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International Services Resource Guide

Switzerland new zealand

ireland

iSrael

argentina

england

SPain

Cayman iSlandS

Puerto riCo

denmark

ruSSia

Virgin iSlandS

Portugal

netherlandS Canada

BahamaS italy

Fiji

B e lg i u m

FranCe

auStralia

greeCe

mexiCo

hong kong

auStria united StateS norway

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

www.HarryNorman.com


a meSSage From our PreSident Harry Norman, REALTORS® is committed to providing exceptional real estate service to all of our customers and clients. Since 1930, we have been part of the Atlanta community and it is our pleasure to help others make Atlanta home. We know the Atlanta area and the local housing market because we have watched Atlanta grow into a world class city. At Harry Norman, REALTORS®, we understand and appreciate the unique needs of the international community. Our company has sales associates who are fluent in most of the world’s languages. They have special training in various cultural customs to assist our international clients as they adjust to their new environment. Many of our sales associates have earned the Accredited International Specialist (AIS) designation. This designation is only awarded to Harry Norman, REALTORS® real estate professionals who have completed the requisite education and have a commitment to working with international and multicultural clients. Harry Norman, REALTORS® also has an International Council comprised of sales associates who have completed the National Association of REALTORS® Certified International Property Specialist (CIPS) designation, the AIS or both and are interested in being active in serving the international community. As a team, we are committed to serving the international community’s real estate needs in greater Atlanta or anywhere in the world. We do this by providing service with awareness, sensitivity and experience. The Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide is part of our commitment to ease the process and make the American Dream of home ownership attainable for all. We trust that you will find this guide helpful and your experience with Harry Norman, REALTORS® the best move you’ve ever made.

Sincerely,

Dan Parmer, President & CEO

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

www.HarryNorman.com

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taBle oF ContentS Letter from the President About Harry Norman, REALTORS速 About HomeServices of America

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For the Sales Associate

International Resettlement Services New Area Information Pre-Departure Checklist International Destination Services Preparing the International Welcome Package & Area Presentation Lending Guidelines for Non-U.S. Citizen Borrowers Expanded Financing Solutions Program/Foreign & National Program The International Outgoing Referral Process International Referral Form

For the Customer/Client

Glossary of Home Buying Terms Pre-Approval vs. Pre-Qualification Mortgage Basics Documents Required for Loan Application Choosing a Loan Behind the Scenes of your Mortgage Application Brokerage Relationships in Real Estate Transactions The Home Purchasing Process Interest Rate Chart Home Finding Needs Worksheet Home Buying Worksheet

Helpful Resources

Conversion Charts Consulate Offices in the Metro Atlanta Area Bi-National Chambers of Commerce in the Metro Atlanta Area Additional Resources

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33 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

46 53 59 62

Harry Norman, REALTORS速 International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright 息 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS速

www.HarryNorman.com

4


aBout harry norman, realtorS®

Since 1930, Harry Norman, REALTORS® has built its reputation for excellence by providing the best in real estate products and services. As Atlanta’s oldest and largest independent real estate firm, Harry Norman, REALTORS® knows real estate and Atlanta. When Mrs. Harry Norman, Sr. (“Miss Emmie”) founded what was then Mrs. Harry Norman & Associates in 1930, she was a vanguard. Not only did she start the first real estate company in Atlanta dedicated to residential real estate, she was a woman opening a business at the height of the Great Depression in an industry dominated by men. She was also an innovator in her commitment to customer service. When she gave the company to her son, the late Harry Norman, Jr., she also passed on a legacy of dedication to offering the best service available. During his over 20-year tenure as company president and chairman of the board, Mr. Norman grew Harry Norman, REALTORS® into an industry institution. Today, President Dan Parmer and a team of top local brokers manage the company’s over 11 sales offices, various franchises and satellite offices and more than 1,000 sales associates. Acquired in 2006 by the Berkshire Hathaway affiliate HomeServices of America, Harry Norman, REALTORS® is a member of the second largest, full-service residential real estate brokerage firm in the U.S., covering 19 states and comprised of more than 21,000 sales associates nationwide. When considering your next real estate transaction, call Harry Norman, REALTORS® - it’s the best move you’ll ever make.

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

www.HarryNorman.com

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aBout homeSerViCeS oF ameriCa, inC. ,

Harry Norman, REALTORS® is a subsidiary of the Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, HomeServices of America, Inc., the nation’s second largest real estate service provider. Harry Norman, REALTORS® is proud to be a member of a wellestablished and internationally regarded corporate family. HomeServices is committed to a one-stop-shopping philosophy, which covers the consumer experience from contact to closing and represents the company’s dedication to streamlining and simplifying the homeownership process. While each of HomeServices’ companies serves different markets throughout the United States, all of them share the same business principles – integrity, excellence, compassion, leadership and teamwork – which are the foundation for delivering exceptional customer service throughout the homeownership process. The success of HomeServices is based on the creation of a unique values-based company culture, honored by all who work within HomeServices’ family of companies. We are proud to share our core values of integrity, compassion and commitment to excellence, so that we continue to:   •  Do what is ethical at all times for our clients – by honoring commitments, respecting confidentiality,  demonstrating accountability, and being at all times fair and consistent in real estate, mortgage, title and insurance.   •  Strive for professional excellence, through creating and implementing the most innovative   technological and informational programs for HomeServices’ professionals, in order for them to meet the changing needs and wants of their customers.   •  Honor and utilize both leadership and teamwork to achieve a unifying, positive customer  experience. HomeServices’ vision is to create an exceptional real estate services experience for the consumer. To do this, Harry Norman, REALTORS® is dedicated to exceeding each customer’s expectations of an exceptional real estate transaction.

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

www.HarryNorman.com

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international reSettlement SerViCeS International Resettlement Services are services to assist foreign nationals (people coming into the United States from other countries) get settled in a new living environment as quickly as possible by offering location destination assistance including, but not limited to:       •    Home finding       •    Utility connections       •    Home furnishings       •    School selections       •    Language assistance resources       •    Area orientations including where to shop and how to purchase items       •    Welcome to the USA and to the area overviews       •    Logistics Assistance v Obtaining crucial documentation such as social security cards and driver’s licenses v Establishing banking and credit relationships Resettlement Services should provide the following to corporate clients for their employees:       •    Assess the needs of the customer/client and family by learning about their particular circumstances,  concerns about the move, and issues which affect either their decision to move or their success in adapting after the move.       •    Assist the individual and/or family in understanding what it will be like to live and work in the  United States and, specifically, the local metropolitan area, by both explaining and demonstrating local practices and lifestyles.       •    Assist the individual and/or family in locating suitable housing based on their needs and preferences,  helping them buy or rent wisely whether it is an apartment, condo or a single-family home.       •    Provide information to the individual and/or family to obtain Social Security cards and driver’s  licenses, visit schools, establish banking relationships, and handle other logistics of the resettlement process.       •    Be available as a continuing resource to the entire family to answer questions that arise regarding  local customs, accomplishing certain tasks, how and where to buy certain commodities, etc.

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

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international reSettlement SerViCeS Additional definitions and things to know: Foreign National or Inpatriate: Citizen of a foreign country relocating to the U.S. under sponsorship of a U.S. employer or firm. Expatriate: Employee leaving the U.S. (or another foreign country) for assignment in another foreign country. Repatriate: Employee returning to the U.S. (or another foreign country) after completion of a foreign assignment. In most cases, spouses will not be permitted to work in the United States during the term of the assignment. This can create tremendous stress, especially if the spouse has a professional career that has to be put on hold or if the loss of income impacts the family’s lifestyle. While you cannot provide solutions to financial concerns, you can help by providing information on educational and volunteer opportunities for the spouse to remain active and involved in the new community. Foreign nationals need to check in advance to learn whether pets can be brought into the United States. If pets are permitted, they can be subject to a lengthy (six months or longer) quarantine period to ensure they are disease free. Depending on the type of pet, recent health certificates from a veterinarian will likely be required to waive the quarantine period.

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

www.HarryNorman.com

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new area inFormation AREA/COMMUNITY INFORMATION •  County Seat/City  •  Climate/Geography •  Driver’s License •  Emission Control for  automobile(s) •  Motor Vehicle Registration •  Local Parks and Recreation  Areas •  Pet licensing/animal control •  Veterinary/Pet Emergency •  Theatre and Performing Arts •  Local Media: newspaper, TV,  radio •  Library •  Post Office •  Banking and Financial Services •  Places of Worship •  Medical/Healthcare •  Local health clubs •  Tax information  EDUCATION, CHILDREN/ FAMILY ACTIVITIES •  Public School/District •  Private School information •  Child/Day Care Centers •  Colleges/Universities •  Sports Clubs/Teams •  Girl/Boy Scouts •  YMCA/YWCA •  Baby Sitters •  Language Groups •  Newcomer’s Clubs •  Volunteer Organizations •  Embassy/Consulate Info

SHOPPING •  Banking and financial Services  •  Full Service Grocery Stores •  Health Food Stores •  Specialty Grocery Stores (if  available) •  Butcher •  Bakery •  Beverage Stores (Liquor) •  Closet Convenience Stores •  Pharmacy/Drug Store •  Hardware/Home Improvement •  Dry Cleaners/Laundry Service •  Alterations/Seamstress/Tailor •  Hair Salon •  Florist •  Jeweler •  Shopping Malls/Shopping  Centers TRANSPORTATION •  Airports •  Train Service •  Bus Service •  Public Transportation •  Taxi Companies •  Limousine Service •  Car Rental Agencies

HOME CARE SERVICES •  Hardware/Home Improvement  Stores •  Appliance Purchase •  Appliance Repair •  Furniture (rental, purchase,  repair) •  Plumber •  Electrician •  Painter •  Lawn Care •  Home Cleaning •  Interior Decorator •  Roof/Gutter Service •  “Handy Man” •  Trash/Refuse Collection •  Cable/Satellite Service EMERGENCY SERVICES/ INFORMATION •  Emergency Number: 911 (in  most locations) •  Local/State Police •  Fire •  Poison Control •  Ambulance Service •  Hospital/Immediate Care  Centers

UTILITIES/SERVICES •  Electric Company •  Gas/Oil Company •  Water Company •  Sewer Department •  Trash/Refuse Collection  •  Telephone Company •  Cable/Satellite Service

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

www.HarryNorman.com

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Pre-deParture CheCkliSt The following are important documents the customer/client should bring: q q

q q q q q q q q q

q q q

Airline Tickets Passports for each family member (Times vary in different countries for how long it takes to receive passports after application and for how long they are valid. In most countries the following is required to apply for a passport: previous passport [if applicable], an original copy of a birth certificate or other proof of citizenship, proof of identity such as a driver’s license and two identical 2”x2” photos). Visas: An official authorization appended to a passport which permits entry into and travel within a particular country or region. Work Permit: Your customer/client’s employer will assist in acquiring.  Each individual who will  be employed needs a permit; however, permits are not usually granted unless employment has already been arranged. Immigration & Naturalization Service (INS) Documents: originals of all paperwork including Alien Registration Receipt Card or other forms. Driver’s License(s) from your customer/client’s home country and/or an international driver’s license. Medical and Dental Records: Each person should have complete medical and dental examinations at least 3 months prior to going abroad. Copies of these records and any x-rays could be very beneficial should a medical emergency occur. Prescriptions: Each individual should pack a good supply of any prescription medicine as well as any other medications used regularly. Make sure your customer/client brings a copy of any prescriptions in generic terms for easier refilling once arriving in the U.S. School Records or Transcripts Marriage and Divorce Certificates Financial Records: Credit letter from your customer/client’s bank, account information, etc. to assist with opening new accounts and obtaining housing in the United States. If your customer/ client plans to rent a home, he or she should ask the employer for a letter which may be required by property owners to verify employment. If your customer/client plans to purchase a home in the United States, he or she should also bring documentation of 12 months previous home mortgage or rental payments, 3 months of bank statements for checking, saving, investment accounts, employment letter and verification of income (four most recent paycheck stubs), list of open credit accounts such as charge accounts, car loans or other loans (include account numbers, minimum monthly payments amounts and account balances). Birth certificates and any adoption or legal guardian papers for each member of the family. Proofs of purchase and/or appraisals for valuable articles to help with any customs questions upon the customer/client’s return home and in the event of losses in transit, theft, burglary, etc. while living abroad. Inventory of Household Goods Shipment: Before packing, your customer/client should make a thorough list of every item in his or her household goods shipment and what its replacement value would be in the United States (the customer/client should consult with a household goods provider). This inventory is necessary to process any claims in the event of damage to any of the customer/client’s property. The inventory of household goods shipment also provides a record Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide

The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

www.HarryNorman.com

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of items taken out of the customer/client’s home country so as not to have problems bringing them back through customs. Foreign-made items, such as cameras, watches and electronic equipment, should be registered with the customer/client’s national customs service prior to departure to avoid               paying duties on them when returning.  Your customer/client should contact his or her national  customs office for required forms. Other items and actions needed: q q

q

q

q q q

Money: Your customer/client should bring a sufficient amount of cash in United States currency for  essentials and transportation costs such as tips, or an international cashier’s check or traveler’s checks to use until new bank accounts are opened and accessible. Automated Teller Machine (ATM) cards: Your customer/client can ask his or her chosen bank for  an ATM card. Instruct your customer/client that an ATM card is a small plastic card linked to an individual’s bank account. This card is used to withdraw cash from or deposit funds into an individual’s account at an ATM machine. Let your customer/client know that usually there is no fee charged for using one’s own bank’s ATM; however, an individual may pay a fee if using an ATM at another bank. Upon providing the card, the bank staff can show your customer/client how to use an ATM card and will provide him or her with a PIN (personal identification number) to use at the ATM. Instruct your customer/client to be careful when using ATMs and to never give anyone his or her PIN or ATM card, as others could use them to take money out of his or her account. The procedure of using an ATM may be slightly different in the U.S. than what the customer/client has previously experienced; explain to him or her that dependent upon the ATM being used, the ATM card may be returned after entering the PIN or it may be held in the ATM until the transaction is complete. Also inform your customer/client that some banks will give cash over the counter with one’s debit card and ID. Debit Cards: Your customer/client’s bank may provide a debit card to be used for his or her  checking account. Inform your customer/client that sometimes an ATM card can also be used as a debit card, explaining that debit cards allow an individual to pay for something without writing a check, as the debit cards allow a bank to send payment electronically from a checking account directly to a business. Bank checks: Instruct your customer/client that bank checks are checks that the bank drafts upon request. Explain to your customer/client that upon giving the bank money, the bank will draft a bank check for the amount of money payable to the person or business to whom payment is being sent. Let your customer/client know that banks may charge a fee for bank checks. Voting: Your customer/client should check his or her country’s regulations regarding absentee  voting procedures should your customer/client wish to continue voting in national and local elections during his or her assignment in the United States. Pets: Should your customer/client plan to bring pets into the United States, please instruct him or her to check with United States Customs Service to verify permissions and any requirements regarding current health documentation or quarantine periods. Health Insurance: Your customer/client should check with his or her employer to verify  appropriate medical and hospitalization insurance coverage is in place.

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

www.HarryNorman.com

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international deStination SerViCeS Area Tour/Orientation       •    Provide a Newcomer Kit including Department of Motor Vehicles  information, contact information for immigration offices, consulates, embassies, international clubs, cultural organizations, internet sites, etc.       •    Tour the general area(s) where the customer/client might live including  community amenities, housing, schools, shopping centers, public transportation, city services, banks and medical facilities. Bank Account       •    Assist with providing information on  local banking/financial institutions  in order for your customer/client to open a bank account. Social Security Number (source: http://www.ssa.gov)       •    To obtain a Social Security number or a replacement card, your customer/client must prove his or  her U.S. citizenship or immigration status, age and identity. For a replacement card, proof of your customer/client’s U.S. citizenship and age are not required if they are already in our records. Under the new law, only certain documents can be accepted as proof of U.S. citizenship. These include a U.S. birth certificate, a U.S. passport, a Certificate of Naturalization or a Certificate of Citizenship. If your customer/client is not a U.S. citizen, different rules apply for proving his or her immigration status, and those rules have not changed.       •    Also under the new law, only certain documents can be accepted as proof of identity. An acceptable  document must show your customer/client’s name, identifying information about him or her and preferably a recent photograph.       •    If your customer/client is a U.S. citizen, Social Security must see his or her:  v U.S. driver’s license; v State-issued non-driver identity card; or v U.S. passport.       •    If your customer/client does not have these specific documents or cannot get a replacement for them  within 10 days, Social Security will ask to see other documents, including: v Employee ID card; v School ID card; v Health insurance card (not a Medicare card); v U.S. military ID card; or v Adoption decree.       •    If your customer/client is not a U.S. citizen, Social Security must see his or her current  U.S.  immigration documents. Acceptable documents from the Department of Homeland Security include: v Form I-551 (includes machine-readable immigrant visa with your unexpired foreign passport); v I-94 with your customer/client’s unexpired foreign passport; or v Work permit card (I-766 or I-688B).

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

www.HarryNorman.com

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•    If your customer/client is a non-citizen applying to enter the U.S., he or she must: v Request a Social Security number card as part of the immigrant visa application; v Be age 18 or older upon arrival in the U.S.; and v Be a lawfully admitted permanent resident.       •    Please assist additional family members of your customer/client in obtaining a Georgia ID card if  those family members are not receiving a social security number. Driver’s License (source: http://www.dds.ga.gov)       •    Provide the information needed, either in the form of a Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV)  booklet or a link to its website (http://www.dds.ga.gov) so your customer/client can begin studying for the drivers test.       •    Once a social security number is obtained, the customer/client must go to the DMV to apply for the  driver’s license. The individual must obtain his or her own car for the driving test. The individual may not use a sales associate’s car for the driving test. Driving School       •    Provide a list of driving schools in the Atlanta area and their websites for information on rates,  schedules and requirements. School Assistance (source: http://www.doe.k12.ga.us)       •    Provide information on area schools - public and private - to suit the needs of the customer/client’s  family. Please include information on the location of the schools, enrollment procedures, health department requirements and other requirements.       •    Provide information on which schools have the IB and ESL programs, if requested.         •    Assist with information pertaining to school registration. Rental Assistance       •    Introduce homes and/or apartments in the area and price range to meet the needs of the customer/ client and/or family.       •    Advise your customer/client on customary deposits, utility transfers, notices required, etc.        •    If a lease is to be approved by the customer/client’s company we will fax to the  company for review. We are not legal experts and are not responsible for issues arising from a lease that was signed by a transferee. It is the transferee’s responsibility to understand the terms and conditions of the lease.       •    Escort the transferee to the home to pick up the keys and do a walk-through of the home.  At that  time, the transferee may choose to take pictures of the existing condition of the home.       •    Assist with utility connections, phone and other services by providing contact information to the  customer/client.

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

www.HarryNorman.com

13


PreParing the international welCome PaCkage and area PreSentation The following are topics you should address in your presentation script and consider including in your International Welcome Package or booklet: Automobile Title and Registration: Provide information on registration locations, documentation needed, emission testing (if applicable) and costs. Provide information for changing addresses for car registration as well. q Automobile Insurance: Provide names of reputable insurance carriers and their contact information. q Automobile: Develop relationships with local dealerships and have materials available from them regarding purchase and lease programs. Ask your customer/client ahead of time about his or her preferences. Most foreign national/inpatriates will not have their current automobiles shipped to the U.S. due to prohibitive costs. q Childcare: Provide lists and contact information for daycare centers or other services such as nannies. q Consulates and Embassies (http://www.state.gov/misc/10125.htm): Provide local or national contact numbers for the nationalities you may be working with most regularly. q Driver’s Licenses (http://www.dds.ga.gov):             •    Keep a supply of Georgia’s Driver’s License Manual or a link to the Department of Motor                    Vehicles (DMV) website (http://www.dds.ga.gov).             •    In your package provide a list of DMV locations, telephone numbers and hours of operation.             •    Offer to accompany your customer/client when obtaining licenses.  Two forms of identification                    will be needed (check with your the DMV to confirm exactly what is needed).  Generally, the  primary document must be one of the following: a passport with an admission stamp/1-94 Form; an 1-94 Form without a passport but containing a photograph; or an Employment Authorization Card (from INS). The secondary document can be one of the following: an International Driver’s License, a Driver’s License from the customer/client’s home country,                   a credit card, a marriage license, or a corporate picture ID card.  Your customer/client does  not have to surrender his or her international or home country driver’s license and, if asked to do so, your customer/client should request a supervisor.             •    Inform your customer/client on the requirements for testing:  vision, multiple choice written                    exam, on-road driving test, etc. Include a sample test if one is available from the DMV.  Some  facilities allow language translation for people taking the test, so if this may be needed, be sure to ask and make arrangements in advance.             •    List test costs and what forms of payment are acceptable.             •    Provide information about the requirements to report any changes of address and  how to do it in your state. q Elder Care: Provide lists and contact information for local senior groups and facilities. q Emergency Information: (911 for police, ambulance and fire). In many parts of the country, if a caller cannot speak English, the caller can identify a language and q

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

Copyright © 2011 Harry Norman, REALTORS®

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emergency staff will conference in someone fluent in the language.  You should verify  if this source is available in your market. Provide non-emergency numbers to your customer/client as well. If preparing a booklet, leave space for your customer/client to write in other numbers, such as a hospital, doctor, landlord, additional contact numbers, etc. q Furniture and Appliance Leasing:             •    Provide a list of companies in your market who lease furniture and assist with obtaining furniture  and furnishings the employee needs.             •    Depending on the length of the assignment, if applicable, it may be in the customer/client’s best  interest to purchase some items as opposed to leasing. q Gasoline/Petrol:             •    Explain to your customer/client that most gas stations in the U.S. are self-service, which means  that there are no attendants to serve people and one is responsible for pumping his or her own gas.             •    Describe how to pump gas and how to make a payment if necessary.             •    As part of the orientation tour, make sure to include gas station locations near the customer/ client’s employer and probable area for housing. q Health Care:             •    Review basic information about the different types of insurance programs (HMO, PPO, etc.)  Advise your customer/client to check with his or her employer regarding availability as a benefit and for specifics about coverage.             •    Provide a list of hospitals, emergency care units and urgent care facilities and be prepared to  explain the difference to your customer/client during your counseling session(s).             •    Briefly explain medicine availability for both prescription and non-prescription (over the counter)  drugs and provide names of local pharmacies to your customer/client. q Helpful Internet Sites: Provide a list of national and local websites (such as government agencies, chambers of commerce, tourism offices, map locators, colleges and universities, public schools, etc.) to your customer/client. q Houses of Worship – Provide locations and contact information for local houses of worship to your customer/client. q Housing:             •    Explain basic information regarding current market conditions (ease or difficulty of finding  suitable housing) and availability and cost of housing (available types and costs of housing in various communities in your market) to your customer/client.             •    Local Rental Practices - Provide information to your customer/client on agent fees if applicable,  standard lease terms and other general issues such as security deposits, escape clauses, furnished vs. unfurnished, etc.             •    Homeowner’s or Renter’s Insurance – Explain the differences between the two types of insurance  and what each type covers. Offer assistance to your customer/client in securing appropriate insurance for his or her needs.             •    Types of Housing: v Apartments for Rent – Studio (small with living area and bedroom combined), one, two or three bedroom with 1 or more bathrooms, kitchen, and living room are basic choices. v Townhouse/Condominiums for Rent from Owners or Purchase – one or two story homes in communities with layouts similar to apartments. This housing type may have more restrictive rules or covenants mandated through a Homeowner’s Association.

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Single Family Homes For Rent or Purchase – Generally detached dwellings on lots of land varying in size offering more living space and rooms, such as family rooms, dining rooms, etc., and garages. (Note: you should address rental availability limitations if applicable in your market) v Corporate Housing for Rent – Generally a fully-furnished apartment or home including furniture, utilities, appliances, cookware, linens, television and phone.             •    If the decision is to rent a home, explain the need to enter a contract with the leasing company  or owner, called a lease. Since your customer/client will not have a credit history in the U.S., landlords may require a letter from the customer/client’s employer and you should recommend that he or she bring it for the final home finding visit. Advise your customer/client to be sure to fully understand all of the provisions included and check with his or her employer, if applicable, for instruction regarding any contract language required regarding lease termination financial penalty limits. (For example: “Transfer/Termination of Tenant’s Employment – Landlord understands that Tenant is in the U.S. on a temporary assignment and work visa. In the event Tenant is transferred by his or her employer, Tenant may terminate this lease upon 90 days written notice without penalty of any kind.”)             •    Prepare your customer/client for the need to pay a refundable security deposit, explaining that  the deposit will be refunded after the property is vacated if there has been no damage during tenancy. (Add other deposits or fees required in broker’s market).             •    Caution your customer/client that many rental properties may not allow pets, and if they do, the  properties will more than likely have weight or type limitations.             •    Rental Costs:  Include price ranges for rental properties in your local market(s). q Laws and Practices: Share basics on traffic laws including penalties regarding drinking while driving, smoking regulations, pedestrian road crossings, right on red, school buses, 3 and 4-way stops, etc. q Maps: Have an ample supply of maps available and indicate location of your customer/client’s employer, your office, the hotel, etc., prior to sending to the customer/client. q Media/Newspapers: List the local publications and assist your customer/client with obtaining subscription(s). Make him or her aware of national newspapers and publications and, if available locally, vendors for international publications. q Media: Provide information on local radio and television stations and national network affiliates, especially for special programming and foreign language broadcasts. q The Money System:             •    Currency: One Dollar ($1) = 100 cents (also called pennies) One Quarter = 25 cents One Dime = 10 cents One Nickel = 5 cents One Penny = 1 cent v

v v v

The Unites States bases its cash currency on the decimal system. The size of a coin does not indicate value – for instance a nickel (5 cents) is larger than a dime (10 cents). Generally coins are worth less than paper bills – One Dollar, Five Dollar, Ten Dollar, Twenty Dollar, Fifty Dollar, One Hundred Dollar and higher.

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Most transactions are completed utilizing $50 bills or lower and some businesses will only take $20 or lower. Some bus services or other transportation providers, as well as vending machines, pay phones, etc., require exact change.             •    Taxes: v Most people pay two types of income taxes, state and federal; review these with your customer/client. If your market area has additional local income taxes review these as well. For detailed information, refer him or her to a professional accountant. v If the employee plans to purchase a home, explain any property related taxes or assessments. v Review other local taxes including personal property, utilities, etc.             •    Banks and Checking: v    Generally, large banks will likely provide specialized international services. You should  interview banks in advance to discover what services are offered and what documentation is required in order to issue a credit card or open personal checking accounts. v Also, your customer/client’s employer may have banking relationships that would make the process easier. v Explain the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) bank deposit safety guarantees (up to $100,000 per customer in each bank) and encourage your customer/client to only work with banks who offer it. v Checking accounts and savings accounts come with a variety of options, interest rates and fees. The bank should be asked to explain these options, rates and fees to your customer. v Explain that most monthly bills are paid by check and show your customer/client how to write a check if needed. Also, if the bank offers online bill pay services, this service should be explained by the bank representative. v Explain ATM (Automated Teller Machine) and Debit cards, locations and how they work to obtain cash and for purchases with automatic deductions from a checking account. Also discuss automated deposits and debit options if applicable. m    Automated Teller Machine (ATM) cards: Your customer/client can ask his or her  chosen bank for an ATM card. Instruct your customer/client that an ATM card is a small plastic card linked to an individual’s bank account. This card is used to withdraw cash from or deposit funds into an individual’s account at an ATM machine. Let your customer/client know that usually there is no fee charged for using one’s own bank’s ATM; however, an individual may pay a fee if using an ATM at another bank. Upon providing the card, the bank staff can show your customer/client how to use an ATM card and will provide him or her with a PIN (personal identification number) to use at the ATM. Instruct your customer/client to be careful when using ATMs and to never give anyone his or her PIN or ATM card, as others could use them to take money out of his or her account. The procedure of using an ATM may be slightly different in the U.S. than what the customer/client has previously experienced; explain to him or her that dependent upon the ATM being used, the ATM card may be returned after entering the PIN or it may be held in the ATM until the transaction is complete. Also inform your customer/client that some banks will give cash over the counter with one’s debit card and ID. m    Debit Cards: Your customer/client’s bank may provide a debit card to be used for his or  her checking account. Inform your customer/client that sometimes an ATM card can also be used as a debit card, explaining that debit cards allow an individual to pay for something without writing a check, as the debit cards allow a bank to send payment v

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electronically from a checking account directly to a business. m Bank checks: Instruct your customer/client that bank checks are checks that the bank drafts upon request. Explain to your customer/client that upon giving the bank money, the bank will draft a bank check for the amount of money payable to the person or business to whom payment is being sent. Let your customer/client know that banks may charge a fee for bank checks. v Encourage your customer/client to open bank accounts in the United States immediately to facilitate any initial deposits or payments for rents or mortgages. (Most employees will maintain an account in their home country during the assignment, and the home bank may have a representative in the United States who could assist with references and account registration.) v There are strict regulations on bringing currency across national borders; some of these regulations limit the amount of cash able to be brought unless a special filing is made with customs. v Credit Union accounts may be an option offered by some corporations and transferees should be encouraged to review those options as well.             •    Credit Cards: v Explain that in the U.S. most stores, restaurants, and banks accept credit cards (but a few do not due to the fees charged to the store for using them, and in these instances cash or a check is needed). v    List well-known card, such as Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover. v Check with the banks you may be dealing with on their requirements in obtaining their bank-issued credit card (such as any credit verification, or a need to obtain a secured credit card by depositing funds as a guarantee while credit is established). Explain the credit approval process and any fees, monthly billing and interest charges to your customer/client and encourage him or her to obtain a credit card for convenience.             •    Currency Exchange: Investigate and have contact information available for currency  exchange services. q Organizations - International Clubs, Social and Cultural – Provide information on ethnic and non-ethnic support groups and associations. q Parks and Recreation: Provide locations and contact numbers for public parks or recreational facilities in the area along with brief descriptions of what they offer. Include locations such as:             •    Community recreation facilities and gyms             •    Movie theaters             •    Live theater venues             •    Libraries             •    Nightclubs             •    Museums             •    Amusement Parks             •    Local Festivals             •    Sports Facilities, etc. q Pets:             •    There may be quarantine periods required for some pets.  Generally, pets will need to have a  current health certificate and current rabies vaccination. Advise your customer/client to check with his or her employer for definitive resources for answers.             •    Provide contact information for local veterinarians, animal hospitals and clinics.              •    Provide information on license requirements and leash laws for dogs. Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

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Plants: Recommend to your customer/client that he or she not import plants due to problems with U.S. Customs regulations. q Personal Safety:             •    Advise your customer/client on personal safety precautions such as locking doors and windows,  putting valuables inside of an automobile’s trunk, locking the automobile, being careful at ATM machines, carrying money, staying alert in unsafe areas (especially at night), etc.             •    If applicable, caution your customer/client about vagrants and panhandlers and provide advice  on how to avoid fraud during telephone solicitations if asked for credit card information. q Postal Rates and Services (http://www.usps.com):             •    Explain that the primary mail delivery system in the U.S. is the U.S Postal Service and that every  community has Post Offices with specific zip codes that identify locations.             •    Provide locations, phone numbers, and hours of operation for the customer/clients local  post offices.             •    Explain that stamps and postal rates for letters and packages are determined by weight.             •    Demonstrate how to properly address letters and packages for delivery if needed.             •    Provide a list of other package delivery service companies in your market such as UPS or Federal  Express (FedEx) and describe how they differ from the postal service. q Restaurants: Provide a list of a number of restaurants by types of food and dining styles (cafeteria, fast food, etc.). Be sure to include ethnic restaurants if available. q Schools:             •    Provide information on public schools and state agencies, such as locations and contact  information. Provide basic information on the customer/client’s school system such as: v Grades v Age requirements v School year calendar v Hours of operation v Bus transportation v Curriculum (especially any honors or accelerated programs) v Graduation requirements v Transcripts the customer/client should take when enrolling (again, you may want to accompany your customer/client as part of your service) v Special courses the schools or agencies have for English as a second language, v Enrollment requirements (such as proof of residency, birth certificate, passport, immunization records) v The immunizations your state health agency mandates. (Check with your school district and state)             •    Provide contact information for private school options. Many foreign nationals will be coming  from countries with a more accelerated curriculum than what is offered in the United States.                   Your customer/client may need your assistance in locating schools or other resources for  additional learning opportunities outside of the public school system so that his or her children are not negatively impacted upon returning to schools in their home countries.             •    Provide contact information and resources for additional language training available from tutors,  community colleges or other schools. Some communities offer free “English as a Second Language” classes at local community centers or public libraries. If your community does not have these resources, research private providers and what the costs are for these services. q

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q Shopping:             •    Provide an overview on shopping options as well as names, products and addresses of businesses  in the area: v Malls – Retail and Outlet v    Discount Stores – Wal-Mart, Target, K-Mart, etc. v Food – grocery stores, health food, specialty products v Electronics and Appliances v Furniture v Department Stores v Clothing v Home Furnishings v Etc.             •    Grocery Stores, Specialty Food Markets and Convenience Stores - Prepare the customer/client for  the wide selection of stores available. People from many other countries are not prepared for the variety of stores that are available. Also explain the difference in pricing between grocery stores and convenience stores.             •    Ethnic Food Stores – Provide a list, if appropriate, and include a visit during orientation tours.             •    Provide information on local specialty food stores such as bakeries, butcher shops, health food  centers, etc. q Social Security Card (http://www.ssa.gov):             •    Supply information about the application process and the location, telephone number and hours  of operation of the Social Security Administration office. Include this information in the booklet but you should accompany your customer/client to obtain the card.             •    Call ahead to determine if the office will accept appointments and if it can provide the social  security number, once issued, by phone so your customer/client does not have to wait to receive it in the mail. Ask Social Security about the time frame for receiving the number verbally and for receiving the card by mail.             •    Note: Only the customer/client can receive a social security number.  Spouses and children will  need to get a Tax Identification Number (see the section on “Tax ID Numbers”, below).             •    The application process includes completing a “Social Security Administration Application for a  Social Security Card” form. Documents needed include: a passport, a visa (including all documents received from the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) such as a white I-94 card) and a pink 1099 form or a J-1 visa. Obtain copies of this form to keep in inventory.                   Verify with your corporate contact in advance that he or she has assisted your customer/client  with obtaining all the needed documentation, and to make sure your corporate contact is not looking for you to assist with this highly specialized and complicated area. After applying for the card, your customer/client will be given a receipt. The Social Security card will be sent in the mail in a few weeks after applying. In the meantime your customer/client may have to use his or her employer’s address, since the application process should be completed before any home finding efforts begin. q Tax ID Numbers – A number is obtained from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) by completing the “Application for IRS Individual Taxpayer Identification Number” form for each family member other than your customer/client. The IRS will need each family member’s passport, visa and INS documentation, as well as the name and social security number of the person on whom they are dependent. Provide a list of IRS office locations, phone numbers and hours of operation for your customer/client.

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q Telephone:             •    Provide an overview on the differences between local and long distance calls, dialing instructions,  service providers and contact information for each.             •    Arrange for a telephone connection if appropriate.             •    Review with your customer/client the local telephone directories, such as the white pages and  yellow pages.             •    Provide your customer/client with cell phone service information, if needed. q Television (Cable/Satellite) and Internet Access Providers: Provide contact information for local carriers. q Tipping in the U.S.: Share customary tipping practices for service providers such as taxi drivers, bartenders, waiters, waitresses, doormen, barbers, hairstylists, manicurists, valet parking services, porters and baggage porters at airports and hotels. Advise your customer/client that an average tip is 15% of the total bill at a restaurant, with 20% recommended for above-average service. q Transportation:             •    Explain to your customer/client the road systems in your area and provide maps of local  Interstates, Expressways, primary roads, secondary roads, toll roads, etc.             •    Provide a list of airports, train stations and bus service locations and phone numbers for each.  Also provide a list of airlines and their contact information for your customer/client.             •    Provide information on public transportation including: v Cabs or taxis (fare rates) v Bus Services (stops, routes and rates) v Commuter Trains (station locations, destinations, rates, etc) v Other             •    Bike Paths             •    Pedestrian Rules             •    Provide your customer/client with Amtrak passenger train information if applicable. q Utilities and Appliances:             •    In the U.S. the standard electrical currency is for 110 volts, 60 Hertz, Three Wire, and Single  Phase. It is possible to purchase converters at appliance stores that will enable use of some existing appliances and equipment. (Provide a list of some of these appliance stores.)             •    List and give contact information of local utility providers as well as any security deposit or  connection fee requirements and other pertinent information. Security deposits may be reimbursed after six months of on-time payments; consult with the utility company for details. Arrange for your customer/client any utility hook-ups, such as: v Electrical Service Connection v Gas/Oil Service Connection v Water and Sewer Connection v Trash/Refuse Collection Service v Recycling Collection Service v Cable/Satellite Service v Telephone Service Connection q U.S. Holidays: Explain to your customer/client that on primary holidays, all government offices, post offices and banks, most employers, and many businesses and stores are closed. There is no mail delivery and schools are closed. (See Holiday List and Description – page 55) q Volunteer Organizations – Since the customer/client’s spouse/partner may not be allowed to work in the U.S., provide a list of active organizations in your community that will allow the partner to contribute his or her time and talents if desired. Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

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q Weather Details (http://www.weather.com):             •    Provide a list of average temperatures for each season and what type of clothing will be needed for  each. (See temperature conversion chart on page 52.)             •    Provide information on ways to obtain weather forecasts such as from weather websites, the                    weather service, weather TV channels and radio stations. q Weights and Measurements - While use of the metric system is increasing, the U.S., continues to               primarily use its own system of weights and measures.  You may need to review basics on the U.S.  system. (See Conversion Charts – page 50)

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lending guidelineS For non-u.S. Citizen BorrowerS Permanent Resident Aliens Academy Financial Services/Wells Fargo Home Mortgage (WFHM) Banking finances conventional mortgages to aliens who are lawful permanent residents of the United States. Permanent resident aliens must hold an Alien Registration card (also called a: Green Card”) or any other evidence of permanent residency issued by the U.S. Citizenship and immigration Services (USCIS) formerly the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). Loan terms available are the same as those available to U.S. citizens. Documentation Green Card A copy of the Green Card is required for all permanent resident aliens whose income and/or assets are being used to qualify for the loan. An enlarged copy of the front and back of the card is required and must be included in the loan file. A completed Alien Registration Certification is allowed when the borrower refuses to allow his green card to be copied. Every attempt should be made to obtain a copy of the card. The Alien Registration Certification form can be found at: http://risk.wfhm.homestead.wellfargo.com/emeg/credit risk/creditpolicy/index.htm If the borrower has not received a hard copy of the permanent Green Card at the time of loan origination, a valid foreign passport with the following stamp is acceptable: q “Processed for I-551. Temporary evidence of Lawful Admission for Permanent Residency.               Valid until mm-dd-yy. Employment Authorized.”  Non-Permanent Resident Aliens WFHM defines non-permanent resident aliens as individuals legally residing in the U.S. who posses a valid visa and if applicable, work authorization. All non-permanent resident aliens whose income and/or assets are being used to qualify for a loan must provide evidence of one of the following visa classes. Required visa Classes q A Series (A-1, A-2, A-3). These visas are given to officials of foreign governments, immediate family members and support staff. Only those without diplomatic immunity as verified n the visa document are allowed. q E-1, Treaty Trader. This visa is essentially the same as an H-1 or L-1; the title refers to the foreign country’s status in the U.S. q G series (G-1, G-2, G-3, G-4, G-5). These visas are given to employees of international organizations that are located in the United States. Some examples of these organizations are the United Nations, Red Cross, World Bank, UNICEF, and the International Monetary Fund.               Verification that the applicant does not have diplomatic immunity must be obtained.

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H-2, Temporary Worker. This is the most common visa given to foreign citizens who are temporarily working in the United Sates. q L-1, Intra–Company Transferee. An L-1 visa is given to professional employees, whose company’s main office is in a foreign country. q TN, NAFTA. Used by Canadian or Mexican citizens for professional or business purpose. q TC, NAFTA. Used by Canadian citizens for professional or business purposes. q

All standards for determining stable monthly income, adequate credit history, and sufficient liquid assets must be applied in the same manner to each borrower, including borrowers who are non-permanent resident aliens. Documentation – Visa A copy of the visa is required indicating the borrower’s name and the type of visa and expiration date. Additional information regarding acceptable visas can be located on the Credit Policy Web site: http://emeg.wfhm.homestead.wellfargo.com/credit risk creditpolicy/retail/alien /index. htm Social Security Number In order to ensure that the borrower is legally able to reside and work in the United States, a valid Social Security Number (SSN) is required for all non-permanent resident aliens whose income and/or assets are being used to qualify for a loan. An individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN) is not sufficient as it does evidence the borrower’s right to earn income in the U.S. Loan Requirements (Conforming Only) A two-year history of employment and credit in the United States or in another country must be documented. There are no product, LTV or occupancy restrictions.  Two bank references, with a two-year credit history may be obtained to establish credit for borrowers who have less than a two-year residence history in the United States. Foreign Nationals WFHM defines foreign nationals as individuals legally residing or visiting the United States who possess a valid visa which may present a higher risk to WFHM than those visa classes acceptable for non- permanent resident aliens. Foreign nationals who have no lawful residency in the United States are both considered to be non- permanent resident aliens and are eligible for financing under the Relationship 3/1 ARM, Relationship 5/1 ARM and Expanded Financing Solutions SM programs only. Required Visa Classes The foreign National borrower must provide evidence of one of the following visa classes: q    B-1, Business Visitors. Exploratory business. Eligible for second homes only. q    B-2, Tourist Visitors. Pleasure or ‘medical’ treatment. Eligible for second homes only.  q E-2, Treaty Traders or investors. Created for developing trade between the U.S. and foreign countries with which the U.S. has a treaty. Used by treaty trader/investor. Spouse and children. q H-2A, Temporary Worker. Temporary agricultural worker. q H-2B, Temporary Worker. Temporary worker for services not available in the U.S.

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H-3, Trainee. Temporary visa for trainee of a foreign corporation with a division of the corporation located in the U.S. q    I, Representative of Foreign Information Media. Used for foreign press, radio, TV, film and  other foreign information media. q    J-1, Exchange Visitor. Used by students, scholars, teachers, physicians, etc. Must leave U.S.  for two years after the visa expires. q    J-2, Exchange Visitor.  Same as J-1 except that this is for the spouse and children of the J-1  visa holder. q O-1, Extraordinary Ability. Used for person with extraordinary ability in the sciences, education or business. q O-2, Extraordinary Ability. Used by essential staff members of O-1 visa holders. q P-1, Athletes and Entertainers. Used by internationally recognized athletes, entertainers and their essential staff. q P-2, Entertainers. Used by entertainers coming to the U.S. n a group for the purpose of presenting culturally unique performances. q P-3, Artists and Entertainers. Used by artists and entertainers coming to the U.S. in a group for the purpose of presenting culturally unique performances. q R-1, Religious Representative. Issued to ministers, missionaries, priests, etc. Who live and/or work in the U.S. for various religious denominations. q

Diplomatic Immunity Due to the inability to compel payment or seek judgment, transactions with individuals who are not subject to United States jurisdiction are not eligible. This includes embassy personnel with diplomatic immunity can be obtained by reviewing the visa document. Matricula Consular Card A matricula Consular Card is an identification card issued by the Mexican consulate to individuals who are otherwise undocumented (no green card or valid visa). As Matricula Consular Cards do not indicate legal residency in the United States, a copy of the card in lieu of a Green Card or valid visa is not acceptable under any circumstances.

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exPanded FinanCing SolutionS Program Foreign national Program General Information Eligibility Foreign national borrowers are allowed under the Expanded Financing Solutions Base program only. The guidelines outlined in this section must be adhered to along with the applicable Base section. Mainframe Updates Foreign national loans only: When underwriting a loan under the foreign national program, it is imperative that we are able to quickly and easily identify this transaction. Therefore, the following update must be made to the loan file on the mainframe: q “1” must be entered into the “SALABLE” field (screen RHM 0030). This will identify the transaction as involving a foreign national borrower.

Eligible Transactions Cash-out Refinances Not allowed. Construction to Permanent Financing Allowed as a purchase or rate/term refinance transaction. Non-Arm’s Length Transactions Not allowed.

Borrower – General Information Loan Limitation Wells Fargo Home Mortgage (WFHM) will finance only one primary residence or one second home for an individual who is a foreign national. Foreign National Definition A foreign national borrower is defined as a citizen of a country other than he United States who: q Has a vital visa to live or visit in the U.S. and q May visit the U.S. periodically or live in the U.S. for a limited amount of time.

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The following criteria make an individual ineligible for foreign national status: q A permanent or non-permanent resident alien; and/or q A U.S. citizen; and/or q Diplomatic immunity. Determining Foreign National Status WFHM must determine the residency status of only the primary wage earner (defined as borrower who has the highest monthly income). These program guidelines will apply only when the primary wage earner is a foreign national. Required Visas Foreign nationals must provide evidence of one of the acceptable visa classes listed in Borrower – General information – Non-U.S. Citizen Borrowers – Foreign Nationals. Diplomatic Immunity Due to the inability to compel payment or seek judgment, transactions with individuals who are not subject to United States jurisdictions are not eligible. This includes embassy personnel with diplomatic immunity. Verification that the borrower does not have diplomatic immunity can be obtained by review of the visa  document. Living “Intervivos” Trusts Not allowed. Power of Attorney Not allowed Employment / Income Documentation If the borrower is self-employed or earns 100% commission and does not file a U.S. tax return, he/she is not eligible for financing under this program. The employment and income of borrowers who receive W-2’s and pay stubs or file U.S. individual tax returns should be documents as outlined in Borrower-Employment/Income and Borrower–Self-Employed Income Analysis. Foreign Source Income Many foreign national borrowers will not have W-2s, paystubs and/or U.S. tax returns. For those borrowers, the following documentation must be satisfactorily reviewed: q Form W-8BEN (Certificate of Foreign Status) is required if the borrower does not have a Tax Identification Number (TIN). q Form W-9 is required if the borrower has U.S. income and a TIN. q Letters from the borrower’s employer(s) which must include: q Annual income from the preceding two years; and q Current employment status; and q Name and title of the person providing the information on the employer’s behalf and q Job title; and q Term of employment. q Letters must be fully translated into English. Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

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q q q

All income must be fully converted to U.S. currency by the underwriter. Once converted to U.S. currency, 100% of the converted dollar amount may be used to qualify the borrower. A copy of the conversion must be included in the file. Conversion charts may be found in The Wall Street Journal. The date of the chart must be the same as the date of underwriting. A minimum of two (2) years of continuous employment must be verified for each borrower.

Foreign Source Interest/Dividend Income If the borrower does not file a U.S. tax return and the interest earning accounts are in the borrower‘s country  of origin: q 24 months bank statements must be provided. q Bank statements must be fully translated into English. q All interest/dividend income for the last two (2) years must be fully converted to U.S. Currency. q Subtract any funds used for the down-payment or closing costs before calculating interest. q Once converted to U.S. currency, the income must be averaged for two (2) years. 100% of the converted average amount may be used to qualify the borrower. q A copy of the conversion chart must be included in the file. Conversion charts may be found in The Wall Street Journal. The date of the chart must be the same as the date of underwriting. U.S. Tax Return Required Under this program, the following sources of income must be documented with U.S. tax returns: q Second jobs/part-time income q Commissioned income q Employed by relative q Foster Care q Notes receivable q Rental income q Trust income q Non-taxable income q Self-employed income Reserves Must be documented. See Expanded Financing Solutions - Base Guidelines for requirements. 1031 Tax Exchanges Not Allowed. Trades Not allowed.

Evaluation Credit Information Eligibility For the loan to the eligible for this program, the borrower must meet one of the following: q The 620 credit score requirements; or q The non-traditional credit report (no credit score) requirements.

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If the borrower does not meet one of these requirements, the loan is not eligible for financing under this program. Non-Traditional Credit Report Requirement The non-traditional credit report (no valid credit score) is allowed only for those foreign national borrowers with no Tax Identification Number (TIN). All non-traditional credit reports must include verification of the following: q A minimum of a twelve (12) month credit history. q A minimum of three (3) original bank reference letters from financial institutions in the country of origin. At least one reference must be a mortgage of the borrower has previously owned a home. q Each credit reference must reflect a minimum twelve-month payment history. q All payments for installment loans and revolving credit must have been prompt for the most recent 12 months. q No significant delinquency within the past three (3) years. Significant delinquency is defined as judgments, tax liens, and collection accounts. q No Previous bankruptcy, foreclosure, deed-in-lieu, short sale or settled for less proceedings regardless of the amount of time that has passed. q A minimum 12 months housing payments (mortgage rating, rental rating or combination of the two) with no late payments; must be verified by the credit bureau or direct verification. The borrowers’ credit is considered valid only if the borrower has greater than or equal to 12 month credit history and greater than or equal to three (3) trade lines reported by the credit reporting service. If the borrower profile does not meet these criteria, he/she is not eligible for financing under this program. Non-Traditional Credit Report Restrictions Foreign national borrowers with a non-traditional credit report (no valid credit score) are allowed with: q Standard documentation q Strict adherence to maximum debt ratios of 28/36 q    55 LTV/TLV reduction – see appropriate product.  Declining Markets When the borrower has no valid credit score and the appraiser indicates that values are declining in the subject property’s area, the loan is not eligible for financing.

Specific Property Types Acceptable Property Types The following are acceptable Property Types for borrowers with valid credit scores: q Single family detached and attached q 2 units q 3-4 units (primary property only) q Manufactured housing. (See Property-Specific Property Types-Manufactured Home Guidelines). q Condotels

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Mainframe Update When underwriting a loan to a foreign national borrower that is secured by a condotel, the following update must be made to the system: q “6” must be entered into the “SALABLE” field (RHM 0030). This will identify the transaction as involving a foreign national and condotel. Unacceptable Property Types The following property types are ineligible for financing under the foreign national program: q Cooperatives q Investment properties

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the international outgoing reFerral ProCeSS q What is the destination country? q Does the referred client wish to buy, sell or rent? q What city or cities are being considered? Be specific – “on the ocean somewhere in Mexico” does not qualify as a referable destination. q If there is a home to be sold in the destination country, was it inherited and are there multiple heirs? In some countries it can be difficult to convey properties with clear titles due to changing governments, shifting boundaries and poor property registration systems. Properties may have been in the family for many generations and inheritance questions can also cause problems. q Call the Client to further qualify the referral, let them know about the referral process, answer questions and obtain helpful information to provide the destination broker: q What is their past experience with the country, have they visited before, do they speak the language? Will they live in the home permanently, use for vacations, investment, etc.? q When will the client visit? If the clients are already there, when would they like to be contacted and how? q Get complete information about the family’s needs, timelines, reason for move, and detailed contact information including email and fax numbers as communication by phone internationally is complicated by time zones, language differences and is expensive. q If they plan to purchase, what is their price range and will they need financing? How much of a down payment can the referred client offer? Are they financially capable to complete a purchase presently or do they have another home to sell first? Recognize that credit will need to be established in the destination country and that in some countries mortgages may not be available. Have they ever owned a home in the country before and how much do they know about real estate properties and practices? q Help set expectations. The timing and pace of business varies from country to country, as do holidays and vacations. For example, August can be a difficult time to find companies open in European countries. Let the referred client know that because of these differences, the process may take longer than it would if moving across the U.S. Learning basic information about real estate practices in the destination location and sharing information with the referred client are keys to providing the best service possible. q Offer helpful websites and other resources to assist them. If the client’s expectations are unrealistic, doing so will help educate them and prepare them for contact by the destination company.

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International Referral Form

This is a referral from Harry Norman, Realtors®, a member of Leading Real Estate Companies of the World™. Date: Referral Type:

Buyer/Purchaser

Listing/Seller

Renter

Rental Listing

Customer InformatIon Name:

Title:

Current Address: City/State:

Country :

Zip/Postal Country Code:

Phone: Country Code

City Code

Number

(i.e. 00 1 312.424.0400)

Fax: Country Code

City Code

Number

(i.e. 00 1 312.424.0400)

e-maIl address (essentIal): Languages Spoken:

Current Employer:

Spouse/Partner’s Name:

Ages of Children:

Pets:

School Needs: referral detaIls Buyer/Renter Property Requirements Areas of Interest (List City and Country): Type of Property Desired: New Construction Bedrooms:

Single Family House

Baths:

Condo/Apartment

Land

Garage:

Additional Requirements: Price Range:

(Currency:

) Time Frame for First Visit:

Listing/Property to be Sold Details Property Address: Occupied:

Yes

House Bedrooms:

No Condo/Apartment

Baths:

Anticipated Sales Price:

Land

Other: (Currency:

)

Has the property been on the market? If so, with which company?

What was the listed price?

addItIonal Comments:

orIgInatIon Company:

destInatIon Company:

Contact:

Contact:

Contact Phone:

Contact Phone:

Contact E-Mail:

Contact E-Mail:

Referring Salesperson:

Assigned salesperson:

Please reply to this email with an acceptance or rejection of this referral or with any questions. Rev. 6/2011

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gloSSary oF home Buying termS Adjustable-Rate Mortgage (ARM): A mortgage in which the interest rate is adjusted periodically according to a pre-selected index. Alternative Financing: A home financing program that accommodates borrowers with special qualifying factors, including unique employment, income or credit issues. Annual Percentage Rate (APR): A yearly percentage rate that expresses the total finance charge on a loan over its entire term. The APR includes the interest rate, fees, points and mortgage insurance, and is therefore a more complete measure of the loan’s cost than the interest rate alone. The loan’s interest rate, not its APR, is used to calculate the monthly principal and interest payment. Appraisal: A report made by a qualified person setting forth and opinion or estimate of property value. The term also applies to the process by which this estimate is obtained. Bridge Loan: A form of second deed of trust or mortgage that is collateralized by the borrower’s present home (which is usually for sale) in a manner that allows the proceeds to be used for closing on a new home before the present home is sold. Closing: The consummation of a real estate transaction. The closing includes the delivery of a deed, financial adjustments, the signing of notes and the disbursement of funds necessary to complete the sale and loan transaction. Closing Costs: The costs paid by the mortgage borrower (and sometimes the seller) in addition to the purchase price of the property. These include the origination fee, discount points, appraisal, credit report, title insurance, attorney’s fees, survey and prepaid items such as tax and insurance escrow payments. Commitment Letter: A formal offer by a lender stating the terms under which it agrees to loan money to a home buyer. Conventional Loan: A mortgage not obtained under a government insured program (such as FHA or VA). Debt-to-Income Ratio: A formula lenders use to determine the loan amount for which you may qualify. Also known as “back-end ratio”. Guidelines may vary depending on the loan program. Deed: The legal document conveying title to a real property. Escrow: An item of value, money or documents, deposited with a third party, to be delivered upon the fulfillment of a condition. For example, the deposit by a borrower with the lender of funds to pay taxes and insurance premiums when they become due, or the deposit of funds or documents with an attorney or escrow agent to be dispersed upon the closing of a sale of real estate. In some parts of the country, escrows of taxes and insurance premiums are called impounds or reserves. Fixed-Rate Mortgage: A mortgage which the interest rate and payments remain the same for the life of the loan. Float the Rate: This term is used when a mortgage applicant chooses not to secure a rate lock, but instead allows the rate pricing to fluctuate until the applicant decides to lock in, usually no later than five days prior to closing.

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Front-End Ratio: Also known as the housing expense-to-income ratio, it compares your proposed monthly home payment (PITI) to your household gross monthly income. Good Faith Estimate: A document which tells borrowers the approximate cost they will pay at or before settlement, based on common practice in the locality. Under requirements of the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA), the mortgage banker or the mortgage broker, if any must deliver the GFE to the applicant. Government Loan: A mortgage insured by a government agency, such as FHA, VA, Farmers Home  Administration, or a state bond program. The loans are generally made by private lenders, such as HomeServices Lending of Georgia. Home Mortgage Consultant: The HomeServices Lending of Georgia representative to a homebuyer. Sometimes called a loan officer, account executive or sales representative. Homeowners Insurance (also called Hazard Insurance): A real estate insurance policy required of the buyer protecting the property against loss caused by fire, some natural causes, vandalism, etc. The homeowners insurance policy may also include added coverage such as personal liability and theft away from the home. HUD-1 Settlement Statement: A standard form used to disclose costs at closing. Index: A published interest rate, such as the prime rate, LIBOR, T-Bill rate, or the 11th District COFI. Lenders use indexes to establish interest rates charged on mortgages or to compare investment returns. On ARMs, a predetermined margin is added to the index to compute the interest rate adjustment. Interest Rate: The percentage of an amount of money which is paid for a specific time. Interim Interest: The interest that accrues, on a per-diem basis, from the day of closing until the end of the month. Leverage: Using credit or borrowed money to increase the rate of return for an investment. For example, by purchasing a $100,000 with 10% down, you are using just $10,000 to control the investment. Lien: A legal claim or attachment against property as security for payment of an obligation. Loan Conditions: These are the terms under which the lender agrees to make the loan. They include the interest rate, length of loan agreement, and any requirements the borrower must meet prior to closing. Loan Payment Reserves: A requirement of many loan programs that, in addition to funds for the down payment and other purchase-related costs, you have saved enough money to cover one or two months of mortgage payments after your closing. Reserve requirements for loan programs may vary. Loan Settlement: The conclusion of the mortgage transaction. This includes the delivery of a deed, the signing of notes, and the disbursement of funds necessary to the mortgage loan transaction. Loan-to-Value (LTV): The ratio between the amount of a given mortgage loan and the lower sales price or appraised value. Margin: The set percentage the lender adds to the index rate to determine the interest rate of an ARM.

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Mortgage: The conveyance of an interest in real property given as security for the payment of a loan. Mortgagor: The borrower in a mortgage transaction who pledges property as security for a debt. Mortgage Specialist: The Academy Financial Services employee responsible for collecting the completed application with all supporting documents before the entire loan packet is submitted to underwriting. Also known as the “processor”. Non-Conforming Loan: Conventional home mortgages not eligible for sale and delivery to either FNMA or FHLMC because of various reasons, including loan amount, loan characteristics or underwriting guidelines. Note: A general term for any kind of paper or document signed by a borrower that is an acknowledgement of the debt, and it, be inference, a promise to pay. When the note is secured by a mortgage, it is called a mortgage note and the mortgagee (lender) is named as the payee. Origination Fee: The amount charged for services performed by the company handling the initial application and processing of the loan. Points: A one-time charge by the lender to increase the yield of the loan, a point is 1% of the amount of the mortgage. Pre-approval: A written commitment from a lender, subject to a property appraisal and other stated conditions, that lets you know exactly how much home you can afford. Prepaids: Closing costs related to the mortgage loan which are collected at loan closing – including per diem pre-paid interest and initial deposits of monthly escrows of taxes and insurance. Primary Residence: A residence which the borrower intends to occupy as the principal residence. Principal: The amount borrowed or remaining unpaid; also, the part of the monthly payment that reduces the outstanding balance of the mortgage. Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI): Insurance written by a private company protecting the mortgage lender against loss resulting from a mortgage default. Rate Cap: The limit of how much the interest rate may change on an ARM at each adjustment and over the life of the loan. Rate Lock: The borrower or lender agree to protect the interest rates, points, and term of the loan while it is processed. Title Insurance: An insurance policy that protects a lender and/or homebuyer (only if the homebuyer purchases a separate policy, called owner’s coverage) against any loss resulting from a title error or dispute. Truth-In-Lending Statement: A Federal law requiring full disclosure of credit terms using a standard format. This is intended to facilitate comparisons between the lending terms and financial institutions. Underwriting: Analysis of risk, determination of loan eligibility, and setting of an appropriate rate and terms for a mortgage on a given property for given borrowers.

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Pre-aPProVal VS. Pre-QualiFiCation A pre-approval indicates that a lender has taken a detailed look into your financial background and has committed to lend you a certain amount of money, pending specific property details. Because pre-approval entails a credit check and a review of supporting documentation, it’s more powerful than a pre-qualification letter, which generally only estimates what you can afford based on information you have provided. Advantages of being pre-approved: Pre-approval offers a number of advantages over waiting to apply for a mortgage until after you have found a home. It entitles you to: 1. Shop for a home with the confidence of knowing you are approved for the price range in which you are looking. 2. Take advantage of the preference many home sellers have for pre-approved buyers. With a pre-approval, sellers know they have a fully-approved buyer qualified to purchase their home. This often will give you an advantage over an un-approved buyer when more than one contract is presented. 3. Strengthen your negotiating position. 4. Allow your sales associate to structure the financing portion of the contract based on your financial needs. 5. Obtain a quick closing date. 6. Discover possible qualification issues early in the home buying process, minimizing last minute surprises. When searching for a new home, the last thing you want to be concerned with is the financing. A preapproval helps remove the stress and anxiety during the home buying process by giving you the confidence that the financing will be in place.

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mortgage BaSiCS Although each individual home financing package has its own variety of features, the concept of a mortgage is really quite simple: a mortgage is a loan to help you finance a home. Your lender advances you a certain  amount of money, which you repay over a specified period of time.

Rates, Points and Loan Fees

Your Monthly Mortgage Payment

The total cost of your mortgage is determined by a number of different factors, most notably the interest rate, discount points and loan fees. The expenses that contribute to the cost of your loan can be expressed as the annual percentage rate (APR).

Mortgage payments can generally be divided into four parts: principal, interest, taxes and insurance. q Principal refers to the amount of money you borrow to buy a home, and to the outstanding loan balance at any point during the mortgage term. q Interest is the cost of borrowing money. As noted above, the amount of interest you pay each month is determined by your interest rate. q Taxes assessed by your local government will likely be collected by your lender as part of your monthly payments and then paid annually or semi-annually on your behalf. This process is known as an escrow. q Insurance, like property taxes, is normally collected by the lender in an escrow account. Insurance offers financial protection and has two major components: • Homeowner’s Insurance, also called hazard insurance, protects you against damage to your property caused by fire, wind or other hazards. • Mortgage Insurance provides partial protection to your lender in the event that you fail to repay your mortgage. Whether you must pay mortgage insurance usually depends on the loan and the size of your down payment.

q Interest Rate refers to the percentage of your outstanding loan balance that you pay the lender each month as part of the cost of borrowing     money. Your interest rate will be based on the current overall rate environment, as well as your financial profile and the specific features of your loan. q Discount Points allow you to “buy down” your interest rate at closing. One point equals 1% of your loan amount. The more points you pay, the lower your interest rate will be and the less you will have to pay each month. q Loan Fees are up-front charges to cover the cost of originating, processing and closing your loan, among other things. An origination point is a loan fee that equals 1% of your loan amount. When considering a loan, keep in mind that rates, points and fees should be considered together. The interest rate alone only tells part of the story.

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doCumentS reQuired For loan aPPliCation* * Some loan programs allow for reduced documentation, therefore all items listed may not be necessary. Additional documentation may be required based on underwriting guidelines.

Income q W-2 forms from the last two years q Federal tax returns, all pages, for the past two years for self-employed or commissioned income sources q A copy of the lease agreement(s) for rental property q A complete copy of the divorce settlement agreement (if using income to qualify) q    Year-to-date pay stub q Pension/Social Security: Current year award letter. Copy of most recent check or, if direct deposit, a copy of the most recent bank statement showing receipt of funds q    Self-employed: Year-to-date Profit & Loss Statement q Self-employed: Corporate/Partnership Tax returns for the past two years

Assets q

The two most recent bank/brokerage statements, all pages, for all accounts

Liabilities q q q q q

Credit card account numbers, lender’s name, balances and minimum payments Car loan: Lender’s name, account number, payment and balance Mortgage loans: Lender’s name, account number, payment and balance for each loan Landlord’s name, address and telephone number dating back two years Complete copy of divorce/settlement agreement

Other Items q q q q

Application fee A copy of the fully executed contract on your home A copy of the relocation agreement (if applicable) Alimony/Child Support/Note Income. Copy of note receivable or divorce decree/paternity award. Six months cancelled checks or deposit slips showing receipt** (to use income to qualify, it must continue for a minimum of three years)

** Alimony, child support, or separate maintenance income need not be revealed if the borrower or co-borrower does not choose to have it considered for repaying the loan.

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38


ChooSing a loan Selecting the right mortgage is central to the homebuying process. You need to consider two things at the  outset: which loan type best meets your homebuying needs and which loan term offers the ideal repayment schedule. Your HomeServices Lending of Georgia representative can assist you in the process, but here are a  few things to keep in mind:

Loan Types Most home loans fall into one of two general categories: fixed rate mortgages and adjustable rate mortgages. You’ll also encounter other basic loan types such as government loans and flexible qualifying programs. q Fixed Rate Mortgages have interest rates that stay the same for the entire life of the loan.             •    You will have predictable monthly payments throughout the life of the loan.             •    You will be protected from rising rates, so your principal and interest payments can never  increase. q Adjustable Rate Mortgages have interest rates that adjust periodically based on market conditions.             •    The initial rate is fixed for an introductory period (usually one to ten years) and is typically lower  than for a fixed-rate mortgage. After that, the rate adjusts annually based on a market index, but can’t go above a predetermined adjustment cap.             •    Because of the lower initial rate, some borrowers may be eligible for a larger loan amount with an ARM than with a fixed rate mortgage. q Government Loans are offered by conventional lenders like HomeServices Lending of Georgia, but               insured by the federal government. They come in two types: FHA and VA.             •    FHA loans are backed by the Federal Housing Administration, and are designed to assist low-tomoderate income homebuyers by offering low down payment requirements and flexible qualifying guidelines.             •    VA loans are backed by the Department of Veterans Affairs (formerly the Veterans  Administration), and are available to qualified veterans and active-duty military personnel and their spouses. They offer many of the same features as FHA loans. q

Flexible Qualifying programs are designed for borrowers with less-than-perfect credit histories, excessive debt or previous bankruptcy, foreclosure or tax delinquency.

Loan Terms The “term” of a loan is the period of time for repayment. The most common loan term is thirty years, but other terms are available, ranging from 10 years all the way up to 40 year terms. Whether you’d be better off with a longer or shorter loan term depends on a number of factors, most notably your monthly income and long-term financial goals. q q

Longer Mortgage Terms offer lower monthly payments and are a good option if you’re on a tight budget or would prefer to direct your monthly cash flow toward other investments or expenses. Shorter Mortgage Terms mean higher monthly payments, but allow you to repay the loan faster and save money on interest.

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Behind the SCeneS oF your mortage aPPliCation Home Mortgage Consultant: q Works with you to gain an understanding of your needs and determine the product and program that best suit your financial needs q Gathers data and documents to pre-underwrite your loan and when possible issue a pre-approval commitment q Discusses purchase price ranges, mortgage payments and closing cost expectations q Sets expectations from application to closing Mortgage Specialist: q Accepts your loan file from the Home Mortgage Consultant and collects any additional documents needed for loan approval q Follows up on appraisal report and title orders with the closing attorney q May make the underwriting decision if certain criteria are met, otherwise refers the file to underwriting Underwriting: q Reviews the loan file and makes the underwriting decision q May request additional documentation from you q Communicates with the Home Mortgage Consultant and Mortgage Specialist. They, in turn, contact you Closing Department: q Prepares instructions for the closing attorney based on your approval q Assembles the package for your closing and sends it to the closing attorney’s office q Reviews and verifies final closing figures and authorizes funding Closing Attorney: q Obtains payoffs q Reviews title examination and survey on your property. Clears any survey and title problems found q Prepares settlement statement and faxes a copy to the closing department and Mortgage Consultant q Conducts closing and executes all lender documents

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Brokerage relationShiPS in real eState tranSaCtionS aCt BROkERAGE IN GEORGIA: •    Sales associates are licensed and are affiliated with  •    Licensed brokers and sales associates are required,  a licensed broker, typically as independent by law, to be honest, truthful and to disclose contractors. materially adverse conditions relative to the •    Buyers and sellers interact with sales associates  purchase and sale of a property. who are supported by their Broker. •    Georgia law defines working relationships  between buyers, sellers and real estate brokers and how relationships are established.

AGENCY RELATIONSHIPS Consumers work with sales associates as “clients” or “customers.”

•    If the buyer and the seller in a transaction are  clients of the same brokerage but represented by •    Clients are represented by real estate brokers and   different sales associates, Designated Agency their sales associates. occurs. Designated agency is not dual agency in •    Brokerage duties to the client are loyalty,  Georgia. confidentiality and protection of the client’s Customers interest in the transaction. Clients

•    Georgia law requires that clients and Brokers sign  •    Customers are not represented by a broker in a  legal or agency capacity. a brokerage agency agreement for representation. •    If the buyer and seller in a transaction are clients  of the same brokerage and working with the same sales associate, Dual Agency occurs.

•    If both the buyer and seller are customers, the  Broker is a Transaction Broker. A transaction broker represents neither party in the transaction.

•    Dual agency requires the written consent of both  •    Services available to a customer are called  buyer and seller. “ministerial acts.” Ministerial acts include: •    Disclosure and consent to dual agency is  locating property, providing information, provided in the seller’s listing agreement and in preparing contracts and providing names of the buyer’s agency agreement. other professionals such as inspectors, •    In dual agency, neither party is exclusively  attorneys, lenders, etc. represented. Confidentiality is maintained for each party, unless information relevant to the transaction is false, unlawful, materially adverse or harmful to the position of either party.

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the home PurChaSing ProCeSS Your Harry Norman, REALTORS® sales associate will guide you through each step of the purchase of your  home. Below is an example of the steps involved from finding your home through closing the transaction.

SOLD

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intereSt rate Chart, FaCtorS Per $1000 The below chart will help you calculate your monthly principal and interest payments for both fixed and adjustable rate loans at various interest rates over 15 and 30 year terms. Start by finding the appropriate interest rate, then look across to the column indicating the desired term of the loan. That number is in the interest rate factor. This is the dollar amount required each month to amortize $1,000 over the specified term. To calculate your principal and interest payment, multiply the interest rate factor by the total loan amount in $1,000s. Interest 15 Year Rate Term

30 Year Term

Interest 15 Year 30 Year Rate Term Term

4

4.77

8

7.4

9.56

7.34

4 1/8

7.46

4.85

8 1/8

9.63

7.42

4 1/4

7.52

4.92

8 1/4

9.7

7.51

4 3/8

7.59

4.99

8 3/8

9.77

7.6

4 1/2

7.65

5.07

8 1/2

9.85

7.69

4 5/8

7.71

5.14

8 5/8

9.92

7.78

4 3/4

7.78

5.22

8 3/4

9.99

7.87

4 7/8

7.84

5.29

8 7/8

10.07

7.96

5

7.91

5.37

9

10.14

8.05

5 1/8

7.97

5.44

9 1/8

10.22

8.14

5 1/4

8.04

5.52

9 1/4

10.29

8.23

5 3/8

8.1

5.6

9 3/8

10.37

8.32

5 1/2

8.17

5.68

9 1/2

10.44

8.41

5 5/8

8.24

5.76

9 5/8

10.52

8.5

5 3/4

8.3

5.84

9 3/4

10.59

8.59

5 7/8

8.37

5.92

9 7/8

10.67

8.68

6

8.44

6.00

10

10.75

8.77

6 1/8

8.51

6.08

10 1/8

10.82

8.87

6 1/4

8.57

6.16

10 1/4

10.9

8.96

6 3/8

8.64

6.24

10 3/8

10.98

9.05

6 1/2

8.71

6.32

10 1/2

11.05

9.15

6 5/8

8.78

6.4

10 5/8

11.13

9.24

6 3/4

8.85

6.48

10 3/4

11.21

9.33

6 7/8

8.92

6.57

10 7/8

11.29

9.43

7

8.99

6.65

11

11.36

9.52

7 1/8

9.06

6.74

11 1/8

11.44

9.62

7 1/4

9.13

6.82

11 1/4

11.52

9.71

7 3/8

9.2

6.91

11 3/8

11.6

9.81

7 1/2

9.27

6.99

11 1/2

11.68

9.9

7 5/8

9.34

7.08

11 5/8

11.76

10.00

7 3/4

9.41

7.16

11 3/4

11.84

10.09

7 7/8

9.48

7.25

11 7/8

11.92

10.19

Here’s an example: Interest rate: 6.5% Term: 30 years Factors per $1,000: 6.32 Total mortgage: $177,215 6.32 * 177.215 = $1119.99 $1119.99 is the monthly principal and interest payment.

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home Finding needS workSheet The more your Sales Associate knows about what you want, the easier it will be for them to help you find the right home. Take time to thoroughly complete the worksheet below and then discuss this with your Harry Norman Sales Associate. FEATURES PROPERTY   •  View   •  Architectural Style   •  Swimming Pool   •  Deck/Patio   •  Garage INTERIOR   •  Floor Plan   •  Room Sizes   •  Bedrooms   •  Bathrooms   •  Living Room   •  Family Room   •  Bonus / Game Room   •  Dining Room   •  Kitchen   •  Basement   •  General Interior Condition COMMUNITY/LOCATION   •  Convenience to Employment   •  Convenience to Transportation   •  Convenience to Shopping   •  Convenience to Schools   •  Convenience to Day Care   •  Nearby Recreational Facilities   •  Near Police & Fire Protection   •  General Appearance of  Properties in Area   •  House Value Relative to Area OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:

SPECIFY PREFERENCES

IMPORTANCE (1-5)

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how muCh home Can you aFFord? home Buying workSheet  

Example* 

You

1. Gross Annual Income (before taxes)

$60,000

$__________

2. Gross Monthly Incoming Line 1 divided by 12 months

$5,000

$__________

3. Monthly Allowable Housing Expense and Long-Term Obligations Line 2 multiplied by .38 **(38% of gross monthly income is usually allocated for principle, interest, taxes, insurance and monthly long-term obligations.)

$1,900

$__________

4. Monthly Allowable Housing Expense Line 3 minus your monthly obligations * credit cards, child support, car loan, etc. (Remainder is allowable principal, interest, taxes and insurance payment.) NOTE: Monthly Allowable Housing Expense on Line 4 should not exceed 33%** of line 2. If it does, enter the lesser amount of the two of line 4 and continue.

$1,400

$__________

5. Monthly Principal and Interest Payment Line 4 multiplied by .80 (80% is the amount of the monthly allowable housing expense usually allocated to only the principal and interest, excluding taxes and insurance.)

$1,120

$__________

6. Estimated Mortgage Amount Line 5 divided by 7.34 multiplied by $1,000 (7.34 is the factor for 8% loan amortized over 30 years. Factors for other interest rates and terms are shown in the Interest Rate Chart .)

$177,215

$__________

7. Estimated Affordable Price*** Line 6 divided by .80 (80% is the mortgage loan amount, assuming a 20% down payment. Use .90 for a 10% down payment.)

$221,518

$__________

If you would like additional assistance, please consult with your Harry Norman Sales Associate. This material is intended for example purposes only and is not a commitment for financing.  Your rate and affordable  price will vary, depending on size of your down payment, specific terms of your loan, other monthly obligations and the amount of assessment fees, if applicable. *The example column is based on a customer(s) with a gross annual income of $60,000 and monthly long-term obligations of $500, an interest rate of 6.5%, a mortgage amount of $177,215 and an Annual Percentage Rate of 6.675%. **These are standard industry guidelines; however, there are a variety of other mortgage products with flexible options. ***Rounded to the nearest $100.

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ConVerSion ChartS WEIGHT 1 pound (lb) = 16 ounces (oz) METRIC WEIGHT CONVERSION CHARTS

LB

KG

KG

LB

1 = 0.45

1 = 2.21

2 = 0.91

2 = 4.41

3 = 1.36

3 = 6.61

4 = 1.81

4 = 8.82

5 = 2.27

5 = 11.02

6 = 2.72

6 = 13.23

7 = 3.18

7 = 15.43

8 = 3.63

8 = 17.46

9 = 4.08

9 = 19.84

10 = 4.54

10 = 22.05

50 = 22.68

50 = 110.23

100 = 45.36

100 = 220.46

VOLUME (LIQUID MEASUREMENT) 1 cup = 8 liquid ounces 1 pint = 16 liquid ounces (2 cups) 1 quart = 32 liquid ounces (2 pints or 4 cups) 1 gallon = 128 liquid ounces (4 quarts or 8 pints or 16 cups) METRIC VOLUME CONVERSION CHARTS GALLON

LITER

LITER

GALLON

1 = 3.79

1 = 0.26

2 = 7.57

2 = 0.53

3 = 11.35

3 = 0.79

4 = 15.14

4 = 1.06

5 = 18.93

5 = 1.32

6 = 22.71

6 = 1.58

7 = 26.50

7 = 1.85

8 = 30.28

8 = 2.11

9 = 34.16

9 = 2.38

10 = 37.94

10 = 2.64

50 = 189.70

50 = 13.20

100 = 379.40

100 = 26.40

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LINEAR A basic length measurement in the United States is the inch (2.54 centimeters). 12 inches = 1 foot (3.2 feet = approx. 1 meter) 3 feet (36 inches) = 1 yard 5,280 feet = 1 mile METRIC LENGTH CONVERSION CHARTS

IN

CM

CM

IN

1 = 2.54

1 = 0.40

2 = 5.08

2 = 0.80

3 = 7.63

3 = 1.20

4 = 10.16

4 = 1.60

5 = 12.70

5 = 2.00

6 = 15.24

6 = 2.40

7 = 17.78

7 = 2.80

8 = 20.32

8 = 3.20

9 = 22.86

9 = 3.50

10 = 25.40

10 = 3.90

11 = 27.94

11 = 4.30

12 = 30.48

12 = 4.70

Distance is measured by the mile (mi).

MI

KM

KM

MI

1 = 1.61

1 = 0.62

2 = 3.22

2 = 1.24

3 = 4.83

3 = 1.86

4 = 6.44

4 = 2.46

5 = 8.05

5 = 3.11

6 = 9.66

6 = 3.37

7 = 11.27

7 = 4.35

8 = 12.88

8 = 4.97

9 = 14.48

9 = 5.59

10 = 16.09

10 = 6.21

50 = 80.47

50 = 31.07

100 = 160.90

100 = 62.14

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TEMPERATURE The U.S. measures air temperature by the Farenheit scale. To convert Farenheit (˚F) to Celsius (˚C): take the number of degrees Farenheit, subtract 32, multiply by 5, divide by 9 and round up. TEMPERATURE CONVERSION CHART

˚F

˚C

32 = 0 40 = 5 50 = 10 60 = 15 77 = 20 86 = 25 95 = 30 105 = 40 140 = 60 175 = 80

MEASUREMENTS FOR COOkING 1 quart (qt) = 1 liter (approximately) 1 pint (pt) = 0.5 liter (approximately) 1 pound (lb) = 500 grams 1 teaspoon (tp) = 2 liquid grams 1 tablespoon (Tbsp) = 6 liquid grams OVEN TEMPERATURE CHART

˚F

˚C

Low heat or slow cooking

140 - 250 degrees

70 - 121 degrees

medium or moderate

300 - 400 degrees

50 - 205 degrees

hot or maximum

400 degrees & up

205 degrees & up

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CLOTHING SIZES OF WOMEN’S SUITS AND DRESSES UNITED STATES

UK

CONTINENTAL EUROPE

JAPAN

4

6

36

3

6

8

38

5

8

10

40

7

10

12

42

9

12

14

44

11

14

16

46

13

16

18

48

15

18

20

50

17

20

22

52

19

SIZES OF MEN’S SUITS AND OVERCOATS UNITED STATES

UK

CONTINENTAL EUROPE

JAPAN

34

34

44

36

36

46

38

38

48

M

40

40

50

L

42

42

52

44

44

54

46

46

56

48

48

58

50

50

60

52

52

62

S

LL

SIZES OF MEN’S SHIRTS UNITED STATES

UK

CONTINENTAL EUROPE

13.5

13.5

34

14

14

36

14.5

14.5

37

15

15

38

15.5

15.5

39

16

16

40

16.5

16.5

41

17

17

42

17.5

17.5

43

18

18

45

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SIZES OF WOMEN’S SHOES UNITED STATES

UK

CONTINENTAL EUROPE

JAPAN

5

3

36.5

23

5.5

3.5

37

23.5

6

4

37.5

24

6.5

4.5

38

24.5

7

5

38.5

35

7.5

5.5

39

-

8

6

40

-

8.5

6.5

40.5

-

9

7

41

-

9.5

7.5

42

-

SIZES OF MEN’S SHIRTS UNITED STATES

UK

CONTINENTAL EUROPE

7

6

38.5

7.5

6.5

39

8

7

40.5

8.5

7.5

41

9

8

41.5

9.5

8.5

42

10

9

43

10.5

9.5

44

11

10

44.5

11.5

10.5

45

12

11

46

Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

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UNITED STATES HOLIDAYS PRIMARY U.S. HOLIDAYS January 1

New Year’s Day

First day of the New Year

Last Monday of May

Memorial Day

Commemoration of men and women who died in service to their country

July 4

Independence Day

Birthday of U.S.; commemoration of Declaration of Independence from Great Britain in 1776.

First Monday of September

Labor Day

Recognizes U.S. workers

Fourth Thursday of November

Thanksgiving

A day of being thankful for all that is good

December 25

Christmas Day

Religious holiday celebrating the birth of Christ

SECONDARY U.S. HOLIDAYS Some employers and many government offices are closed. The Monday nearest January 25

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Commemoration of the civil rights leader’s birthday

The Monday nearest February 20

President’s Day

Birthday of two U.S. Presidents: George Washington and Abraham Lincoln

The Monday nearest October 12

Columbus Day

Commemoration of the discovery of America

The Monday nearest November 11

Veteran’s Day

Commemoration of men and women who have served in the U.S. military

OTHER HOLIDAYS Businesses do not close, but many people celebrate. February 14

Valentine’s Day

Celebration of romance & loved ones

March 17

St. Patrick’s Day

Irish heritage celebration

Second Sunday of May

Mother’s Day

Day to honor all mothers

Third Sunday of June

Father’s Day

Day to honor all fathers

October 31

Halloween

Eve of All Saints’ Day

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WAYS IN WHICH HOLIDAYS ARE CELEBRATED New Year’s Eve

Dinner parties, dances & celebrations welcome the New Year.

New Year’s Day

Family and friends get together for meals and watch football games on television.

Valentine’s Day

Send or give greeting cards, candy, flowers or small gifts to your sweetheart or loved one. Young children exchange special greeting cards.

St. Patrick’s Day

Many Irish and non-Irish people wear green clothing and go to parties at Irish pubs to eat traditional foods and drink green beer.

Easter

It is traditional for the “Easter Bunny” to bring candies and colored eggs in baskets to children to find on Easter morning. Christians attend church and special services celebrating the resurrection followed by family meals.

Mother’s Day/Father’s Day

Children give cards and presents or do special things for their parents.

Memorial Day Independence Day Labor Day

Celebrations include things such as picnics, barbecues, trips to the beach. The three holidays have come to signify thee beginning, midpoint and end of summer.

Halloween

Children dress in costumes to go to parties or ring neighbors’ doorbells, greeting residents with “Trick or treat!”, after which they are given candy or other treats. Many adults attend costume parties.

Thanksgiving

Friends and family gather for a feast with traditional foods including turkey and dressing, cranberries, sweet potatoes and pumpkin pie.

Christmas

Many people attend church on Christmas Day or Christmas Eve, friends and family gather to exchange gifts, decorate a Christmas Tree, sing Christmas carols and “Santa Claus” brings gifts for children.

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ConSulate oFFiCeS in the metro atlanta area Argentina - Consulate General of Argentina 245 Peachtree Center Avenue, Suite 2101 Atlanta, GA 30303 Phone: (404) 880-0805 Fax: (404) 880-0806 Email: catla@bellsouth.net Mr. P. Carlos Layus, Consul General

Belgium - Consulate of Belgium 230 Peachtree St. NW, Suite 2710 Atlanta, GA 30303 Website: http://www.diplobel.org/usa Phone: (404) 659-2150 Fax: (404) 659-8474 Email: Atlanta@diplobel.org Mr. Jan Verbeeck, Consul

Australia - Consulate General of Australia The Atlanta Financial Center 3353 Peachtree Rd., Suite 1140 Atlanta, GA 30326 Website: http://www.austrade.gov.au Phone: (404) 760-3401 Fax: (404) 760-3401 Ms. Amanda Hodges, Consul General & Trade Commissioner

Flanders Investment and Trade 235 Peachtree Street NE North Tower , Suite 810 Atlanta, GA 30303 Phone: (404) 659-9611 Fax: (404) 659-9461 Email: atlanta@fitagency.com Mr. Ludwig Van Den Bossche, Trade Commissioner

Austria -Honorary Consulate General of Austria 4200 Northside Parkway NW Bldg. 1, Suite 300 Atlanta, GA 30327 Website: http://www.austria.org Phone: (404) 264-9858 Fax: (404) 266-3864 Email: ferdinands@seefriedproperties.com Mr. Ferdinand C. Seefried, Honorary Consul General The Austrian Trade Commission Southern Region Office 4200 Northside Parkway NW Bldg. 1, Suite 300 Atlanta, GA 30327 Website: http://www.austriantrade.us Phone: (404) 995-9347 Fax: (404) 995-9348 Email: atc_atl@bellsouth.net Mr. Bruno Freytag, Trade Commissioner Barbados -Honorary Consulate of Barbados P.O. Box 77007 Atlanta, GA 30357 Phone: (404) 365-8353 Fax: (404) 365-8354 Dr. Edward Layne, Honorary Consul

Walloon Foreign Trade Board 235 Peachtree Street NE North Tower , Suite 820 Atlanta, GA 30303 Website: http://www.wallonia-export.be Phone: (404) 584-2002 Fax: (404) 659-9461 Email: awexatlanta@compuserve.com Mr. Jean Pierre Muller, Trade Commissioner Bolivia - Honorary Consulate General of Bolivia 1401 Peachtree St., Suite 240 Atlanta, GA 30309 Phone: (404) 522-0777 Fax: (404) 873-3335 Mr. George Handelsman, Honorary Consul General Brazil - Honorary Consulate of Brazil One Atlantic Center 1170 Peachtree St, NE Suite 800 Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Phone: (404) 962-6493 Fax: (404) 962-6393 Mr. Timothy S. Perry, Honorary Consul

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Canada - Canadian Consulate General 1175 Peachtree St. NE 100 Colony Square, Suite 1700 Atlanta, GA 30361-6205 Website: http://www.atlanta.gc.ca Phone: (404) 532-2000 Fax: (404) 532-2050 Email: brian .oak@international.gc.ca Mr. Brian Oak, Consul General

Cyprus - Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Cyprus 895 Somerset Drive Atlanta, GA 30327 Phone: (770) 941-3764 Fax: (770) 941-2109 Email: michaelides@bellsouth.net Dr. Kyriakos Michaelides, Honorary Consul

Quebec Trade & Investment Office 1170 Peachtree Street, Suite 250 Atlanta, GA 30309 Phone: (404) 815-4979 Fax: (404) 815-6664 Email: louise.fortin@mri.gouv.qc.ca Ms. Louise Fortin, Director

Czech Republic - Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic Four Concourse Parkway, Suite 215 Atlanta, GA 30328 Phone: (678) 587-9198 Fax: (770) 395-1655 Email: geonovak@mindspring.com Mr. George A. Novak, Honorary Consul General

Chile - Honorary Consulate of Chile 2876 Sequoyah Drive NW Atlanta, GA 30327 Phone: (404) 355-7923 Fax: (404) 355-9030 Email: emonckeberg@bellsouth.net Ms. Erika M. Monckeberg, Honorary Consul

Denmark - Honorary Consulate of Denmark 1100 Spring St. NW, Suite 550 Atlanta, GA 30309 Phone: (404) 876-5511 Fax: (404) 875-2629 Email: sselig@seligenterprises.com Mr. S. Stephen Selig III, Honorary Consul

China - Hong kong Trade Office 3340 Peachtree Rd., Suite 1800 Atlanta, GA 30326 Phone: (404) 238-0875 Fax: (404) 364-6512 Email: hkica@mindspring.com Mr. Gene Hanratty, Executive Director

Trade Commission of Denmark International Tower 229 Peachtree Street NE, Suite 1010 Atlanta, GA 30303 Website: http://www.dtcseusa.org Phone: (404) 588-1588 Fax: (404) 588-1589 Email: js@dtcseusa.org Mr. Jan Sauer, Trade Commissioner

Colombia - Consulate General of Colombia 5901 C Peachtree Dunwoody Rd, Suite 375 Atlanta, GA 30328-5382 Phone: (770) 668-0552 Fax: (770) 668-0763 Email: consulco@bellsouth.net Mr. Camilo De Bedout Herrera, Consul General Costa Rica - Consulate General of Costa Rica 1870 The Exchange, Suite 100 Atlanta, GA 30339 Website: http://www.costarica.com Phone: (770) 951-7025 Fax: (770) 951-7073 Email: consulate_ga@costarica-embassy.org Ms. Emilia Trejos, Consul General

Ecuador - Honorary Consulate of Ecuador 5505 Roswell Rd., Suite 350 Atlanta, GA 30342 Phone: (404) 252-2211 Fax: (404) 252-8580 Email: consulecuadorga@aol.com Ms. Patricia Elena Boezio, Honorary Consul El Salvador - Consulate General of El Salvador 3505 Duluth Park Lane, NW, Suite 320 Duluth , GA., 30096 Tel (770) 623-8858 ext 24 Fax: (770) 623-8867 E-mail laguilar@rree.gob.sv Mr. Asdrubal Aguilar Zepeda, Consul General

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Finland - Honorary Consulate of Finland Promenade II, Suite 3100 1230 Peachtree Rd., NE Atlanta, GA 30309-3592 Phone: (404) 815-3682 Fax: (404) 685-6982 Email: jsaunders@sgrlaw.com Mr. John D. Saunders, Honorary Consul

Guatemala - Consulate General of the Republic of Guatemala 2750 Buford Highway Atlanta, GA 30324 Phone: (404) 320-8804 Fax: (404) 320-8806 Email: hhun@minex.gob.qt Mr. Hugo Hun, Consul General Ms. Maria Teresa Fraser, Honorary Consul Phone: (770 992-6419 Email: conquatatl@charter.net

France - Consulate General of France 3475 Piedmont Rd. NE, Suite 1840 Atlanta, GA 30305 Website: http://www.consulfrance-atlanta.org Phone: (404) 495-1660 Fax: (404) 495-1661 Email: consulfrgausa@mindspring.com Mr. Philippe Ardanaz, Consul General and Trade Commissioner

Honduras - Consulate General of Honduras 600 Houze Way, Suite 3 - A Roswell, GA 30076 Phone: (770) 645-8881 Fax: (770) 645-8808 Ms. Cecilia Callejas, Consul General

Enterprise Rhône-Alpes International 3495 Piedmont Road NE Building 11, Suite 710 Atlanta, GA 30305 Website: http://www.erai.us Phone: (404) 233-8623 Fax: (404) 233-8625 Email: Xavier.lalande@erai.org Mr. Xavier Lalande, Director USA

Iceland - Honorary Consulate General of Iceland 20 Executive Park West, Suite 2023 Atlanta, GA 30329 Phone: (404) 321-0777 Fax: (404) 634-9640 Email: mkhorowitz@bellsouth.net Mr. Maurice K. Horowitz,  Honorary Consul General

Germany - Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany Marquis Two Tower, Suite 901 285 Peachtree Center Ave. NE Atlanta, GA 30303-1221 Website: http://www.germany.info/atlanta Phone: (404) 659-4760 Fax: (404) 659-1280 Email: atlanta@germanconsulate.info Mr. Hans-Joerg Brunner, Consul General Greece - Consulate of Greece Tower Place, Suite 1670 3340 Peachtree Rd. NE Atlanta, GA 30326 Website: http://www.greekembassy.org Phone: (404) 261-3313 Fax: (404) 262-2798 Email: atlanta@greekembassy.org Mr. Lambros Kakissis, Consul

India - Honorary Consulate of India One Atlantic Center 1201 West Peachtree St. NE, Suite 2000 Atlanta, GA 30309-3400 Phone: (404) 312-4044 Fax: (404) 881-0470 Email: he@indiaconsul.com Mr. Kenneth A. Cutshaw, Honorary Consul Israel - Consulate General of Israel 1100 Spring St. NW, Suite 440 Atlanta, GA 30309 Website: http://www.israelemb.org/atlanta Phone: (404) 487-6582 Fax: (404) 487-6555 Email: consul.sec@atlanta.mfa.gov.il Mr. Shmuel Ben Shmuel, Consul General

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Italy - Honorary Consulate of Italy 133 Luckie Street, NW Atlanta, GA 30303 Website: http://www.italconsmiami.com Phone: (404) 442-8298 Fax: (404) 442-6940 Email: consulate@italyatlanta.org Ms. Angela Della Costanza Turner, Honorary Consul

korea Trade Center 5 Concourse Parkway NE, Suite 2181 Atlanta, GA 30328 Phone: (770) 508-0808 Fax: (770) 508-0801 Email: kotra@bellsouth.net Mr. Kyun Min, Director General Liberia Honorary Consulate General of Liberia 2265 Cascade Rd., SW Atlanta, GA 30311 Phone: (404) 753-4753 Fax: (404) 753-4228 Dr. Walter Young, Honorary Consul General

Italian Trade Commission 233 Peachtree Street, NE Harris Tower, Suite 2301 Atlanta, GA 30303 Phone: (404) 525-0660 Fax: (404) 525-5112 Dr. Giovanni Bifulco, Trade Commissioner

Luxembourg - Honorary Consulate of Luxembourg 1170 Peachtree St. NE, Suite 1750 Atlanta, GA 30309 Phone: (404) 892-2100 Fax: (770) 875-0798 Email: gahoffmann1@aol.com Mr. Georges A. Hoffmann, Honorary Consul

Jamaica - Honorary Consulate of Jamaica 5405 Memorial Drive, Building H, Suite 1 Atlanta, GA 30083 Phone: (404) 297-7696 Fax: (404) 508-4712 Email: martinlaw@bellsouth.net Mr. Vin Martin, Honorary Consul

Mexico - Consulate General of Mexico 2600 Apple Valley Rd. Atlanta, GA 30319 Phone: (404) 266-2233 Fax: (404) 266-2302 Email: info@consulmexatlanta.org Ms. Remedios Gomez Arnau, Consul General & Dean of the Atlanta Consular Corps

Japan - Consulate General of Japan One Alliance Center, Suite 1600 3500 Lenox Road Atlanta, GA 30326 Website: http://www. japanatlanta.org Phone: (404) 240-4300 Fax: (404) 240-4311 Email: ogawa@cgjapanatlanta.org Mr. Shoji Ogawa, Consul General Japan External Trade Organization - JETRO 245 Peachtree Center Avenue Marquis One Tower, Suite 2208 Atlanta, GA 30303 Phone: (404) 681-0600 Fax: (404) 681-0713 Mr. Hirokazu Yamaoka, Chief Executive Officer korea - Consulate General of the Republic of korea Cain Tower, Suite 500 229 Peachtree St. NE Atlanta, GA 30303 Phone: (404) 522-1611Fax: (404) 521-3169 Email: kenzie.freeman@gmail.com Mr. Kwang-jae Lee, Consul General

Trade Commission of Mexico 229 Peachtree Street NE, Suite 917 Atlanta, GA 30303 Website: http://www.bancomext.com Phone: (404) 522-5373 Fax: (404) 681-3361 Mr. Miguel Navarro, Deputy Trade Commissioner Mongolia - Honorary Consulate of Mongolia 781 Marietta Street Atlanta, Georgia 30318 Phone: (404) 894-9451 Fax: (404) 894-1903 Email: john.endicott@inta.gatech.edu John E. Endicott, Ph.D., Honorary Consul

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Netherlands - Honorary Consulate of the Netherlands 270 Carpenter Drive, Suite 550 Atlanta, GA 30328 Phone: (404) 531-0781 Fax: (404) 531-4735 Email: consulatenlatlanta@earthlink.net Janny Ronde, Honorary Consul

Peru - Consulate General of the Republic of Peru 4360 Chamblee Road, Suite 580 Atlanta, GA 30341 Phone:(678) 336-7010 Fax: (678) 990-1920 Email: informes@consulperuatlanta.com Website: http://www.consuladoperu.com/georgia Mr. Jorge Puente Luna, Consul General

New Zealand - Honorary Consulate of New Zealand 513 Seminole Avenue NE Atlanta, GA 30307 Phone: (404) 745-4551 Fax: (404) 745-4991 Email: newzealand@mindspring.com Mr. Ian Latham, Honorary Consul

Philippines - Honorary Consulate General of the Philippines 3340 Peachtree Rd., NE, Suite 2310 Atlanta, GA 30326 Phone: (404) 239-5740 Fax: (404) 233-4041 Email: ray@ahdintl.com Mr. Raoul Donato, Honorary Consul General

Nicaragua - Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Nicaragua 3161 Lemons Ridge Atlanta, GA 30339 Phone: (404) 495-7816 Fax: (770) 319-3787 Email: jtratch@bellsouth.net Mr. J. Thomas Ratchford Jr., Honorary Consul

Romania - Honorary Consulate of Romania 3481 Washington Way Atlanta, GA 30340 Phone: (770) 934-4814 Fax: (770) 934-6764 Email: lazauj1@bellsouth.net Mr. John Lazau, Honorary Consul

Nigeria - Consulate General of Nigeria 8060 Roswell Road Atlanta, GA 30350 Website: http://www.nigeria-consulate-atl.org Phone: (770) 394-6261 Fax: (770) 394-4671 Email: cgna@nigeria-consulate-atl.org Mr. Victor Onochie Bosah, Consul General Norway - Honorary Consulate of Norway 300 Northcreek, Suite 650 3715 Northside Pkwy. Atlanta, GA 30327 Phone: (404) 239-0885 Fax: (404) 239-0877 Email: jrm@mcdonald.devco.com Mr. John R. McDonald, Honorary Consul Panama - Consulate General of Panama 630 Paces Wood Court Lawrenceville, GA 30044 Phone: (404) 522-4114 Fax: (404) 522-4120 Email: pma-atlconsulate@hotmail.com Mr. Jaime Aleman, Consul General

Sao Tome and Principe - Honorary Consulate of Sao Tome & Principe 190 Windsor Cove Atlanta, GA 30328 Phone: (678) 259-8146 Fax: (770) 454-0032 Email: gngenner@mindspring.com Mr. Gareth N. Genner, Honorary Consul Slovenia, Republic of - Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Slovenia 400 Colony Square, Suite 200 Atlanta, GA 30361 Phone: (404) 881-2812 Fax: (404) 881-2813 Email: psteinfeld@bellsouth.net Mr. Paul Neal Steinfeld, Honorary Consul Spain - Honorary Consulate of Spain 1010 Huntcliff, Suite 2315 Atlanta, GA 30350 Phone: (770) 518-2406 Fax: (770) 518-2410 Email: itaboada@aol.com Mr. Ignacio Taboada, Honorary Vice Consul

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Sri Lanka - Honorary Consulate General of Sri Lanka One Atlantic Center, 40th Floor Atlanta, GA 30309-3424 Phone: (404) 881-7164 Fax: (404) 253-8643 Email: kevin.grady@alston.com Mr. Kevin E. Grady, Honorary Consul General Sweden - Honorary Consulate of Sweden 600 Peachtree St. NE, Suite 2400 Atlanta, GA 30308 Website: http://www.sacc-usa.org Phone: (404) 815-2292 Fax: (404) 815-2424 Email: jill.olander@att.net Ms. Jill Olander, Vice Consul Switzerland - Consulate General of Switzerland 1275 Peachtree St. NE, Suite 425 Atlanta, GA 30309-3533 Website: http://www.swissemb.org Phone: (404) 870-2000 Fax: (404) 870-2011 Email: vertretung@atl.rep.admin.ch Mr. Ulrich Hunn, Consul General Swiss Business Hub USA - Atlanta Branch 1275 Peachtree St. NE, Suite 425 Atlanta, GA 30309 Phone: (404) 870-2010 Fax: (404) 870-2011 Email: kimberly.corradi@eda.admin.ch Ms. Kimberly Corradi, Trade Commissioner Taiwan - Taipei Economic and Culture Office (TECO) in Atlanta Suite 800, Atlantic Center Plaza 1180 West Peachtree St. NE, Atlanta, GA 30309 Website: http://www.teco.org Phone: (404) 870-9375 Fax: (404) 870-9376 Email: tecoatl@teco.org Mr. Rong-chuan Wu, Director General Commercial Division, TECO in Atlanta Website: http://www.taiwantrade.com.tw Phone: (404) 892-5095 Fax: (404) 892-6555 Email: taiwantrade@mindspring.com Mr. Eugene Chen, Division Director

Tanzania - Honorary Consulate of Tanzania 2245 Goolby Road Atlanta, GA 30349 Phone: (404) 766-8000 Fax: (404) 767-5264 Dr. Al H. Anderson, Honorary Consul Thailand - Honorary Consulate General of Thailand 7115 Oakridge Parkway Austell, GA 30168 Thai Trade Office 3895 Cherokee Street Suite 200, Box 104 Kennesaw, GA 30144 Website: http://www.geostrategypartners.com Phone: (770) 642-4959 Fax: (770) 642-4508 Email: mt@geostrategypartners.com Mr. Mark Towery, Managing Director Turkey - Honorary Consul of Turkey 1266 West Paces Ferry Rd. NW, Suite 257 Atlanta, Georgia 30327-2306 Phone: (404) 848-9600 Fax: (404) 364-0777 Email: mdiamond@honturkishconsulga.org Website: http://http://www.honturkishconsulga.org Ms. Mona Tekin Diamond, Honorary Consul United kingdom - British Consulate General Georgia Pacific Center, Suite 3400 133 Peachtree St. NE Atlanta, GA 30303 Website: http://www.britainUSA.com Website: http://www.tradepartnersuk-usa.com Phone: (404) 954-7700 Fax: (404) 954-7702 Email: martin.rickerd@fco.gov.uk Mr. Martin Rickerd OBE MVO, Her Majesty’s  Consul General

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Bi-national ChamBerS oF CommerCe in the metro atlanta area There are currently 31 bi-national chambers of commerce actively involved in Georgia’s international business community. These organizations work to assist their members develop business contacts, and they foster, promote and develop commercial relations and exchanges between Georgia and their countries. American Israel Chamber of Commerce 1150 Lake Hearn Drive NE, Suite 130 Atlanta, GA 30342 Web: www.aiccse.org Phone: (404) 843-9426 Fax: (404) 843-1416 Email: tom@aiccse.org Mr. Tom Glaser, President

Brazilian American Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 93411 Atlanta, GA 30377 Phone: (404) 880-1551 Email: baccpresident@aol.com Ms. Alessandra Coppola, President Ms. Lucia Jennings, Founder

Argentine-American Chamber of Commerce 885 Woodstock Rd. Suite 430 #135 Roswell, GA 30075-2274 USA Phone: (770) 906-5696 www.ghcc.org http://www.allendebrea.com/esp/home/index.html Paula B. Holfeld, President

British American Business Group of Atlanta 1260 Winchester Parkway, Suite 205 Smyrna, GA 30080 Phone: (404) 681-2224 Fax: (770) 433-2907 Email: admin@babg.org Ms. Margo Engel, Executive Director

Asian-American Chamber of Commerce Business Resources, USA, Inc. 5455 Buford Highway, Suite B-203 Atlanta, GA 30340 Phone: (404) 557-9000 Fax: (770) 619-3115 Mr. Jack Lu, President

Canadian American Society of the Southeast United States 1188 Dirby Park Drive Atlanta, GA 30319 Phone: (404) 261-7070 Fax: (404) 261-3600 Email: donna@imagekeepers.net Ms. Donna Murley, Administrator

Australian American Chamber of Commerce 48 South Park Square Marietta, Georgia 30060 Phone: (770) 795-9384 Fax: (678) 797-0024 Email: info@anzaccatlanta.org Mr. Mark Allen, President

Colombian American Chamber of Commerce 5901B Peachtree Dunwoody Road, Suite 480 Atlanta, GA 30328 Phone: (770) 394-2173 Fax: (770) 394-2176 Email: chambercolatl@yahoo.com Mr. Cesar Felipe Gonzalez, President

Belgian American Chamber of Commerce 1401 Peachtree Street NE, Suite 500 Atlanta, GA 30309 Web: www.belcham.org Phone: (404) 870-8085 Fax: (404) 870-0288 Email: wboel@bellsouth.net Mr. Werner Boel, Executive Director Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

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Czech North American Chamber of Commerce Four Concourse Parkway, Suite 215 Atlanta, Georgia 30328 Web: www.ccrcc.net Phone: (678) 587-9198 Fax: (770) 395-1655 Email: geonovak@mindspring.com Mr. George A. Novak, Director Danish American Chamber of Commerce 229 Peachtree Street, NE, Suite 1010 Atlanta, GA 30303, USA Web: www.daccusa.org Phone: (404) 614-1748 Fax: (404) 588-1589 E-mail: info@daccusa.org Ms. Pernille Carlsen, Executive Director Dominican – American Chamber of Commerce 2801 Buford Highway, Suite 500 Atlanta, GA 30329 Phone: (404) 680-6604 Email: dacc@ghcc.org Mr. Fernando Ramirez, President Finnish American Chamber of Commerce 1650 Satellite Boulevard Duluth, GA 30097 Phone: (770) 813-0452 Fax: (770) 813-1713 Email: sunchr@mindspring.com Mr. Christer Sundell, President French-American Chamber of Commerce 2996 Grand View Avenue NE, Suite 109  Atlanta, GA 30305 Web: www.faccatlanta.com Phone: (404) 846-2500 Fax: (404) 846-2555 Email: info@facc-atlanta.com Mr. Denys Gounod, President Georgia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 2801 Buford Highway, Suite 500 Atlanta, GA 30329 Web: www.ghcc.org Phone: (404) 929-9998 Fax: (404) 929-9908 Email: sgonzalez@ghcc.org Ms. Sara J. Gonzalez, President

Georgia Indo-American Chamber of Commerce 4780 Ashford Dunwoody Road Suite A-276 Atlanta, GA 30338 Web: www.giacc.org Phone: 678-230-3283 Fax: 770-381-9344 Email: athakker@globaltechinc.com Dr. Ash Thakker, President German American Chamber of Commerce 530 Means Street Suite 120 Atlanta, GA 30318 Web: www.gaccsouth.com Phone: (404) 586-6800 Fax: (404) 586-6820 Mr. Kristian Wolf, President & CEO  Ireland Chamber of Commerce in the United States 4554 Cape Kure Court  Norcross, GA 30092 Phone: (770) 621-2503 Fax: 770) 621-2516 Email: jfgaffey@bellsouth.net Mr. Jim Gaffey, Chairman Japan American Society of Georgia 3121 Maple Drive, Suite 114 Atlanta, GA 30305 Web: www.us-japan.org/jasg Phone: (404) 842-1400 Fax: (404) 524-8447 Email: jasg@mindspring.com Mr. Clark T. Wisenbaker, Acting Executive Director Japanese Chamber of Commerce of Georgia 245 Peachtree Center Avenue, Suite 2201 Atlanta, GA 30303 Web: www.jccg.org Phone: (404) 522-0122 Fax: (404) 522-7524 Email: jccg@jccg.org Mr. Hirokazu Yamaoka, Acting Executive Director 

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korean American Chamber of Commerce 5455 Buford Highway, Suite 127B Atlanta, GA 30340 Phone: (770) 452-0366 Fax: (770) 452-0466 Email: hslim67@hotmail.com Mr. Kevin Park, President 

Portuguese-American Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 79291 Atlanta, GA 30357 Phone: (770) 649-2576 Mr. Victor J. Marques, President  Romanian-American Trade Chamber of Commerce and Cultural Center 4422 Sheila Court Lilburn, GA 30047 Web: www.consiliu.org Phone: (770) 925-1871 Email: romaniancc@aol.com Ms. Smaranda Livescu, Director

korean Southeast United States Chamber of Commerce 241 Ralph McGill Boulevard NE Atlanta, GA 30308 Phone: (404) 506-7604 Fax: (404) 506-7610 Email: fjmcclos@southerco.com Mr. Frank McCloskey, President Mexican-American Business Chamber of Commerce 5522 New Peachtree Road, Suite 129 Chamblee, GA 30341 Phone: (770) 441-7581 Fax: (770) 441-7909 Email: bgasiba@mexicanchamber.org Beatriz Gasiba, President/Executive Director Peruvian-American Association of Georgia 3155 Presidential Drive, Suite 104 Atlanta, GA 30340 Web: www.rdtorecovery.com Phone: 770-220-2885 Fax: 770-220-2835 Email: rociow@rdtorecovery.com Mr. Rocio Del Milagro Woody, President/CEO Philippine American Chamber of Commerce 1620 Manhasset Farm Ct. Dunwoody, GA 30338 Web: www.paccga.org Phone: (770) 396-1828 Fax: (770) 396-6695 Ms. Roni Buenaventura, President Polish-American Chamber of Commerce 600 Peachtree Street, Suite 4100 Atlanta, GA 30308 Web: www.pacc-south.com Phone: (404) 724-4500 Fax: (404) 633-9936 Email: wzabinski@csicorp-usa.com Mr. Wit Zabinski, President

South Africa Atlanta Business Association 4605 Windsogate Court Atlanta, GA 30342 Phone: (404) 252-1867 Fax: (404) 252-4969 Email: fabotha@aol.com Ms. Francois Botha, Director Swedish American Chamber of Commerce 4775 Peachtree Industrial Boulevard Building 300, Suite 300 Norcross, GA 30092 Web: www.sacc-atlanta.org Phone: (770) 670-2480 Fax: (770) 670-2500 Email: sacc@sacc-atlanta.org Ms. Jill Olander, Chairman Swiss-American Chamber of Commerce c/o CIBA Vision Corporation 11460 Johns Creek Parkway Duluth, GA 30097 Phone: (678) 415-4219 Fax: (678) 415-4258 Email:  Karen.wright@cibavision.novartis.com   Mr. Robin Terrell, Chairman US-China Peoples Friendship Association 18 Fairfield Drive Avondale Estates, GA 30002 Phone: (404) 292-0714 Ms. Peggy Roney, President

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additional reSourCeS Helpful Website Links Business Journals and Publications http://www.imi.american.edu/ http://www.interculturalpress.com http://www.internchangeinstitute.com Business Culture Information http://www.executiveplanet.com http://www.culturegrams.com http://moving.com http://www.bound4.com http://www.culturelink.org CDC Travelers’ Health http://www.cdc.gov/travel/index.htm Conversion Tables http://www.onlineconversion.com/ http://www.worldtimeserver.com http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/advmeeting.html http://www.albireo.ch/temperatureconverter/ http://www.franzus.com/voltage_guide.htm http://www.timezoneconverter.com/ http://www.oanda.com Countries of the World: Maps http://www.atlapedia.com/ Embassies http://www.embassy.org/ http://embassyworld.com Exchange Rates and Dialing Codes http://www.the-acr.com http://www.countrycallingcodes.com/ http://www.state.gov/m/a/als/prdm/ Immigration http://www.aila.org/ International Holidays http://www.bank-holidays.com Harry Norman, REALTORS® International Services Resource Guide The information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not warranted.

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International Real Estate Investor Convention http://www.mipim.com International Real Estate Facts & Information http://www.globaledge.msu.edu/ibrd/countryindex.asp http://www.burns.dcb.du.edu/main. http://www.ired.com/ http://www.afire.org http://www.erc.org International Referral Contract (Note you will need NAR ID# - appears on mailing label for REALTOR magazine) http://www.worldproperties.com (Member center/referral network forms) Language Resources http://www.languageline.com http://www.elite.net/%7Erunner/jennifers/language.htm http://www.world.altavista.com/ http://www.berlitz.com http://www.immobel.com http://www.Travelang.com Organizations for Children http://www.girlscouts.org/ http://www.girlscouts.org/who_we_are/overseas/ http://www.scouting.org/councils/index.html Religious Orientations by Country http://www.adherents.com Sales Associate Training Materials http://www.realtor.org/cipshome.nsf/pages/toolkits http://www.LeadingRE.com Scholastic Information http://nces.ed.gov/timss/ Travel and Transportation http://www.customs.treas.gov/ http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_1764.html Tipping Calculator http://www.magellans.com/store/article/367?Args World Weather http://www.weather.com/

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Publications Kiss, Bow & Shake Hands – Terri Morrison, Wayne Conaway & George Borden Do’s & Taboos of Body Language Around the World – Roger Axtell When in Rome…A Business Guide to Cultures & Customs in 12 European Nations – John Mole Basis Concepts of Intercultural Communication: Selected Readings – Milton Bennett Cross-Cultural Dialogues – 74 Brief Encounters with Cultural Difference – Craig Storti The Art of Crossing Cultures – Craig Strorti Gestures: Do’s and Taboos of Body Language Around the World – Rober Axtell Multicultural Manners – Norine Dresser

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®

®

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International Services Resource Guide