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Connecting People, Places, Adventure and Lifestyle

HARBORS Future of Salmon

Ranger Tugs R-27 The Perfect Cruiser

Poulsbo Marina The Broughton Islands

Fall Coho USD $6.95 CAN $7.95

Juneau, AK


Navigator 42

Navigator 42

Performance & Size:

Capacities:

Length Overall: 42’ 2’ / Beam: 13’ 6’

Fuel/Fresh/Holding 450/135/45 gal.

Displacement (Full): 20,800 lbs.

Comfort: 2-3 Berths (Queen beds)

Cruising Speed: 30 knots

Separate Head and Shower

Economy at Cruise: 1.35mpg/22gph

Sleeping Capacity: 5-7

Propulsion: Volvo IPS 500/600

Fish Hold (approx): 9’x4’x3’, ~6,000 lbs.

Adventure. It can be defined in so many ways. Extreme fishing on the open ocean. A quiet anchorage in the middle of nowhere. Spontaneously taking your 16 year old daughter to the city - by boat, to enjoy fine dining and the ballet. Whatever your adventure, it matters. And at Lindell Yachts, we build the finest boats available for just that - your adventure.

www.lindellyachts.com


FLYING AT A HIGHER STANDARD

Alaska Seaplanes is the premier commuter airline of Southeast Alaska with scheduled, year-round passenger and cargo services. Operating from a hub in Juneau, Alaska Seaplanes serves the markets of Skagway, Haines, Gustavus, Hoonah, Kake, Sitka, Angoon, Tenakee Springs, Pelican, Elfin Cove and Excursion Inlet.

SCHEDULED & CHARTER FLIGHTS Schedule your flight anytime with 24/7 online booking!

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Many of our aircraft are IFR certified so that you can count on safe and reliable service to anywhere we fly, even with the challenges of Alaska weather.

COLD STORAGE

For your convenience, we have freezer/cooler baggage storage available in the Juneau Airport.

GREAT CONNECTIONS IN ALL DIRECTIONS. WHERE WILL YOU GO?

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Seattle, WA 425-736-4867 info@cacoastyachts.com

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HARBORS

MAGAZINE

View the most sought-after adventure destinations around the waters of the Pacific Northwest.

H ARBORS

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine | volume 8 • issue 5

CONTACT 3214 45th Ave SW Seattle, WA 98116 360.821.1047 info@harborsmagazine.com www.harborsmagazine.com PUBLISHER Katherine S. McKelvey BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT George V. Bivoino EDITORIAL Kat McKelvey George Bivoino Vince Hagel Russ Young Alanna Wight editor@harborsmagazine.com ART DIRECTOR Karen Johnson

Adventure & Lifestyle

ADVERTISING SALES Mark McLean, Senior Account Executive mark@harborsmagazine.com

CONTRIBUTORS Pat Awmack Natasha Dworkin Jean Groesbeck Deane Hislop Ron Parker Terry W. Sheely Tom Tripp Alanna Wight Russ Young PHOTO CREDITS Ranger Tugs, pgs. 14-21 Terry W. Sheely, pgs. 22-27 Deane Hislop, pgs. 28-33, 51, 53 Karen Johnson, pgs. 50, 52, 58 Long Live the Kings, pgs. 54-57 West Marine, pgs. 70-71 Kangaroo House, pgs. 74, 75 (middle left, bottom) Alan Tower, pg. 75 (top) Alanna Wight, pg. 75 (middle right) Domaine Madeleine, pgs. 76-77 Wedgewood Hotel, pgs. 78-79 HARBORS Magazine is a proud sponsor of: Pacific Salmon Foundation of Canada Long Live the Kings of Washington State Friday Harbor Film Festival The Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival HARBORS Magazine is a proud member of: British Columbia Floatplane Association Northwest Marine Trade Association Northwest Yacht Brokers Association Washington State Seaplane Pilots Association

Cultural & Culinary Experiences

PUBLISHED BY © 2017 by All Ports Media Group

Fishing Excursions

Resorts & Spas

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HARBORS Magazine is printed on recycled paper. All rights reserved. Partial or whole reproduction is prohibited. The publisher will not be held responsible for errors in advertising beyond the cost of the space of the ad. No changes may be made or cancellation accepted after the publication deadline date. Opinions expressed in signed articles are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of this magazine.

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HAR B O R S

Welcome to HARBORS The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

A Note from the Publisher

Harbor Lights Hello from HARBORS, What a great summer, sunshine almost every day in Seattle, and from what I have heard sunshine from Seattle to Homer, AK, until the smoke from the wildfires moved in. George and I had a very busy summer, getting our house ready to sell and move to Anacortes, WA. Anacortes is a great seaport town north of Whidbey Island’s Deception Pass and west of Burlington, WA on Fidalgo Island. It’s the gateway to the San Juan Islands. We picked Anacortes because we love boating and wanted to have quick access to the San Juans and the Gulf Islands, not to mention the desire to flee the city traffic. We don’t really know many people in Anacortes, except one of our writers, Deane Hislop, and his wife Arlene, and Pricilla and Clyde Carlson who own Hakai Lodge in BC. But in June, we attended the Northwest Marine Trade Association (NMTA) Annual BBQ in Anacortes and found another reason to move there. We drove up and met Deane and Arlene to go to the NMTA BBQ, which was scheduled to be on the docks of Cap Santé Marina. The weather was not cooperating, so it was moved to the end of Commercial Avenue at the Pier. The pier building is now an event complex and perfect for getting out of the wind. Due to the weather, the event was not as well attended as expected, but the people that braved the weather were some of the nicest people we had the pleasure to share a burger and a glass of wine. When we started telling people that we were planning on moving to Anacortes, we were greeted with an overwhelming welcome. Several people, including the port commissioner of Anacortes, John Pope, were eager to tell us how wonderful Anacortes is, and when we get up there to be sure to stop by and say hello. We thoroughly enjoyed the NMTA BBQ and chatting with Anacortes residents; some even followed up with emails after the event. (See the photo spread on page 62. The experience led us to believe that Anacortes must be the friendliest town in Washington state! Which is a nice feeling for us, having plans to move in late August 2017. Needless to say, we will be out exploring the islands this fall and hope to share with our readers the new destinations we discover. Enjoy the magazine, the journey and the destination…get out and BOAT! Cheers,

Katherine S. McKelvey Publisher

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Get on board with

HARBORS Calling all Captains, Pilots and Adventure Enthusiasts…. we appreciate your support and look forward to bringing you more and more exciting boating and seaplane destinations.

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2017 September/October

Features

14

Ranger Tugs R-27

22

September Coho

28

Dream to Reality

34

Travel Maps

42

Waterfront Living

48

Poulsbo Marina

54

Silver Threads

62

HARBORS Happenings

70

Gear Guide

74

Seaplane & Boating Destinations

The Perfect Cruiser

Juneau After the Crowds The Broughton Islands

Pacific Northwest Coastal Waterways Freedom-Size Your Lifestyle

photo by Ranger Tugs

A Ranger Tug anchored at Roofie Island in Desolation Sound, BC.

Little Norway of the Pacific Northwest Weaving a Prosperous Future for Salmon NMTA BBQ in Anacortes

How to Save Your Own LIfe Eastsound, WA • Port Angeles, WA • Vancouver, BC

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WOODENBOAT.ORG

photo by Irving Mortensen


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Ranger Tugs R-27 The Perfect Cruiser by Ron Parker

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T

he all-new R-27 from Ranger Tugs is a great family or couple’s cruiser that packs a lot of punch in a mid-size package. Her modern styling displays her tug heritage but also hints at the performance she is capable of with gasoline outboard power. That’s right—an outboard-powered tug. This might seem unusual at first, but there are many benefits to this setup. The weight-to-power ratio on modern outboards provides high performance and reliability is no longer an issue. The powerful Yamaha F300 is an electronically controlled outboard, which makes the R-27 fast with top speeds in excess of 35 mph, according to Yamaha’s initial testing. A fast, continuous cruise in the high 20’s helps widen the range of the boat, especially for weekending. One of the nice things about these new outboards is that even at speed, your fuel burn remains reasonable. In fact, preliminary testing

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by Yamaha showed modest consumption of around 2 mpg at fast cruising speeds, giving the R-27 a range of over 250 miles at around 30 mph. If you slow down to a traditional trawler speed of 9 mph, the range increases to more than 350 miles. Ranger Tugs also addresses the fact that many people just don’t have the time to cruise at a more leisurely pace. This boat is designed to get them to their cruising destination fast enough to enjoy their weekend or whatever cruising time they can spare. If R-27 owners want to cruise at a slower pace, they still can, but the boat really can get up and go. Not all of this great performance is due to the outboard. Ranger Tugs founder and design guru Dave Livingston meticulously redesigned this fast-tug hull form, and it really makes a difference. The ride is stable and dry, and the dynamic hull design incorporates reverse chines for stability and comfort at all speeds, and patented Laminar Flow Interrupters for 16

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VIP Charters to Canada’s West Coast Resorts Executive Class Comfort and Safety for Seven Pax www.vihexecujet.com

Pick Ups From: • Washington State Airports and Lakes • E.G. Boeing Field • Lake Union • Lake Washington

1-800-277-5421 smooth, positive cornering. Having a bow thruster as standard equipment, and opening side windows, makes this boat easy to drive. Ranger Tugs are known for spacious accommodations and innovative touches like seats that flip to face forward or aft, opening bulkhead windows and doors to allow access to the exterior and cockpit, flip-up bow seating, fold-down cockpit seating, stowaway tables, and more. The Ranger R-27 utilizes these great features to provide many different gathering and seating areas that you might expect to find only in a much larger vessel. Through creative design Ranger provides more useable space than other boats in this same class. The main salon also features a fully functional galley, including a two-burner stove, an oven, a microwave, a deep stainless sink, and a refrigerator/freezer. All of these features are standard, as is seating for five adults. When dockside or at anchor, you can face each other at the four-person The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

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high-low table, and when underway all five seats can face forward, giving everyone a great view. When collapsed, the table converts to a berth, and curtains provide privacy, but you don’t need to disrupt your salon for extra sleeping. The aft seat folds up, revealing a hidden cabin below the table. This area can be used for sleeping, storage or both, and children love the bunk. With a full beam master berth forward and its own in-suite head, there is ample room for a family to cruise in comfort, and for cruising couples there are tons of storage room as you can utilize the aft berth. The R-27 has a spacious cockpit set up for entertaining, fishing, and just being in the fresh air and sun near the water. There is a built-in electric grill that converts to a cooler depending on whether you are catching dinner or eating it. Outdoor waterproof speakers from the Fusion entertainment system can set any mood. There is also ample seating and a pop-up table for

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dining or maybe fold it all up, crank up the music and dance! One step out the locking cockpit door is an ample platform with a built-in stainless swim ladder for swimming, diving, waterskiing or just to dipping your feet on a hot day. Yes, you can water ski behind this tug and there is even a concealed ski tow that pops up behind the cockpit seat. The Ranger Tugs R-27 comes with a full complement of Garmin electronics including remotely controlled autopilot. There is excellent visibility at the helm with opening windows and hatches as well as skylights above, and easy access to controls for the thruster, wipers and more. An entertainment package includes a flip-out TV/DVD player for fun and relaxation. Trailerable, comfortable, and affordable, the Ranger Tugs R-27 is great for

weekend getaways and capable and dependable on longer cruises. The versatility of this design fits many different boaters’ needs and schedules. She has speed and agility for day cruises, but the range and accommodations to take a family or a couple far into Canada and even on to Alaska. Her speed also can help skirt bad weather when needed, which increases the safety of the cruise. To offer the best in value, performance, and fun, the R-27 is hand built in Washington State, as are all other Ranger Tugs. Ranger Tugs is the number one selling inboard boat in America between 24 and 40 feet, and they will continue to build and sell diesel powered boats as they have since they were established in 1958. The introduction of outboard-powered tugs like the R-27 brings increased versatility

to their line of boats and allows customers to have even more choices of where to cruise, how far to go and whether they have the time to get to distant destinations. Outboard power provides safe and swift cruising to help boaters do more with their boats.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Check out a Ranger Tugs R-27 or go online to www.rangertugs.com and start building the boat that is right for you.

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September Coho Juneau After the Crowds by Terry W. Sheely

T

wo hours north of Sea-Tac Airport the 737-400 banks over a lump of green mountains on the north end of Douglas Island, crosses Auke Bay, and lines up with the paved runway at Juneau International. The water runway, the

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adventure runway, is on the right where a dozen float planes rest on hollow pontoons. Helicopter pads are on the left. When I step off this plane I’ll be looking at a week of smoking hot silver-salmon fishing in saltwater and

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fresh, and a world changed from the one I left in Seattle; if not for the better, then certainly for the more adventurous, eventful, and colorful. The airliner glides in low over a harbor with a mix of docked vessels as eclectic as the town itself: commercial


fishing boats, work boats, tugs, barges, pleasure boats, sport-fishers, charters, whale-watchers, kayaks and oceangoing yachts with helipads, crews in dress whites with slight airs of an international arrogance. Downtown Juneau is ten miles south on a somewhat level wedge of land between saltwater and a wall of mountains so steep that in places the snow doesn’t stick and mountain goats feel safe. September coho, hook-nosed slabs, are nosing into the town’s wet backyard. As the big plane loafs toward the runway, my nose presses to the window, looking east where flakes of September sunlight transform the morning horizon into a shimmer of blue and white ice—an ice field 1,500 miles ginormous, 140 glaciers wide reaching all the way to British Columbia— an ice field so ancient that the mastodon bones in its crevasses are considered newcomers. Iconic Mendenhall Glacier, all 13 cracked and crevassed The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

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miles of it, rises dramatically above Mendenhall Lake where small icebergs float like squashed marshmallows, and black bears hunt streams for brilliantly red sockeye salmon. My next few days will be filled with float planes, waders, salmon, trout, halibut, and charter boats that prove that Juneau has arrived as a destination for quality Alaskan sport fishing. This year I’m especially looking forward to wading the quick water in Montana Creek, near Mendenhall Glacier, where, with my fly rod, I’ll be shredded by swarthy hooknose cohos that bang up this little river in September and October. Silvers begin showing in the Juneau area as early as late July, swell during August and hit September with the end of the runs and the biggest coho of the year—12- to 20-pounders. The saltwater silver areas are just a short run from 24

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Juneau, along Douglas and Shelter islands, Lynn Canal, Stephens Pass, and Saginaw and Favorite channels. The silver fishing in both saltwater and freshwater is solid in September, and at least one outfitter—Abe Tanha’s Hooked on Juneau—has made a career out of guiding anglers to saltwater hot spots in Juneau fishable from shore. “No one ever gets seasick on my trips,” he brags, and he knows how to fish the shoreline, especially for silvers. Several streams on the 41-mile road system fill with spawn-run silvers in September—big fish, small stream challenges for fly rods and spinning tackle. The staff at Alaska Fly Fishing Goods downtown can tip you off to hot local streams reachable by rental car or taxi. By far, my favorite way to tackle Juneau’s September silvers is to book

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a half-day excursion with a float-plane outfitter who provides all the tackle and gear needed, scouts out the hot streams, drops our small group and a gun-slinging, lunch-toting guide on a remote, secluded, rarely fished stream. It’s like you imagined Alaska. Mountains, glaciers, bear tracks in the sand, streams often black with the dark-green backs of aggressive salmon and action so hot that the neighbors won’t believe you. Brown bear, whale sightings, and the low-level flight from Juneau are spectacular bonuses. At least three flight-fishing outfitters service Juneau each with a personalized twist. I book with Bear Creek Outfitters, consummate flyfishers with an unbendable catch-andrelease policy. In July and August streams are filled mostly with pinks and chums but by


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September hold some of the hottest coho salmon I’ve ever tied into. These fish are mere yards from saltwater, bright as new chrome and mean-eyed aggressive. The guides are also instructors who will have beginners hooked up within minutes. When I climb into a deHavilland Beaver at Juneau International I’m never sure where we’ll set down; Admiralty or Chichagof islands or the Chilkat Peninsula. Wherever we splash down I know the salmon will be thick. Super silvers and succulent halibut aside, there is even more to appreciate in this town of characters. Like nights in the purple-greenchartreuse walls of the Silverbow Inn, above Alaska’s oldest continuously operating bakery where the old oak furniture reminds me of my grandmother’s Midwest farmhouse. Mornings with ribbons of mist, ravens, eagles and seals on the docks along Gastineau Channel, the infamous 26

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Red Dog Saloon where Wyatt Earp’s revolver hangs. Tram to the sky views atop Mount Roberts, food-binging with Midgi Moore’s tours of Juneau eateries for king crab, prawn fritters, smoked salmon, cod tacos and craft beer. There’s a rumor that dried walrus is served somewhere in town. By mid-September some Franklin Street trinket shops will have called it a season but there is still the Juneau Unusual—alley doors that mysteriously open into solid rock walls, stores that will tailor coats of thick wolf fur or wolverine-lined mukluks, accessorized with Alaska gold nuggets, mastodon ivory, and strips of black baleen for the mantle. Book a spot on a boat at Auke Bay, Aurora, Harris or Douglas harbors and when you return there’s a good chance it will be with a box of prime silver and halibut fillets, a camera filled with brown bears, breaching humpback whales or icebergs adrift in the fjord

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of Tracy Arm. A Juneau-Special silver salmon trip with Chris Conder on his Rum Runner’s charters stands out—double headers on wild, acrobatic saltwater silvers, pods of bubble-netting humpback whales erupting into the sky in a chaos of herring scales, panicking baitfish, geysers of whitewater and a circle of gaping black jaws. In the same afternoon, a pod of black and white Dall’s porpoise clowned in the bow push of Chris’ 31-foot sportfishing boat, and a carpet of chum and silver salmon past under the boat, fleeing from marauding seals and sea lions. Just another day in Juneau, Chris says. According to local whale watchers more than 600 humpbacks feed in the northern reaches of the Inside Passage, and it’s almost impossible to not see one on a Juneau saltwater outing. Vulnerable salmon bring black and brown bears to the beaches and there’s plenty of both in September.


For years serious fishermen used Juneau as a springboard to shuttle off to remote fishing lodges. That’s been changing. Traveling anglers have discovered that the House of Politics, Tourism and Good Beer is also a fishing destination with benefits. Benefits being non-stop airline connections to the Lower 48, good hotels to unpack the overnight bag, restaurants with menus that skittle from fish n’ chips to white linen, shopping, theater, hoot-andholler bars, art, museums, and more eco-adventure “look-and-aha” tours than I want to count. Juneau’s September super silvers are tracked to a monstrous fish hatchery that pulls ocean salmon along the downtown waterfront on Gastineau Channel. Macaulay Salmon Hatchery, within sight of the Alaska state capital building, can take credit for Juneau’s salmon boom, enhancing local waters with millions of salmon smolts. Tours of the hatchery are fascinating, and the

transparent tube of saltwater rockfish, salmon, cod and sharks is riveting. The town has one of the largest marina complexes in Southeast with a diversified fleet of fishing and sightseeing charter boats, float plane fly-outs to remote streams, kicker-boat rentals and beach fishing guides. Then come back to a hotel with good food, warm beds and urban benefits. That describes Juneau. By mid-September cruise-ship tourists are gone, replaced by streams and channels of silver salmon. The local saltwater halibut fishery will continue into the first winter storms of October. The Twisted Fish Company will continue to serve platters of surf-and-turf, the Mount Roberts Tram will soar, Mendenhall will calve. I’ll be standing in Montana Creek with a few hundred coho shooting upriver past my waders, hoping tomorrow’s trip on the Rum Runner will produce a box of winter silvers and halibut fillets.

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Dream to Reality The Broughton Islands A Photo Essay by Deane Hislop

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T

he first time I saw the Broughton Archipelago area, also known as the “Broughtons,” was in 1978 from the seat of a deHavilland Beaver, on the way to Rivers Inlet. From the air the area resembles a complex jigsaw puzzle with areas between the pieces being navigable water. I daydreamed of cruising this wilderness area aboard my own boat someday. Fast forwarding some thirty years later the dream came true when my wife, Arlene, and I made our first trip to these enchanting islands aboard our boat Easy Goin’. We spent ten weeks exploring much of this intriguing

puzzle of islands, lying at the far east end of Queen Charlotte Strait in British Columbia. For us, half the adventure of cruising to the Broughtons is the challenges of getting there. The keys for a safe and enjoyable cruise are selecting proper weather windows for crossing major bodies of water such as Strait of Juan de Fuca, Strait of Georgia and Johnstone Strait, and timing slack water at the reversing saltwater rapids. The area offers visitors unimaginable natural beauty, an abundance of wildlife, rich in aboriginal culture, and fishing and logging history. There

are anchorages that can accommodate many boats to very private one-boat anchorages that you have all to yourself, with a handful of quaint and friendly rustic marinas operated by colorful and interesting owners. If that’s not enough, we also enjoy being self-reliant, meeting people, and foraging and preparing our next meal onboard. Since that first visit we have returned many times and are continually questioned by fellow boaters, “Why the Broughtons?” We return because … well, photos do a better job describing this piece of Pacific Northwest boating paradise than words.

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Dream to Reality

unimaginable natural beauty

anchorages for many boats or just one 30

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The Broughton Islands

friendly rustic marinas

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Dream to Reality an abundance of wildlife

aboriginal culture, and fishing and logging history 32

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The Broughton Islands IF YOU GO Be sure you have the following charts and websites handy: Canada Border Service Agency: • www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/menu-eng. html Canadian Hydrographic Charts: • 3515, 3546, 3547 Fisheries and Oceans Canada: • Fisheries: www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/ fm-gp/rec/index-eng.htm • Marine Conditions: www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/otw-am/ conditions/index-eng.htm

foraging and preparing meals onboard

SUGGESTED READING If you are interested in finding out more information about the Broughtons, check out these books: • “The Curve of Time” by M. Wylie Blanchet • “Following the Curve of Time” by M. Wylie Blanchet • “Totem Poles and Tea” by Hughina Harold • “Heart of the Rainforest” by Billy Proctor & Alexandra Morton • “Full Moon Flood Tide” by Billy Proctor & Yvonne Maximchuk • “Becoming Wild” by Nikki Van Schyndel MUSEUMS & CULTURAL CENTERS Discover a little culture while you’re cruising: • Billy Proctor’s Museum at Echo Bay • Telegraph Cove’s Whale Interpretive Centre: www.killerwhalecentre.org • The U’mista Cultural Center: www.umista.ca • Port McNeil Heritage Museum 250-956-9898 • The Sointula Museum: www.sointulamuseum.ca

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IDENTIFICATION OF COMMON GROUNDFISH SPECIES (of Washington, Oregon and Northern California)

Anglers are responsible for knowing current fishing regulations, which can change frequently. Check the state website for up-to-date information.

Yelloweye Rockfish

Canary Rockfish (Slightly indented tail)

Adult

(Smooth jawline)

Juvenile

Bright yellow eye and raspy ridges above eye. Fins usually have black edges. Juveniles have 1 or 2 white stripes along side of body.

Tiger Rockfish

Dark Version

Variants

(Smooth jawline)

Variants

(Gray lateral line)

(Anal fin slanted)

Typically three stripes across side of head and gill plate. Body orange mottled with gray.

Vermilion Rockfish

Pink Version

Strong ridges between eyes. 5 or 6 vertical bars on body.

Lower jawline rough to touch. Body reddish and mottled with gray. Anal fin rounded.

Black Rockfish

Deacon Rockfish

Large mouth. Body mottled with gray. White belly. Black spots on the dorsal membrane.

Small mouth with extendedlower lip. Vague stripes across forehead. Blue-tipped pelvic fins. Many small speckles covering sides of body.

Bocaccio Rockfish

Blue Rockfish

Large mouth extending upwards. Slightly concave between mouth and dorsal fin. Body orange, olive or brown.

Small mouth. Vague stripes across forehead. Bluetipped pelvic fins. Large angular blotches on sides of body. Photos courtesy Vicky Okimura; WDFW

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REV. 2016


Quillback Rockfish

Copper Rockfish

(Deep indentations in dorsal fin)

Variants

Variants

Light colored band along the last 2/3 of lateral line.

Freckles on head and/or throat. Yellowish saddle markings do not extend to tail.

Yellowtail Rockfish

China Rockfish

Fins yellowish, large mouth. May have pale patches or spots on back. May be confused with Olive Rockfish.

Widow Rockfish

Broad yellow stripe starting on dorsal fin, along lateral line. Yellowish white freckles.

Brown Rockfish

Dark brown patch or spot on gill cover. Underside of throat and lower jaw pinkish. Fins may be pinkish.

Small mouth, anal fin slanted posteriorly.

Kelp Greenling

Cabezon

Lingcod

Flap of skin above eye and on snout. Huge mouth, small teeth. Body marbled. Smooth skin.

Large mouth and large teeth. Deep notch in long dorsal fin. Elongated body. Smooth skin.

Male Female Small mouth, small teeth. Blue spots may be faint except when breeding, when they become almost neon. Reddish spots on female. Smooth skin.

wdfw.wa.gov

dfw.state.or.us

wildlife.ca.gov Photos courtesy Vicky Okimura; WDFW

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

psmfc.org REV. 2016

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Skagway to Ketchikan

Alaska

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Cape Flattery

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Bamfield

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Lopez Airport

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| HARBORS S hi uns

INS NTA Arm

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Haro Strait

Nanaimo to Olympia

Puget Sound


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OLYMPIA

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Waterfront Living in the Pacific Northwest by Jean Groesbeck

Freedom-Size Your Lifestyle I see it every day, especially among baby boomers; people crave a simpler life. As baby boomers enter retirement, they have disposable income and time, two things they have not experienced simultaneously before. They want to travel, spend time on hobbies, visit their grandkids and work on their bucket list. The things they spent the first 2/3 of their life working hard to obtain now encumber them, the biggest culprit being the large home and all the furniture, art and stuff. If you are one of these baby boomers looking to freedom-size but 42

| HARBORS

you don’t know where to begin, here are a few tips to enter the new phase of your life. The first step is to stop buying stuff! No more “As seen on TV” purchases. Stop stocking up at Costco, and if you buy one sweater, you need to get rid of two. Eat out of the pantry so you don’t need to move the nine cans of tuna, and if you were carried away during the last sale of pasta, remember food banks will always take dry goods. You must also recognize the possessions that are strangling you. Is it the house? The large yard? The horses? The

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snowmobiles that you haven’t used in four years? Start unloading the possessions you don’t use. In some cases, these might be items in your home that you no longer even notice. Maybe it is the huge china cabinet—you need it to store all your china, you say? When is the last time you used the china? And there is more. Rummage through your home room by room and list what you really need, not what you want. If you own more than you need, think about when you are on your boat, at your cabin, or in your RV; few things are really


necessary. You really need very little to get by, and remember how nice it is not to clean all those things! Part of enjoying those places is your vacation in a simpler lifestyle. After you determine what you really need (two sets of sheets per bed, not four!), decide whether to sell or donate what you don’t need. EBay, consignment shops, craigslist, galleries, auctioneers—there is no shortage of methods to sell your pre-owned items. Eliminating family heirlooms or other sentimental attachments can be more difficult, as younger family members tend to want what’s trending in their generation and not what your generation values. Don’t feel guilty about tossing these items. They are just things. You won’t have room in your new house to move all the history with you, so keep a photograph of your heirloom furniture and take the actual piece to an antique dealer. When it comes time to part with the large family home, there are often pangs of remorse. You are not just leaving a building, but your neighbors, neighborhood stores, and memories as well. I have seen homeowners remove and replace pieces of drywall with the markings of their children’s heights. They’ll need a place for that. Boomers are looking for good quality smaller, low-maintenance homes, which allow them the freedom to

travel, visit grandkids and spend more time on their boat or in that RV. Without children at home, the space of their current home doesn’t fit the lifestyle of retirees. Sometimes there is prestige and enjoyment associated with owning a larger home. But as you enter the last third of your life, you may realize that time is more precious than any material item. Let go of your possessions and your emotions. When you finally decide to downsize, it is best to also downsize furniture. Rooms in your new house can be multiple use flex space. There are great furniture components designed for efficiency that take up little space

and can convert your sewing room to a guest room in less than a minute. You might buy a treadmill desk and combine your workout room with an office. Of course, you may not be able to part with things right away, and if that is the case consider renting a storage facility, but make yourself examine the storage unit after a year and dispose of the things that have lost their value. Don’t just let your things sit there and pay storage year after year. So, what do you earn when you ‘freedom size’? A smaller home, lower taxes, less maintenance, and a location of your choice—maybe on the water, or with better weather or closer to the grandkids. Select a good quality house, with low maintenance costs, which will allow you to age in place. That means a very different floor plan, not just a miniature version of what you have now. Perhaps the baby boomer generation should be renamed the “Responsible Generation.” We took care of our kids, our parents, and have always strived to be environmentally and socially responsible. Now, we need to be told, “It is OKAY to enjoy life”! What do you do with your freedom when you have downsized? Live an active lifestyle and visit all the wonderful places featured in HARBORS Magazine of course!

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

HARBORS |

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10

REASONS TO DOWNSIZE

We glorify Spring Cleaning season for a reason; getting rid of old goods is a great way to feel refreshed and invite more freedom into your life. If that’s not convincing enough, there are at least 10 reasons why downsizing is an important step to take for yourself and for others, too!

5. You will have more space for company. Gatherings with family and friends don’t have to be kept outside. Invite your guests indoors with a better home rearrangement that focuses on minimalism and open spaces. 6. Letting go of things will feel better. It can be difficult to detach yourself from things you’ve owned for many years. But you may feel better knowing that an unused item is living out its intended purpose in the hands of someone in need.

1. It makes housecleaning a breeze. Fewer household items means less hassle with cleanup, as sofas, carpeting, home décor and other extra furnishings require extra care to keep them looking their best. 2. You can earn extra money. For those seeking supplemental income, a large downsizing sale full of home furnishings will attract a lot of visitors with cash in hand. With the help of a few extra hands, your front lawn can be a weekend marketplace. 7. It can help you prepare for a future move. If you’re considering moving into an assisted living or independent living facility, downsizing your existing home can help make that transition much smoother. 8. It can help you make room for assistive devices and other home modifications. If your home will need a bath installation, guardrails and other adjustments for better mobility, removing extra furniture, foliage and unused merchandise can help make these home modifications a breeze. 9. Downsizing can help make room for a live-in family member or caregiver. If you expect that you will need a full-time caregiver, removing unwanted goods can help make room for that individual should they need to provide you with 24hour care. 3. It can help keep your home safe. Especially for those with mobility issues, extra furniture can make home navigation difficult. Moving out home furnishings can help open up tight hallways and living spaces. 4. Your home will look better (and bigger). Leaving only essential home décor, a home with less furniture looks more modern, and seeing the actual size of your home may surprise you. If you feel like you have too much space, look for space-saving solutions for home décor, such as wall hangings, dramatic drapes, a new paint color or improved lighting, instead of bulky planters, statues and other large freestanding furnishings.

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10. It can benefit those in need in your community. Unused goods, especially unwanted appliances, old furniture and other household items, are always welcome at local shelters, furniture banks, group homes, churches and crisis centers. You may even have a friend or family member who could use a hand-me-down that’s collecting dust in your attic.

Jean Groesbeck is a licensed real estate broker with Coldwell Banker Bain and was raised in the Northwest. She and her husband Paul live in Anacortes with their two dogs, Jingles and Belle.


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A rare opportunity to own a truly unique property on Brown Island. Located on .48 acres, there’s 215 ft of waterfront with a 40 foot year round dock that leads directly to the front door. The 2 story, 3 bed/3 bath south facing, sunny home has separate living quarters downstairs. Plenty of space for entertaining family & friends. A mere boat ride away from the town of Friday Harbor. MLS#1110532, $1,695,000.

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A rare opportunity to affordably purchase 76 acres of land on SJI. 2 TAX PARCELS w/multiple valley views, serene & private, wooded areas, abundant pasture, seasonal stream & all day sun w/spectacular sunsets. Fenced areas w/4 loafing sheds; 2 w/dry lot paddocks & 2 in pasture. Pastures can be used for haying &/or grazing.Water piped to pastures. Excellent 4,000 sq ft shop is multi-functional w/loading door, ridge skylight for natural light. Lg Greenhouse for year round gardening. Don't miss out! MLS#808931, $695,000.

Situated on 247 feet of premier westside waterfront, this meticulously maintained custom home offers an open floor plan from which to watch the whales frolic, stunning sunsets, and the magnificent views across the Salish Sea to the Olympic Mountains, Vancouver Island, and the Gulf Islands. Among the many custom features are hardwood floors, vaulted ceiling, spacious deck, radiant floor heat, abundant storage. This 3 bedroom, 3.5 bathroom wonderful home must be shown by appointment. MLS#890357, $1,595,000.

Designed by award winning architect, Michaela Mahady, Foxtail Barn was created with the picturesque barns of New England in mind. Nestled in a madrona tree grove, this unique 4800+ sq ft home offers intimate rooms crafted in the Shaker sensibility. The silo contains a flowing wood spiral staircase connecting all levels of the home ending with an eagle's perch reading room. The 210 ft medium bank waterfront is a popular Orca feeding area and provides sunny seating to enjoy the Salish Sea views. MLS#918330, $2,495,000.

Beautiful madrone grove entrance to newly remodeled waterfront home on Fish Creek at sunny Cape San Juan. Enjoy wildlife year round: deer, fox, heron, nesting geese and so much more. Walk out your front lawn to superb paddle boarding, kayaking, or other water sport. Miles of park trails to explore. Home has delightfully private feel in a lovely quiet neighborhood. Cape SJ amenities include community beach, pool, and marina. MLS#1098015, $649,000.

Perfectly-placed waterfront home. Meticulously kept and tastefully updated to preserve its timeless appeal, the main house features an open design, with floor-to-ceiling windows framing w/f views from the gourmet kitchen, master suite (w/fp) and library. The detached 3-car garage has full guest accommodations. The natural landscape is easy to maintain. Septic and well on 2nd lot. Lots total 2.28 acres and 448'w/f. MLS#930097, $1,900,000.

Wonderful home, guest home & big garage. 160 ft of waterfront & ownership of tidelands. Plant your own clams and oysters! Priced below market value. MLS#1116660. $795,000.

300+ feet of protected west facing waterfront with quality home. Quality finishes throughout, 2 master bedrooms, hot water radiant heat, great kitchen. Low maintenance property with beach, mossy rocks, salal, and trees. Beautiful view of protected bay. Tidelands included. 2 3/4 baths up and 1/2 bath on lower level. Dock in front of property owned by others. MLS#881570, $895,000.

French courtyard charm with fruit trees. High-beamed living room with wood-burning fireplace, adjacent dining room with high tech kitchen. Master suite with fireplace serves bedroom and bathroom includes heated towel rack and bidet, heated tile floor and a water feature. Separate studio/study. Incredible views! 1100 sq ft of Ironwood decking with hot tub. Stairs to a private cove adds to your enjoyment of this beautiful waterfront home. MLS#1019538, $975,000.

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Open Letter To Anyone Who Cares About Wild Sustainable Salmon “There used to be millions of wild salmon in the waters of the Pacific Northwest. Now, there’s only a fraction of that. Where have all the salmon gone? That’s the question I, Duke Moscrip, owner of Duke’s Chowder House have been asking lately, and we want to know the answer. That’s why we at Duke’s support the non-profit organization, Long Live the Kings, who are committed to answering that question. Their mission is to restore wild salmon and steelhead. Think about this: one of our most important food sources is endangered and is threatened with extinction. And, without salmon, there will be no Orca Whales. Now is the time to support the efforts of Long Live the Kings. I urge you to give now to support the restoration and preservation of our wild salmon. If we don’t do it, who will? Let’s not take the risk that our salmon disappear forever. Help me by helping Long Live the Kings. Together we can move mountains and restore our wild salmon back to our waters.” Visit http://lltk.org/support-us to donate today and support our salmon!”

Searching For The World’s Finest Seafood Is Duke’s Passion. “Sustainability is personal to me. I will do everything I can to make sure that we have Wild Seafood for our grandchildren and our grandchildren’s grandchildren forevermore. I know you are hungry for better seafood. That’s why I go to Alaska and fish with the fishermen and women in order to bring you the best seafood on the planet. I want you to personally experience the taste of the best and invite you to visit any of our six locations where I guarantee sustainable seafood with exceptional flavor.”

FIX BORDER ALKI 206-937-6100 LAKE UNION 206-382-9963

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KENT STATION 253-850-6333

P.S. Receive two free dinners at Duke’s by joining our VIP Club. Join for free on our website below.

TACOMA The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine HARBORS www. DukesChowderHouse .com | 253-752-5444

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Poulsbo Marina “Little Norway of the Pacific Northwest” makes a wonderful year-round getaway. by Deane Hislop

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T

he sign at the head of the dock reads, “Velkommen Til Poulsbo.” Scandinavian charm and hospitality in an old-country setting await visiting boaters throughout the year. However, you don’t have to fly thousands of miles to find the dock, the sign, or the setting. Poulsbo is located in Liberty Bay on the eastern shore of Puget Sound. Poulsbo makes an easy and engaging year-round getaway for Puget Sound boaters. The colorful town, the friendly people, the well-organized and operated marina, and a long list of community events throughout the year are all part of the “Velkommen Til Poulsbo” that will have you coming back year after year. By boat, you can approach Liberty Bay from the north end of Bainbridge The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

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Island via Agate Pass, 12 miles from Seattle’s Shilshole Marina. The bay may also be reached from the south end of Bainbridge Island by way of Rich Passage and Port Orchard Channel. In either case, currents in these narrow channels may be as strong as six knots during extreme tides. Poulsbo Marina is located in the northeast corner of the four-mile long bay. The town rises above it and the eloquent spire of the First Lutheran Church on the hill makes an ideal approach landmark. On Sunday mornings, its bells ring out across the bay. The marina’s 130 guest slips are located on E and F docks, and a seaplane float is north of F dock. During the winter months pull into any open slip and check in with the harbormaster located on the floating barge at the head of the dock. Reservations are recommended for the balance of the year. The marina is open seven days a week (except Christmas and New Year’s) and offers wide concrete floats, gas, diesel, pump-out, portapotty dump, water, 30-amp power, restrooms and showers, laundry and Wi-Fi. An activity float and meeting room are also 52

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available. If you prefer to anchor out in the bay, there is a dinghy area on the shore side of the dock closest to the shore. Known as “Little Norway,” Poulsbo was settled in the 1880s by Norwegian loggers, farmers and fisherman who likened the fjord-like landscape to their homeland. At that time, Liberty Bay was called Dogfish Bay, named after the fish harvested there. Dogfish oil was used to grease skids for moving logs, important for the booming logging industry. The town’s name comes from a misspelling of Norwegian for “Paul’s Place.” Today, Poulsbo celebrates its cultural and natural heritage, as well as its growing diversity, in many ways. Downtown has a Norwegian theme. Norwegian was the first language in many households during the early 1900s, but a closer look reveals an English-style pub, Mexican and Italian restaurants, cafes featuring South American coffees, and art galleries featuring indigenous and other local artists. Getting to town couldn’t be easier. The marina is less than a block from Front Street, Poulsbo’s shopping

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district. During the summer, Front Street is lined with enormous hanging flower baskets and brightly colored banners. It is home to Scandinavianstyle gift shops, boutiques, art galleries, and antique shops decorated with flowers and folk art. Two of our favorite shops to visit are Sluys Poulsbo Bakery where we pick up loafs of Poulsbo Bread and delectable bakery treats, as well as Boehm’s Chocolates, a chocoholic’s dream, with a large selection of gourmet treats. If shopping makes you hungry, an impressive variety of restaurants and cafes offer more culinary delights than you’d expect from a small shoreline community. For a cozy Italian lunch or dinner, good eats can be enjoyed at Sogno Di Vino. For German fare in a chalet-like setting you can eat at Tizley’s Euro Pub. If your tastes are for fish n’ chips, then it’s JJ’s Fish House. Looking for Mediterranean? Burrata Bistro is your spot. The Green Light Diner is the place for a good oldfashioned American breakfast. Liberty Bay Park is the waterfront centerpiece of Poulsbo and is guarded by a large Viking, or at least a bronze


statue of one, complete with menacing sword. The Viking is kind enough, however, to allow visitors to use the park’s picnic tables, large fire pit, restrooms, and the Rangvald Pavilion. Poulsbo is a great walking town with numerous parks, trails and neighborhoods you can tour through to see the heritage homes dating back to the 1890s and early 1900s. A guide is available at City Hall. You can also walk along the 800-foot raised shoreline boardwalk and enjoy the wildlife or watch the sunset over the hills and the Olympic Mountains across the bay. The path eventually leads to the small American Legion Park. Many boaters time their visit to Poulsbo with one of its many festivals and events: Saturday Farmers Market (April – October), Viking Fest (May), St. Hans Mid-Summer Fest (June), Third of July Fireworks, Summer Nights at the Bay concerts (July – August), North Kitsap Arts Festival

(August), Lutefisk and Lefse Dinner (October) Downtown Halloween (October 31) and Yule Fest, Christmas Bazaar and Boat Parade (December). Golf is another year-round option when visiting this seaside community. Three of Washington state’s toprated golf courses—Trophy Lakes and Casting Club, McCormick Woods and Gold Mountain Golf Complex — are all accessible from Poulsbo via taxi. Even during the winter there are plenty of activities to keep the crew busy. History buffs can visit the Poulsbo Historical Museum or the historic Martinson Cabin at the corner of Lindvig Way and Viking Way, which displays artifacts from the area’s pioneers. If you’re interested in learning more about marine life, a visit to the Marine Science Center is a must. With its aquarium, touch tank, activities and displays it’s a great spot to learn about local marine environment and the sea life it supports. To learn more

about Poulsbo’s earliest maritime days to the present, visit Poulsbo Maritime Museum. For an escape from the big city and a taste of Scandinavian hospitality, add Poulsbo to your cruising itinerary this winter ... or anytime of the year.

PLANNING TO VISIT: Poulsbo Marina: www.portofpoulsbo.com Poulsbo Chamber of Commerce: www.poulsbochamber.com Poulsbo Historical Museum: www.poulsbohistory.com Marine Science Center: www.poulsbomsc.org

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Silver Threads Weaving a Prosperous Future for People and Salmon by Natasha Dworkin

PHOTO: JNB Photography

~~~ “Salmon are among the oldest natives of the Pacific Northwest, and over millions of years they learned to inhabit and use nearly all the region’s freshwater, estuarine and marine habitats …. From a mountaintop where an eagle carries a salmon carcass to feed its young, out to the distant oceanic waters of the California Current and the Alaska Gyre, the salmon have penetrated the Northwest to an extent unmatched by any other animal. They are like silver threads woven deep into the fabric of the Northwest ecosystem. The decline of salmon to the brink of extinction is a clear sign of serious problems. The beautiful tapestry that the Northwesterners call home is unraveling; its silver threads are frayed and broken.” —Jim Lichatowich, Salmon without Rivers: a History of the Pacific Salmon Crisis

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Photo: Paul Joseph Brown/Ecosystemphoto.com

F

ollowing the Boeing Company’s economic bust in 1971 realtors Jim Youngren and Bob MacDonald commissioned a billboard near Sea-Tac Airport suggesting that “... the last person leaving Seattle turn out the lights.” This national nosedive in the aerospace industry had shrunk Boeing, the region’s largest employer, from 100,000 employees in 1967 to just 39,000 by 1971. Residents across the Pacific Northwest—in all sectors—saw a proportionate loss of business, jobs, and property values as our region endured the worst post-Great Depression unemployment for any major city ever— nearly 12%. McDonald said their out-of-town clients “were amazed that Seattle wasn’t a ghost town with weeds growing in the streets,” and that he and Youngren sought to counterbalance

that perception with a bit of humor. Today, it’s hard to imagine our region being summarily abandoned by disheartened workers, looking for a livelihood elsewhere. Boeing recovered from that bust, and several booms ultimately surfaced in its wake. In 1985 Microsoft put down roots in Bellevue and ten years later was the world’s most profitable corporation, spawning countless other software companies, establishing the west side of the Cascades as a hub of technological innovation, and catalyzing an explosion in diverse industry, including coffee, biotech, and internet retail. Signs of the resultant human population boom—along with the infrastructure and development that growth demands—can be seen all around us. Cranes pepper the Seattle skyline as construction soars, tens of thousands of new jobs have been added in downtown Seattle since 2010, and

retail spending and housing values are higher than ever. In 2017, Seattle couldn’t seem farther from the place Youngren and MacDonald chided in 1971, but despite being in the middle of a boom, the Northwest is still home to populations in peril. Hidden in the waters of the Salish Sea and high up in our watersheds, away from the lights and the culture and trappings of economic prosperity, Pacific Salmon, impacted by the ebbs and flows of industry, politics, fishing, and development, are experiencing one of the biggest busts of their millennia-spanning history. According to the National Marine Fisheries Service, 31 of the 52 salmon and steelhead populations in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and California are now listed as threatened or endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). In British Columbia, all

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five salmon species have been reduced to between 13 percent and 50 percent of their previously historic abundance. Even some hatchery populations are beginning to falter. With salmon’s numbers dwindling in many places to less than one tenth of what they were just 30 years ago, that iconic Sea-Tac billboard could now be placed on the shores of Puget Sound, with one foreboding edit: “Will the last salmon leaving Seattle turn out the lights.” We have seen busts in our region before, and we have seen remarkable 56

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resilience. Together we have weathered economic storms and rebounded in spades. In fewer than 50 years, we have gone from having the highest unemployment rate on record to being one of the world’s most prosperous regions, but will we be able turn the tide for salmon in the same way? What do we—individually and collectively— stand to gain by working harder, investing more, and committing ourselves anew to salmon’s recovery? The answers to these questions lie in understanding what is at stake if we do not.

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~~~ “The Pacific Northwest is simply this: wherever the salmon can get to.” —Timothy Eagan, The Good Rain

~~~ With lifecycles that take them from remote wilderness streams, through densely populated urban waterways, and to the Pacific Ocean and back again, salmon connect our watersheds and our communities.


They carry the mountains to the sea and play an important role in maintaining the very structure of our ecosystems. When they spawn, their decomposing bodies provide essential nutrients for bears, birds, and even salmonberries. They are the heart of our region’s culture, history, and economy, and a bellwether of our health; they’re the linchpin of a billion-dollar annual recreational fishing industry, and the lifeblood of Native American cultures that stretch from California to Alaska. Along with our towering evergreens, snow-capped peaks, and vast expanses of open water, salmon define our region as uniquely The Northwest. It’s not just where we live, it’s who we are.

~~~ “Only a few wild animals symbolize the heart and soul of a region: tigers in India, lions and elephants in Africa, kangaroos in Australia. In North America, the buffalo of the Great Plains and the salmon of the Pacific Northwest supported economies, cultures and human selfidentities ….” —Carl Safina, The Soul Who Swims

~~~

If we lose salmon, we begin to unravel the very qualities that define us as Northwesterners: innovation and resilience, reverence for our environment, passion for our natural resources, commitment to working together across philosophic and geographic divides. Having these fish among us, as our region grows and changes, is a critical element of retaining our identity as a place and as a people. Together we recovered from the Boeing Bust, we weathered the recession of 2008, and we are now witnessing unprecedented growth. In this time of economic prosperity, we must not forget the other assets that drew many of us to this mossy corner of the world in the first place, and as

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in other historic downturns, it is now time for all of us to come together and do our part to ensure the future of this place we call home. We must work to protect our marine and freshwaters, restore habitat, and fish responsibly, so we will have salmon in our lives for the long run. As you read this, fall salmon stocks are making their returns to the rivers and streams of their birth. Their numbers have diminished and still they persist. But they can’t survive without us. Just as they are woven into our lives, we too are woven into theirs. They are the fragile silver thread that delicately weaves the tapestry that is the Pacific Northwest.

~~~ “Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.” —Chief Seattle

~~~

Post script: Jim Youngren, one of the realtors who leased that clever billboard in 1971, would go on to found salmon-recovery nonprofit Long Live the Kings (LLTK) in 1986. For more than 30 years, LLTK has been working to restore wild salmon and steelhead and provide sustainable fishing in Northwest waters. Earlier this year, Jim Youngren stepped down from his three-decade-long role as chairman of the LLTK Board of Directors. Jim’s lifelong commitment to our region’s prosperity, and his love affair with Pacific salmon, were honored in April when he received LLTK’s prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award in Salmon Conservation. Today LLTK is focused specifically on crafting and implementing new tools for restoring and sustaining healthy salmon populations in the context of a rapidly urbanizing environment. Learn more at www.lltk.org.

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PACIFIC SALMON ID

Spawning Phase

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/salmon/identification.html

CHINOOK (K ING)

Female

• Olive-brown colored body • Large spots on back and both lobes of tail • Mouth is black with black/grey gum line

Male

Female

COHO (SILV ER) • Greenish-black head with red to maroon colored body • Spots on back and only upper lobe of tail • Mouth is black with white gum line

Male

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PINK (HUMPY) • Vast majority return during odd-numbered years • Large oblong spots on back and both lobes of tail • Males develop pronounced hump

CHUM (DOG) • No spots on back or tail • Greenish to dusky mottling on sides • Males have reddish-purple vertical markings

SOCK EY E (R ED) • No distinct spots on back or tail • Greenish head • Brick red to scarlet red colored body, female coloration is more dull

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

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HARBO R S happenings HA RB O R S happenings H A R B O R S happenings

2017 NMTA BBQ in Anacortes

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HARBO Rwww.harborsmagazine.com S happenings HA RB O R S happenings H A R B O R S happenings

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HARBO RS happenings HA R B O R S happenings H A R B O R S happenings

HARBO RS happenings HA The R BSeaplane O R S happenings HARB O R S happenings HARBORS | and Boating Destination Magazine

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OUR MISSION • Protect and grow seaplane access to Washington waters • Promote safe and responsible seaplane operations • Foster communications among owners, operators, service providers and the community • Facilitate events sharing the joy of seaplane flying in Washington and the Pacific Northwest

2017 EVENTS

• Sept. 8-10 – Priest Lake Idaho • Sept. 23 – American Lake Splash www.washingtonseaplanepilots.org


DON’T MISS OUR NEXT ISSUE

November/December 2017

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Crazy for Razor Clams Birding in Alaska

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Gift Cards Available Are you looking for a SMASHING and AWARD-WINNING Trade Show Exhibit or Display?

RedLine Exhibits located in Lakewood, WA can design, build and deploy one to match your budget. Since 1995, RedLine Exhibits has created “Best of Show” designs for major companies throughout the U.S. Please find us at www.redlineexhibits.com (253) 507-8712

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orthwest

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From Washington to Alaska, Your Source for Marinas, Restaurants, Services, Points of Interest & much more.

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How to Save Your Own Life by Tom Tripp

The readers of this magazine are, by definition, outdoor people. They live, work, and play in one of the most beautiful parts of the globe, and they are familiar not only with the stunning vistas that abound but the sometimes dark and capricious nature of the outdoors. A leisurely paddle between islands in the Pacific Northwest can easily become a near-survival situation because the weather changes so suddenly or because the wake of a nearby vessel might overtake you unexpectedly. In an instant,

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you can find yourselves hanging onto an overturned kayak or standing knee-deep in the cockpit of a boat taking on water. What would you do if it happened to you? To be prepared you should assume it can happen and be ready. First, choose the best properly fit life jackets and buy quality gear built for harsh environments. Look for advice and information about the environment and your activity from authoritative sources, and finally, connect yourself with the best technology available—technology


that can make the difference between a bad day and the worst possible day. I recommend you also buy yourself a Personal Locator Beacon (PLB). This is essential. In previous articles, I’ve briefly mentioned PLBs in the context of important boating gear. However, in 2017, I’m ready to say that if you’re serious about being on the water, hiking and camping in the wilderness, or travelling anywhere off the grid, you should always carry such a device. In this case, I’m going to point you toward a specific product line originally from DeLorme and now, in its latest and upgraded version, from Garmin. The inReach Satellite Communicator is a great deal more than just a PLB. It is, first and foremost, a safety device that ultimately can bring search and rescue directly to your location, often within minutes. If you’re on the water, in the wilderness or on a mountain and injured with no help around, the SOS feature on inReach devices will send an emergency alert that includes your precise GPS location to one of a constellation of Iridium satellites and then to a GEOS emergency services facility, which will alert the appropriate authorities in your area. They will stay in touch with you throughout the process via twoway satellite messaging so you know that help is coming and when it will arrive. It is one of the best uses of modern technology available today, and someday it could make a life-or-death difference to you or someone you know. As satellite communicators, both the inReach SE+ and Explorer+ offer identical messaging capabilities. They differ on the GPS navigation. InReach SE+ uses GPS to provide basic grid navigation and allow you to drop waypoints, mark key locations, track your progress, and follow a breadcrumb trail back to base. The inReach Explorer+ goes a step beyond, providing full-fledged GPS on-map guidance with preloaded TOPO mapping and waypoint routings viewable directly on the unit. A built-in digital

compass, barometric altimeter and accelerometer are included with the Explorer+ that Garmin says will help you get and maintain accurate bearings anywhere on or off the beaten path. You will need a subscription plan to use the inReach devices, but you can buy it only for the months you need it and, while using it, you can set it up to provide a tracking map for others to view on the internet. The inReach SE+ goes for about $400 USD, while the inReach Explorer+ is about $450. No, it’s not cheap, but it might turn out to be the cheapest insurance you have ever bought.

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WHERE

FRIDAY BEGINS ™

Photo / Kevin Holmes

Take flight from the hustle and bustle of the city and consider an enviable lifestyle… the jewel-like cluster of the San Juan Islands awaits! Put things on a more permanent basis… moorage, flight plans and cruising opportunities. Raise your famiy with fine schools and supportive communities. Work online within a serene and stunning natural environment, just a short flight from Seattle. Post Office Box 889 • Friday Harbor, WA 98250

PORT OF FRIDAY HARBOR

VHF66A • 360-378-2688 • Fax: 360-378-6114 www.portfridayharbor.org

ROBINSON LAW FIRM PLLC YAC HT LA W Representing Yacht Owners in the U.S., Canada and Asia 11027 Marine View Drive SW Seattle, WA 98146 (206) 200-1511 Fred@frobinsonlaw.com www.frobinsonlawfirm.com

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Destinations

Seaplane & Boating

Kangaroo House, Orcas Island, WA

On an evening in August our seaplane ascended from the Friday Harbor Seaplane terminal on south Lake Washington, headed for Deer Harbor, Orcas Island. The normally clear Pacific Northwest air was awash with smoke from more than thirty wildfires raging in British Colombia. Although not the best air for flying, the smoke colored a beautiful sunset upon our destination. Orcas Island was busy the evening of our arrival. The beautiful setting, summer art shows, boutiques, Saturday farmers market, music 74

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and much more attract people from all over the world, though it didn’t seem crowded. We were on our way to experience the Kangaroo House Bed and Breakfast, a quaint Craftsman Style inn built in 1907. For the past 35 years the Kangaroo House has provided bed-and-breakfast stays for island visitors, making it the longest continuously operating B&B in the San Juan Islands. The five suites within the Kangaroo House are named after wild birds that

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by Alanna Wight

can be spotted around the island and on feeders hanging outside the B&B. The lodge-like ambiance of the spacious living room, with its stone fireplace and Mission-style furnishings, invites you to enjoy the comfortable setting and relax. In the morning, we were served a delicious breakfast before our day’s adventures to Cresent Beach and Doe Bay. The first course was a plate of fresh organic fruit with a honey-lime drizzle. The second course was Rösti, (a savory swiss potato dish), and the third course was a light


pistachio cake with rhubarb glaze. In fact, the rhubarb was picked directly from the innkeepers’ garden. Charles Toxey and Jill McCabe Johnson clearly have a passion for excellent cooking and treating their guests. They enjoy experimenting around the kitchen, trying different dishes, and, of course, making their own recipes. One of these experiments Jill explained over breakfast. She steeps the wild and local Nootka rose petals with honey, which becomes a tasty rose-scented honey. Their experimentation flourishes from trading food amongst gardeners and farmers around the island. That morning Charles and Jill also told us how the inn was named. About the middle of the 20th Century, a sea captain, Harold (Cap) Ferris, had adopted a young kangaroo on a voyage in Adelaide, Australia and brought the joey back to his home on Orcas Island. Locals and visitors on Orcas Island would come watch “Josie” the kangaroo, and she quickly became a popular attraction in Eastsound. In time, locals took to calling Cap’s home the Kangaroo House, which became its formal name after the house was purchased and renovated into a B&B. Today, the Kangaroo House remains open year round, and guests feel right at home in the spacious living and dining room, or in the hot tub or luscious gardens. Orcas Island is accessible by ferry, plane, or private boats, which can be tied up at Brandt’s Landing, located within walking distance of the Kangaroo House. Expect a peaceful stay located just minutes from town, a quiet and cozy getaway from the busyness of city life.

Kangaroo House 1459 North Beach Road Eastsound, WA 98245 360.376.2175 www.kangaroohouse.com

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Domaine Madeleine, Port Angeles, WA

A visit to Domaine Madeleine can actually be summed up in only two words: “wow!” and “ahhhh ...” The “wow’s” will likely begin as you drive onto the property, stroll the grounds, walk into your accommodations and spot the amenities. And they will almost certainly continue when you have breakfast in the morning. The “ahhhh’s” come as you breathe in the ocean air, pick a sunny or shady spot to sit and relax, step into your whirlpool tub, or sip wine by firelight. And it’s likely that “ahhhh ...” is the last thing you’ll say as you slip off to sleep. Located in Port Angeles, Washington, along the Strait of Juan de Fuca and on the northern edge of Olympic Peninsula, Domaine Madeleine is a bed-and-breakfast that has been generating “wow’s” and “ahhhh’s” from its guests for more than 26 years. Built in 1946 as a private residence, the main building has been remodeled to accommodate three suites ranging from 240 to 630 square feet, along with a lounge area (open 24 hours for 76

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all guests) and a breakfast room. There are also three cottages on the grounds; we stayed in the Rialto Beach Cottage, which offers a “wow” water view from its private porch and the huge windows along its front. (The same view can be appreciated from the king-size bed and/or the two-seat jacuzzi tub, if you discretely leave the shades up. We did.) It would be hard to ask for a more perfect location; Domaine Madeleine sits at the end of a private gravel road—watch for the “elephant” in the woods as you approach the gate—on a high bluff above the beach. The town of Port Angeles is to the west; Sequim and Dungeness are to the east. (All three offer a variety of shopping and dining experiences, as well as a surprising number of wineries. This area, the sunniest part of western Washington, supports grape growing.) Across the Strait is Victoria, BC (you can take the Black Ball Ferry from Port Angeles). To the south is Olympic National Park; a few miles east is the

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By Russ Young

Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge. Deciding where to go may be difficult, although a multi-day stay is probably the simplest solution to that dilemma. You’ll have at least one tough decision to make every day, though: how and where do you want your breakfast? You can have it left outside your door, packed and ready to take along on an adventure, or served at a table in the breakfast room. We chose the third option, joining a married pair of doctors from Savannah at a table. The conversation was good; the food was nothing short of spectacular. There was good coffee; organic orange juice; and a poached pear topped with cherries and currants, followed by a freshly baked blueberry scone. Then came Granny Smith apple crepes with creme fraiche and a caramel sauce, along with vegetarian “field roast” sausage. We were offered the “hiker’s dessert,” which we suspected might be trail mix. Wrong! Way wrong!! It was mango sorbet with warm black “forbidden rice.”


We probably wouldn’t have been blamed if we waddled back to our cottages and slouched down in the chairs on the porch. Instead, our new Southern friends were off to explore the National Park, while we took a sunny hike out to the lighthouse at the end of the sandspit at the Wildlife refuge. (At six miles, the Dungeness Spit is America’s longest.) We returned later that day, lightly sunburned and slightly sore, with a bottle of locally grown—and appropriately named—Madeleine Angevine wine. Sitting outside our cottage, we were enjoying the view down the lawn and across the water, as well as the quiet. We toasted our good fortune with a single “wow.” And as we slipped off to sleep later, I suspect the last thing we both said after “good night” was “ahhhh ...”

Domaine Madeleine Bed Breakfast Inn at &Port Gardner

146WWildflower Lane 1700 Marine View Drive PortEverett, Angeles, WA 98362 WA 98201 360.457.4174 425.252.6779 www.domainemadeleine.com innatportgardner.com The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

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Wedgewood Hotel, Vancouver, BC

Downtown Vancouver abounds with first-class hotels, but one such hotel prides itself on being different from the rest. The 83-room boutique Wedgewood Hotel and Spa—a member of the prestigious Relais & Chateaux—is wholly familyowned and run, unlike the megahotels owned by global companies. The Wedgewood’s old-world charm captivates before you even enter the lobby. A coat-tailed doorman greets you and welcomes you into a lobby reminiscent of the foyer of a European manor house. Wood-paneled walls, elegant but comfortable furniture, and ornate candelabras and chandeliers evoke an atmosphere of gentility missing in more modern hotels. Located in the heart of Vancouver, the 78

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hotel is a short stroll from the high-end shops of Robson Street. The Vancouver Art Gallery, Robson Square (with its winter-time skating rink and summer dance venue) and the Vancouver Law Courts are across the road. The Bacchus Lounge, with its windows open to the street in good weather, is a popular watering hole for the city’s lawyers and judges. On the day I visited, the windows offered a view of the brilliant oranges and reds of the fall foliage. The award-winning Bacchus restaurant—with its red and gold velveteen drapes, pale embossed dining chairs, crimson divans and cozy fireplace—offers an intimate setting for a delicious meal. In 1984, Greek-born Eleni Skalbania, after several years in the Vancouver

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by Pat Awmack

hotel industry, purchased the former Mayfair Apartment Hotel and, after a major renovation, opened the doors of her pride and joy—the elegant Wedgewood Hotel. She filled the hotel with artwork from her private collection. Although Eleni passed away a few years ago, the hotel is now co-owned by her two daughters. While daughter Marousa isn’t involved in the dayto-day operations at the hotel, her sister Elpie Marinakis Jackson—having worked at the hotel for over 20 years—is now the managing director. Eleni’s sister, Joanna TsaparasPiche, who worked with Eleni from the beginning, is director of Sales and Marketing. When asked what makes their hotel different from the rest,


she responded, “Being family-owned and -run allows us to offer more personalized service than if we were part of a large hotel chain.” She also disclosed that they have many long-term employees, some of whom have been there for over 20 years. One of the highlights of my stay was the fact that my room had a full-size balcony, which is a feature of most of the rooms. Finding a balcony on a downtown hotel room is no easy task, so it’s a treat when you do. It was heaven to be able to open my balcony door and let in the warm September air. The bed was extremely comfortable and, although I slept with my window open, there was almost no street noise throughout the night. Free Wi-Fi for all hotel guests was an unexpected bonus, as was the complimentary box of chocolates from Daniel, Le Chocolat Belge— yum! Each room is complete with a Nespresso machine, for those who need their caffeine fix before they leave their room, along with the standard kettle, tea and coffee. Toiletries were by L’Occitane. The Wedgewood is approximately a 10-15 minute walk from the Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre, the convention center and the cruise-ship terminal. The Canada Line rapid-transit station to take you to the airport is five minutes away. It was obvious during Joanna’s and my chat over breakfast how important family is to the entire clan. That, and how proud they are of their hotel. I don’t blame them … it’s beautiful!

Wedgewood Hotel & Spa 845 Hornby St. Vancouver, BC V6Z1V1 604.689.777 www.wedgewoodhotel.com

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

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Harbors 2017 Sept/Oct Issue  

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine for the Pacific Northwest

Harbors 2017 Sept/Oct Issue  

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine for the Pacific Northwest

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