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Spring/Summer 2021

A NEW DAWN Green designs, purposeful interiors and a joyful outlook

INTERIORS | LIFESTYLE | PROPERTY


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047 LIFESTYLE

KEY PIECES

021_The moment

047_Spring into summer

Red-carpet glamour for the living room;

Revitalise your home for the warm(er)

body-positive ceramics; colourful collabs

season with rich colours and quirky touches

027_New in

083_Light touch

From table linens inspired by armchair

Simple but beautiful accessories to imbue

travel to spectacular tech-meets-art

your surroundings with a sense of calm

034_Statement staples Rainbow brights and unconventional shapes

060

036_The eco-luxe revolution One upside to the pandemic is more conscious consumerism. And don’t think

DESIGNER FOCUS

that means less luxury

044_The future of

home

029_Fun at the double La DoubleJ’s JJ Martin on jewellery-

So long to open-plan layouts? Four experts

as-décor, “bonkers” dessert plates

paint a picture in a world of shifting priorities

and the road to happiness

056_Earthbound beauty Pieces to bring that back-to-nature feel

072

040_A light that never goes out Charlotte Perriand spent much of her career in the shadow of male peers –

060_A feast for the senses

114_Ahead of

but the designer’s vision never faltered

COVER Photographer

Oli Douglas

From Sri Lankan curry to Sicilian-style lamb stew… all presented beautifully of course

068_Going Soho

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Recreate the impossibly cool style

072_Hot desking

chair is deliciously playful

of Soho House chez vous

PROPERTY

No more makeshift WFH: practical meets personal taste for maximum motivation

090_Sew bold – and beautiful Need to kit out your jet with couture fabrics

079_Cocooning luxury Elevate your interiors to new levels

the curve

Un Croissant Lounge Chair, s’il vous

095_Harrods Estates

or embroider the walls of your bowling alley?

Discover London’s most exclusive

Get Beaumont & Fletcher on the case

properties for sale and rental

INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

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Introduction

W ELC OM E H O M E SPRING/SUMMER 2021

As the future begins

to look joyful once again, we’re starting to reflect this positive shift in our homes with bright, exuberant prints, quirky furnishings and treasured objets d’art – both vintage and new. For the former, inspiration abounds in the Milan apartment of designer (and avid collector of retro plates, dresses and Murano glass) JJ Martin. As for the latter… well, where do we begin? Whether you prefer the relaxed luxury of Soho Home or the unabashed maximalism of Beaumont & Fletcher, we’ve got you covered with a closer look at each brand’s aesthetic and how you can bring it into your own space. Plus, the latest trends and most striking new pieces, from body-positive ceramics and Croissant lounge chairs, to innovative tech with an artistic twist. Spoiler alert: the home of the future is definitely going to put the ‘fun’ in functionality. Speaking of the future, we’ve been asking some of the interiors world’s top experts where we go from here – and while they can’t say whether we’ll be able to fly abroad for the summer, they certainly have a lot of opinions on how our homes may evolve as we emerge from these turbulent times (goodbye, open-plan layouts). One prediction that we can all embrace is the shift towards eco-luxury as more and more brands seek to prove that chic design and ethical credentials are not mutually exclusive. And if you’re still conducting virtual meetings, dates and yoga classes from your dining table, turn to page 72 for our guide to creating the home office of your dreams. If there’s one thing we can all celebrate, it’s the arrival of warmer days and longer evenings – perfect for outdoor soirées. For inspiration on what to serve, look no further than seasonal recipes designed for sharing with family and friends. After all, the best thing about any home is the people you welcome into it.

From the Harrods team

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Contributors

HARRODS HOME EDITOR AMY BROOMFIELD FASHION FASHION EDITORIAL DIRECTOR STACEY DUGUID FASHION EDITORS ELIZABETH REYNOLDS, CHRISTOPHE RUIZ STYLE EDITOR JACK REID FASHION FEATURES EDITOR LINDSAY MACPHERSON FASHION ASSISTANTS MARINA PAMIES, CLEMENTINE SAGLIO BEAUTY BEAUTY EDITORIAL DIRECTOR KATIE SERVICE BEAUTY EDITOR OLIVIA DE COURCY BEAUTY WRITER MOLLIE HAMMOND BEAUTY ASSISTANT ELLA CROSBIE LIFESTYLE FEATURES WRITER GRACE CAIN CONTENT ASSISTANT ZOEY HAYNES ART, FILM AND PHOTOGRAPHY HEAD OF CREATIVE BARNEY PICKARD HEAD PRODUCER WENDY HINTON SENIOR PRODUCER ZOË ROBERTS PRODUCERS KIM REDDISH, CHARLOTTE SANKEY ASSISTANT PRODUCERS ELIOT BRITTAIN, KINGA WOJCIECHOWSKA CASTING EDITOR EMMA SOMPER CREATIVE LEADS CASEY CAREY, EMILY SELLERS PROP STYLIST CLARA METTER ASSISTANT PROP STYLIST JUSTINE BLENNERHASSETT PICTURE EDITOR FRANCISCO LUDOVICO LEAD ART EDITORS NATALIE BOO MOSQUERA, AMBER SINCLAIR ACTING LEAD ART EDITOR KARA WRIGHT DIGITAL CREATIVE LEAD VICKY BIRD DIGITAL DESIGN & DELIVERY KAURI-ROMET AADAMSOO, JONNY CLEMENTSON, MELISSA LIVINGSTON

If you could buy any work of art, which one would it be? We ask this issue’s cast list… W Oli Douglas

Spring into summer, p47 Over the past 10 years, Oli Douglas has established himself as one of the industry’s finest photographers, inspired by the beautiful furniture and fabrics he is privileged to shoot. “If I could buy any artwork,” he says, “it would be Snow Storm – Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth by Joseph Mallord William Turner, the first artwork that ever truly arrested me when I saw it for the first time, at Tate Britain.”

CHIEF SUB-EDITORS CAROLINE HUNT, NICOLETTE THOMPSON SUB-EDITORS SARAH ALLEN, MICHELLE HIGGINS, GREG HUGHES HEAD OF DIGITAL CONTENT JODIE BLACKBROUGH DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER NEIL THORNTON DIGITAL CONTENT EDITOR SARAH SMITH DIGITAL CONTENT COORDINATOR MELPA GRIFFITH DIGITAL WRITERS EMILIE DOCK, ABIGAIL GURNEY-READ SOCIAL MEDIA PROJECT MANAGER SHELAN KAFOOR SOCIAL MEDIA EXECUTIVES MAVIS HSU, OLIVIA LOWER, KATIE WATERIDGE

Top: A behind-the-scenes snap from Oli Douglas’ ‘Spring into summer’ shoot

CREATIVE OPERATIONS DIRECTOR BETH HODDER PA TO CREATIVE OPERATIONS DIRECTOR KAYLEIGH SANDERSON-BROWN HEAD OF CREATIVE OPERATIONS DAWN HALL TEAM OPERATIONS MANAGER CLAUDIA CROUCH LEAD PROJECT MANAGER SUZY CHAPMAN EDITORIAL PRODUCTION MANAGER DANIELLE MORT EDITORIAL ASSISTANT EMILY BONE DIGITAL PROJECT MANAGER KIERAN HORGAN PRODUCTION OPERATIONS MANAGER PAUL BRADY PRODUCTION EXECUTIVES DAVID BROWNING, ANDY M C DOWELL PARTNERSHIPS DIRECTOR ALEX UNITT FASHION, ACCESSORIES, WATCHES AND JEWELLERY BRAND PARTNERSHIPS GENERAL MANAGERS HARSHEEL BAINS, SOPHIE READ BRAND PARTNERSHIPS MANAGERS NATASHA DUNK, ROSIE M C HUGH BRAND PARTNERSHIPS EXECUTIVES SHEENA ANADKAT, LAURA ATHERTON, ANOUCHKA GRANON BRAND PARTNERSHIPS ASSISTANT ISHA HUTCHINSON BEAUTY BRAND PARTNERSHIPS GENERAL MANAGER LOUISE HOBHOUSE BRAND PARTNERSHIPS MANAGER AIRLIE HYLAND BRAND PARTNERSHIPS ASSISTANT TREVISHA QUASHIE

Jessica Jonzen X

The eco-luxe revolution, p36 Jessica Jonzen is a writer and editor, who also co-founded online magazine The Home Page and creative content agency Studio Home Page. Jonzen’s dream purchase? “Any of Jacques Henri Lartigue’s Riviera photographs,” she says. “They’re so evocative, and brim with the seductive possibilities of summer. They can transport me in an instant.”

HOME, TECHNOLOGY AND THIRD PARTY BRAND PARTNERSHIPS GENERAL MANAGER STELLA LEE BRAND PARTNERSHIPS MANAGERS ELISSA HUTCHINSON-GILBERT, RAPHAELLE VANDERHOEVEN BRAND PARTNERSHIPS EXECUTIVE ASTRID TENTORIO BRAND PARTNERSHIPS ASSISTANT MOLLIE TOYE

BEYOND THE MAGAZINE

On the app

STRATEGY AND OPERATIONS PARTNERSHIPS DIGITAL MEDIA STRATEGY GENERAL MANAGER LUCIE LEVERTON PARTNERSHIPS MARKETING GENERAL MANAGER LIZZIE CANTOR PARTNERSHIPS MARKETING MANAGER SHRINA PATEL PARTNERSHIPS MARKETING ASSISTANT EMILY M C LEAN PARTNERSHIPS, OPERATIONS & PROJECTS MANAGER MEERA PEIRSON PARTNERSHIPS PLANNING & OPERATIONS EXECUTIVES SABRINE LAW, OLIVIA MACQUILLAN PARTNERSHIPS PLANNING & OPERATIONS ASSISTANT FRANCESCA HERVEY-EXLEY CORPORATE CORPORATE PARTNERSHIPS GENERAL MANAGER JACKIE YEE CORPORATE PARTNERSHIPS EXECUTIVE ANNA PHIPPS-BRIAN

Jessica Jonzen Wendy Aldiss Photography

ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES HARRODSPARTNERSHIPS@HARRODS.COM REPRODUCTION ZEBRA • PRINT PRODUCTION PINDAR (PART OF THE YM GROUP) PAPER SUPPLIER GOULD PUBLICATION PAPERS UK LTD HARRODS, 87–135 Brompton Road, Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7XL Tel. +44 (0)20 7730 1234 • harrods.com All information and prices are correct at time of going to press. Offers and promotions may have limited availability. We hope you enjoy reading Harrods Home magazine. As we are committed to providing the highest level of customer service possible, we would love to hear your comments. Please email magazine@harrods.com. The paper in this magazine originates from timber that is sourced from responsibly managed forests, according to strict environmental, social and economic standards. The manufacturing TPSSOHZIV[O-:*HUK7,-*JLY[PÄJH[PVUHZ^LSSHZ0:6 HUK0:6HJJYLKP[H[PVU TO DISCOVER MORE, DOWNLOAD THE FREE HARRODS APP FROM THE APP STORE OR GOOGLE PLAY

At home or on the go, the Harrods app will give you a restorative dose of life’s luxuries. From shoppable edits to long reads, it’s yours at the click of a button.

On social

S Letitia Fitzgibbon

Time is never wasted if it’s spent scrolling

The future of home, p44

the amazing properties on @harrodsestates.

The head of Harrods Interior Design, Letitia Fitzgibbon has been a speaker and moderator at the London Design Festival, Decorex and more. “I’d buy René Magritte’s painting The Son of Man,” she says. “The ordinary features combined with the bizarre placement of the apple make a striking enigma.”

And don’t forget @harrods, @harrodsman, @harrodsbeauty and @harrodsfood too!

Online Home accessories, luxury linens, cookware – it’s all on harrods.com, plus store news, and a weekly dose of inspiration in Stories.

INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

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THE MOMENT

Words by Grace Cain; image courtesy of Elie Saab Maison

W

Elie Saab Maison

Bringing all the elegance of the red carpet to your living room, fashion designer Elie Saab has expanded his world of high-octane glamour to embrace interior design, and the results are as opulent as you’d expect. To bring his vision to life in furniture form, Saab enlisted the expertise of Italian architect and designer Carlo Colombo. From Parisian Art Deco to Saab’s penchant for the 1960s and ’70s, this new collection draws on the same influences that infuse the brand’s distinctive haute couture. > Elie Saab Maison Palace armchair from £9,622 and Zenith table from £4,833

INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

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THE MOMENT

“You can now fill your home with Anissa Kermiche’s torso-shaped jugs and Breast Friend vases”

Anissa Kermiche

Even if you’re not familiar with Anissa Kermiche’s cult jewellery, you’ve almost definitely double-tapped her whimsical body-positive sculptures on Instagram. Following the success of her first foray into the world of ceramics – the wittily named derrière-shaped Love Handles vase (left) – she has branched out into further representations of the female form. You can now fill your home with Kermiche’s torsoshaped Jugs jugs and Breast Friend vases, both available in a selection of colours. Anissa Kermiche Love Handles vase £2,500

Savoir x Zandra Rhodes X Cheerful prints, wild colour clashes and a shock of bright pink hair are all things you might associate with fashion and textile designer Zandra Rhodes. Now, you can add dream maker to the list, as Rhodes teams up with sleep merchant Savoir to create the Lilies bed (right). Based on Field of Lilies, a motif that Rhodes designed during a visit to Japan in 1971, the bed’s ornate upholstery is unabashed in its maximalism. “Pattern has the power to make our lives wonderful,” says Rhodes. “The Savoir mattress is the key to a good night’s sleep – the bedhead is just there to lure you in.” > Savoir x Zandra Rhodes Lilies bed from £33,680

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I NTER I ORS | L I FESTYLE | P ROP E RTY

Images courtesy of Anissa Kermiche and Savoir

W


THE MOMENT

Image courtesy of Morris & Co.

W

Morris & Co. x Ben Pentreath

William Morris’ beautiful prints have long been a source of inspiration for architect and interior designer Ben Pentreath, so it’s no surprise that he jumped at the chance to collaborate with Morris & Co. The Queen Square collection, named after the road that housed the company’s first factory and showroom, comprises 18 wallpapers and 18 fabrics featuring Pentreath’s vibrant reinterpretation of Morris’ original designs. Classic patterns, such as Willow (pictured), have been recoloured in bold shades inspired by ’60s remakes of the enduring brand’s fabrics – a testament to their timelessness. Morris & Co. x Ben Pentreath Willow wallpaper £75 per metre Home, Third Floor; and harrods.com

INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

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New in

Homewares W CABANA Named after the Italian word for ‘artisanal’, *HIHUH»ZUL^(Y[PNPHUHJVSSLJ[PVUL_LTWSPÄLZ the magazine-turned-lifestyle-brand’s colourful, handcrafted spirit. Editor-in-chief Martina Mondadori claims to, over the last year, have ILLUPUÅ\LUJLKI`@]LZ:HPU[3H\YLU[»ZJVUJLW[ of being an ‘armchair traveller’. Japan was the inspiration for the Dahlia table linen design, which provides an exquisite bold backdrop for the rustic Blossom collection. Dahlia tablecloth £280, Mirandola napkins £150 for set of four, 3LJJLWSHJLTH[Z£LHJO)SVZZVTKPUULYWSH[LZ£LHJO dessert plates £66 each and salad bowl £120, Balloton Murano water glass £100 and wine glass £100

W INDIAN OCEAN A passion for innovation is at the heart of Indian Ocean’s aim to create the ultimate collection of luxury outdoor furniture. Inspired by the organic shapes found in nature, the new Organix range of sofas is the perfect way to elevate your outdoor seating area. Guaranteed to withstand even the harshest weather conditions, the high-performance fabric is available in an

Words by Zoey Haynes; images courtesy of Cabana, Indian Ocean, Samsung and Zaha Hadid Design

array of colours. This, combined with a modular design that allows each sofa to be arranged HUKYLHYYHUNLKHZ`V\ZLLÄ[TLHUZ[OH[[OL possibilities for personalisation are endless. Organix Sofa Set One from £7,525

S ZAHA HADID DESIGN The legacy of Baghdad-born Dame Zaha Hadid

SAMSUNG

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– internationally acclaimed for her avant-garde approach to architecture – continues through this

As it heads into its 15th year as a leading TV

exquisite collection of home accessories. With its

brand, Samsung is ushering in a new era of

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sensational picture quality and design. The highlight of its latest range? An updated version of The Frame, an innovative TV that allows you

candle range pays homage to the work of the ‘Queen of the Curve’. Available in a variety of rich colours and aromas, it’s as much an olfactory

to transform the display into a stunning work

experience as it is a visual one. Enjoy the way the

of art with the touch of a button. Featuring AI-

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powered technology and a refreshed collection

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of masterpieces via the Art Store, this smart TV

The only question is: which one will you choose?

will transform your living room into a gallery by

Shimmer Jasmine candle 260g, £89

becoming your personal curator. The Frame TV from £1,099

Home, Third Floor; Technology, Fifth Floor; and harrods.com

INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

027


Interview

By Grace Cain

“I firmly believe everyone should have many different plates in their

Neutrals? Minimalism? Forget it. JJ Martin’s eclectic lifestyle and fashion brand is a blast of colour and joy

home,” says JJ Martin, founder of vintage-inspired maximalist lifestyle brand La DoubleJ. “I love it when nothing matches – like, my silverware collection is totally random because I’ve mixed vintage finds with newer pieces.” Fleeting trends and buzzy names have never been Martin’s style. Instead, she prefers to salvage pieces from charity shops, warehouses and (in the case of her kitchen) the occasional elderly Milanese lady. “She wanted to get rid of her 1990s Poliform kitchen, so I bought it from her and recycled it,” Martin shrugs. Her apartment is full of such quirky finds, from the mismatched vases and objets d’art scattered across tabletops and shelves, to the 18th-century Sicilian plaster bas-relief on the dining room wall. In a large antique cabinet, Martin’s kaleidoscopic collection of Murano glasses (many of them prototypes for La DoubleJ’s glassware range) keeps the company of display jars filled with pasta and grains. Even the apartment itself is vintage, tucked away in a 1910s building that (according to Martin) “looks like a castle”. “I moved in on 1st March 2020 – right before lockdown,” she recalls with a wry smile. “For a while, I basically just had a mattress on the floor and >

Fun at the double Above: JJ Martin, founder and creative director of La DoubleJ, at home in Milan

INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

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Interview very little furniture. But the whole situation encouraged me to be very creative with this environment where I was suddenly spending all my time.” Although this particular apartment still just about qualifies as a ‘new’ home, Martin has been living in Milan for 20 years – but hails originally from LA and describes her family as “classic outdoorsy beach-volleyball Californians”. Fashion – let alone vintage – didn’t appear on her radar until the late ’90s, when she moved to New York to work in the marketing department of Calvin Klein. More importantly, she discovered the city’s famed Chelsea Flea Market. “I didn’t have a lot of money at the time, so it felt like I’d discovered a magical paradise,” she laughs. “For $40, you could go home with an amazing evening gown.” Thus, a lifelong passion was born. When Martin eventually made the move to Italy’s fashion capital, it was because she had fallen in love with a man. Milan, not so much. “Oh my God, I hated it,” she recalls. “It’s not a showy city, and the way of life here seemed very different to New York. It took me a while to adjust.” Spoiler alert: Martin now adores her adopted home. “It feels like a really large small town,” she enthuses. “Wherever you go, you’re sure to meet someone you know, so in that way I feel a real sense of belonging. And, of course, I love the fact it’s a creative capital in terms of both fashion and design; there’s this real air of sophistication.” During those first few years in Italy, Martin’s passion for vintage set her apart from the locals. The sight of a vibrantly adorned American rummaging enthusiastically through a discount bin was not a common occurrence in the mercatinos of Milan at that time. “There wasn’t the culture around vintage clothes that we see today,” she says. “I think people had a perception of it as something really uncool and dirty. I felt like a fish out of water. The classic Milanese women would all stare as I walked down the street in my weird clothes.” However, Martin was poised at the cusp of a vintage explosion in her chosen city. By the time she launched La DoubleJ in 2015, she was leading the charge against the common misconception of second-hand fashion. Originally a ‘shoppable magazine’, Martin’s platform offered her the chance to sell pieces from her own vintage-clothing collection while celebrating the stories of Milan’s most creative women (who, it would seem, had slowly begun to come round to her way of thinking about vintage fashion). When she ran out of pieces to sell, she began to create her own designs using vintage patterns discovered in the archives of Italy’s top textile manufacturers. Now, La DoubleJ is a holistic lifestyle brand that encompasses homewares as well as fashion. “It felt like a natural progression, to bring all that pattern and print into the home,” she explains. “And it’s been so fun, because, unlike a dress, which is really just for you, items like plates and tablecloths and Murano glassware are meant to be shared with others. I want people to connect over our bonkers dessert plates and napkins. I want it to be a conversation starter.” Plus, she says, while a dress is something that can be removed at the end of the day, a home is something you interact with all the time: “It’s an extension of yourself in a deeper way than clothes.” A self-confessed spiritualist, Martin has built a narrative of self-care and healing around her penchant for vivid prints and shades. She talks about her intention to create fashion that will “raise your vibration”, a philosophy that seeps into both La DoubleJ’s homewares line and her personal approach to interior decoration. “I want to create joy,” she states – although she is quick to acknowledge that the road to happiness is paved with more than just amphora vases and mididresses. “What you wear and where you live are just one aspect of your spiritual practice – a very superficial material part. There’s nothing wrong with that, but it’s limiting to put all your happiness on these things alone.” Martin explains that she is “very sensitive to the energy of colours”, something that has heavily influenced her approach to home décor. “The majority of my apartment is painted in a pale dusty rose, but I have sage > 030

I NTER I ORS | L I FESTYLE | P ROP E RTY

“Never keep anything for best. Even if you’re just at home with your dog, put on that special dress and use those fancy plates”

Above: JJ Martin’s dining room features an 18th-century Sicilian plaster bas-relief. Opposite page: The creative’s name up in lights


Interview

032

I NT ER I ORS | L I FESTYLE | P ROP E RTY

F I V E FA S T Q U E S T I O N S Best way to make an entrance at a party? With an enormous smile and your inner light turned on to full wattage. Who are your design icons? I’ve got a few: Yves St Laurent in the 1970s, Gio Ponti in the 1960s, Piero Fornasetti also in the 1960s, and Tony Duquette in the 1950s. What piece of tech could you not live without? I don’t like technology… it messes with our energy centres. But I do use my iPhone without 5G (I am human). What are your top tips for entertaining at home? Relax and have fun, otherwise nobody else will. And always allow people to Clockwise from top left: Colourful glassware is scattered throughout the apartment; an eclectic mix of objets mingle harmoniously; angel wings make a striking wall decoration

bring more friends – I learned that from

Home, Third Floor; and harrods.com

Your thoughts can change your life.

the Italians. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Monica Vinella/Photofoyer

green in my bedroom and navy blue in my meditation room.” And it’s no surprise to learn it’s the latter that scoops the honour of being Martin’s favourite space in which to spend time. “My meditation room is my sanctuary. It’s the one place that doesn’t have any furniture – just my altar, a lot of plants and my crystal collection. This is where I come every morning to do my intentions for the day, meditate and practise yoga.” Martin’s altar is also home to a small portion of her extensive vintage-jewellery collection. The larger part hangs on the bathroom wall. “I love having it around to enjoy,” she explains. “What would be the point of keeping it all in a box?” Naturally, La DoubleJ’s vintage-inspired prints feature heavily in the apartment, from the sheets to the fabric on her kitchen chairs. “There’s a lot of pattern in my home,” she says, confessionally. But that’s simply stating the obvious – and nowhere is this more evident than the wardrobe, filled with the vintage clothes she has been curating since she discovered that NYC flea market more than 20 years ago. Fortunately, she’s come up with a solution for those days when it feels too much. “At either side of the closet, I have velvet drapes in a rich petrol blue – the same shade as my meditation room. If I ever feel overwhelmed, I can just close them and feel as though I am in my sanctuary.” Martin’s biggest piece of advice covers both dressing yourself and decorating your home: never keep anything for best. “Especially La DoubleJ stuff,” she laughs. “Even if you’re just at home with your dog, wear that special dress. Serve your breakfast on our dessert dishes. I always use my parents’ wedding china from 1967, because I don’t believe in being precious about the things we collect. We should all use our special plates every day.”


Stun and delight by swerving convention with curious shapes and a bold palette

Statement staples

Shop & Awe

1.

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3. 6.

5.

4.

7.

11.

8.

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1. Flos Taraxacum 88 Suspension 1 light from £2,695; 2. Versace Pop Medusa chairs from £1,090 each; 3. Vitra Panton chair from £259; 4. 9LÅLJ[PVUZ*VWLUOHNLU Budapest Cabinet box £290; 5. Porada Trittico side tables from £614 each; 6. Vitra Eames plastic armchair DAR from £685; 7. *\S[P4PSHUV*OYVTyH:[PSLKPќ\ZLYZ£LHJO"8. 9LÅLJ[PVUZ*VWLUOHNLU Soho bookend £285; 9. 9LÅLJ[PVUZ*VWLUOHNLU Grand Manhattan vase £809; 10. -LUKP*HZH Boogie side table £4,752; 11. Vitra Evo-C chair from £285 Flowers, Cards & Gifts, Lower Ground Floor; Furniture and Home, Third Floor; and harrods.com

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I NTER I ORS | L I FESTYLE | P ROP E RTY

Images courtesy of Flos, Versace, Vitra, Reflections Copenhagen, Porada, Culti Milano and Fendi Casa

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Sustainability W VISPRING

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hand-woven from 90m of natural linen cord. The PJVUPJ++PUPUN*OHPYKLZPNULKI`2VTWSV[+LZPNU PU  PZ YLPTHNPULK PU YLJ`JSLK WVZ[PUK\Z[YPHS WSHZ[PJWLYMLJ[MVYIV[OPUKVVYHUKV\[KVVY\ZL(UK the archival Grace Chair, by the late Danish designer ;V]L 2PUK[3HYZLU THYRZ .\IP»Z ÄYZ[ MVYH` PU[V [OL highly sustainable and zeitgeisty material rattan. Clockwise from far left Grace Chair from £1,059, MR01 Initial Chair from £1,860 and 3D Dining Chair from £236

P O LT R O N A F R A U A N D P O R A D A

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Martha and Times Lounge armchairs and photovoltaic power plants By Jessica Jonzen / Illustrations by Emily Robertson

Luxury Italian furniture brands Poltrona Frau and Porada are leading the way when

Covid-19 has been a driving force behind a dramatic change in the way we consume. Nowhere is that more evident than in our homes – but making ethical interiors choices doesn’t have to mean losing the luxury

P[JVTLZ[V[VWKV^UZ\Z[HPUHISLWYVK\J[PVU>H`IHJRPU7VS[YVUH-YH\ PUZ[HSSLKHWOV[V]VS[HPJWV^LYWSHU[PUP[Z;VSLU[PUVOLHKX\HY[LYZZH]PUN[OV\ZHUKZ of tonnes of CO2, and the beautiful new Martha and Times Lounge armchairs are its ÄYZ[WLYJLU[-:*JLY[PÄLKWYVK\J[Z7VYHKHOHZILLUTHRPUNJVU[LTWVYHY` M\YUP[\YLPU)YPHUaHPU[OL*VTVHYLHVM0[HS`ZPUJL (SS[OL^VVK\ZLKPU [OL THU\MHJ[\YL VM P[Z M\YUP[\YL JVTLZ MYVT JLY[PÄLK MVYLZ[Z" HSS P[Z Z\WWSPLYZ»

The eco-luxe revolution

WYVK\J[Z HYL THKL O`WLYSVJHSS`" HUK P[ [VV OHZ LZ[HISPZOLK H WOV[V]VS[HPJ WSHU[WYV]PKPUNJSLHULULYN`MVYP[ZMHJ[VY`HUKSPRL7VS[YVUH-YH\KYHTH[PJHSS` reducing CO2 emissions. Poltrona Frau Martha armchair from £3,050

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From the renowned Mario Bellini (in a run of just 100),

In the past year,

we’ve spent more time in our homes than ever before – working, eating and sleeping within the same four walls for months on end. So after the initial novelty of baking banana bread and wearing slippers to a board meeting wore off, what were we left with (other than bad hair and a noticeably thicker waistline)? It would appear that, for a vast majority of us, the answer is a conscience when it comes to the environment. Numerous reports and studies have found that Covid-19 has precipitated a more conscious kind of consumerism. A 2020 global survey by Accenture found that consumers’ buying habits had ‘dramatically evolved’, with 60 per cent making more environmentally friendly, sustainable or ethical choices since the start of the pandemic. Meanwhile, 65 per cent of global respondents told pollsters Ipsos Mori that climate change is as serious as Covid-19 and should be prioritised in the economic recovery from the pandemic. With our homes more important to us than ever, making responsible choices about what we fill them with has never mattered more. And as familiarity breeds contempt, allow me to broaden the horizons, introducing the most sustainable (and stylish) homewares brands and pieces to know now…

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I NTER I ORS | L I FESTYLE | P ROP E RTY

I TA L I A

Blitz table ) )0[HSPH»Z)SP[a[HISLPZHZWV^LYM\SHKLZPNUHZP[Z UHTLZ\NNLZ[Z¶I\[^P[OHZVM[LJVMVV[WYPU[;OL frame is crafted from highly sustainable bamboo, P[Z NYHPU LSL]H[LK I` H ÄUL ZVSPK^VVK WYVJLZZPUN [OH[JVU[YHZ[Z^P[O[OLZSLLRISHJRZOLSSHJLќLJ[VM the interior. The origami-like folds on each end add Z[YLUN[O^OPSL[OLTVK\SHYJVTWVZP[PVUTHRLZ[OL WPLJLLHZ`[VTV]LHYV\UK¶WYV]PUN`V\JHUTHRL

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a bold statement very gently. £21,691

Le Compositeur home fragrance diffuser

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Pure towels and environmentally friendly textiles

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Its deliciously soft Pure range is manufactured sustainably from organic cotton

sourced essential oils, and you can adjust the levels

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UVUWYVÄ[MVYL]LY`WVKW\YJOHZLKFrom £1,090

any excess lint recycled and used as insulation material. From £6 for a face cloth

/VTL;OPYK-SVVY" and harrods.com

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The Creative By Mark C O’Flaherty

Exceptional talent and fortitude are the backbone of an enduring brand. Charlotte Perriand possessed such qualities in abundance, creating some of the world’s most iconic pieces

A light that never goes out

seeking out that one perfect object. For Parisian architect Charlotte Perriand, it was a lamp for a mountain retreat she was designing in 1938. She ended up making it herself. She drew a strong black line that would help define modernist design – and connect numerous dots in its future. Her Potence Pivotante could hardly have been simpler: a single rod attached to a wall-mounted axis, allowing a glass bulb to pivot into the room. “It uses materials sparingly, is uncomplicated, and improves the comfort of a space,” says architect Craig Bassam of Connecticut-based BassamFellows, who finds Perriand endlessly inspiring. “That’s modernism!” Perriand did more than create a singularly perfect light. In France, she collaborated with some of the greatest visionaries of the 20th century. When Paris was occupied by the Nazis, she fled to Tokyo, where she learned about Japanese architecture and design. The Nuage bookcase (far right) is just one manifestation of such influence. Her work was celebrated in an exhibition at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris last year; another – Charlotte Perriand: The Modern Life – opens at London’s Design Museum this June. When Perriand took her portfolio to Le Corbusier in 1927, she was dismissed with the jibe, “We don’t embroider cushions here.” Women 040

I NTER I ORS | L I FESTYLE | P ROP E RTY

From left: Charlotte Perriand reclines on the Chaise Longue Basculante B306; the Nuage bookcase is among Perriand’s most famous works – first designed in 1952, it continues to chime with contemporary décor almost 70 years later

were mostly seen as being more suited to textiles and upholstery. Perriand would not be constrained – within months she was the manager at Le Corbusier’s studio, sitting next to the architect’s cousin and fellow collaborator Pierre Jeanneret, wearing her trademark choker of steel ball bearings. Interviewed in 1984 for The Architectural Review, Perriand recalled: “I think the reason Le Corbusier took me on was because he thought I could carry out ideas. I was familiar with current technology, I knew how to use it and, what is more, I had ideas about the uses it could be put to. Le Corbusier had no time for what he called ‘le blah-blah-blah’… I was responsible for everything concerning ‘l’équipement’.”

Far left Charlotte Perriand on the Chaise Longue Basculante B306, 1929, ©ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2020/©AChP

We all know what it is to spend years

“While Le Corbusier is aligned with endlessly photographed buildings, the vision Perriand had for his furniture is what keeps his name alive within contemporary interiors ”

Perriand died in 1999, leaving a legacy as solid as anything she had machine-forged during her life. While Le Corbusier is aligned with endlessly photographed buildings, such as the Capitol Complex in Chandigarh, it’s the vision Perriand had for his furniture – including the iconic LC4 chaise – that keeps his name alive within contemporary interiors. The apartments at Marseille featured kitchens by Perriand – one of which was bought 10 years ago in its entirety for the collection at MoMA in New York. “She was a woman, and she focused on interiors, which was seen as marginal to architecture,” explains the curator of the new Design Museum show, Justin McGuirk. “It has taken time for her reputation to be established > INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

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independently of them. But she was always fiercely independent. Perhaps the reason she was overshadowed is that much of her most famous work was collaborative. She was a consummate collaborator, and she loved working with others. She was a synthesiser.” When it comes to collaborations, the Potence Pivotante, which Perriand created in 1938, is particularly interesting. Its influence is blindingly clear: there is her prototype, which was put belatedly into commercial production in 2012 by Nemo; and the Potence attributed to Jean Prouvé, which has been the core product for almost two decades at Vitra. At the time it was first created, Perriand was part of Team Prouvé. “Since the founding of the Union des Artistes Modern (UAM) in 1929, Jean Prouvé worked together with Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand on several projects,” says Stine Liv Buur, classics design manager at Vitra. “They were all part of a greater movement and change in attitude towards design thinking. One can surely draw several lines between the shape of their objects, as they clearly inspired the other.” Originals of Prouvé’s Potence are highly prized at auction – particularly those made for La Maison Tropicale, a prefabricated structure conceived for colonial West Africa in the late 1940s. Various strands of the Prouvé and Perriand story overlap in Africa – a Prouvé-accredited Potence sold at auction for $185,000 at Phillips in New York in 2015, with its provenance detailing the 1952 interior of the Air France office in Brazzaville in the Congo. Prouvé and Perriand’s work appeared together in projects for the airline for many years. As for La Maison Tropicale, Perriand was already way ahead of Prouvé – she had designed a prefab beach house, ‘La Maison au Bord de l’Eau’, in 1934. But it was never fully realised until Louis Vuitton got its hands on the blueprints in 2013. In its day, it had been too radical for potential customers – essentially it wasn’t fancy enough; today, it looks like it was designed five minutes ago and is a minimalist masterpiece. Prouvé’s Potence was reissued by Vitra from 2002 in two versions – the 1947 Petite Potence, which is less angled and closer in style to Perriand’s precursor, and the 1950 Potence, which extends around an 80in span into a room. “The elegance of the Potence’s construction,” says Buur, “lies in the spare use of materials: the long, thin, tubular steel arm pivoting from the slender metal bar that is screwed vertically to the wall… and the wooden knob that fits into the hand to facilitate the adjustment of the light source.” In 2019, fashion designer Roksanda Ilinčić created a radiant interior for a penthouse at the Gasholders development in King’s Cross, London, with a focus on female designers and artists. “From Perriand, I selected her Table en Forme Libre and her Potence light,” she says. “In seeking to disrupt the old and bring about an optimistic newness to modern design, Perriand created a vision that no-one has quite been able to replicate since, and in my eyes, she remains a true visionary of her time.” Buur believes there’s a transcendental quality to the modernists that keeps the designs fresh. “The Potence light we produce does not represent a certain style or time,” she says. “Prouvé, Perriand and the designers of the UAM were motivated to make a clean break from the past. They struggled against objects that had a ‘style’. Together, they embraced industrial materials like glass and steel, and emphasised functionality over ornament, design over decoration. Each of these personalities succeeded with several design solutions that are free of all artifice, but still successful on the market today.” The search for the perfect object will always be a challenge. But to find one that will never date is almost impossible. Perriand was an independent spirit, industrial pioneer and inspirational collaborator. She deserves every accolade belatedly bestowed on her and her work. She was ahead of every perfectly drawn curve, and truly lit the way forward. Home, Third Floor; and harrods.com

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I NTER I ORS | L I FESTYLE | P ROP E RTY

“In seeking to disrupt the old and bring about an optimistic newness to modern design, Perriand created a vision that no-one has quite been able to replicate since. She remains a true visionary of her time”

This page: A Charlotte Perriand sketch, detailing different Fauteuil Grand Confort designs – part of the collaboration with Le Corbusier for the Villa Church in Ville d’Avray. Opposite page: Roksanda Ilinčić’s Gasholders penthouse project, featuring Perriand’s Table en Forme Libre, a modernised version of the 1938 design

Above Charlotte Perriand, colour studies of various versions of the Fauteuil Grand Confort for the Villa Church, 1928, ©AChP. Opposite page Rory Gardiner/Photofoyer. Previous page Manolo Yllera/Photofoyer; Interior Design: Gallery Saint Jacques

The Creative


Viewpoint

The future of home

The way we live has evolved, and evolved again, over the past turbulent year. Four experts share their views on how things may unfold from here

01/ Letitia Fitzgibbon

At the start of last year, I read an article comparing what we were collectively going through with what a caterpillar goes through to become a butterfly. It pointed out our tendency to focus on the wings of the story’s end, rather than the uncomfortable and painful realities of the process. Within the cocoon, the caterpillar is drenched in a type of acid, melting its present form to make way for the evolution. It is an abstract way to describe how the past year has changed the way we live, but I thought it captured its essence – of a painful reality we shouldn’t glaze over. Last year was about making do, feeling unsettled and, unfortunately, pain. How this transpired in our homes (or ‘cocoons’) can be seen in our makeshift solutions: cobbled-together home-office spaces, living-room classrooms, gym corners and in-house entertainment havens. Fortunately, we can now see the light and, as per the caterpillar, it’s safe to say we have all been changed by the process in a permanent – but hopefully positive – way. In the melting of everything we knew, it’s understandable that our needs have changed. Where open-plan spaces were popular in a pre-Covid era, barriers – walls, joinery or room dividers – are now more popular than ever. Homes need not only to allow more activities, but also to cater for every individual. Everyone needs space to be productive, to rest, to maintain healthy habits, to be alone and to be together. And in smaller homes, this becomes a question of clever spatial design, to fit everything in and do every part justice. There’s a change, too, in our expectations of products and brands. We now consider more carefully the lifespan of items and the environmental impact of our choices, with a move away from the mass-produced towards meaningful modern heirlooms, helped by the time we’ve had to research, hear new stories and tap into nostalgia. Likewise, craftsmanship and customisation will continue to be celebrated: think hand-painted wallpapers to reflect your family; embroidered linens; and bespoke wardrobe joinery. This is also the moment to properly embrace the home office; to accept its permanence and admit that the boxes you’ve piled up to create a standing desk, though effective, are an eyesore. Now is the time to invest and transform that corner into a positive zone dedicated to focus, inspiration and productivity. In times of uncomfortable change, where we are able to call the shots, we should grab that chance with both hands. This can be as simple as transforming the humble reading chair. Place it strategically in a quiet corner of the home, with a scented humidifier nearby, a selection of books at hand, and speakers that not only are decorative and functional, but, when in use, signal to the rest of the household that this is a no-go zone. A small thing in the scheme of evolution, but something we can control – which feels great.

02/ Michelle Ogundehin

In the past 12 months, many have awakened to the importance of their environment, now understanding it to be as fundamental to their wellbeing as good food and exercise. Home has been elevated from simply a place to leave in the morning and crash back into at night to somewhere with the power to profoundly affect the way we feel. Our homes have also had to embrace a more holistic version of ourselves as individuals and families (however the latter are composed), and I think this is long overdue. The best homes have always reflected the full gamut of a person’s life and interests, from the professional to the familial – whether that’s a desire to keep fit, create art, bake cakes or learn the tuba. And yet the siren call of trends such as Colour of the Year, or magazine decrees for must-haves and hot designer buys, have held many in thrall to external statements of what their homes should be. Now, it’s abundantly clear that authentic homemaking starts with working out what you like for yourself – and this doesn’t just concern the contents of our homes. Many had slavishly pulled down walls between living areas, dining rooms and, latterly, kitchens, in pursuit of open-plan living without any thought for leaving a den in which to retreat – let alone a room of one’s own in which to work. Such amorphous spaces offer little in the way of the comfort that helps humans to thrive, even before we asked them to double (triple, quadruple…) up. What lies ahead then? In a socially distanced screen-based world, we need to create more-supportive domestic foundations that remind us of our essential humanity: homes that restore and rejuvenate, not as insulation from the world beyond our doors, but as fortifying armoury to deal with it. In the forthcoming era of the real, it is my hope that our homes will reflect lives that are infinitely more interesting, rich, nuanced and full of compassion than they have been before. So, sofas and beds laden with tactile throws and sumptuous pillows that our fingers crave to touch; and walls finished in colours to make the heart sing and adorned with artwork that lifts the soul. For to live in a home like this – a tactile, sensory and personalised haven – is to have harnessed a secret super-power.

03/ Claudia Baillie

It’s fair to say that the past year has brought with it many challenges. Subsequently, how we view and, indeed, use the space we live in has changed. More time at home means greater demands on our interiors than ever; being somewhere to sleep, eat and relax is now just a small part of the story. And while open-plan layouts were once a must-have, they weren’t designed to be lived in by everyone, all of the time. A shift back towards more traditional floor plans had already begun; now, the increased need for privacy for both work and personal time out means that separate rooms, or at least more defined spaces, are increasingly appealing. A dedicated office or gym (preferably equipped with a state-of-the-art Peloton bike) is, of course, the ideal, but in existing multifunctional spaces, plenty of easy-access storage is essential to accommodate newly acquired gym, WFH and general life kit. Meanwhile, investing in adaptable furniture that pulls out and folds away smoothly will make the switch from dining area to fitness studio as fuss-free as possible.

When it comes to decorating, we need homewares that not only look good but make us feel happy and secure. This means minimising anxiety-inducing clutter, and bringing in serene shades, natural materials, soft shapes and textural fabrics to imbue a sense of calm. And ironically, a trend that looks back is coming to the fore: with swathes of city dwellers eyeing up a more rural way of living, a country escape has become the ultimate goal. In interiors, this is manifesting itself in a more traditional approach – gingham, chintz, florals, stripes, frills and ruffles, plus scallop-edged accessories and vintage-inspired furniture, all feeding into a desire for a simpler and less stressful lifestyle. Once the preserve of well-groomed grandmothers, dressing tables are also enjoying a revival – and providing a spot for some much-needed self-care. Finally, never has the concept of an outdoor room been more relevant, be it a fully zoned garden with dining, cooking and relaxation areas, or a neat urban terrace with a fun-to-use pizza oven. Either way, weatherproof cushions, rugs and outdoor lighting will enhance the space, while an ample collection of pots filled with flowers, shrubs or grow-your-own fruit and veg guarantees positive vibes, both from a visual and a mental health point of view.

04/ Pip McCormac

Life has really hotted up for me this past year. Sorry, not life – that’s been pretty tepid – but the new love of my life: my compost heap. It’s getting incrementally closer to the optimum temperature of 57°C, its torridity monitored obsessively by an app on my phone linked to a thermometer in its belly, the steaming pile of decomposing cuttings rising in degrees as my newfound ardour for the outdoors grows. Compost wasn’t part of my world a year ago. The tangled noise of my parents’ gardening chat was impenetrable during my teen years. But then came lockdown, and home became a place I wanted to look nice but also somewhere I wanted – no, needed – to make me feel nice, too. Gardeners’ World was my gateway drug, Monty Don’s gentle ambling around his estate a balm. And suddenly I had a passion for pruning, an avocation that fed my composting. I’m not alone in this hankering for a feeling of sanctuary, and because people respond differently, requirements for the home are going in myriad ways. ‘Broken plan’ is on the rise – screens working as partitions, niches turned into offices. For those who crave social contact, it means wide spaces in which to be ‘together’. Others want to spread out – in 2020, more than double the number of Londoners were registering with estate agents outside the city than a year earlier. Meanwhile, some have reprioritised, got rid of everything and boosted the sale of ‘tiny houses’ – miniature structures with just enough room for two, which are popping up around the world like mushrooms in woodlands. Homewares designers are responding in different ways, too. From Arflex’s russet tub chairs to Alessi’s tableware collaboration with Patricia Urquiola, a terracotta palette abounds, warming the soul like a holiday in the Med. In contrast, some are taking a walk on the mild side – textile companies Pierre Frey and Designers Guild are among those upping their neutrals, while soothing beige tones are even appearing in schemes by colour devotees like Jonathan Adler and Matthew Williamson (albeit as part of a riotous pattern) – proof that this Rich Tea tone truly takes the biscuit. The common thread here is simply about finding design to reassure you, in whatever way you need to be reassured – an interiors comfort blanket if you will. Probably in beige. INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

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Trends Photographer Oli Douglas / Stylist Emily Sellers

Furniture Gubi 62 Dresser console £4,540; Fendi Casa Thea armchair £8,540; accessories and homewares, from left Projects £59.95; 9LÅLJ[PVUZ *VWLUOHNLU Grand New Haven Basin £750; )HJJHYH[ Eye Vase Rectangular S £650 and Baby Candy Light £760; 4VVVP Perch ÅVVYSHTW£"9VJOL)VIVPZ_ 4HPZVU3HJYVP_ Finition Onyx folding ZJYLLU£"VUÅVVY) ,PJOOVS[a *HYWL[=V`HNLY\NT_T£

Spring into summer Giving your home a new look needn’t mean starting over. From revitalising colour updates to mood-boosting furnishings and quirky decorative details, it’s the little things that count the most this season 047


Trends

“A little Eames house bird told us that every bedroom needs a touch of red ”

Furniture Savoir Lenoir 01 super-king-size bed upholstered in Metaphores St Germain 71221 Littoral 004, £24,910; Eichholtz Arnaud stools £399 each and Arnaud bench £1,109; Gubi 62 Dresser console £4,540; accessories and homewares, from left (on left stool) 4HUZÄLSK7HYR £14.99; The Count of Monte Cristo £18.99; The Woman in White £17.99; (on bed) Ralph Lauren Home Remy king-size duvet cover £429 and Remy standard Oxford sham pillowcases £95 each; Alexandre Turpault Teo Oxford pillowcases £62.95 each; (cushions, from left) K3 Missoni Phoenix £329; The Rug Company Dash Aqua £80; Roche Bobois Mah Jong in Glenville Velvet £140; (on right stool) LSA International Madrid tumbler £45 for set of four; The Mayor of Casterbridge £16.99; The Sonnets and a Lover’s Complaint £14.99; (on console, from left) Cire Trudon Maduraï candle £80; La DoubleJ Amphora Wildbird vase £335 and Wildbird bubble vase from £300; 9LÅLJ[PVUZ*VWLUOHNLU Grand New Haven Basin £750; (on bench, from top) Roche Bobois Kin Shishu cushion £190; (throws, from top) BeggxCo Arran Plain throw 147cm x 183cm, £859; Harrods of London x Johnstons of Elgin plain throw 190cm x 140cm, £599; Ligne Roset Parachute pendant light £207; (VUÅVVY) Vitra Eames House Bird £165; Eichholtz Carpet Voyage rug 4m x 3m, £1,529

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Trends

“Put the focus on natural textures. Cool marble and hand-woven rattan make a stylish pair”

Furniture Gubi GamFratesi Epic dining table £3,718, Marcel Gascoin C-Chair dining chairs £623 each and TS console £1,708; accessories and homewares Roche Bobois Mariposa Suspension light £1,760; (on console, from top) Ligne Roset Vase: T £216; Gubi Space Copenhagen candlesticks from £79 each; L’Objet Cubisme Condiment Server £255; (on table) Baccarat Heritage Pontil vase £1,100 and Heritage Paraison tumblers £490 for set of two; (VUÅVVYMYVTSLM[) The Rug Company Stingray rug 3.05m x 2.44m, £8,186 and Romy rug 2.74m x 1.83m, £6,268; prints, candles and plant pot, stylist’s own

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Trends

“Bring joy to every corner with sculptural objets d’art. The more eccentric, the better”

This page, furniture B&B Italia Tesaurus cabinet £10,214; accessories and homewares, from left The White Company Aurelie vase mini £35; Zaha Hadid Design Shimmer Lemongrass candle £89; Roche Bobois Cheval Année 1940 ornament £170 and Cheval Museau Fin Brun ornament £410; L’Artisan Parfumeur 7YV]LUJLIHSS£"WYPU[ZÅV^LYZHUKIVVRZZ[`SPZ[»ZV^U Opposite page, furniture Gubi Marcel Gascoin TS console £1,708; Vitra Wiggle stool £429; accessories and homewares (on console, from top) BoConcept Contour vases (from left) £54 and £49; Alessi Z[LLSIHZRL[£ "BoConcept :[VJROVSTSHTW£ "books, from top) Houses: Extraordinary Living£  "The Art of Looking Up £35; The Monocle Book of Japan £50; Zaha Hadid Design7YPTL6YPLU[HSJHUKSLRN£ " (VUÅVVY) Gubi4H[tNV[ÅV^LYWV[JT£ "The Rug Company9VT`Y\NT_T£"WYPU[WSHU[ZHUKWSHU[WV[ZZ[`SPZ[»ZV^U

INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

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Trends

“Rich green tones, floral accessories and, of course, plenty of house plants; let’s get botanical ”

Furniture 9VJOL)VIVPZ7YVÄSL three-seater sofa £5,020; Gubi ,WPJJVќLL[HISLZPU9LK;YH]LY[PUL JT_JT£ >OP[L ;YH]LY[PULJT_JT£ and Grey Travertine 80cm x 38cm, £",SPL:HHI4HPZVU Joelle armchair from £7,887 and pouf MYVT£"accessories and homewareson sofa, from left) 3»6IQL[ Seville Bouclé throw £565; 9VJOL)VIVPZ Madame Doré J\ZOPVUZ£LHJO"VUJVќLL tables, from left) 9VJOL)VIVPZ Les Voyages, Cochon PM Bronze Pantine ornament £206; 3»6IQL[ .LJRVSL[[LYVWLULY£"=P[YH Hexagonal containers £95 for set VM[OYLL"on side table, from left) :VOV/VTL=LYVUHJHUKSLN £60; /V\ZLVM/HJRUL` Amphibia lamp stand £495 and Herbarium 4HYSV^SHTWZOHKL£"on ÅVVY) The Story of Gardening £35; Great Gardens of London £20; ;OL1HWHULZL.HYKLU£49.95; ;OL9\N*VTWHU` Tidal rug T_T£"WYPU[ and plants, stylist’s own The Harrods Bookshop, Lower Ground Floor; Beds, Entertaining at Home, Furniture, Home and Luxury Linens, Third Floor; and harrods.com Photographer’s Assistant 9VZPL>PSZVU

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Shop & Awe

Bring the outside in, with natural materials, fluid silhouettes and forest-green tones

Earthbound beauty

2.

1.

3.

4. 5.

6.

9. 7.

1. B&B Italia Tesaurus cabinet from £10,118; 2. Porada Pilar table from £5,495; 3. Anissa Kermiche Breast Friend vase £410, exclusive to Harrods; 4. Frato Santorini sideboard £9,628; 5. Vitra Découpage, Disque vase £269; 6. Gallotti&Radice7YPZT3V^JVќLL[HISLMYVT£ "7. Vitra Cork Family, Model D stool/side table £379; 8. Vitra Wiggle chair £799; 9. Flos*HW[HPU-SPU[ÅVVYSHTWMYVT£ Flowers, Cards & Gifts, Lower Ground Floor; Furniture, Third Floor; and harrods.com

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I NTER I ORS | L I FESTYLE | P ROP E RTY

Images courtesy of B&B Italia, Porada, Anissa Kermiche, Frato, Vitra, Gallotti&Radice and Flos

8.


To conjure up a bedroom worthy of an English stately home, look no further than the new Harrods of London Chatsworth collection

Bring on the night Surrounded by a beautifully cultivated garden

that reflects the magnificence of its art-filled interiors, Chatsworth House is the perfect source of inspiration for Harrods of London’s latest bedding collection. Translating the opulence of the Derbyshire stately home into indulgent throws and pillows, not to mention toile de Jouy printed duvets, the Chatsworth range is guaranteed to elevate the grandeur factor in any boudoir. A nature-inspired palette of faded blues and deep greens combines with crisp whites and touches of emerald to encourage a mood of serenity. Cushions are, of course, a must for any cosy retreat, and the Chatsworth collection’s bold geometric trellis design provides the perfect counterbalance for the softer chintz and Delft-print duvets. And should you want to bring even more of an English stately home feel into your own bedroom, our monogram service has you covered. With exquisite craftsmanship and the finest materials at the heart of everything Harrods of London creates, you’ll never have to worry about waking up on the wrong side of the bed again. Sweet dreams.

Left, from top Harrods of London Cavendish pillowcase from king-size duvet set £479, Lancelot and Cavendish Oxford pillowcases £159 per pair and Twin Chevron bedspread £409; right, from top Harrods of London Cavendish square pillowcases £169 per pair, Lancelot king-size duvet set £499, Wicker cushions £54.95 each, Cavendish king-size ÅH[ZOLL[£ folded over the duvet) and Twin Chevron bedspread £409 Luxury Linens, Third Floor; and harrods.com


Dining

A F EAST F OR T HE SE N S E S Emily Ezekiel’s earliest memory of food? A bacon sandwich, made by her grandad Ezekiel Ezekiel (yes, that was his name). “He’d microwave a slice of crusty white bread for 10 seconds until it was warm and springy, then smother it in a spicy sweet sauce, and top with crispy bacon fried in butter and olive oil,” she remembers. “Dreamy.” Growing up in London as part of a large family who all loved to cook, Ezekiel always knew that she wanted to work with food. Now, with more than 15 years of experience as a food author, art director, and food and prop stylist – and having worked with some of the industry’s most well-respected names (think Jamie Oliver, Antonio Carluccio and Melissa Hemsley) – she can safely say her culinary dream has come true. For her perfect meal, it’s all about texture. And her best advice? Keep it simple. “Think about the layers of flavours in your mouth. Fresh herbs will add a verdant flavour to any dish, while crispy onions or toasted nuts are the perfect topping for stews and soups.” Her less-is-more philosophy also applies to presentation. “No-one wants a tiny portion, but don’t just pile everything on the plate,” she says. “Give food the space to breathe.” >

By Grace Cain / Recipes by Emily Ezekiel / Photographer Issy Croker Opposite page, clockwise from top left Mauviel M’Heritage 28cm casserole with lid £679; Soho Home Rosa table runner £50; LSA Bar tapered jug £40 and Void oil/vinegar bottle £30; Alessi Mami forks from 24-piece cutlery set £136; Soho Home Mandala side plates £12 each and dinner plates £16 each; Richard Brendon bowl from a selection; LSA Madrid tumbler £35

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Dining

Spring crab salad with broad beans and shaved veg To me, this salad is spring on a plate! You can use the same method but swap out any of the veg for whatever you have – maybe cucumber, carrots or sugar snap peas?

Ingredients

Method

150g sourdough, torn

Toss the sourdough with the almonds, fennel seeds, lemon juice and zest, and olive oil. Season well with salt and pepper, and chuck it all onto a large baking tray. Roast in the oven for about 10 minutes, take out and toss the mixture well. Put back in the oven until everything is golden and crisp, then remove and leave to one side. 

Serves 4 as a starter

Preheat the oven to 180˚c/gas mark 4

50g green almonds 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 lemon, juice and zest (plus extra zest for serving) 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 100g broad beans (in pods) 1 bunch of asparagus 1 head of fennel 200g dressed crab For the dressing 1 tbsp Dijon mustard JOPSSPÄULS`JOVWWLK 1 lemon, juice and zest

Place a small saucepan of water over a high heat. Once boiling, tip in the broad beans, cook for 1 minute, then drain and run under cold water. Pod the beans out of their skins and leave to one side.

1 tbsp honey 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch of chervil

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Snap off the woody ends of the asparagus, then peel long thin shavings of the spears

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and place to one side. Using a sharp knife or mandolin, finely slice the fennel and add to the beans and asparagus. For the dressing, whisk the mustard, chilli, lemon juice and zest, honey and olive oil in a large bowl. Mix in 2 tablespoons of brown crab meat and season with salt and pepper. Roughly chop half the chervil leaves and stir in. Adjust the seasoning if needed.   Toss the vegetables into the dressing bowl. Scatter onto a large platter, then crumble over the remaining crab along with the roasted sourdough and almond mix. Finish with a flurry of fresh chervil and a little extra lemon zest if you like. Eat straight away. >

This page Soho Home Mandala side plate £12 and Rosa table runner £50. Opposite page Richard Brendon bowl from a selection


Dining

My Sicilian-style lamb and heirloom tomato stew I’m sure there will be many Italians furious with my attachment to this, but I have fond memories of sipping cold wine and eating a dish like this on a warm Sicilianesque evening in Syracuse. The stuff of dreams…

Ingredients

Method

3 tbsp light olive oil

Add 2 tablespoons of olive oil to a large heavy-bottom casserole (with a snugfitting lid) and place over a high heat. While the pan heats up, heavily season the lamb with salt and freshly cracked black pepper.

Place in the oven with the lid on for 2 hours, then remove the lid and cook for a further hour (or until the lamb is really soft and the tomatoes have caught a little), stirring after half an hour.

Add half the diced lamb to the pan and brown on all sides; remove with a slotted spoon and place in a bowl while you repeat with the rest of the lamb. Turn the heat down to medium.

When the lamb is done, cook some papardelle until al dente (following the packet instructions) and toss it through the stew. Serve with a grating of Pecorino and a flurry of pepper. >

Add the remaining olive oil and the shallots, garlic, celery and fennel to the pan. Fry until softened and cooked down slightly – roughly 10 minutes. Turn the heat up, pour in the wine, then add the lamb back in along with all the remaining ingredients.

This page, from left Legnoart beechwood chopping board £42.50; LSA Void oil/vinegar bottle £30; Soho Home Rosa napkin £40 for set of four; Jars Maguelone rectangular plate £27; Richard Brendon bowl from a selection; Wüsthof Classic Ikon Crème paring knife from three-piece set £301. Opposite page, from left Staub 31cm oval cocotte £299; Soho Home Roc side plates £12 each and Mandala side plate £12; Jancis Robinson x Richard Brendon glass £150 for set of six

Serves 4–6 as a main

1kg lamb shoulder, deboned and cut into 3cm chunks ZOHSSV[ZWLLSLKHUKÄULS`JOVWWLK JSV]LZVMNHYSPJWLLSLKHUKÄULS`JOVWWLK

Preheat oven to 150˚c/gas mark 2

Z[PJRZVMJLSLY`ÄULS`KPJLK OLHKZVMMLUULSÄULS`KPJLK 300ml dry white wine (preferably Sicilian) 1.2kg heirloom tomatoes, roughly chopped ½ a bunch of oregano leaves ½ a bunch of rosemary 3 bay leaves [ZWKYPLKJOPSSPÅHRLZ

To serve 600g of papardelle Pecorino to serve

INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

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Dining

Sri Lankan-style fish and tomato curry, served with a coconut sambal This take on a Sri Lankan fish curry is utterly delicious. It’s great with monkfish, but any other white meaty fish (make sure it’s sustainably sourced) will work fine

Ingredients

Serves 4 as a main

NTVURÄZOZRPUULKHUKKLIVULK 1 tsp ground turmeric 2 limes, zest and juice

Method

For the sambal 100g desiccated coconut 1 tsp maple syrup 1 tsp sea salt [ZWJOPSSPÅHRLZ ZOHSSV[ÄULS`KPJLK 2 limes, zest (of 1) and juice For the sauce 3 onions 4 cloves of garlic 7cm piece of ginger 3 green chillies (fewer if you don’t like the heat ) 2 tbsp coconut oil 1 large handful of fresh curry leaves 1 tsp ground cardamom 2 tsp mustard seeds 1 tsp cumin seeds 1 tsp fenugreek seeds ½ tsp ground turmeric 1 x 400g tin chopped tomatoes 1 x 400ml tin of coconut milk 1 tbsp tamarind paste

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Slice the monkfish into large chunks and pop into a large mixing bowl with the turmeric and lime zest and juice, and season generously with salt. Mix to make sure the fish is well coated, then place in the fridge until you’re ready to use. Tip the desiccated coconut into a large bowl, pour boiling water over it, and put to one side.   Start your sauce by peeling and finely slicing the onions and garlic. Peel and finely chop the ginger, then slice the chillies in half lengthways.   Place a large casserole pan over a medium heat, add the coconut oil, then tip in the sliced onion and cook, stirring frequently, for about 15 minutes or until soft and completely cooked down.

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Add the garlic, ginger, chillies and curry leaves, and cook for a few minutes until fragrant. Add all the spices and fry for a further minute, then tip in the tomatoes and cook down until thick – this should take around 10 minutes. Then add the coconut milk and tamarind paste, and cook for a further 5 minutes.    Tip in the monkfish, and simmer until the fish is cooked through and opaque – roughly 10 minutes.   While the fish is cooking, drain the coconut using a fine sieve, squeezing out any excess water; then place it and all the remaining sambal ingredients in a large pestle and mortar, and give it a good bash together.

The Food Halls, Ground Floor; Home, Third Floor; and harrods.com

Serve the curry with the sambal and, if you fancy, some rice and rotis.

Photographer’s Assistant Liam Desbois; Food Stylists Clare Cole and Emily Ezekiel

This page Le Creuset 26cm shallow casserole £215; Soho Home Rosa napkin £40 for set of four; Richard Brendon bowl from a selection. Opposite page Cole & Mason Granite Pestle & Mortar £39.95; Richard Brendon bowl from a selection; Soho Home Nero side plate £12 and Rosa table runner £50; Alessi Mami teaspoon from 24-piece cutlery set £136


Interiors Soho Home Theodore chairs £ LHJO1HYYV^JVќLL[HISL £ 4HYUPLÅVVYSHTW£  :PSHZ[HISLSHTW£ HUK 1HYYL[[Y\N£ 

By Claudia Baillie

Next best thing to living chez Soho House? Recreating its style for yourself with Soho Home furniture and accessories, inspired by the clubs’ interiors around the world

Going SOHO Relaxed, eclectic, glamorous, inviting, luxurious – all words that might describe the interiors at any one of Soho House’s worldwide network of members’ clubs, which now number an astonishing 27… and counting. With a further six in the pipeline, including in Paris, Rome and Tel Aviv, it’s an incredible success story that began 26 years ago on London’s Greek Street and continues thanks to its members’ unwavering loyalty. And when founder Nick Jones launched the first Soho Home homewares range back in 2016, it was a response to members and guests keen to recreate the club’s unique, impossibly cool style. “We were constantly being asked, ‘Where can I get your sheets, where are the towels from, who is the glassware by?’” says Jones. “As more houses opened, we decided to start designing everything to go in them. The progression was to make those things available for people to buy.” Five years later, the ever-popular collection has been expanded even further, with innovative furniture leading the look of the new houses – pieces that are now available to order at Harrods, through Soho Home on the Third Floor. “We’ve designed 350 new products, so there’s a full lifestyle experience,” says Gareth Lewis, the brand’s senior creative director. “The concept is that they look great on their own and have a strong material or colour story, but if you throw them together, they create that layered, instantly recognisable Soho House look. Everything is super comfortable and not rigid or serious.” Inspiration comes from art, architecture and a host of mid-century designers (George Nakashima, Jean Prouvé, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret…), as well as from the houses themselves. “We visited our locations all around the world and were inspired by but not tethered to their style,” says Lewis. “We’re fortunate to have so many looks to play with, and more houses opening that all have different aesthetics.” Pieces are conceived by the specialist team of designers > INT ER IOR S | LIFEST YLE | PR OPERT Y

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Interiors

Left Soho Home Sagrada chair £795 and Taston rug £565; above Soho Home Nero side plates (top and bottom) £12 each, mug £10, dinner plate £14 and cereal bowl £12 Home, Third Floor; and harrods.com

“The pieces look great on their own, but together have that instantly recognisable Soho House look” at the company’s Strand headquarters, then crafted all around the globe, from Indonesia and India to the US and the UK. “There is also a made-to-order service,” says Lewis. “All of our wood is ethically sourced, and our aim is to make the highest-quality products possible, things that will last for a lifetime.” Standouts in the new collection include the Rosaline dining table, carved from solid Turkish marble with striking contrast veining. “We took inspiration from grooves in the walls at White City House, transferring them onto the edge of the tabletop,” explains Lewis. “The result is a chunky table that’s almost brutalist, and very proud. Each one is completely unique.” Seating-wise, many cues are taken from vintage furniture, not least for the Theodore armchair and Dunloe dining chair, new additions. “Theodore takes its inspiration from a mid-century Danish design,” Lewis says. “It has a really deep, tapered birch frame, and we tweaked the proportions to make it a bit more modern. There’s also cast-brass cap detailing on the arms and it has soft, classic cushions upholstered in natural linen.” Similarly, the Dunloe is influenced by a pair of 1960s chairs. “They were originally by Milo Baughman, and we loved the idea of dining on velvet,” says Lewis. “Our tribute pieces are fully upholstered and ergonomically designed so you can rest your arms as you sit. We spent a long time getting the height just right.” And thanks to a solid oak frame wrapped in vegetable-tanned leather and equestrian-inspired buckled straps, there’s also a heritage quality in the new Sagrada swing chair. Fully upholstered furniture comes in the shape of the Garrett chair 070

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and the Clovelly sofa. “The Garrett is covered in tactile bouclé fabric to give it a vintage look, and it has amazing seam detailing that comes from the inside of the seat itself all the way out to the base,” says Lewis. “When we received the sample, it felt like it needed to be more fluid, so we added a swivel base, which makes it that bit more special.” Similarly retro in style, the Clovelly is a large three-seater with elegant curves that recall mid-century Serpentine seating. “We wanted the shape to hug you as you sit down,” reveals Lewis. New for bedrooms is the Manette bed, referencing the cosy aesthetic at Kettner’s hotel in Soho. With its curvaceous scalloped headboard and velvet upholstery, the feel is distinctly Art Deco. And original lighting includes the Swirl table lamps, with green, white or pink-and-white marble bases. “The swirled glass globe is inspired by vintage Murano glass from the ’60s and ’70s,” says Lewis. “The dimmer is bronze… and the effect is amazing.” More handmade glass appears in the Amara chandelier, with free-poured frostedglass discs that overlap and cascade down from an antiqued brass frame; while the sizeable, multi-bulb Rohe pendant features natural rattan for a more casual, textural look, which, says Lewis, “looks fabulous on its own – but in a larger space, you could even hang several together to create extra impact”. “People want to buy into the Soho House story and have always come to the houses to be inspired by the beautiful interiors,” reflects Lewis. “That’s very much still the case. If you love Soho House and what the designers do, we really do have something for everybody.”


Creating a home office? Combine practical needs with your own personal style to design a space with maximum motivational appeal, says Amy Broomfield

Hot desking

Lifestyle

7OV[VNYHWOLY Oli Douglas

Furniture Linley Helix desk £12,995; Vitra ID Trim VffiJLJOHPYMYVT£ "accessories and technology, from top BoConcept Desolate print £439; Linley Tellus globe £58,500; (on desk, from left) Linley x Ruark Audio ;LTWVYHKPV£ "Montegrappa ,STVIHSSWVPU[WLU£"Smythson HKKYLZZHUK [LSLWOVULIVVR£HUKJLSSHYIVVR£ "Stow >VYSK*SHZZ[LJOJHZL£ "Leica +3\_JHTLYH £"Asus ALU)VVRSHW[VW£ "Samsung .HSH_`5V[LZTHY[WOVUL£ "Decor Walther 2YPZ[HSS[\TISLYused as pen pot) £89.95; Graf von Faber-CastellWLUJPSZ£ MVYZL[VM[OYLLHUK .\PSSVJOL7LYMLJ[7LUJPS£"Aspen Style £" Watches: A Guide by Hodinkee£"Stow]HSL[[YH` WHY[VM[OYLLWPLJLZL[£"Fornasetti 7HSHaaV *LSLZ[LZJLU[LKJHUKSL N£

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Lifestyle

“It’s said that a tidy desk means a tidy mind, so swap bulky gadgets and horribly tangled wires for design-conscious speakers, versatile tablets and ultraslim laptops. And look for lightweight options that can be easily stashed out of sight when the working day is done”

For many of us, up until last year the office we worked in was assigned to us by the company we worked for, with a one-size-fits-all set-up – meaning different working practices and stylistic choices were rarely a priority. Enter 2020, when operating from home became the norm and we had to adapt to versatile living – fast! Being propped up at the kitchen table while our kids ate breakfast soon lost its appeal when it was necessary five days a week – just as sinking into a sofa for a day full of Zoom calls quickly proved far from ideal. All of which raised the question of how to create a home office that met our practical demands as well as our personal tastes. Of course, some rules are universal: natural light helps lift the spirits; leafy plants breathe life into a room and improve air quality; and, of course, there’s that old adage that a tidy desk means a tidy mind. But on an individual level, the more the space is in keeping with your own tastes, the more you’ll want to spend time in it. Are you stimulated by ultra-clean lines and dark colours? Do you feel more productive surrounded by calming soft curves and neutral tones? Or maybe you need a multipurpose solution to fit within a communal space. Then there’s the gadgetry – and the great thing is that, these days, it often doesn’t actually look like tech. Take the Linley x Ruark Audio special-edition Tempo Bluetooth radio, for one, which delivers high-quality audio from a design featuring Linley’s signature marquetry inlays. With phones and computers, meanwhile, versatility is key. Samsung Galaxy’s Z Fold2 is both a phone and a tablet, taking you seamlessly from crucial call to coffee pitstop. And the ultra-slim and lightweight design of laptops such as the HP Spectre x360 and Lenovo Yoga Slim makes them unobtrusive on the desk – and means they can be easily stowed away at the end of the working day. >

Furniture Gubi Grossman 62 Series desk £2,714; accessories and technology, clockwise from left Samsung Galaxy Z Fold2 two-in-one smartphone and tablet £1,799; Le Labo Calone 17 home fragrance 100ml, £80; Byredo Altar scented candle 240g, £57; Montegrappa Elmo rollerball pen £170; Of Mice and Men £8.99; Nineteen Eighty-Four £8.99; The Great Gatsby £6.99

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Furniture, left and above 9LÅL_7L[HSV KLZR£HUK7LNN`JOHPY£" Porada4`YPHIVVRJHZL£" accessories and technology, above HP :WLJ[YL_SHW[VW£ "Bvlgari )=3.(90)=3.(90^H[JO£" Smythson:VOVUV[LIVVR£" Hello DayWLU^P[OZSLL]L£ " left, from left Roche Bobois x Missoni rug £1,410; (on table) Colunex*VZTVWVSP[HU [HISLSHTW£"Aspinal of London pen pot £95; Hello DayWLU^P[OZSLL]L£  Y\SLY^P[O[HZZLS£  HUKZJPZZVYZ£ " Bvlgari)=3.(90)=3.(90^H[JO£" Smythson7HUHTHWLUJPSJHZL£HUK :VOVUV[LIVVR£"Samsung.HSH_` ;HI[HISL[£ "HP:WLJ[YL_ SHW[VW£ "Ligne Roset(Y[PML_]HZL £540; (on bookcase, from second shelf) Gallotti&Radice]HZL£"Prada Catwalk: The Complete Collections £50; Chanel: Collections and Creations £29.99; Linley /LUSL`WPJ[\YLMYHTL£"Gallotti&Radice WHWLY^LPNO[Z£ LHJO

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Lifestyle

“Whatever your particular interior aesthetic, every home office is sure to benefit from two additions: leafy plants (to improve air quality) and plenty of mood-boosting natural light”

Furniture Gubi4H[tNV[[YVSSL`£ "Ligne Roset[HISL£" Vitra,HTLZ-PILYNSHZZJOHPYZ£LHJO"accessories, technology and toys, from left The Rug Company Herringbone rug 3.09m x 2.5m, £8,500; (on trolley, from top) BoseWVY[HISLZTHY[ZWLHRLY £330; Hello DayWLUJPSZNYL`NVSKHUKISHJR^P[OZSLL]Lnot pictured£ MVYZL[VMMV\Y"Graf von Faber-Castell .\PSSVJOL IYV^U WLUJPSZ£ MVYZL[VM[OYLL" Hello DayZJPZZVYZ£ " Decor Walther2YPZ[HSS[\TISLYused as pen pot) £94.95; Paul Smith + Caran d’AcheIHSSWVPU[WLU£"Smythson7HUHTH ^YP[PUNMVSKLY£"Beatrix Bakes £22; Ottolenghi Flavour£" Original Crown Mill(^YP[PUNWHK£ HUK(LU]LSVWLZ£  MVYZL[VM"on table) Dunoon*HPYUNVYT /V[:WV[ZT\N£ " Hello DayUV[LWHKISVJR£  "Lenovo@VNH:SPTSHW[VW£ " Hello DayUV[LZMVSKLY£  "Ligne Roset9VZLH\PU ]HZL£"VUÅVVY) Le Toy Van9V`HS,_WYLZZ[YHPUZL[£ ;OL/HYYVKZ(YJHKL;OL/HYYVKZ)VVRZOVWHUK7LUZ .PM[Z :[H[PVULY`3V^LY.YV\UK-SVVY";OL)LH\[`/HSSZHUK -PUL1L^LSSLY`.YV\UK-SVVY"/VTL;OPYK-SVVY";V`Z-V\Y[O -SVVY";LJOUVSVN`-PM[O-SVVY"HUKOHYYVKZJVT 7OV[VNYHWOLY»Z(ZZPZ[HU[ZAVÄH*OTPLSLJRHHUKRosie Wilson

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Shop & Awe

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Cocooning luxury

If you have to stay inside, you may as well do it in style, surrounded by the absolute best

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Images courtesy of BeggxCo, De Le Cuona, Elie Saab Maison, Fendi Casa, Flos, Gubi and Poltrona Frau

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1. Poltrona Frau Kyoto table from £5,900; 2. BeggxCo Arran throw £1,100; 3. Flos Taraxacum 2 pendant light £1,770; 4. De Le Cuona Maroc buckle cushion £275; 5. De Le Cuona Victoria fringed cushion £200; 6. Flos Tatou S pendant light from £275; 7. Elie Saab Maison Byblos sofa from £13,800; 8. Gubi Pacha Lounge Chair from £1,832; 9. Poltrona Frau Get Back sofa £18,600; 10. Fendi Casa Antius cabinet £18,552 Furniture and Luxury Linens, Third Floor; and harrods.com

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Partnership

From match days to movie nights, staying in is the biggest event of all thanks to Samsung’s groundbreaking MICRO LED

The bigger picture Some people covet cutting-edge

technological innovation; others prefer gadgets that are design-led, to slip seamlessly into their perfectly appointed homes. And then there are those who just really love a night in with Netflix. Whatever you’re looking for in a home-entertainment system, Samsung can make it a reality with its revolutionary 110in MICRO LED. Although such trailblazing technology is nothing new for Samsung – the brand has been presenting supersized modular MICRO LED displays for years – this is the first time it’s been made available in traditional TV form. Representing a revolution in screen technology, each of the tiny pixels in a MICRO LED screen is self-illuminating – meaning that, say, one could be completely black, while those beside it are vibrant turquoise. This ensures a vivid picture with sharply precise detail, rich saturation and brilliant contrast in natural light or darker environments. And there’s an additional bonus: these microsized LEDs are made from durable inorganic materials with a lifespan of more than a decade, so there’s no chance of the dreaded burn-in affecting some OLED TVs. The unparalleled picture quality on the edge-to-edge screen makes for a visual experience that is as immersive as it is innovative. And the audio is taken care of in equally spectacular fashion. Eliminating the need for an external speaker, the built-in 6.2.2CH Arena Sound System promises to transform the space into your own personal movie theatre. The tech elevates your audio experience by moving sound all around the screen to match the action; so, if you’re watching the latest action blockbuster and a fighter plane roars overhead, it will feel like the engines are right above you. Of course, a TV is no longer just for movie night, and Samsung’s 4Vue feature takes full advantage of the 110in MICRO LED’s supersized screen, letting you watch up to four streams simultaneously on 55in split screens. So if you’ve ever wanted to watch the match while scrolling through Twitter (and keeping one eye on the news), Samsung’s got you covered.

Price on request. To view and order the MICRO LED, call Samsung in-store on 020 3036 6204. Technology, Fifth Floor; and via Personal Shopping – harrods.com/en-gb/services/personal-shopping

“Samsung MICRO LED’s unparalleled picture quality makes for a visual experience that is as immersive as it is innovative”


Accessories

Light touch

Photographer Jake Curtis / Stylist Casey Carey

Simple, calming and beautiful. At a time when our homes are central to our lives, it’s more important than ever to make those spaces a place of tranquillity From left Jars Maguelone jug £42; Vitra Découpage, Feuille vase £269; Soho Home Pilos bowl £12; Alessi juicer £15.50

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Accessories

“With this new invested love for our home comes a fresh pared-back approach”

This page, from left L’Objet Haas Mojave Desert bowl from £195; Fendi Casa Medium Ripple tray £1,170; Hermès picnic basket with four crystal glasses, eight porcelain dessert plates and four sets of cutlery £12,350; Alessi plate £28; Baccarat Dionysos decanter £470; Romo Oswin Putty fabric £35 per metre. Opposite page, from left Fendi Casa onyx ball £2,590; L’Objet Cubisme vase from £255; Vitra bowl £119

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Accessories

“Have nothing in your house that you know not to be beautiful or useful ”

Clockwise from top left CTO Lighting (Y[tZÅVVYSHTW£"Porada Torii stool £1,735; Ligne Roset Polygon white vase £112 and black and white vase £124; Vitra Jasper Morrison Model E table £379; Alessi Grind pepper, salt and spice mill £94; Soho Home Verona candle £85; Fendi Casa marble ball £2,130; Vitra bowl £379; Anissa Kermiche jewellery box £275

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Photographer’s Assistant Ed Tritton

Accessories

From left Staub condiment bowls £14.95 for set of four and plate £14.95; Dior Gardens wine (left) and water glasses £120 each and Manta Rock vase £2,000 Flowers, Cards & Gifts, Lower Ground Floor; Home, Third Floor; and harrods.com

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Brand profile By Lindsay Macpherson

Private bowling alleys with elaborate embroidered walls, superyachts with bespoke couture fabric interiors… Beaumont & Fletcher weaves dream interiors projects for clients seeking the grandest of designs. Owner and director Jana Durisova tells us how

Sew bold – and beautiful

This page Beaumont & Fletcher owner and director Jana Durisova. Opposite page Beaumont & Fletcher Sevilla artwork £17,451, Alexandra footstool from £1,416 and couture cushions (from left) Habibi from £2,800, Andromeda from £2,500 and Circe from £2,550

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“It was mostly about function and necessity,” says Jana Durisova of her first introduction to craft. “Growing up in a communist country, which Slovakia was back then, meant that if you wanted clothes or curtains, you had to make them.” Today, as owner and director of homewares and furnishing specialist Beaumont & Fletcher, Durisova focuses on the more fantastical elements of handicrafts. Think commissions to kit out private jets with opulent velvet interiors, and furnishing superyachts with custom-created fabrics studded with semiprecious stones and seed pearls. “We’re currently working on a project in Japan,” she says. “The client wanted a bowling alley complete with embroidered curtains and elaborate embroidered walls. A client in Moscow recently asked us to make over an ice rink in their property. It’s exciting when we’re able to use crafts in unexpected ways. The possibilities are truly endless.” The company – which is named after the 17th-century playwrights Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher – was founded by the late John Crowell in 1989, initially as a specialist in furniture and printed fabrics. “It was more traditional back then,” says Durisova. It wasn’t until she joined the company as a showroom assistant in the early noughties that Crowell decided to branch out into more heavily worked fabrics. “We were the first interiors company to come out with anything like it,” says Durisova, who took the helm when Crowell passed away in 2016. “Everyone else was doing contemporary, colourful stuff or crewel work.” Investing so much in something so unique was a risk. “People were doubtful we’d find a market for it, but John was determined to follow his instinct.” One fabric in the collection, an elaborate chinoiserie design called Cathay, was expected to be used for PR purposes, due to the expense of actually using the highly worked design for furnishings. “But it was our bestseller by far,” says Durisova. “It showed people did appreciate that type of craftsmanship. The more intricate and incredible the design, the better. Today, people seek us out for our couture fabrics.” Durisova credits her ascension at the company as a case of being in the right place at the right time. “I didn’t have a passion for embroidery at the time,” she says. “It was only after John introduced me to it that I discovered my interest. It connects the two parts of me: creativity and practicality.” Durisova studied hydraulic engineering at university. “It sounded like a >


Brand profile

Courtesy of Beaumont & Fletcher

“Embroidery translates really well into modern spaces. For example, some Art Deco work on the back of dining chairs can look very impactful. We did a yacht interior that incorporated shells and beading in the design” This page Beaumont & Fletcher Pompadour sofa from £7,110 plus fabric (shown in Casaleone mohair) £13,350, Victorian footstool from £1,416 and couture cushions (from left) Beatrice from £2,100 and Thalia from £1,980. Opposite page (clockwise from top left) Beaumont & Fletcher Sevilla couture fabric from £7,100 per metre, Peacock artwork £20,538 and Racine couture fabric from £4,100 per metre; preparing the intricate details on embroidery is delicate work

good career,” she shrugs. “It just came out of a sense of, well, what else could I do?” A move to London at 23 opened her eyes to the possibilities. She planned to pursue studies in architecture, but couldn’t afford it. “So I did a short course in interior design instead,” she says. “It’s fortunate I love it, as it wasn’t my first choice. That was my first stroke of good luck.” The others? “Ending up at Beaumont & Fletcher. And having John as my mentor, of course. That was the luckiest break of all.” Together, the pair embarked on a journey to educate themselves about every aspect of embroidery. “Whenever we got a chance on work trips, we’d go to museums, French flea markets or royal palaces and just absorb it all,” says Durisova. “In the past 100 years, there’s been some amazing fashion embroidery – particularly by Dior and Chanel – but very little in interior design, so you have to go way back to find examples. My favourites come from 18th-century France, because it’s so fine and delicate. But early last year, I visited the Royal Palace of Madrid and The Mirror Room and it blew me away. It’s embroidery from wall to wall, and it’s really big and bold. It shows how versatile embroideries can be. I’ve never seen anything so spectacular.” Durisova’s favourite commissions come from clients who don’t shy away from maximalism. “It makes such an impact on curtains, drapes for fourposter beds and wall panelling,” she says. “We don’t use machine embroidery – everything is done by hand – so it’s incredible to see this type of craftsmanship on a grand scale.” Such is the company’s expertise that it has collaborated with the costume departments of a slew of high-profile feature films. Beaumont & Fletcher has created period pieces for Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast and the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise and, most impressively, played a pivotal part in the set creation for the 2012 film adaptation of Anna Karenina. While ornate embroidery might connote ideas of grandness and tradition, Durisova says it can look contemporary too. “It translates really well into modern spaces. For example, some Art Deco embroidery on the backs of dining chairs can look very impactful. We did a yacht interior where we incorporated shells and beading into the embroidery. It gave the space a really fresh, clean, nautical feel.” She also likes coming up with new concepts for the embroideries themselves. “We often work with clients – particularly the royal families in the Middle East – who want something unique that won’t be seen anywhere else. For us, that doesn’t mean just doing an exclusive colourway; it’s creating something entirely bespoke for the space.” Pre-Covid, the director’s inspiration often came from her travels. “Every country has a different style,” says Durisova. “When you dig a little deeper, you often discover influences that tell you a lot about a place’s history: people tend to take their techniques with them when they travel to new lands.” A trip to Trinidad unearthed a series of folkloric embroidered tablecloths. “It was similar to Madeiran embroidery, which is down to the Portuguese diaspora almost 300 years ago.” More recently, Durisova has been delving into the collection she’s amassed over the years. “Some are simply scraps of fabrics, others are really large,” she says. “But I can find something inspiring in all of them. For example, I found an antique appliqué piece where the techniques are very simplistic, but the layout is something special. It ended up inspiring our Cellini embroidery, which is a very intricate and ornate leading-edge design.” Her favourite piece in the collection? “Easy,” she says. “It’s a teal silk-velvet cape, which was a present from John, from an antiques shop in France. It’s so beautiful, I can’t decide whether to have it restored and wear it, or frame it and hang it on my wall. That’s the beauty of embroidery: it can be whatever you want it to be.” Home, Third Floor; and harrods.com

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HARRODS ESTATES

LONDON LIVING Our edit of the capital’s most desirable properties


Sales

Park Mansions Knightsbridge SW1

This bright, spacious three-double-bedroom apartment is on the sixth floor of a purposebuilt residential block. The property has been totally refurbished to the highest specifications, with a beautiful open-plan reception/kitchen/ dining room, two en-suite bathrooms and a separate shower room. Park Mansions is a landmark building that has 24-hour porterage and security, as well as recently refurbished communal areas, lifts and more. At the junction of Knightsbridge and Sloane Street, it’s right opposite Hyde Park and moments’ walk from Harrods. It is ideally located for the world-class amenities of Knightsbridge, with Piccadilly, Park Lane and the West End also easily accessible. 096

GUIDE PRICE £2,500,000

TOTAL AREA 1,025sq ft (95sq m)

LEASEHOLD Approximately 121 years remaining

EPC RATING C

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7225 6797 reem.dougramaji@harrodsestates.com

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Sales

Basil Street Knightsbridge SW3

Located on the ground and lower-ground floors of a recently built development, this spacious duplex apartment comes complete with full air conditioning, underfloor heating and a Crestron smart-home automated system. A large reception and dining area greets you as you enter the apartment, with a stylish modern kitchen and breakfast bar to one side. A wide polished timber staircase leads downstairs to two generous en-suite double bedrooms. The home has been interior-designed with bespoke furnishings by leading design firm Finchatton. It is directly opposite Harrods and just a short stroll from Hyde Park, with a great choice of restaurants, shops and hotels close by. 098

GUIDE PRICE £4,500,000

TOTAL AREA 1,485sq ft (138sq m)

LEASEHOLD Approximately 991 years remaining

EPC RATING B

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7225 6509 michael.harte@harrodsestates.com

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Sales

Park Crescent Marylebone W1

This outstanding two-bedroom apartment, with private entrance, has Regent’s Park right on its doorstep, and the fantastic location means it is also within easy walking distance of the unparalleled amenities of central London. Arranged over two levels, the property offers the perfect mix of entertaining and practical living space. On the reception level, 4.2m-high ceilings create a sense of grandeur, while on the bedroom level, there are two inviting and relaxing suites. The apartment – which has been finished to an unrivalled standard, with clever use of materials, bespoke joinery and technology – also includes a guest cloakroom, drinks bars, a study area and generous storage. 100

GUIDE PRICE £5,950,000

TOTAL AREA 1,944sq ft (181sq m)

LEASEHOLD Approximately 136 years remaining

EPC RATING B

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7409 9047 robert.cox@harrodsestates.com

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Sales

Hasker Street Chelsea SW3

This charming three-bedroom townhouse has undergone extensive refurbishment, resulting in a tastefully designed period family home. A spacious reception room opening onto a lovely terrace occupies the raised ground floor. On the lower ground floor, there are three distinct areas comprising a large kitchen/breakfast room, a dining room and a family room that leads onto a patio garden. The three double bedrooms are arranged over the first and second floors, along with two bathrooms, including a stunning marble en-suite bathroom for the main bedroom. The property is ideally positioned in the heart of Chelsea, with a tempting selection of boutiques and restaurants just a short stroll away.

GUIDE PRICE £3,950,000

TOTAL AREA 3,523sq ft (327sq m)

FREEHOLD

EPC RATING E

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7225 6797 reem.dougramaji@harrodsestates.com

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Sales

Sales

Park Lane Mayfair W1

Offering a rare opportunity, this large, lateral four-bedroom apartment is in a luxury block, with 24-hour concierge service, opposite Hyde Park. The accommodation includes a 36ft open-plan reception room and dining room, a fully fitted kitchen, two master bedroom suites each with dressing room, a large double bedroom with en-suite shower room, and a fourth double bedroom. The property is equipped with a Crestron system, comfort cooling, an integrated speaker system and electric curtains/blinds. One of the most prestigious addresses in Mayfair, 55 Park Lane is ideally placed for various Michelin-starred restaurants and the boutique shopping district of Mount Street.

GUIDE PRICE £10,000,000

TOTAL AREA 2,812sq ft (261sq m)

LEASEHOLD Approximately 113 years remaining

EPC RATING C

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7409 9047 robert.cox@harrodsestates.com

Montpelier Square Knightsbridge SW7

Ideally positioned, facing south and directly overlooking the square’s gardens, this elegant six-bedroom period townhouse is arranged over six floors, with a lift to the second. Located moments from Hyde Park, the property has been completely refurbished to the highest specifications, including the lift and air conditioning. Three generous reception/ entertaining areas have access to either the double-height glazed atrium or a spacious roof terrace. The master bedroom suite (with separate dressing room) occupies the second floor, with four double bedrooms on the top two floors, and a lower-ground-floor sixth bedroom suite (which could be used as a staff bedroom). 104

GUIDE PRICE £10,950,000

TOTAL AREA 4,247sq ft (395sq m)

FREEHOLD

EPC RATING C

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7225 6506 shaun.drummond@harrodsestates.com

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Rentals

The Corniche Albert Embankment SE1

This apartment is part of a highly sought-after new development – with views over the Thames – that incorporates a swimming pool, gym and bar. Available furnished, the third-floor (with lift) property features a beautiful master suite with a dressing area, an en-suite bathroom and a balcony. There is a second double bedroom with en-suite bathroom and a third bedroom with a separate bathroom. The kitchen and living room are open plan, with a balcony that overlooks the river.

PRICE £1,500 per week plus property fees* *harrodsestates.com/tenants

TOTAL AREA 1,535sq ft (143sq m)

EPC RATING B

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7409 9158 robin.boghhenrikssen@harrodsestates.com

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Rentals

Rentals

Basil Street Knightsbridge SW3

This beautifully presented lateral apartment is situated on the first floor (with lift) of a portered mansion building located just moments from Harrods and the many restaurants, cafés and bars in the immediate vicinity. The three-bedroom property, available immediately on a furnished basis for short-term lets, features an air-cooling/warming system, Lutron lighting and wooden floors throughout. As well as a fabulous entertaining space and a fully fitted kitchen with breakfast bar, there is a master bedroom suite with en-suite bathroom and superb built-in wardrobes.

PRICE £4,000 per week plus property fees* *harrodsestates.com/tenants

TOTAL AREA 1,717sq ft (160sq m)

EPC RATING B

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7225 6602 sarah.mcintyre@harrodsestates.com

The Knightsbridge Apartments Knightsbridge SW7

An immaculate two-bedroom apartment is available in this prestigious development, which comes complete with gym, spa and pool. The property features a fully customised integrated audiovisual and lighting control system, with keypads and touchscreens providing simple, intuitive control of the systems in each room. There are two surround-sound rooms, five multiroom audio zones and three independent viewing areas. The media highlight is a Kaleidescape music and film server, alongside Sky and Russian satellite TV. The apartment is available furnished for long-term lets, and private underground parking is available by separate negotiation. 108

PRICE £3,500 per week plus property fees* *harrodsestates.com/tenants

TOTAL AREA 1,700sq ft (158sq m)

EPC RATING B

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7225 6602 sarah.mcintyre@harrodsestates.com

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Rentals

Wilton Place Belgravia SW1

This beautifully refurbished five-bedroom Georgian townhouse occupies a prime Belgravia location – the elegant family residence sits at the southern end of Wilton Place, enjoying the highly desirable outlook along Wilton Crescent. Particular features include the first-floor drawing room, which opens to a west-facing terrace; and the open-plan kitchen/family room, which opens to a delightful patio on the lower-ground floor. The property also has a lift, and air conditioning and underfloor heating throughout. Wilton Place is ideally placed for all the world-class amenities Knightsbridge has to offer, with easy access to Chelsea, Hyde Park and the West End. 110

PRICE £7,500 per week plus property fees* *harrodsestates.com/tenants

TOTAL AREA 4,243sq ft (394sq m)

EPC RATING D

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7225 6602 sarah.mcintyre@harrodsestates.com

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New developments

Soneva Villa Ownership Soneva Fushi and Soneva Jani, Maldives The only company in the Maldives to sell property to foreign investors, Soneva is offering a limited number of spectacular private beachfront residences to purchase. All are designed and located to combine maximum seclusion and tranquillity, while being close enough to enjoy Soneva’s butler service and six-star amenities. Benefiting from abundant natural light, lush foliage and picturesque views, the sprawling villas – all constructed using sustainable materials – comprise detached living areas connected by wooden walkways. Each private residence is a bespoke design, to meet the owner’s specific requirements while remaining true to Soneva’s values. 112

GUIDE PRICE From approximately £3,000,000

TOTAL AREA From 4,000sq ft to 12,000sq ft (371.6sq m to 1,114.8sq m)

LEASEHOLD Approximately 74 years remaining

CONTACT +44 (0)20 7225 5867 simon.barry@harrodsestates.com

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T H E U LT I M AT E Couch potato? Can’t see the appeal. A Croissant chair, on the other hand… now that’s design par excellence! Playful and elegant in equal measure, this distinctive take on the traditional Chesterfield club chair comes straight from the mind of mid-20th-century Danish architect and designer Illum Wikkelsø. Now part of the Gubi gallery of archival icons, Wikkelsø was renowned for an innovative creative approach and sense of humour – both of which were perfectly suited to the optimism of the 1960s. He was also wedded to the importance of functionality – so, excellent news for loungers and slouchers – with the Croissant Lounge Chair, designed to be comfortable regardless of the way you sit. Add in the sculptural curves and meticulously hand-stitched details, and there can be no doubt about which is the best – and most stylish – seat in the house. Gubi Croissant Lounge Chair from £2,794. Furniture, Third Floor

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Images courtesy of Gubi

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