2 Nc6 15.Ba3 Rad8 16.c4 Be6 17.Ne4 Nxe4 18.Bxe4 h6 19.b5 Na5 20.Bb4 Nxc4 21.Rxa7 Bd5 22.h3 Bxe4 23.Qxe4 Rd7 24.Rc1 Qb8 25.Raa1 Nb6 26.Rc5 Rc7 27.Rxc7 Qxc7 28.Ra7 Rb8 29.Ba5 h5 30.h4 g6 31.Kh2 f5 32.Bxb6 Qxb6 33.Qd5+ Kh7 34.Ra4 Qf6 35.g3 Qe7 36.b6 Rd8 37.Qc4 Qd7 38.Ra5 Rc8 39.Rd5 Qe6 40.Qb5 Rc6

Tras pensar 40 minutos!! Gelfand se decide por esta lรณgica jugada, parece que la elecciรณn de Anand le cogiรณ por sorpresa.] [Lo mรกs empleado es 9.Qe2 Bc6 10.Rd1 Qe7 (10...Nbd7 11.d5 exd5 12.Nxd5 Nxd5 1330


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Rxa3 26.Qxc6 Rb3 27.Re4 g6 28.Rce1 Rd3 29.Re8 Rd8 30.R8e7 Qf4 31.R7e4 Qb8 32.Re7 Qf4 33.Qe4 Rd4 34.Qxf4 Rxf4 35.R1e4 Rf6 36.Re8 Rf5 37.R8e5 Rxe5 38.Rxe5 Rb8 39.f4 h5 40.Kf2 Kg7 41.g4 Rc8 42.Rxb5 Rc3 43.gxh5 Rxh3 44.hxg6 fxg6 45.Rd5 Rb3 46.b5 Kf6 47.Ke2 Ke6 48.Rc5 Ke7 49.Re5+ Kf7 50.Rc5 Ke7 51.Re5+ Kd7 52.Kf2 Kd6 53.Ke2 Kd7 54.b6 Rxb6 1/2–1/2 (54) Peralta,F (2574)Lopez Martinez,J (2508) Barcelona ESP 2006]

41.Rxe5 Qa2 42.Kg2 Rc2 43.Qf1 Qb2 44.Re7+ Kh6 45.Rxb7 Rc1 46.Qd3 Rc2 1/2–1/2 (46) Lesiege,A (2497)Kortschnoj,V (2568) Montreal CAN 2004; 9...Bxc3 10.bxc3 Bc6 11.Re1 (11.Ne5 Bd5 12.Bd3 Nbd7 13.c4 Be4 14.Nxd7 Qxd7 15.Be2 Rfd8 16.Bb2 Qe7 17.f3 Bc6 18.Qb3 Ne8 19.Rad1 Nc7 20.Rd2 Rab8 21.Rfd1 Qe8 22.dxc5 Rxd2 23.Rxd2 Qe7 24.Be5 Rd8 25.Rxd8+ Qxd8 26.Qd3 Qc8 27.Qd6 Na6 28.Qe7 Qf8 29.Qxf8+ Kxf8 30.Bd6+ Ke8 31.e4 Kd7 32.e5 Nc7 33.Bd3 h6 34.Bf8 Ne8 35.Kf2 h5 36.h4 g6 37.Ke3 Nc7 38.g4 Ba4 39.Kf4 Bd1 40.Be4 Kc8 41.gxh5 gxh5 1–0 (43) 42.Kg5 Be2 43.Kxh5 Gheorghiu,F-Medina,A Palma de Mallorca 1968) 11...Nbd7 12.Bb2 Qa5 13.Bd3 cxd4 14.cxd4 Be4 15.Ne5 Bxd3 16.Nxd7 Nxd7 17.Qxd3 Rac8 18.Rec1 Nb6 1/2–1/2 (18) Geller,E-Keres,P Moscow plof (Curacao ct 2pl) 1962]

10...Bc6 [10...Qe7 11.Bd2 Bb6 12.Rfd1 Bc6 13.dxc5 Qxc5 14.b4 Bxf3 15.gxf3 Qg5+ 16.Kh1 Qh4 17.Rg1 Rd8 18.Bd3 Nc6 19.Ne4 Nxe4 20.Bxe4 f5 21.Bc2 Bc7 22.f4 Qf6 23.Bb3 Bxf4 24.exf4 Qb2 25.Qxe6+ Kh8 26.Ra2 Qd4 27.Be3 Qd3 28.Bc2 Qc3 29.Qxf5 g6 30.Qc5 Qf6 31.b5 Nd4 32.Qe5 1–0 (32) Panno-Schweber Australia 1969] 11.Rd1 Bxc3N [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + + +! " + +# $ " "%+ & ' " +Q "" "( ) * !*+ ,- . /012345678

10.Qe2 [Diagram

+ + + + + + + + +! " + +# $ " % "%+ & ' " +Q "" "( ) * ! +*,- . /012345678

Llega la novedad de Anand, en las partidas anteriores se habĂ­an jugado De7 y Cbd7.]

] [10.Qc2 cxd4 11.exd4 Bc6 12.Be2 Bxf3 13.Bxf3 Nc6 14.Bxc6 bxc6 15.Qa4 Bb6 16.Be3 Qd6 17.h3 Rab8 18.b4 e5 19.dxe5 Qxe5 20.Bxb6 axb6 21.Rac1 b5 22.Qc2 Ra8 23.Rfe1 Qb8 24.Ne4 Nxe4 25.Qxe4

[11...Nbd7 12.d5 exd5 13.Nxd5 Nb6 14.Nf4 Qc7 15.Ba2 Rae8 16.Bd2 Bxd2 17.Rxd2 Ne4 18.Rc2 Qe7 19.Rac1 Ba4 20.b3 Bc6 21.Nd2 Nd7 22.Bb1 Qg5 23.Nf1 Re7 1331


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24.Qd1 Rfe8 25.f3 Nef6 26.Nh3 Qh6 27.Rd2 Ne5 28.Nf2 Bb5 29.f4 Ng6 30.Bd3 Bxd3 31.Rxd3 b6 32.Rd8 Nh4 33.Ng4 Qg6 34.Nxf6+ Qxf6 35.Qd7 Kf8 36.Rxe8+ Rxe8 37.Rd1 g6 38.Qxa7 Qc6 39.Rd2 Ra8 40.Qd7 Qxd7 41.Rxd7 Rxa3 42.Nd2 Ke8 43.Rd5 Nf5 44.g4 Ne7 45.Rd3 f5 46.g5 b5 47.Rd6 Ra2 48.e4 Rc2 49.e5 Nc8 50.Rd3 c4 51.bxc4 bxc4 52.Rd4 c3 53.Nb3 Nb6 54.Rb4 Nd5 55.Rb8+ Ke7 56.Rb7+ Kd8 57.e6 Kc8 58.Rb5 Nxf4 59.Nd4 Rd2 60.Rc5+ Kd8 61.Nf3 Rb2 62.Nd4 Rb1+ 0โ 1 (62) Knaak,R (2515)-Jussupow,A (2605) Hamburg 1991; 11...Qe7 12.Bd2 Bxf3 13.Qxf3 Nc6 14.dxc5 Qxc5 15.Bf1 Qe5 16.g3 Rfd8 17.Rac1 Rd7 18.b4 Bb6 19.Na4 Qe4 20.Qxe4 Nxe4 21.Be1 Rxd1 22.Rxd1 Rd8 23.Rxd8+ Nxd8 24.Nxb6 axb6 25.f3 Nd6 26.b5 Kf8 27.Bc3 f6 28.Bd3 h6 29.Bb4 Ke7 30.f4 Kd7 31.e4 N8f7 32.Kf2 g6 33.e5 fxe5 34.Bxg6 exf4 35.gxf4 e5 36.Kf3 Ke6 37.a4 Kd5 38.h4 Ke6 39.Bc2 Nf5 40.Bb3+ Kf6 41.fxe5+ Nxe5+ 42.Ke4 Nxh4 43.Bc3 Nhg6 44.Bd4 h5 45.Bxb6 Nd7 46.Bd4+ Ke7 47.a5 h4 48.Bd5 h3 49.Bxb7 Kd6 50.Bg1 Nc5+ 51.Kf3 Ne5+ 52.Kg3 h2 53.Kxh2 Nxb7 54.a6 Nf3+ 55.Kh1 1โ 0 (55) Korchnoi, V-Matanovic,A Palma de Mallorca 1968]

De nuevo Gelfand tiene la ventaja de la pareja de alfiles pero todas las piezas negras estรกn bien colocadas y activas y la posiciรณn estรก igualada, lo รบnico es que Gelfand tiene casi 1 hora menos de tiempo y decide simplificar la posiciรณn cambiando damas.] 17.Ne5 [17.Rab1 Rfe8 18.Bg3 b6=; 17.Nd2 e5! 18.Bxe5 Nxe5 19.Qxe5 Qxe5 20.dxe5 Nd7=] 17...Qxe2 18.Bxe2 Nxe5 19.Bxe5 Rfd8 20.a4 [20.f3!?] 20...Ne4 21.Rd3 f6 22.Bf4 Be8 23.Rb3 [23.c5 e5=] 23...Rxd4 24.Be3 Rd7 [Diagram

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12.bxc3 Nbd7 [Anand seguรญa jugando muy rรกpido y tenรญa mรกs de 50 minutos de ventaja.] 13.Bd3 Qa5 14.c4 [Era interesante 14.e4!? Qxc3 (14...c4 15.Bc2*) 15.Bd2 Qb3 16.e5 Nd5 17.Rdb1 Qa4 18.Rc1ห ; 14.Bb2 Be4 15.c4 Rad8=] 14...cxd4 15.exd4 Qh5 16.Bf4 Rac8 [D

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y Anand ofreció tablas que fueron aceptadas, la posición estå igualada y a Gelfand le quedan solo 15 minutos para pasar el control. Todo queda pendiente de la última partida donde Anand llevarå blancas.] [24...Rd7 25.Bxa7 Nc5=] ½-½

las negras pueden preservar su pareja de alfiles tras a3, jugando ... Aa5 y mĂĄs tarde ...Ab6 o c7.] 9.a3 Ba5 [0.37/0] 10.Qe2 [0.28/0] [10.dxc5 Bxc3 destruyendo la estructura de las blancas.] 10...Bc6 [0.31/0] 11.Rd1 [0.14/0] Bxc3 [ÂĄUna novedad! Normalmente las negras juegan ...De7 o Cbd7 aquĂ­. 0.16/0] [11...Nbd7 12.d5 exd5 13.Nxd5 Nb6 se jugĂł en Knaak-Yussupov 1991.] 12.bxc3 [0.16/0] Nbd7 [0.14/0] 13.Bd3 [0.12/0] Qa5 [0.36/0] [13...Be4 controlando e4 era la jugada normal.]

Gelfand,Boris (2727) − Anand,Viswanathan (2791) [E54] WCh Moscow (11), 26.05.2012 [Milos,Gilberto,Taner,Harun]

14.c4 [0.29/0] [14.e4 tiene buena pinta, pero las negras pueden aceptar el peon. 14...Qxc3 15.Bd2 Qb3 y la dama escapa.] 14...cxd4 [0.24/0] 15.exd4 [Diagram

[En este momento tenemos un duelo a dos partidas y asumir riesgos es mĂĄs difĂ­cil. Veamos como juega Anand la Ăşltima partida. Tiene mĂĄs experiencia que Gelfand en duelos de campeonatos mundiales y ya derrotĂł a Karpov en la Ăşltima partida de un duelo cuando lo necesitĂł. Desgraciadamente, posteriormente perdiĂł aquel duelo en el desempate a partidas rĂĄpidas.]

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1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 5.Bd3 d5 6.Nf3 c5 7.0-0 dxc4 8.Bxc4 Bd7 [Diagram

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Esta es la segunda Nimzo del duelo y en ambas partidas Anand ha escogido la misma estructura de peones con las mimas piezas restantes. 0.25/0] 15...Qh5 [0.64/0 esta es la idea complementaria tras Da5. Ahora las negras cambian damas o pueden tomar en f3 debilitando la estructura de peones de las blancas.] 16.Bf4 [0.38/0] [16.Ng5 Qxe2 17.Bxe2 estĂĄ mĂĄs o menos igualado.; 16.Ne5? Qxe2 17.Bxe2 Nxe5 18.dxe5 Nd7 es mejor para las negras.] 16...Rac8

En vez de ...b6–Ab7 las negras juegan ...Ad7–Ac6. Una de las diferencias es que 1333


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[0.37/0] [16...Bxf3 17.gxf3 es posible, mĂĄs arriesgado y mĂĄs difĂ­cil de valorar. La estructura de las blancas es un desastre, pero dos alfiles son mejores que caballos con una estructura de peones dinĂĄmica. Para el pĂşblico esta continuaciĂłn hubiera sido mucho mĂĄs interesante, pero nadie quiere arriesgarse a perder a estas alturas del duelo.] 17.Ne5 [0.22/0] Qxe2 [0.25/0] 18.Bxe2 [0.21/0] Nxe5 [0.32/0] 19.Bxe5 [0.22/0] Rfd8 [Diagram

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Soweit folgten die Spieler der neunten WMPartie, doch mit] 8...Bd7 [schlug der Weltmeister einen anderen Weg ein. Dieser Zug wird deutlich seltener gespielt, gehĂśrt aber definitiv zu den zahlreichen Hauptvarianten des Nimzoinders. Ein Freund dieses Läuferzuges ist beispielsweise der legendäre Viktor Korchnoi. Gelfand jedenfalls schien zumindest leicht Ăźberrascht, denn er nahm sich schon in diesem frĂźhen Stadium der Partie sehr viel Zeit.] [8...cxd4 9.exd4 b6 10.Bg5 Bb7 11.Qe2 Nbd7 12.Rac1 Rc8 13.Bd3 Bxc3 14.bxc3 Qc7 15.c4 Bxf3 16.Qxf3 Rfe8 17.Rfd1 h6 18.Bh4 Qd6 19.c5 bxc5 20.dxc5 Rxc5 21.Bh7+ Kxh7 22.Rxd6 Rxc1+ 23.Rd1 Rec8 24.h3 Ne5 25.Qe2 Ng6 26.Bxf6 gxf6 27.Rxc1 Rxc1+ 28.Kh2 Rc7 29.Qb2 Kg7 30.a4 Ne7 31.a5 Nd5 32.a6 Kh7 33.Qd4 f5 34.f4 Rd7 35.Kg3 Kg6 36.Qh8 Nf6 37.Qb8 h5 38.Kh4 Kh6 39.Qb2 Kg6 40.Qc3 Ne4 41.Qc8 Nf6 42.Qb8 Re7 43.g4 hxg4 44.hxg4 fxg4 ½â€“½ (49) Gelfand,B-Anand,V Moscow 2012] 9.a3 [Nach Ăźber 30 Minuten des Nachdenkens gespielt.] [Sofort 9.Qe2 lautet eine weitere Hauptfortsetzung. z. B. 9...Bc6 10.Rd1 Nbd7 11.d5 exd5 12.Nxd5 Nxd5 13.Bxd5 Qc7 14.Bxc6 Qxc6 15.a3 Ba5 16.b4 Bc7 17.Bb2 Rad8 18.Rac1 b6 19.Qc4

Ahora la posicion esta muy equilibrada y las tablas son claras. 0.40/0] 20.a4 [0.16/0] Ne4 [0.09/0] 21.Rd3 [0.02/0] f6 [0.00/0] 22.Bf4 [0.04/0] Be8 [0.05/0] 23.Rb3 [0.00/0] Rxd4 24.Be3 Rd7 ½-½

Gelfand,Boris (2727) − Anand,Viswanathan (2791) [E54] WCh Moscow (11), 26.05.2012 [Chess Tigers,Taner,Harun] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 5.Bd3 d5 6.Nf3 c5 7.0-0 dxc4 8.Bxc4 [

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56.Rb7+ Kd8 57.e6 Kc8 58.Rb5 Nxf4 59.Nd4 Rd2 60.Rc5+ Kd8 61.Nf3 Rb2 62.Nd4 Rb1+ 0–1 Knaak (2515) - Jussupow (2605), Hamburg 1991] 12.bxc3 Nbd7 [D

Rfe8 20.Rd5 Qe6 21.Ng5 Qg6 22.h4 h6 23.Nf3 Qe6 24.Rcd1 Nf6 25.Bxf6 Qxf6 26.Rxd8 Rxd8 27.Rxd8+ Qxd8 28.bxc5 Qd1+ 29.Qf1 Qb3 30.Qc1 bxc5 31.Nd2 Qd3 32.g3 Ba5 33.Nc4 Bc3 34.Qf1 Qc2 35.Qg2 Qd1+ 36.Qf1 Qc2 37.Qg2 Qd1+ 38.Kh2 Qd3 39.Qa8+ Kh7 0–1 Beliavsky (2667) - Korchnoi (2579), Paks 2004]

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9...Ba5 10.Qe2 Bc6 11.Rd1 Bxc3!?N [

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Die schwarze Strategie zielt auf die Kontrolle von d5 und e4 ab und den zunächst schlecht postierten schwarzfeldrigen Läufer von WeiĂ&#x;.] 13.Bd3 [WeiĂ&#x; seinerseits mĂśchte eventuell e4 spielen und mit] 13...Qa5 [gestattet es der Weltmeister sogar.] [13...Be4 , um den weiĂ&#x;en e-Bauer zu blockieren, war auch eine mĂśgliche Idee. z. B. 14.Nd2 Bxd3 15.Qxd3 Qc7=] 14.c4 [Diagram

Das kam durchaus Ăźberraschend, denn Schwarz hätte ja schlieĂ&#x;lich schon nach 9.a3 auf c3 schlagen kĂśnnen. Aber offenbar wollte Anand erst den weiĂ&#x;en Turm auf d1 sehen, bevor sich am Springer schadlos hält.] [11...Qe7 und 11...Sbd7 wurden bisher gespielt.; z. B. 11...Nbd7 12.d5 exd5 13.Nxd5 Nb6 14.Nf4 Qc7 15.Ba2 Rae8 16.Bd2 Bxd2 17.Rxd2 Ne4 18.Rc2 Qe7 19.Rac1 Ba4 20.b3 Bc6 21.Nd2 Nd7 22.Bb1 Qg5 23.Nf1 Re7 24.Qd1 Rfe8 25.f3 Nef6 26.Nh3 Qh6 27.Rd2 Ne5 28.Nf2 Bb5 29.f4 Ng6 30.Bd3 Bxd3 31.Rxd3 b6 32.Rd8 Nh4 33.Ng4 Qg6 34.Nxf6+ Qxf6 35.Qd7 Kf8 36.Rxe8+ Rxe8 37.Rd1 g6 38.Qxa7 Qc6 39.Rd2 Ra8 40.Qd7 Qxd7 41.Rxd7 Rxa3 42.Nd2 Ke8 43.Rd5 Nf5 44.g4 Ne7 45.Rd3 f5 46.g5 b5 47.Rd6 Ra2 48.e4 Rc2 49.e5 Nc8 50.Rd3 c4 51.bxc4 bxc4 52.Rd4 c3 53.Nb3 Nb6 54.Rb4 Nd5 55.Rb8+ Ke7

+ + + + + + + + + + +" " + +# $ " +! "%+ & ' + +Q "" "( ) * !*+ ,- . /012345678 Gelfand wählt Herangehensweise.] 1335

eine

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[14.e4 bot sich natĂźrlich an und hätte zu allerlei Verwicklungen gefĂźhrt. Besonders dann, wenn Schwarz das Bauernopfer annimmt: 14...Qxc3 15.Bd2 Qb3 (15...Qb2?? 16.Rdb1+-) 16.a4!? Qb6 mit unklarer Lage. WeiĂ&#x; hat fĂźr den Bauern das Läuferpaar und die bessere Entwicklung.] 14...cxd4 15.exd4 Qh5 [Diagram

Schlecht ist die ErĂśffnung fĂźr WeiĂ&#x; nicht gelaufen, er steht mit dem Läuferpaar leicht besser. Aber dafĂźr hatte Gelfand hier fast eine Stunde weniger auf der Uhr als Anand!] 19...Rfd8 20.a4 [Laut Bischoff die schärfste Herangehensweise an die Stellung.] [20.f3 , um dem schwarzen Springer das Feld e4 zu nehmen kam auch in Betracht.] 20...Ne4 [Anand wählt seinerseits die prinzipiellste Fortsetzung. Es "droht" Sc3, was Gelfand mit] 21.Rd3 [bedient.] 21...f6 22.Bf4 Be8! [Nun Ăźbt Schwarz maximalen Druck auf das weiĂ&#x;e Zentrum aus.] 23.Rb3 [23.c5 lautet der Vorschlag der meisten Computer, allerdings schwächt dieser Zug das Feld d5 empfindlich.] 23...Rxd4 24.Be3 Rd7 [D

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Der Schwenk auf den KÜnigsflßgel war also der eigentliche Plan von Da5.] 16.Bf4 [Der natßrliche Zug mit der Idee Se5.] 16...Rac8 [16...Bxf3!? wollte Anand offenkundig nicht, denn dann hätte er erneut mit zwei Springern gegen das Läuferpaar spielen mßssen.] 17.Ne5 Qxe2 18.Bxe2 Nxe5 19.Bxe5 [

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Mit Remisangebot gespielt, akzeptiert wurde.] ½-½

Redaksiyon Dr Harun Taner

1336

welches


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