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HARBORS Connecting People, Places, Adventure and Lifestyle.

HARBORS www.harborsmagazine.com Winter 2012

Nanaimo British Columbia

Island Inn

Lake Washington

Designer Hospitality on San Juan Island

Boating for All Seasons

Olympic Coastal Cuisine Olympic Peninsula, WA

Mystic Steelhead Fishing the Sol Duc River

Craft Beer Victoria, BC

SLU: Gates Foundation


Seen in All

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he most appealing destinations often aren’t just around the corner. That’s why we’ve built Ranger Tugs® in the Pacific Northwest since 1958.

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The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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hen we see land as

a communit y to which we belong, we may begin to use it

with love and respect – Aldo Leopold

These ideas, penned by the recognized father of wildlife management, are at the core of Ducks Unlimited’s operating philosophy. To date we’ve conserved more than 12 million acres of habitat in North America for the benefit of wildlife and people too. Show your love and respect for the land. Join Ducks Unlimited today. 1.800.45DUCKS | WWW.DUCKS.ORG 2

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EXPERIENCE

Hands-On HISTORY

The Center for Wooden Boats is a hands-on maritime museum located on Seattle’s Lake Union, a stone’s throw away from Kenmore Air. Rent a boat, learn to sail or just marvel at the forces that make planes fly and sailboats sail.

Both adults and youth can learn to sail in historic wooden sailboats. Non-sailors can rent a rowboat and enjoy a floating picnic in the middle of the city. Do-it-yourselfers can build a wooden boat, cast a bronze oarlock or learn classical navigation.

A short walk through Lake Union Park will take you from Kenmore Air’s Lake Union Terminal to Wooden Boat Paradise. ...And Admission is FREE!

LAKE UNION

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The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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WINTER 2012

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Features Nanaimo Vibrant City with a Rich Past

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Island Inn

22

Mystical Steelhead

28

Finding the New Victoria

32

UW Marine Labs

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Kenmore Air Destination Maps

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Lake Washington

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South Lake Union - Seattle

45

Olympic Coast Cuisine

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Brewing Up Business

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Northwest Author Spotlight

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Flyaways

62

NW Marketplace

Luxury by Design on San Juan Island

Olympic Peninsula’s Sol Duc Winter-Runs

Beyond the Waterfront

Cover Photograph de Havilland Beaver on approach to landing at Alderbrook Resort on Hood Canal, near Union, WA —Ross Anderson

More Than a Century of Marine Research

South Zone / North Zone

“The Lake” for All Seasons

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

From Farm to Plate

Victoria’s Craft Beer Scene

Jennifer Hahn

Marqueen Hotel, Beaconsfield Inn, Colette’s B&B

Quality Products and Services from Local NW Communities The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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volume 3 issue 1 HA R B OR S The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine CONTACT P.O. Box 1393 Port Townsend, WA 98368

E: info@harborsmagazine.com W: www.harborsmagazine.com

PUBLISHER / EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Katherine S. McKelvey GRAPHIC DESIGN Danny McEnerney EDITOR Allen Cox query@harborsmagazine.com CONTRIBUTORS Allen Cox Ben Keene Bobbie Hasselbring Emily Trujillo Eric Lucas

Heather Larson John Beatty Roger Ward Sue Frause Terry W. Sheely

ADVERTISING SALES ads@harborsmagazine.com WEB DESIGN workin’ man creative PHOTO CREDITS Courtesy of:

Anne Weaver, pages 10-15 Island Inn, pages 16-20 Bob Kratzer, pgs. 22, 24 Olympic Peninsula Guides Association, pgs. 23, 24 Terry W. Sheely, pg. 26 Leslie Forsberg, pages 28-31 AJ Hunt, pages 32-33, 42-44, 56

John Beatty, pages 38-41 Nash Farms, Bella Italia, pages 45-47 Spinnakers Brewpub, Swans Brewpub, Lighthouse Brewing Co., Moon Under Water Brewery, pages 48-50 Kenmore Air/PDN, pg 52 (top) Roger Ward, pages 59, 60 (top) Colette’s B&B, pages 58 (bottom), 59

HARBORS magazine is printed by Mitchell Press, Vancouver, BC.

HARBORS magazine is printed on recycled paper. DISTRIBUTED BY

PUBLISHED BY

SUBSCRIPTIONS AVAILABLE www.harborsmagazine.com © 2012 by All Ports Media Group All rights reserved. Partial or whole reproduction is prohibited. The publisher will not be held responsible for errors in advertising beyond the cost of the space of the ad. No changes may be made or cancellation accepted after the publication deadline date. Opinions expressed in signed articles are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of this magazine or Kenmore Air Harbor, Inc.

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HAR B O R S

Welcome to our winter issue of HARBORS magazine.

Harbor Lights A Note from the Publisher

Well, another fall has slipped by. But we don’t have to let the cool weather cause us to hibernate…there are lots of reasons to get out and enjoy the winter months in the Northwest. This is our first issue of 2012 and it’s full of great destination ideas and interesting things to do this winter. A short, off-season getaway can be relaxing and fun. Numerous Northwest destinations offer cozy hospitality and plenty of winter recreation. There is nothing like a weekend in Victoria or the San Juans or the Olympic Peninsula, snuggled up with a good book in front of a fireplace to help remedy a hectic work week. A good meal in a quaint seaside café, a leisurely morning coffee while watching winter wildlife, or a beach walk in the crisp, fresh salt air can offer the perfect dose of tranquility to rejuvenate the soul. Even the fish bite in the cold weather, but be sure to bundle up and maybe plan a visit to a local winery after your catch just to warm up a little. An abundance of bed and breakfasts, boutique hotels and resorts offer special rates and provide added-value amenities to travelers during the off season. Innkeepers and staff have more time to take care of their special winter guests and the shops and restaurants are less crowded with tourists. There are many one-of-a-kind museums and galleries to visit. Winter is a great time to experience the true pace and local lifestyle of a destination. Lake Union and Lake Washington in Seattle offer numerous urban hotels and sightseeing opportunities, not to mention unique and contemporary shopping. So take advantage of off-season rates and the chance to escape from the daily doldrums to a cozy and inviting winter destination that is just minutes away. You never know what adventure awaits you. Whatever you do, enjoy the magazine, the journey and your destination!

Katherine S. McKelvey Publisher

The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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ON THE HARBORS WEBSITE...

HARBORS Travel Club Card

Blog Us Your Travel Experiences on Our New Travel Blog. Participating Businesses

HARBORS Travel Club Members receive a 10% or greater rewards discount at the following participating businesses. The rewards vary by business and are restricted to regular priced merchandise and services. Contact the individual businesses for restrictions and details or go to: www.harborsmagazine.com/travel-club

We want to hear about your adventures in the great waterways of WA and BC. Special Places | Interesting Faces Boating and Fishing Brags | Spa Experiences Wine and Culinary Journeys Spectacular Photos

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Special Rates and Values Offered by our Advertisers

Lodging | Wine & Culinary | Shopping | Boating & Fishing | NW Art & Culture | Real Estate | Travel

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Special Offers

from Kenmore Air Destinations Seattle | San Juan Islands | Olympic Peninsula Victoria | British Columbia

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Join HARBORS Travel Club *$19.95 for a year of savings

Hotels | Restaurants | Marinas | Retail

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*$26.95 Canadian membership, see website for details.

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Victoria/Vancouver Island, BC

Abigail’s Hotel Bear Mountain Westin Bear Mountain Golf Resort Brentwood Bay Lodge Delta Victoria Ocean Pointe Resort and Spa Hotel Grand Pacific Fairholme Manor Parkside Victoria Resort & Spa Prestige Oceanfront Resort Prime Steakhouse & Lounge Royal BC Museum Sauce Restaurant & Lounge Sooke Harbour House Victoria Regent Waterfront Hotel Waters Edge Resort at Pacific Rim

San Juan Islands

Orcas Island: Doe Bay Resort & Retreats Orcas Island Golf Course San Juan Island: Afterglow Spa Roche Harbor Bird Rock Hotel Coho Restaurant Crystal Seas Kayaking Day Tours Earthbox Motel & Spa Friday Harbor Marine Harrison House Suites Horseshu Guest Ranch Island Inn 123 West Island Wine Company Joe Friday’s Shirt Company Kings Marine Center Orcas Suites States Inn & Ranch San Juan Classic Day Sailing San Juan Excursions, Whale Watching San Juan Vineyards Trumpeter Inn Bed and Breakfast Tucker House Bed and Breakfast Waterworks Art Gallery

Olympic Peninsula

Bella Italia Restaurant George Washington Inn Gift Shop, Port Angeles Port Ludlow Resort Quileute Oceanside Resort

Northern BC Islands Dent Island Lodge Poet’s Cove Resort & Spa Rendezvous Lodge

Seattle

Center for Wooden Boats DiStefano Winery (Woodinville) ExOfficio Holiday Inn Seattle Jillian’s Billiards Kenmore Air Flightseeing Tours Kenmore Air Gift Shop Lake Washington Terminal MarQueen Hotel Quality Inn & Suites, Seattle Center Trago Cocina ZUM Fitness

See www.harborsmagazine.com for additional listings and restrictions.


Welcome to Kenmore Air As you get off your Kenmore Air seaplane flight today, take a moment to look back at the tail of the airplane. If it says “N765KA,” then you have just flown aboard the newest addition to our fleet. Never mind that this particular Otter first flew in 1953! You see, since its start more than 65 years ago, a “new” airplane at Kenmore Air has most often meant an old airplane rebuilt to better-than-factory-new condition by our talented mechanics. This began when my grandfather, Bob Munro, and his buddy, Reg Collins, restored a 1930svintage two-seater in the family garage and decided to start a flying service called Kenmore Air Harbor. It continues with N765KA, which arrived last fall as a battered shell of an airplane in a shipping container from Kenai, Alaska. To be sure, there are faster ways to grow a fleet. Transforming this tired, worn airframe— which hadn’t flown since the late 1980s—into the finest Otter in airline service anywhere in the world has taken more than 5,000 man hours of highly skilled work by the best crew in the business. Under the direction of project manager Sam Hale, most of the airplane’s metal skin has been replaced. A new instrument panel has been filled with modern gauges and radios. A powerful Pratt & Whitney turboprop engine has been installed, and the cabin has been outfitted with a beautiful leather interior. So why do we take this difficult, time-consuming road to “new” aircraft ownership? Why not just write a check? Because despite being decades-old designs, the Beaver and Otter seaplanes we fly perform their missions better than anything that has been produced since. And Beavers and Otters bearing a small brass plaque that reads “Rebuilt by Kenmore Air Harbor” are the best of the best. If you didn’t get to take a ride on N765KA today, I hope you’ll have the opportunity when you fly with us again soon. And when you do, I hope you’ll join me in congratulating Sam and his crew on a job extremely well done.

Schedules and fares for Kenmore Air’s 2012 summer season destinations are available now at KenmoreAir.com

Todd Banks President

The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Nanaimo By Bobbie Hasselbring

Vibrant City with a Rich Past

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In 1849, Ki-et-sa-kun, a Snuneymuxw Coast Salish chief, traveled to the Hudson’s Bay Company trading post in Victoria to have his rifle repaired. He overheard two men discussing coal and told them that similar black rock lay all over the beach on Winthuysen Inlet in his home territory. It was a conversation that changed his people’s future and ushered in a mining boom that created Nanaimo, a picturesque and historically rich town on the eastern shore of Canada’s Vancouver Island. Nanaimo, dubbed the “Harbor

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City,” weaves together many threads— First Nations culture, colorful characters, and coal, logging, fishing and sandstone industries—into a fascinating tapestry. Whether you’re traveling to Nanaimo on business or for pleasure, for a day or for a week, you’ll find Nanaimo is a walkable, architecturally interesting community that embraces its future by incorporating its past. After arriving at the Nanaimo Harbour Water Airport, my traveling companion and I walked along the waterfront, once home to a thriving fishing industry. While it’s still a


The Nanaimo skyline from Newcastle Island highlights British Columbia’s third oldest city.

working harbor, the waterfront now boasts a harbor-side walkway, a busy fishing and pleasure-boat marina, trendy shops and cafes, upscale condos and hotels, and public spaces for outdoor music and events. The old Swy-a-lana Lagoon, once littered with shipyard waste, is now a favorite swimming place for children and home to the Dragon Boat Festival and the Bathtub Race, a fun event created by a former mayor who often donned pirate garb. We climbed a set of stairs designed to mimic the mast of the 1854 Prin-

cess Royal, the ship that brought the first European settlers to Nanaimo. Nearby, The Bastion, a three-story, wooden octagonal tower that’s the city’s oldest building (1853), was the last Hudson’s Bay Company fortified trading post in the west. If you plan to visit in summer, you can watch (and hear!) them shoot the tower’s canon daily at noon; call ahead and you can even light the fuse. King Coal After Chief Ki-et-sa-kun’s fateful revelation, the Hudson Bay Company

began mining coal in Nanaimo. By 1922, they were pulling close to 1.5 million tons of black gold from Nanaimo mines. But life underground wasn’t easy. Early miners toiled one to two miles underground in dimly lit tunnels for $1.40 to $3.50 a day. Accidents were common. An 1887 explosion in the Nanaimo Mine killed 150 miners; the next year, 100 died. We got a better sense of early Nanaimo, including coal mining, at the Nanaimo Museum in the new Vancouver Island Conference Center downtown. Nearby, at the corner of Front and

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Nanaimo Courthouse built in 1895 one of many historic buildings showcasing Nanaimo’s heritage.

Church Streets, the last piece of coal mined here in 1949 is on display. Nanaimo is British Columbia’s third oldest city and its downtown is filled with buildings dating from the late 1800s. The free “A Walk Through Time” brochure, available at the Nanaimo Museum, visitor centers and downtown businesses, gave us the locations and history of significant buildings on three different self-guided walking tours: the coal walk, railroad walk and harbor walk. Banners divide the city into the Arts District in the city core, the Old City Quarter up the hill, and the Waterfront District along the harbor. Along downtown’s Commercial Street and Victoria Crescent, we admired dozens of historic storefronts and bars and impressive structures, such as the Great National Land Building, a 1914 Classical Revival originally built as a bank. The Nanaimo Courthouse, facing the harbor on Front Street, was built in 1896 in Richardsonian Romanesque style by the same architect that built the iconic Parliament buildings in Victoria. The Palace Hotel, up brick-paved Skinner Street, and the Occidental Hotel (reputed to be haunted) on Fitzwilliam still feature tin ceilings and other original architectural accents. Many historic buildings invite further inspection with their contemporary shops and cafes, such as Modern Café, where we stopped in to experience a few unusual adaptations of the Nanaimo Bar, Canada’s favorite confection: a Nanaimo Bar martini and Nanaimo Bar latte. The original Nanaimo Bar was invented by a Nanaimo housewife in the 1950s. Today, visitors can follow the Nanaimo Bar Trail, a must for anyone with a sweet tooth, with bakeries, cafes, bars and coffee shops each peddling its version of this rich chocolate-coconutnut delight. Along Commercial Street, we stopped at Pirates Chips to try a deep fried Nanaimo Bar that’s as decadent as it sounds. The walkable waterfront is a favorite gathering spot.

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Nanaimo Bars: the city’s confectionary claim to fame.

First Nations Culture We’d seen plenty history of European settlers, but were curious about the Coast Salish native people. We headed to Nanaimo’s wharf and hopped aboard the Nanaimo Harbour Ferry, a “mini-ferry” that transports visitors 10 minutes across Nanaimo Harbour to Newcastle Island. Now a Provincial Marine Park, Newcastle is part of Snuneymuxw First Nations traditional territory; shell middens (ancient waste heaps) provide evidence that it was used by native peoples. A statue and plaque and a few native totem poles commemorate First Nations culture. The island was and still is a favorite of white settlers. Newcastle saw coal mining, herring salteries, and sandstone milling for buildings and grinding stones to make paper. Big grinding stones and the cutters that cored them from bedrock stand like witnesses to an earlier time. In 1950, the island was purchased by the Canadian Pacific Railroad, which turned it into a vacation spot. The old dance hall with its spring-loaded floor is still in use today. Keen to find more First Nations’ history, we headed nearly three miles

(top) Nanaimo’s protected harbor is a haven for commercial and leisure boaters year round. (middle) Remnants of the Morden Mine, just south of Nanaimo, stand as a reminder of the robust coal mining history.

Nanaimo Harbour Ferry takes passengers to Newcastle Island Marine Provincial Park.

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south of Nanaimo on the Trans-Canada Highway to Petroglyph Park, a two-acre site that protects ancient rock drawings. Up a steep gravel pathway, interpretive panels explain the petroglyphs and concrete casts enable visitors to make rubbings. A little farther on, a large, flat rock is scored with swirling images of fish, sea creatures, and human forms. Up a hill shaded by madrone (arbutus) trees, we found more petroglyphs carved into the sandstone, including “G Simpson,” a modern day would-be carver who had left his name amidst the ancient images. Back on the waterfront, we spotted a First Nations artist carving a stylized hummingbird on a piece of cedar. I greeted him, but then realized he couldn’t hear me because his iPod earbuds were blasting a rap song. Typical Nanaimo—where past and present live in perfect harmony.

First Nations artisans keep carving traditions alive and compliment the various cultural and recreational opportunities Nanaimo has to offer.

For more information, visit: ● tourismnanaimo.com ● nanaimomuseum.ca

● nanaimoharbourferry.com ● themoderncafe.ca

Nanaimo is a 90 minute drive from Victoria, or a short flight from Seattle on Kenmore Air (seasonal schedule applies).

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A Snuneymuxw Totem Pole welcomes visitors to Newcastle Island. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Scott Hale, CEO (Chief Experience Officer) and Misty Todd, Owner, Designer and Re-imaginator.

Island Inn By Allen Cox

Luxury by Design on San Juan Island

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Cascading down a hillside only steps from Friday Harbor’s seaplane dock, marina and ferry terminal, Island Inn gives its guests a gift from every suite: a classic, quintessentially Northwest view of the small harbor framed by neighboring islands. State ferries come and go according their timetables and Kenmore Air seaplanes glide across the water beyond a marina populated with sailboats, yachts, and charters. The backdrop of thickly forested islands and the passages in-between inspire deceleration, introspection and even re-combobulation (as the office sign suggests). But the captivating view makes up

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only a portion of Island Inn’s magic. The striking post-industrial architecture and keen eye for design in every interior and exterior space balances this elegant equation. Corrugated steel, Parklex panels, sustainably harvested ipe wood and well-placed windows lend the exterior of juxtaposed living units a modern and varied texture whose effect is in harmony with the environment and the surrounding village’s historic architecture. Inside, rooms elevate the act of relaxation with clean lines, luxe amenities and uncluttered, inventive décor. Island Inn opened in the summer of 2011. Scott Hale, who has a career


background in hospitality management, proudly holds the inn’s title of Chief Experience Officer. He believes in the concept of “Intuitive Guest Services,” but he’s not a psychic, just a very good listener who’s tuned in to the type of experience each guest wishes to have. Whether it’s to have an adventure of a lifetime, to be left in complete peace, or to be pampered with a cadre of masseurs, valets and chefs, Hale and his “Experience Ambassadors” make it happen. The inn’s brainchild and resident owner, Misty Todd, is no newcomer to San Juan Island. “I first came here with my family when I was in the tenth grade,” Todd says. “We fell in love with it. When we were leaving, we had a one-hour wait for the ferry, and in that hour my parents found and bought a piece of property.” The prime real estate on which Todd built Island Inn—not to be confused with the site her parents purchased during their mad dash for the ferry—was once a fuel storage site in the waterfront core of the historic village. Todd’s husband is architect Don Mackay. With her innovative design concepts in mind, he drew up plans. After an arduous permit process and some extremely challenging clean-up, excavation and site preparation, the inn’s uber-modern structures emerged from the steep hillside. The architecture stands on its own merit: it won an AIA Honor Award and is a Silver LEED certified building. It’s a model of green architecture with sustainably built materials and a catchment system that collects 80 percent of the site’s water on an island where fresh water is precious. Todd and Mackay originally built the structures as luxury condos, but the unfortunate timing happened to be at the front end of the economic downturn. Shifting strategies, the couple later converted the structure to Island Inn and are committed to green operating practices inside and out of the guest rooms. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Guests choose from Penthouses or Eurostyle Guestrooms. No two of the inn’s accommodations are alike. Penthouses, each unique, are condolike structures with fireplaces and full kitchens—perfect for snuggling in off-season or using as a home base between on-season activities. Euro Rooms resemble luxurious and efficient hotel rooms and suites that share a common living area. Several nearby eateries offer plenty of dining options. Running down the hillside through the heart of the property, a landscaped stairway with water-catchment waterfalls invites the public to use the site as a pedestrian thoroughfare connecting downtown Friday Harbor to the waterfront. Signs that read “Shhhh” remind those using the stairs to respect the tranquility of the space. Todd owes her success to her eye for design and to her ability to surround herself with those who have impressive hospitality resumes. This winning formula has introduced a new standard of luxury, design and hospitality to an island already renowned for superb lodging. Discerning guests recognize that Todd’s vision, passion and talent make Island Inn an exceptional destination hotel. (Continued on next page) The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Misty Todd: Behind the Design When asked to describe the interior design style of Island Inn, owner Misty Todd replies: “The décor is very me.” Looking around the interior spaces, the personal touches jump out. A consistent and prominent thread runs through the fabric of the inn’s design. Paintings by her 86-year-old father, Don Todd—who belies his talent by referring to himself as “a Sunday painter”—and other island artists adorn the walls. Choices of materials, such as basalt counters and walnut cabinetry, lend spaces a modern yet relaxed feel. The presence of an Asian antique here and there among modern furnishings breaks modern lines and adds contextual points of interest. Todd, and not an outside design firm, is personally responsible for the sleek look and relaxed feel of the materials, furnishings and accents. She is an independent designer by profession and enjoys a successful career in the interior design field. For her, Island Inn represents a natural progression and milestone. “I have no hospitality background,” says Todd. “I never imagined I could be doing what I’m doing.” Such is the life of a Re-imaginator.

GREAT SPACE Island Inn is the perfect setting for corporate retreats, receptions and destination weddings. The clustering of Euro-Suites and penthouse living space allows for convenient group activities and gatherings. Local catering from casual corporate lunches to fine dining is available upon request, as well as technology needs. The Inn also provides Epicurean Escapes that will entertain any group looking to impress guests. Visit the Island Inn website at

www.123west.com. 20

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Enjoy a view of Cascade Bay from the balcony of your guestroom as you relax and soak in the easy pace of Orcas Island. Rosario’s seaplane dock and Marina are a short distance away. Ideal for family adventures or a romantic getaway.

360-376-6262 www.OrcasSuites.com

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High-End website & print design for your small business. www.workinmancreative.com

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Mystical Steelhead By Terry W. Sheely

This is why wild Sol Duc steelhead attract anglers from around the world.

Olympic Peninsula’s Sol Duc Winter-Runs The Sol Duc. Magic hides in that hallowed river name, inexplicable sorceries where impossible trout and salmon dreams inevitably explode into dazzling head-shaking, tail-slamming life from mysterious swirls and darkening depths. 22

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Sol Duc starts in the flows of two forks in the frozen heights at the top of the Olympic Mountains, collected from cloud mist that seeps down the north side of the High Divide, plunges in a roar at Sol Duc Falls, slips around Sol Duc Hot Springs, twists through the Sol Duc Valley along and under Highway 101, brushing campgrounds, fishing accesses and bridge crossing. Near the remote community of Forks it joins the Bogachiel River and together they become the Quillayute River and purl into the Pacific near the sea stacks of La Push.

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It’s a 78-mile emerald ribbon where streams of failures only sweeten heady successes. The Sol Duc, drenched in rain-forest solitude, has been described as “100 miles from nowhere.” To hook a winter steelhead, to connect with one of the glistening, wildeyed, green-backed icons of Olympic Peninsula legend, is a feat best consigned to memory as a remarkable bonus, bragging rights certainly, and at the least a tall challenge satisfied. But never, never is a fish—even a coveted steelhead—recalled as the destination. The river is the destination here; serpentine, canopied by


leaning alders and towering conifers, rock gardens with granite teeth that will test any boatman, water clear as old gin, complex and confounding, a place as beautiful as any cathedral. But the winter steelhead demand their due, and they deserve it because that’s why we come here, to match tackle with one of the healthiest runs of truly wild steelhead left in the lower Northwest. Thousands of wild steelhead continue to bless this river, partially because of its pristine habitat, rock garden hidey-holes, rapid tailouts and snarls of white water. And partly because of a former grassroots enhancement program launched by fishing guides to perpetuate wild steelhead. The Snider Creek Steelhead Enhancement Program was a rearing pond project of the Olympic Peninsula Guides’ Association (OPGA), which since 1986 has stocked upwards of 100,000 wild steelhead smolts a year in the Sol Duc. Their production routinely doubles the number of wild

steelhead available in the Sol Duc. The enhancement program ended in October 2011 when Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) refused to renew the OPGA permit, claiming it was not compatible with state efforts to maintain the Sol Duc as a wild steelhead river. Wild steelhead presently released from the Snider Creek project will continue to return over the next two years as early fish, but after 2014 the number of steelhead in the river in January and February is expected to decline. Wild spawned steelhead typically don’t become avaialble until late Feburary, March or April. Snider Creek winter-run spawners were selectively sport-caught from the native gene pool, played gently to hand, tethered and floated down river to collection trucks. Spawners were relocated to Snider Creek tanks to ripen, where eggs were goosed from the hens, milt from the bucks and the fertilized wild eggs moved to the

Wild Sol Duc Snider Creek steelhead held for spawning. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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WDFW salmon hatchery to hatch. Forks steelhead outfitter Bob Kratzer is an adamant supporter of the steelhead program and credits Snider Creek with producing the contemporary surge in winter-run numbers and the explosion of trophy-size fish showing up January and February. For steelheaders, at least for the next two years, the collapsing enhancement project will continue to provide naturally-spawned wild steelies—the most gorgeous of all, with their wide and perfectly fanned fins, back lines as green and dark as the river bottom, and a fighting spirit that can leave anglers splattered and breathless with tackle in shambles. Along much of its course the Sol Duc dominates drainages in the northwest corner of the remote and lightly peopled Olympic Peninsula. It births and delivers winter and summer steelhead, all of the five Pacific salmons, imperiled bull trout, and packs of sea-run cutthroat. It is one of the few, possibly the only, river south of British Columbia where anglers have an honest chance to catch all of the Pacific salmon—chinook spring and fall runs, coho, chums, pinks and sockeye. But it isn’t the salmon, endangered char or spritely trout that create the angling magic found in the Sol Duc. That bewitchery arrives with the ocean-going steelhead, specifically winter-runs, the subspecies that evolved its spawners to return from the ocean in the dead of storm season—December into March. By January on an average year, enough winter steelhead have surged upriver that fishers convince themselves that they have at least a prayer that their repetitive casts will be interrupted with hookups. Wild steelhead from Snider Creek begin to show in January, and by February and March the river will carry good numbers of wild steelhead, wonderful 12 to 25 pound fish, thick

Volunteers release a big wild winter-run buck into a holding tank at the defunct Snider Creek project. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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From drift boats and bank rocks, anglers respect the ‘Duc as a river worthy of wild steelhead.

through the mid-section, crimson on the cheek and nasty on the rod. But it’s the always dicey winter weather blowing in from the ocean— hundred-mile storms that arrive with tree-hurling winds and leave with gushing flood water—that worry old-timers. Because the Sol Duc has its head in the unlogged mountains of Olympic National Park and most of its course is laid through filters of forest duff, moss and unsilted rocks, it is the first big Peninsula steelhead river to clear of storm mud and settle back into “steelhead green,” which 26

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makes it a favorite of time-pressed traveling anglers. Sol Duc veterans know they have to move quickly to catch the windows of fishing opportunity. Guides line up in advance, gear packed and, when the river is clearing and dropping, steelheaders are already en route. On the highway, from Seattle, the road is 140 miles and nearly three winding hours, longer if a ferry is involved. Better yet, steelheaders can soak in spectacular views of the Sol Duc’s birthplace among the snow-covered Olympic peaks

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during the brief 35-minute Kenmore Air flight to Port Angeles and meet their guide with the best of the day left to fish. While bank fishing accesses are found near campgrounds, fern trails and at pullovers from Highway 101, the Sol Duc saves its best for drift-boat fishermen. Success belongs to those who win the game of hide-and-seek, looking for steelhead tucked into pockets, migrating in pods, holding in runs. The more water you can cover in a fishing day, the better your odds. No less than half a dozen major


steelheading sections are on the Sol Duc. Which run holds the bulk of the fish is a search most efficiently conducted by rocker-bottomed drift boats with professionals on the oars. This is not a river to trifle with. Each of those half dozen premium runs is guarded by boulders, snarly plunges, and river treachery that can flip a drift boat in a single bad sweep of the oars. Riverside and Bear Creek are runs that will stand your hair on end until you unravel the slots. Experienced non-resident boatmen are not bashful about booking local guides to scope out the river before pushing their luck into its teeth for the first time. The prominent fishing holes are distinctive and each favors specific fishing techniques. What, where and when you fish are determined by water levels, color and personal preferences. Fly fishermen throw sink-tips and gaudy streamers while sharing the water with bobber-and-jig technicians, who share the river with side drifters and plug masters. With courtesy and decent river manners, there is room for all. There are fly shops in Port Angeles to pack the box, such as Waters West. Fly boxes bulge with Syd Glasso spey patterns, Orange Herons, the famous orange and yellow Sol Duc, Glo Bugs, Lady Caroline, Purple Peril, Purple Ghost and more. Boaters pack wobbling plugs—Flatfish, Wigglewarts, Hot Shots—most in green colors, along with foam bobbers and weighted jigs in pinks and whites and peach flavors. When you hear about a local jig developed by Kratzer and fellow guide Mike Zavadlov, find it and buy it. It sports a black head, a shimmering body of pink and chartreuse rabbit fur with Krystal Flash tail. On the Sol Duc, in winter storm season, with runs of winter-steelhead in the offing, steelhead magic has a power all its own.

Contacts: Conventional Tackle: • Swain’s, Port Angeles, www.swainsinc.com • Olympic Sporting Goods, Forks, www.olympicsportinggoods.com Fly Tackle: • Waters West, Port Angeles, www.waterswest.com Guide: • Olympic Peninsula Guides Association, www.olympicpeninsulaguidesassociation.com Live Web Cams on Sol Duc River Conditions: • www.northolympic.com/areawebcams/index.php Air Travel: • Kenmore Air, www.kenmoreair.com Accommodations: • Forks Chamber of Commerce, www.forkswa.com • Port Angeles Chamber of Commerce, www.portangeles.org • Olympic Peninsula Visitor Bureau, www.olympicpeninsula.org

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Downtown side streets off Victoria’s main waterfront offer unique shopping and culinary experiences.

Finding the New Victoria By Eric Lucas

Beyond the Waterfront

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The lunch venue at one of Victoria’s quintessential restaurants is a retrochic, diner-type long bar, lined with stools, on an outdoor patio beneath a light canopy. The couple next to me is speaking German; the couple behind, Spanish. The vista overlooks one of the world’s busiest floatplane harbors, with pontoon craft taking off about 20 times an hour. Sun sparkles on sapphire water and the food is divine. It’s practically perfect. And not a lace doily in sight. British Columbia’s venerable capital city once labored under the perception that it’s one of the last bastions of British colonial grandeur. Isn’t it named after the monarch who presided over the glory days of the empire? Doesn’t it

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have a world-famed hotel whose very façade bespeaks imperial elegance? Isn’t high tea a daily tradition in walnut-paneled parlors? “A little bit of merrie olde England,” went the tourism slogan. Scones, clotted cream and finger sandwiches.True, but… High tea is almost exclusively a tourist affair, and declining. The city years ago abandoned the “bit of England” slogan in favor of “full of life.” The Fairmont Empress Hotel is indeed named after Queen Victoria, who was Empress of India—but it opened in 1908, making it Edwardian in both style and fact. As for genuine British colonial history: the city was actually an outpost of the British empire for just 22 years, from 1849 to 1871,


when it became the capital of its thennew Canadian province. During its short imperial heyday, clipper ships riding the westerlies from Asia dropped anchor in the Inner Harbour to offload tea and silk. That trading heritage is reflected today in the city’s strong Asian flavor, colorful antiques district and wellpreserved historic center, whose main street, Government, offers a delightful shopping stroll past goods that range from tea to tobacco to First Nations art. Victoria also has one of the continent’s smallest, but most interesting, Chinatowns; a thriving arts scene that embraces an excellent small symphony and a superb local professional theater; and its residents comprise an incredibly diverse community of Asian, European, Caribbean and North American extraction. More than 35 languages are spoken among the metro area’s 360,000 people. I’m enjoying one facet of that cultural diversity this morning, with an

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early lunch at Red Fish Blue Fish. Yes, fish and chips is quintessentially British, but the RFBF version is possibly the best in the world—Asian fusion, with sustainably harvested salmon, halibut and cod coated in tempura and fried in vegetable oil—which, by the way, is recycled into biodiesel that the restaurant uses in its company car. Speaking of recycling, Victoria has done just that with an old railroad track that once ran from the central harbor to the mountain foothills 56 kilometers west of the city. Now it’s the Galloping Goose Trail, one of the best recreation paths in North America. Victoria’s been named Canada’s most bike-friendly city, its residents the country’s fittest, so in the spirit of that ethos my wife Leslie and I don bike gear and hit the trail to enjoy our own version of afternoon tea, 21st century Victoria style. First is a stop at Fol Epi Bakery, an estimable café in a new condo complex right at the start of the trail, overlooking the Gorge waterway. Two black currant scones, some organic Vancouver Island butter, a couple blackberry sodas: load these carefully in a backpack and off we go. The trail begins as a paved path along the water, crosses a lengthy old railroad trestle bridge, veers west through city and suburb, winding out to the pastoral, oak-dotted farmland bordering the urban area, then dips down past a small, fir-fringed lake. There’s a dock along the shore below the trail, and this is our venue for afternoon tea. No crystal, no silver—unless you count the reflections from the sun-splashed water. We toast the wondrous, cosmopolitan nature of the modern Victoria. That evening we savor a contrasting side of the city’s sophistication with dinner at a brassy modern chophouse, Prime Steakhouse, whose menu features six different cuts of prime Alberta beef, cooked in a high-tech, ultra-hightemperature Montague broiler. My ribeye is close to perfect; Leslie’s tuna is crusted with sesame and wasabi, and 30

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our panko-crusted onion rings may be the best in Canada. (There’s that Asian influence again.) The atmosphere is a brawny but sleek blend of ebony woods, burgundy drapes and hushed accent lighting. No lace doilies here, either. Later, at the Belfry Theatre, a revival production of a BC-born play, Mom’s the Word, stretches the envelope of family theater about as far as possible. Composed of sketches recounting four women’s varying experiences with motherhood, the words in Mom’s the Word range from stunningly sharp to hilariously familiar for anyone who has raised kids, male or female. Next day, we set off on foot to blend old and new Victoria in one jaunt along Government Street. At the end near the Inner Harbour, Murchie’s Tea offers classic English Breakfast blends—Leslie’s favorite—in a café next to Munro’s Books, where Thomas Hardy meets Lao Tse on the shelves. We detour up Fort Street to poke our heads into antique stores featuring 19th century silver and china, and duck into Chronicles of Crime, where the proprietress steers me toward a brand new book by one of my favorite writers. An hour later, back down on

On or off the tourist trail, Royal BC Museum is a must-see.

Government, we head into Silk Road, the city’s New Age tea and aromatherapy store. Is there English Breakfast here? Sure (an English Breakfast type, anyhow), but also patchouli-scented massage oil, a tasting bar where you can sample Pu Erh, the exotic Chinese fermented tea, and a spa where you can have a green tea facial. “How about you?” the counter clerk asks when I notice the latter. “Green tea, not my thing,” I reply. Not facials either, but I don’t say that. “Well, then maybe you’d like our treatment expressly designed for men, the Imperial Dragon,” she offers. This sounds intriguing, but it raises an obvious question in a city as cosmopolitan as Victoria. “Which empire is it from?” She just smiles enigmatically.

The Insider’s Victoria For flights between Seattle and Victoria: www.kenmoreair.com Visitor information: www.TourismVictoria.com Eric Lucas is the author of the new Explorer’s Guide Victoria and Vancouver Island, www. harborsmagazine.com/books

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UW Marine Labs

By Emily Trujillo

San Juan Island

More than a Century of Marine Research

Visible from air and sea, an idyllic 484-acre shoreline parcel and collection of buildings just north of Friday Harbor on San Juan Island often has arriving visitors inquiring what the compound is. The answer that islanders usually give is “The Labs.” The Friday Harbor Laboratories are a scientific outpost for the University of Washington and, while the focus is on research, there is also an emphasis on teaching, providing indepth courses for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. The pristine beauty and isolation of the San Juan Islands provide a unique spot for marine research and study. Dorm buildings, a dining hall and plenty of forested trails make up the lab’s campus, more reminiscent of a well-appointed summer camp than a research station. However, instead of learning woodcraft or perfecting the cannonball dive, lab residents are focused on highly sophisticated 32

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research projects. The island’s legacy of marine research began in the latter half of the nineteenth century when a group of young men, sons of the area’s original settlers, created the Young Naturalists Society. Their mission was to learn as much as possible about the waters of the San Juan Islands. In 1894 the group disbanded and donated their collection of findings to the University of Washington, sparking the university’s interest in the San Juans as a research hub. For more than 100 years, the labs have functioned as a highly respected field station for research in marine biology, zoology, genetics and many other fields of scientific study. The state-of-the-art research facilities— more than 10 laboratories, a 58-foot research vessel, and 1,500 acres of biological preserves—are world renowned and attract scientists from around the globe.

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In addition to research and collegelevel courses, the labs also operate a K-12 environmental science outreach program for the classrooms of the San Juan Islands, enhancing the current science curriculum. Students have the opportunity to be actively involved in hands-on scientific processes and to become scientifically educated stewards of their island environment. One of the newly formed research projects at the labs is the impact of ocean acidification (OA) on marine organisms. OA has only been on the scientific radar for the past twenty years and only seriously studied for the last decade. In short, OA can be explained as a lowering of the pH levels of the world’s oceans due to an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2). “The chemistry is fairly simple,” says postdoctoral researcher Michael O’Donnell. “If you add CO2 to water, the pH is going to change.


The chemistry of the entire world is changing right now and will continue to do so until CO2 levels stabilize.” O’Donnell, along with Emily Carrington, Terrie Klinger and other members of the UW scientific community, have spent the last three years writing grants, obtaining funds, and building the equipment essential to study the effects of OA. Included in that equipment is a recently completed floating metal dock. Attached to this dock are large 20 ft. bags holding several thousand gallons of water. The research team can manipulate the pH levels inside these enclosed environments while the water temperature and light exposure remain the same as the outer environment. This allows the team to see how plankton communities develop and react in an environment with higher levels of CO2. According to scientists, the pH of the ocean is changing very minutely. pH is sensitive. It is measured on a logarithmic scale, similar to the Richter scale. So, as with earthquake measurements, a small change can have a huge effect. “pH is incredibly important to all living things,” O’Donnell says. “If your blood pH changed by twotenths of a percent you would be hospitalized. The pH is changing in the

whole ocean and right now we don’t really know what that means.” The organisms most immediately affected are those made of calcium carbonate such as coral reefs, mussels, and oysters. Calcium carbonate is essentially a chalk-like substance and the acidity of the ocean seems to be causing this substance to weaken. The current research at the Friday Harbor Labs is focusing on the effects OA produces on the common mussel (Mytilus edulis), which is widespread in the Puget Sound region. A newly completed lab consists of many large ice chests full of plexiglass containers that can each be manipulated independently to simulate different pH levels. These experiments will not only test the strength of the mussels’ shells, crucial to defense against predators, it will also test the strength of the organism’s byssal threads, also referred to as the beard, a very durable string-like substance emitted by the mussel to anchor to rocks. This substance is secreted by the mussel in liquid form which upon contact with sea water becomes a very tough, solid string. Emily Carrington of the Friday Harbor Labs is currently studying the strength and structure of byssal threads as well as the effects of OA on the resilience of these threads and the strength of the shell. While the common mussel may not

Resident Scientist Michael (Moose) O’Donnell studies the effects of increased atmospheric CO2.

appear to be highly significant to the marine ecosystem, O’Donnell points out they are “quite important to what lives on the coast in this part of the world.” Mussels anchor themselves to rocks in layers, which create a tiny protected ecosystem for small marine organisms. If the mussel’s ability to properly attach itself is compromised, this whole intertidal zone is in danger. The scientific research team at the Friday Harbor labs is in the beginning phase of testing the affects of OA on marine organisms. This emerging field of study can only help shed light on our changing planet, our role in it, and how we as a species can become responsible stewards so that all organisms may remain vital and healthy.

One of the marine laboratories at UW’s Friday Harbor complex.

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Topographical data by True North GIS. Map Š2009 Kenmore Air Harbor, Inc. All rights reserved.

Olympia to Nanaimo

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Topographical data by True North GIS. Map Š2009 Kenmore Air Harbor, Inc. All rights reserved.

Nanaimo to Port Hardy

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Lake Washington By John Beatty

“The Lake” for All Seasons Viewed from the air, the Seattle area is home to several lakes, but one holds the title as the granddaddy of them all—a 22-mile ribbon carved out by glaciers—Lake Washington. If you mention “the lake,” most locals know that’s the one you mean. In the days of yesteryear, major shipyards populated its shorelines and coal barges and log rafts floating to market were common sights. Today, the south end of the Lake hosts one of the world’s busiest airline factories, the Boeing Renton plant. On the north end is Kenmore Air, the largest seaplane operator in the country. In between, along the east and west shores, lies some of the most expensive and sought-after residential real estate on the west coast. Many Seattle-area residents are boaters and, regardless of the season, Lake Washington offers many excuses to forget about the lawn mower and get out on the water. Some of the largest boating events in the world, featuring craft from canoes to opulent mega-yachts, take place on this lake. On the first Saturday in May, tradition reigns with Opening Day of Boating Season. The Windermere Cup

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UW Husky Stadium stands offer a commanding view of Lake Washington.

launches the festivities with races including eight-oared boats and fourman shells. Over the last 25 years, teams from China, Australia, Russia, South Africa, Egypt and the Czech Republic have competed in the first major crew race of the year. Following the race, decorated pleasure boats parade by, giving people on shore and on boats tied to a log boom a grand spectacle. Seattle Fire Department boats put on a show of spray and sailboats hoist their spinnakers. The University of Washington Husky Marching Band floats through on three yachts playing “Tequila,” lending an even more festive spirit to the event. Although this event is called “opening day,” boating season never really ends in the Seattle area. When summer arrives, Lake Washington warms up and ski boats appear. The big

UW Husky fans head to Husky Stadium by boat. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Opening Day of Boating Season brings boaters and non-boaters alike to Lake Washington.

Independence Day fireworks celebration takes place on the Lake’s little brother, Lake Union, connected via the Montlake Cut and Portage Bay. Many boaters take to the water for front row seats for this spectacular show. As July winds down, the whole town turns out for the many parades and parties called the Seafair celebration. The first weekend in August is statistically the summer weekend with the least chance of rain. Seafair culminates at the Lake with unlimited hydroplane races and a spectacular airshow starring the Blue Angels. The race course is south of the Interstate 90 floating bridge. There, spectators line the course along the lakeside and at the Stan Sayers Pits, where the turbine-powered, 200-mph hydroplanes are put in the water. The other side of the oval course is defined by a log 40

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boom where a flotilla of yachts and sailboats tie up to view the racing. They moor there for two or three days anticipating the races, a recipe for a bit of partying. The warm days in the Northwest continue well into September, but fall means back to school and football. The University of Washington is on the Lake’s Seattle side. The campus shoreline is not very developed, but there is a University-owned dock and boathouse where anyone can rent canoes and rowboats. On any fall Saturday, when a home game is scheduled, a transformation occurs. Pleasure boats loaded with Husky fans converge at the dock. When that dock fills up, the next arrivals tie alongside the first boats and the next group ties to them until a raft of yachts and small boats gets to be ten boats long and twenty boats deep. When the

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boats are properly lined up, the stern “swim steps” make a path to shore. In addition to docks for private vessels to raft to, there are docks reserved for commercial charter boats that deliver football fans from docks and restaurants across Lake Washington and from places on Lake Union and along the Ship Canal. If a boater anchors out in the bay near the stadium, there is a shuttle boat to the shore. Unlike the Great Lakes and lakes in the Northeast, where shorelines ice up in winter, Lake Washington stays open for business all year. On sunny winter weekends, cruisers and sailors enjoy a less crowded scene on the water. In December, one hearty soul dons a Santa suit and water skis along Lake Washington’s floating bridges at morning commute time. Traffic jams up badly on those days. On many evenings in December,


the Argosy Christmas Ship tours along the shore of the Lake. The ship is festooned with white lights and carries a local choir on board. A fleet of decorated pleasure boats follows the big ship and the parade stops at parks along the shore where neighbors gather around bonfires and listen to the choir sing Christmas carols. The public is welcome to buy a ticket on this Christmas Ship and anyone with a boat is welcome to tag along behind. And on New Year’s Day, the Lake plays host to polar bear plunges at several sites for those hearty souls who care to brave the frigid water. The Lake is a Seattle-area treasure long used by millions for celebration and quiet contemplation. You can eat dinner as the sun goes down and jog along the shore as it comes back up again. Sail, fish, or water ski. Or just sit and watch the seaplanes take off and land. Lake Washington—the Lake—is truly a lake for all seasons.

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The annual Lake Washington Windermere Cup is an international rowing regatta. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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SLU:

Neighborhood Happenings

Seattle’s South Lake Union Neighborhood, home of Kenmore Air’s Seaplane Terminal.

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation By Allen Cox

The recently opened 12-acre campus of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is more than a stunning example of modern sustainable architecture; it’s the foundation’s locus of support for thousands of global humanitarian initiatives. This welcome new addition on the edge of Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood houses the foundation’s operational headquarters and its three grant-making programs: Global Development, Global Health and the United States Program. Put simply, the foundation, under the leadership of Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett, is focused on helping people in the United States and abroad lead healthier and more productive lives. In the U.S., the foundation’s focus is on improving public education across the nation. Educators and students in the Pacific Northwest are particularly fortunate that this is the location of foundation headquarters—several grants have benefited public education and quality of life for the poor in the Northwest through organizations such as Washington Families Fund and United Ways of Washington. 42

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The Gates Foundation campus features abundant outdoor space with sustainable landscaping.

Abroad, the focus is on agricultural development; water, sanitation and hygiene; and financial services for the underserved. Programs crucial to millions, such as Oxfam-America Inc. and United Nations Development Programme, benefit tremendously from the foundation’s grants. In all, the foundation has given more than 4,000 grants in the United States Program alone, and globally (including the U.S.) nearly double that. In a speech before the United Nations General Assembly, Melinda Gates said of the foundation, “…we can be very impatient with the way the world is—and very optimistic that we will change it… The world is not called on to conjure progress from a void. Instead, it is called on

The comfortable interior facilitates interaction, collaboration and learning. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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to learn from very real progress on nearly all the MDGs (Millennium Development Goals), to expand it, and to speed it up.” The design of the campus reflects the foundation’s work in health and education. The campus was created to facilitate interaction, collaboration and learning. Sustainable architectural features include green roofs, water-recycling for non-potable uses, local and recycled construction materials, and energy consumption onefourth below code requirements. In her speech to the U.N General Assembly, Melinda Gates continued: “I believe that when poor people lift themselves out of poverty, we ought to celebrate, no matter where they happen to come from. Bill and I started our foundation because we believe that all lives have equal value.” For those who want to learn more about the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s work in helping people lead productive and healthy lives, the foundation houses a Visitor Center open to the public. Interactive exhibits provide stories of the foundation’s work in touching real communities and lives and information about the organizations that the foundation benefits. There, visitors can learn more about and connect with causes they care about. The Visitor Center is located on the foundation’s campus at 500 Fifth Ave. N, across from Seattle Center. To find out more, go to www.gatesfoundation.org. (top) In addition to the sustainable architectual features, the campus is abundant with local northwest art and design. (bottom) Light-filled spaces reduce the need for energy consumption.

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Olympic Coast Cuisine

By Heather Larson

From Farm to Plate Neil Conklin knows and appreciates local food. He’s cooked it, served it and now spends much of his time getting the word out about the tasty fare raised and caught on and around the Olympic Peninsula. When asked to describe a regional favorite, Dungeness crab, Conklin said: “The meat tastes sweet, buttery and clean-flavored, besides being easier to pull from the cracked claws, legs and body than any other type of crab.” Conklin considers himself the unofficial ambassador of Olympic Coast Cuisine, a term he coined almost a decade ago. “Food tastes better when you know the ground or water it came from and the people who grew it or caught it,” he says. What is Olympic Coast Cuisine? At first, Olympic Coast Cuisine meant cooking that took advantage of local ingredients like incredibly fresh crab, mussels, oysters and clams, as well as locally-grown carrots, tomatoes, peppers and other produce. But the definition has evolved and now includes wine and hospitality. “It’s been my mission to create and define Olympic Coast Cuisine,” says Conklin who owns Bella Italia, an Italian restaurant in Port Angeles. Taking his mission very seriously he became a founding board member of the creative group behind the Olympic Peninsula Culinary Loop (www.olym-

picculinaryloop.com). Four counties in the region—Clallam, Jefferson, Grays Harbor and Mason—have partnered to design itineraries that allow travelers to experience local food at its source. For example, a two-day itinerary for Port Angeles and Sequim, the hub of Olympic Coast Cuisine, includes farm tours, a winery, bistros, farmers markets plus tips on how to store the food you enjoy so you can bring it home. Future plans for the Olympic Peninsula Culinary Loop include building the membership base, which is how the organization is funded; letting those who travel the I-5 corridor know this experience is available and sharing the knowledge gained through this organization with other restaurants. “In a perfect world every restaurant would have at least one local product

on their menu,” says Conklin. Bella Italia, located in heart of downtown Port Angeles, features mostly locally-sourced food. Opened in 1996, this fine-dining venue quickly became a space where people could enjoy each other’s company around the table and indulge in good regional food. “From the beginning the utilization of local products came naturally,” says Conklin. This makes sense given the abundance of agriculture, aquaculture, fishing and foraging in the area. His current menu items include wild-caught Neah Bay Halibut, Quileute King Salmon, Hood Canal Manila Clams and Mussels and of course Dungeness Crab. The mushrooms, organic carrots, sugar snap peas, arugula, radicchio and more ingredients also come from nearby farms. Add to that an awarding-winning

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(top and bottom) Fresh produce from local farmers guarantees savory flavors and healthy color for Olympic Coast Cuisine. (middle) Bella Italia Restaurant in Port Angeles, WA, owned and operated by Neil Conklin.

selection of more than 500 wines, including the restaurant’s very own Bella Italia Sangiovese made by Walla Walla Vintners. Conklin’s original focus stands: enjoying friends, family and food around the dining table. But a keen eye for what his customers want has guided him to honor the Twilight phenomenon demand. In these popular books about vampires, the two main characters, Bella and Edward, had their first date at Bella Italia. In the book, she ordered Mushroom Ravioli. Since the book came out, thousands of Twilight fans from around the world have come to dine on the pasta made with all natural ingredients. Soon the entrée will be available frozen in grocery stores and through mail order with a portion of the proceeds benefiting the Quileute Tribal School and Forks High School. Conklin has a long history of volunteering his time and services. “I feel lucky that I can afford the time to do that,” says Conklin. “I grew up with parents who were always involved in civic activities and most of those revolved around food. Paul Newman was our neighbor in Redding, Connecticut, and his philanthropy was a great inspiration to me.” For many years Conklin produced the Dungeness Crab Festival, held in October in Port Angeles. He’s no longer in charge, but you’ll still find him there overseeing three flat-top grills, cooking his restaurant’s iconic Dungeness Crab Cakes. Last year he went through 600 pounds of crab. At the Sequim Lavender Festival in July, Conklin shares his cooking skills 46

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Olympic Coast Cuisine: What is it? The Olympic Culinary Loop is a group of people who grow, harvest, catch and ultimately serve you the Peninsula’s bounty that we call Olympic Coast Cuisine. Experiencing all that’s local is an adventure, and for many a first-time experience. We invite you to share our food and our communities. The Peninsula is a mosaic of past and present: a rich Native American heritage, pioneer farm families and a new community of young farmers who want to put down roots, work the land and preserve it for the future—our children. Olympic Coast Cuisine reflects the diverse microclimates, coastal proximity and Native American heritage that characterize the Olympic Peninsula. The combination of sustainable locally-grown and foraged fruits, vegetables, herbs and berries, locally hunted game, bountiful local sea fare, and handcrafted local wines offers farm-to-table experiences that instill a unique sense of place. Prepared with reverence for the local history and culture, fresh Olympic Coast Cuisine is best enjoyed amid the beautiful scenery that surrounds the Olympic Peninsula loop.

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at one of the participating farms. As a board member of Friends of the Fields, he works to preserve and protect the farmland in Clallam County. The group has secured grants, that enabled some local farms that were in jeopardy to be put into conservation trusts. Conklin was also the founding director of the Olympic Peninsula Community Celebrations, a non-profit

organization that puts on local celebrations. “Neil is an outstanding and involved community member and very generous with his time and helping others,” says Ken Hays, who is the mayor of Sequim. “I look forward to our gettogethers because he’s tireless and has great ideas. He represents the best of what our part of the world has to offer.”

The Olympic Culinary Loop: Each of these locations has a unique offering. For more information go to www.olympicculinaryloop.com.

Olympic

CULINARY LOOP

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Brewing Up Business By Ben Keene

Victoria’s Craft Beer Scene Strolling around downtown Victoria, it might seem strange to imagine this place without the multitude of brewpubs and breweries that have woven themselves into the city’s colorful culinary fabric. Yet until about 25 years ago, thirsty travelers looking for anything beyond a cold bottle of the standard Canadian brews were likely to be disappointed. Times have changed though, and beer drinkers now reward local brewers who experiment with flavorful and creative approaches to brewing. Today, more than a dozen small breweries keep visitors and residents happy with a wide variety of craft ales and lagers. “There’s never been a better time for craft brewing,” says Paul Hoyne of Lighthouse Brewing Company. “Victoria is a Mecca for craft beer.” Chatty and good-natured, Hoyne speaks from experience, having worked as a brewer for well over two decades. “I moved to Victoria and absolutely loved the city,” he says. He also saw 48

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opportunity. Demand for craft beer in British Columbia (and indeed across Canada) was growing fast. So fast that small, independent suppliers had trouble keeping up. Here was an opportunity to offer something other than another pilsener or light lager. “No other brewery was doing any of those styles,” he explained, referring to the six signature brands and assorted seasonal beers that Lighthouse sells in kegs, cans, and bottles. “We first came out with Race Rocks Ale—a full flavored amber— and the market accepted it right away.” Of course there were already two pioneering brewpubs in town: Spinnakers, Canada’s oldest, and Swan’s

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Brewpub & Hotel, which began doing business in 1989. When Swan’s opened, their draft list concentrated on traditional UK-style beers, drinks that had character, but wouldn’t rock the boat. But when Andrew Tessier came on as head brewer in 2003, tradition gave way to innovation. A homebrewer since high school, Tessier lives to try new recipes and isn’t one to shy away from atypical ingredients. Pushing the envelope seems to pay off for craft brewers. Hoyne took home a silver medal at the 2011 Canadian Brewing Awards for his massive, 10% ABV (alcohol-by-volume) Navigator Dopplebock, while Tessier won gold


Stainless steel brewery kettle.

in 2010 for his silky Coconut Porter, a beer that channels the sunny South Pacific as much as it does the wetter Pacific Northwest. Hoyne doesn’t plan to stop pushing the limits, and Tessier isn’t one to rest on his laurels. Across the Inner Harbor at Spinnakers, Tommie Grant assumed the role of head brewer in 2010. As the tenth person to hold that position, Grant is building on 25 years of expertise. And in spite of only recently taking the helm at Spinnakers, he remembers beer from an early age. “I first got interested in the brewing process as a young lad in Prince Edward Island,” Grant recalls. “My step dad was an avid homebrewer and our house often smelled of hops and barley boiling away on the stove. I was fascinated by the DIY aspect of homebrewing and the fact that it gave people the ability to have something different than the watered down corporate offerings that were a beer drinker’s only other choice there at the time.” When it comes to the newest brewpubs in Victoria, The Moon Under Water stands out by concentrating on session beers—those lower alcohol

Swan’s Brewmaster Andrew Tessier inspecting the brew.

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varieties that are meant to be enjoyed with pub fare and good company over the course of an evening. “It’s about the flavor and the social environment,” explains brewmaster Don Bradley. “I love beer but I don’t really like getting pissed. I’m just an old stick in the mud.” So instead of heady barleywines and German bocks, he sticks to English bitters, harvest ales, and the occasional dry stout. Fortunately for Bradley, there’s room for specialization in Victoria. Even as strong beers and hoppier India Pale Ales continue to gain admirers, The Moon Under Water has cultivated a customer base that orders according to personal preference and not trends alone. “It’s great being in a town with a beer culture,” Bradley remarks. “The quality is really striking.” Not only have the craft beers improved since Spinnakers first opened its doors on Catherine Street, they’ve multiplied, and show no signs of slowing down. In fact, some brewers see Victoria’s thriving brewpub scene as a sign of things to come around the rest of the country. “I think we’re going to end up like Europe with hundreds and hundreds,” predicts Hoyne. “We’ve just broken the tip off the iceberg.”

NORTHWEST

Brewpubs • Swan’s Brewpub & Hotel, www.swanshotel.com • Spinnakers Brewpub and Guesthouses, www.spinnakers.com • Lighthouse Brewing Co. www.lighthousebrewing.com

• The Moon Under Water, www.moonunderwater.ca

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Healthy Travel Tips

Staying Active at Your Destination

By Allen Cox

Many of us find it a challenge to stick to an exercise regimen at home. But when we travel, it can be even tougher to add exercise to our daily routine. Staying active can be the first thing we sacrifice on the road. Add to that the rich and sometimes fatty restaurant meals, and we might be packing a few unwanted pounds home. Staying active at your destination doesn’t have to be an ordeal. Before you travel, assess the exercise potential at your destination. Try to visualize the surroundings. Will you be at a hotel with an exercise facility or a pool? Will you be near a park suitable for walking or running, or perhaps a mall with space to walk laps? Will there be easily accessible hiking trails, or kayaks or bicycles at your disposal? 52

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Once you assess your surroundings, decide on an activity (or a few) that you will do at least every other day at your destination. Match the activity with the available facilities and with your exercise preferences. This is no different than choosing an activity on your home turf, but you’ll be in new surroundings, so be creative in your planning. If you’re sightseeing, do as much of it as possible on foot. If your hotel has stairs, use them instead of the elevator. Does your destination have hills? Take advantage of them to burn some extra calories. Once you have planned your likely activities, pack accordingly. A few exercise outfits and a pair of sneakers won’t take a lot of space in your luggage. If your chosen activity involves

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outdoor recreation or water sports, such as kayaking, pack the right gear to stay dry. As important as making a plan and packing the right gear is your resolve to follow through. Make a promise to


yourself. Write your planned activities down on an activity list and pack it with your exercise gear. Include the necessary time in your itinerary for your chosen activity and stick to it. Whether business or holiday takes you on the road, it can be far too easy to convince yourself that you don’t have time in the day for exercise. If you find yourself negotiating your way out of your exercise routine at your destination, take a time out. Pull the planned activity list out of your luggage and read it. This is your reminder to yourself that you made a promise, so follow through. The last step is to suit up and do it.

Watch this column for more tips to make your travel experience on Kenmore Air as enjoyable as possible.

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Northwest Author Spotlight: By Allen Cox

In discussing the topic of food with Jennifer Hahn, one might assume she was dropped off in a forest as a child and left to fend for herself. The real story is hardly that cruel, but she did indeed learn to forage for wild, native foods at a young age. Hahn’s father was a man with an adventuresome, wanderlust spirit who liked to explore the country, kids in tow, in his VW van. Along the way, he’d forage for wild ingredients—everything from blueberries in Maine to razor clams in Washington—and he’d ask locals how to prepare them. These were Hahn’s first lessons that edible and even delicious foods are found in nature all around us. “You 54

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Jennifer Hahn

have to know where to look, what to eat, and most importantly what not to eat,” Hahn said. These lessons laid the foundation for her life’s pursuits. As a teenager in the north woods of Wisconsin, Hahn befriended an elderly neighbor woman who had been harvesting wild ingredients all her life. They went on foraging treks together, trips in which Hahn deepened her knowledge of wild edibles and medicinal plants, and eventually inherited her friend’s library of reference books on the subject. As a young woman, Hahn relocated to Washington and discovered a passion for sea kayaking—the hard way. She and a group of fellow kayakers and

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sailors embarked on a 30-day voyage from Bellingham up the Inside Passage and back. Their only foodstuffs were staples such as flour and oil. They harvested everything else in their diet from land and sea along the way. “From that trip, I knew I wanted to kayak Alaska’s inside passage solo,” Hahn said. “I was a very good forager by that time.” According to Hahn, it was on that solo voyage that she really began to get in synch with the natural foods and medicines of the Pacific coastal environment. “Nori (a seaweed variety) and sea urchins were my favorite foods,” she said. “They are very nutritious.” Admittedly, she lost some weight on


the expedition, but the experience prepared her to author the book, Spirited Waters: Soloing South Through the Inside Passage. “I was eating like the First Nations people had eaten. My senses became more heightened. My dreams even changed.” Hahn cautions people not to harvest wild foods without taking precautions for their own safety and for sustaining the wild environment. She suggests having a good reference book, and if possible an experienced mentor who can guide you through what’s edible and how to harvest sustainably. That’s why she co-authored Pacific Coast Foraging Guide, a handy field guide for harvesting wild ingredients, and her latest book, Pacific Feast: A Cook’s Guide to West Coast Foraging and Cuisine. Learn more about Jennifer Hahn at www.pacificfeast.com.

Pacific Feast: A Cook’s Guide to West Coast Foraging and Cuisine In Jennifer Hahn’s most recent book, Pacific Feast, she brings wild ingredients and her storehouse of knowledge about sustainable wild food harvesting into the everyday kitchen. In this entertaining and accessible volume, she makes foraging the stuff of weekend walks in the woods and shoreline explorations. Then she partners the harvested wild ingredients with more common foods from the fridge and pantry in a collection of gourmet recipes. Pacific Feast is a personal account of Hahn’s respect for the Pacific coastal environment, a practical foraging guidebook and a cookbook, all beautifully packaged and illustrated in one volume. According to Hahn, “Harvesting and eating wild food connects us back to something primordial.” But you won’t have to join a drum circle to glean some new West Coast culinary skills from Pacific Feast. Wild food foraging is fast becoming a mainstream gourmet pastime. You can order a copy of Pacific Feast at www.harborsmagazine.com/books

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Winter Flyaways MarQueen Hotel, Seattle, WA

As a visitor to Seattle, you can experience the Emerald City’s rich and colorful past in just about any direction you look in the city’s core. Historic buildings restored with meticulous attention to detail grace the cityscape alongside more modern structures. The MarQueen Hotel is one such building. Built in 1918, the MarQueen tells the story of a young city transitioning to a modern age. The building was originally the home of the Seattle Engineering School, an institution that rescued the livelihoods of blacksmiths (whose jobs were quickly vanishing) by retraining them to work at the Ford assembly plant on nearby Lake Union. In recent years, the building has un-

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By Allen Cox

dergone another transition to one of the city’s best boutique hotels. At the MarQueen, guests enjoy the convenience and space of studio rooms with kitchenettes, or larger one-bedroom suites with parlor and kitchen—all adorned with period furnishings and accents. In the spirit of blending new and old, the hotel staff offers conveniences you’d expect in times past, such as overnight shoe shine service, as well as services like free Wi-Fi to please the modern traveler. “The old-world character makes the hotel one of Seattle’s gems,” says Kristen Vander Linden, Assistant General Manager at the MarQueen. “We attract both leisure and business guests who like the hotel’s smaller scale, the won-

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derful amenities, and our location close to so many choices for entertainment and great food.” Regardless of whether your travel brings you to Seattle on-season or off, the MarQueen is a stone’s throw from some of the city’s most popular yearround attractions. “Guests love the location,” says Vander Linden. “It’s a very hip neighborhood with about 20 restaurants, night spots, and performance and sports venues within a two-block radius of the hotel.” The hotel sits in Seattle’s vibrant Lower Queen Anne neighborhood. It’s also near the South Lake Union district (home of the Kenmore Air terminal),


Nine passenger wheeled Caravan

Ten passenger turbo Otter seaplane

Seattle Center, Belltown, Downtown Seattle, Pike Place Market and the Waterfront—each a unique urban neighborhood worth exploring. The MarQueen also offers optional lodging packages that cater to many tastes, such as a half-day boutique winery excursion by one of the North-

west’s most celebrated luxury small tour operators, Evergreen Escapes, or theater packages for the dinner show at nearby Teatro Zinzanni. Many guests simply check in to experience an oasis of relaxation. Its spa and salon offer massage treatments, skincare and hair styling. Its

Beaconsfield Inn, Victoria, BC A peacock often represents beauty, dignity and rebirth in art. The decorative peacock that presides over the breakfast room of the Beaconsfield Inn in Victoria, BC symbolizes the rebirth of this architectural gem from a decayed mansion facing demolition into one of Victoria’s most beautiful inns. City leaders in the late 1960s and 1970s pushed to replace turn-of-thecentury houses near downtown. Preservationists fought, but lost almost every battle, and demolition of many old houses and mansions spread outward from the city’s core until the battle for Beaconsfield turned the tide. Today, the inn stands as a landmark to the perseverance of the heritage movement in Victoria. Beaconsfield provided the perfect ammunition that preservationists needed to become a major force in defining Victoria’s future as a leading travel and cultural destination. Architects testified that Beaconsfield “is valued as an outstanding example of an Edwardian

complimentary wine receptions let you unwind over tastings of select Northwest wine. And the old world gentility and excellent service from a hospitable staff send a welcome signal that you’re in good hands in this out-of-the-ordinary hotel. www.marqueen.com.

By Roger Ward

Tudor Revival mansion and is a highlyvalued work of Samuel Maclure at the peak of his creativity.” Maclure’s work defined the architectural style of Victoria for almost a century. Several painstaking renovations added to the comfort, luxury and romance for

guests, but never diminished the historical authenticity or the Edwardian ambiance. The inn features all the necessities for a modern traveler with contemporary bathrooms, many with jacuzzi tubs, luxurious bedding, flat screen televisions and Wi-Fi, but it is the dark, wood-

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paneled library with its large wood fire, sherry service and freshly baked goods that most defines this warm retreat into Edwardian opulence. Owners furnish the six suites and three guest rooms with high-quality period furniture to heighten the relaxed romance of the inn. A fifteen-minute walk or very short cab or pedicab ride from the Kenmore

Air terminal to the Beaconsfield takes you near the Royal BC Museum, up Humboldt Avenue and by stately St. Anne’s Academy, built in 1858. A horse-drawn carriage ride through nearby Beacon Hill Park alternatively provides the most romantic path to the inn. Guests can reserve one of several of

the inn’s special packages, such as the popular “Dining Extravaganza” that provides a voucher for a romantic dinner for two at one of five top restaurants in Victoria. One winning choice is Chef Anna Hunt’s exquisite, but approachable local and seasonal creations at Paprika Bistro in nearby Oak Bay. www.beaconsfieldinn.com.

Colette’s B & B, Olympic Peninsula, WA

By Sue Frause

Colette’s Bed & Breakfast, located 10 miles east of downtown Port Angeles, is a lovely, romantic getaway on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. Spread out over 10 acres, the five-room B&B perches on a high bank overlooking the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Unobstructed views of Mt. Baker, the San Juan Islands and Victoria, BC on Vancouver Island mark the horizons. Colette’s is the ideal location for exploring nearby Olympic National Park or touring the eight wineries that make up the Olympic Peninsula Wineries. There are also several 18-hole golf courses nearby—and the Sequim-Port Angeles area boasts 290 days of annual sunshine. For Twilight fans, the Olympic Peninsula is home to the popular series of the same name. Many local points of interest are featured in the novels and movies. Self-guided tour maps of Port Angeles, Forks and First Beach at La Push are available at the inn. The five suites at Colette’s (Spruce,

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“One of ten restaurants worth a plane ride” N Y Times

A Short Trip For An Extraordinary Experience The New York Times says the Willows Inn is worth a plane ride, but for those in the Seattle area we are only a short trip. Visit us and taste seasonal, local and sustainable dining, prepared by our chef Blaine Wetzel. You’ll understand what all the buzz is about. “I’ve seen the future on a little island in the Pacific Northwest.” – Joe Ray, Boston Globe

360-758-2620 | 888-294-2620 www.willows-inn.com Call for Reservations

Cedar, Iris, Lavender and Azalea) feature king beds and fireplaces, plus oversized, jetted tubs for two and plush robes. Other amenities include fine linens, comfy beds, TV/DVD/stereo and complimentary Wi-Fi. Cedars and other evergreens tower over lush gardens featuring stone patios and an outdoor fireplace on the main patio. The gardens have been artistically groomed and manicured for more than five decades, and flagstone pathways wend their way throughout the property. Benches and a courtyard pool invite the pause and reflection of a meditation garden. Breakfasts at Colette’s are bountiful events. Menu items range from Northwest Eggs Benedict (with smoked wild salmon) to a strata with pesto, prosciutto, mozzarella cheese and tomato. I enjoyed a Savory Breakfast Strudel

composed of phyllo stuffed with sausage, cheddar and peaches and topped off with scrambled eggs. Complimentary wine and hors d’oeuvres are offered in the Great Room prior to going out for dinner (Bella Italia and Michael’s Seafood & Steakhouse are two excellent choices). A forty-foot wall of windows brings the outdoors in, and it’s a great spot to cozy up with a book by the stone fireplace. If you left your book at home, there are plenty of good reads to borrow, along with a wide selection of movies and music. Throughout the day, complimentary soft drinks and other beverages are available, along with yummy homemade cookies and other treats. As the day winds down, the lights of Victoria glimmer across the strait as ships quietly pass by. www.colettes.com.

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Flying with Kenmore Air

Things you need to know... Baggage Allowances

At Kenmore Air we have big hearts but little airplanes! Our baggage limits and penalties for overweight bags are dictated solely by safety of flight concerns, which are more acute on our size aircraft than on the big jets. Seaplane passengers are permitted up to 24 pounds of baggage per person. All items are weighed and count toward the limit, including purses, laptops, backpacks, and so on. Additionally, no single baggage item can exceed 10 x 16 x 24 inches. On Kenmore Air Express wheeled-plane flights, passengers may check baggage totaling up to 50 pounds and may hand-carry one personal item (purse, backpack, etc.) of up to 20 pounds. The checked item may not exceed 62 linear inches, and the personal item may not exceed 36 linear inches. Overweight baggage will be carried on either service if capacity is available for $1 per pound, and oversized baggage will be accommodated, if possible, for a $10 per piece penalty. However, overweight/oversized baggage is always at risk of being bumped unless extra baggage space has been reserved and pre-paid in advance.

Sea-Tac Shuttles

Kenmore Air operates ground shuttles between SeattleTacoma International Airport and its three Seattlearea terminals. These shuttles are complimentary for connections to year-round routes and available at a nominal charge for connections to seasonal routes. Shuttles must be reserved in advance. When booking flights online, select “Seattle-Tacoma International” as your origin or destination, and our system will automatically book the correct combination of shuttle and flight for you. Shuttles pick up from Sea-Tac at Door 00 in the Scheduled Airporter waiting area at the far south end of Baggage Claim. Please be at Door 00 with your claimed baggage at least 10 minutes before the scheduled shuttle departure time. The shuttle driver will always make a departure announcement over the PA system, but passengers are ultimately responsible for getting on the shuttle by departure time. When connecting to another airline from Sea-Tac, be sure to schedule your Kenmore Air flight and shuttle to arrive at Sea-Tac with sufficient time (per your major airline’s recommendation) to check in, check baggage and clear security. A minimum of 90 minutes is generally recommended.

Customs & Immigration

Charter Service

Kenmore Air offers a lot of scheduled flights to a lot of places, but sometimes, you really need to travel on your schedule, not ours. Or perhaps you need to go somewhere we don’t fly everyday. That’s what charters are for. With our large and diverse fleet of seaplanes and wheeled-aircraft, we’re able to offer customized flying throughout the Pacific Northwest. For a quote, call 866.435.9524 and ask for a charter specialist or send an e-mail to charters@KenmoreAir.com.

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With a handful of extremely limited exceptions, everyone flying internationally — regardless of citizenship or age — is required to have a current, valid passport book. Passport cards, NEXUS cards and so-called “enhanced driver licenses” are not valid for travel aboard Kenmore Air. Travelers should also be aware that some criminal offenses that are misdemeanors in the United States are considered felonies in Canada and can result in denial of entry. Driving under the influence of alcohol is a common example. Every traveler is responsible for making sure that they meet the requirements of international travel. Kenmore Air will accept no liability for cost or inconvenience arising from denial of entry into either the United States or Canada.


Check-in Times

Kenmore Air passengers enjoy a generally more relaxed traveling experience than the typical airline affords. Nevertheless, we do require check-in for all domestic flights 30 minutes prior to scheduled departure. Due to certain requirements of U.S. Customs & Border Protection, check-in for international flights is required 45 minutes prior to departure. Flights close for boarding 15 minutes prior to scheduled departure, which means that seats for passengers who haven’t checked in at that time may be released to stand-by passengers. Also, the flight may depart anytime after closing, even if it’s prior to scheduled departure. We like arriving early! For flights departing from unstaffed locations, like seaplane docks in the San Juan Islands or British Columbia, passengers should be ready to go at least 15 minutes prior to scheduled departure time to accommodate unforeseeable variations in flight time.

Reservations & Customer Service Reservations can be made online 24 hours a day, seven days a week at KenmoreAir.com, or call us tollfree seven days a week from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Pacific Time at 866.435.9524. For customer-service inquiries of an urgent nature, call our reservations line at 866.435.9524. For less timesensitive concerns, kudos or complaints, please e-mail us at feedback@KenmoreAir.com.

Alaska Airlines Partnership

Since April 2010, Kenmore Air has been a proud partner in the award-winning Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan. Passengers who are participants in the Alaska plan earn 250 miles each way on qualifying Kenmore Air flights, and miles can also be redeemed for free flights on either airline. For details on the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan, visit AlaskaAir.com/MileagePlan. In addition to the Mileage Plan partnership, Kenmore Air and Alaska Airlines (as well as Alaska’s regional affiliate, Horizon Air) have an interline ticketing agreement. This means that you can purchase singleticket itineraries between Kenmore Air destinations and more than 90 Alaska Airlines and Horizon Air cities across North America, including Hawaii. Besides the simplicity and convenience of making a single phone call or online booking, such joint itineraries also offer much more coordinated and accommodating customer service in the event of weather delays, misrouted baggage or other issues.

Terminal Locations Seattle Boeing Field 7277 Perimeter Road Seattle, WA 98108 Seattle Lake Union 950 Westlake Avenue N. Seattle, WA 98109 Kenmore Lake Washington 6321 NE 175th Street Kenmore, WA 98028 Port Angeles/Fairchild Airport 1404 West Airport Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Local tel.: 360.452.6371

Friday Harbor Airport 800 Franklin Drive Friday Harbor, WA 98250 Local tel.: 360.378.1067 Eastsound/Orcas Island Airport 847 Schoen Lane Eastsound, WA 98245 Local tel.: 360.376.1407 Victoria Inner Harbour 1234 Wharf Street Victoria, BC V8W 3H9 Local tel.: 250.384.2411

Interline bookings can be made only through Alaska Airlines. If your travel plans include an Alaska Airlines or Horizon Air city, we strongly encourage you to book an interline ticket by visiting AlaskaAir.com or calling 800.ALASKAAIR.

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T

he most appealing destinations often aren’t just around the corner. That’s why we’ve built Ranger Tugs® in the Pacific Northwest since 1958.

Each Ranger Tug features standard bow and stern thrusters for effortless handling, coupled with fuel-efficient Yanmar® diesel power to bring even remote anchorages within easy reach. A comfortable ride, generous interior and standard equipment make the trip worthwhile. And, Ranger Tugs are designed for easy trailering, to extend your horizons even further. No wonder Ranger Tugs has emerged as a leading builder of family cruisers, and the favored choice of experienced owners across North America and worldwide.

R-27

For a Ranger Tugs® dealer near you call 253.839.5213 or visit www.RangerTugs.com


HARBORS Connecting People, Places, Adventure and Lifestyle.

HARBORS www.harborsmagazine.com Winter 2012

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The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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