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contents OCTOBER 2012

30

8

82

110

Athletes to Watch Meet eight athletes dedicated to both school and sport.

30

Presidential Platform

Halloween Haunts Find Haunted Happenings and costumed cuties!

142

College and university leaders speak out about the future of the region (Dr. Boehm of Keystone College pictured above).

42

110

Outrageous October Things to do, where to go, everything you need to know!

Northeast PA Football See which pro player took the field for the Northeast PA Miners.

74

Puppy Mill Rescue Discover how to handle the special needs of rescued pups.

78

Hot Topic: Insurance President and CEO of Blue Cross of Northeastern PA gives her opinion on the region, health and costs.

82

Pink Ribbon Proud Breast Cancer Awareness Month brings inspiration through fundraisers, a survivor’s story and medical information about genetic links to the disease.

October 2012

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MAILBAG Dear Happenings, I have been visiting Clarks Summit regularly for over a decade, and on every visit I make it a point to look through Happenings Magazine. Nearly every page of the magazine exudes a sense of appreciation for living well.The targeted readership seems to be educated people who want to find enrichment and enjoyment in the Clarks Summit region. I have glanced at a number of articles written by vendors attempting to market to these people. What I have not seen are many articles written to educate and inform from an objective standpoint. –Peter Anderson Dear Happenings, The article, "Artistic Flair by the Mile,” (September 2012) is excellent and beautifully written. Thank you for your generosity. We will highly recommend to any fellow businesses that they advertise with you. –Jesse Gardner, West End Gallery, Corning, NY Dear Happenings, I was tickled to see one of my former students, Melissa Sanko's, sincere letter in the September issue (Letter from the Editorial Assistant). I am always so happy to see my students doing well and doing good for their communities. Please keep up the good work. –Kim Pavlick, University of Scranton

What’s Happening this

Weekend?

Happenings Magazine Insiders know. Sign up FREE At HappeningsMagazinePA.com! 4

Publisher Managing Editor Art Director Associate Art Director

Paula Rochon Mackarey Barbara Toolan Lisa M. Ragnacci Peter Salerno

Administrative Assistant

Katherine Kempa

Associate Editor

Erika A. Bruckner

Editorial Assistant Account Representatives

Interns

Melissa Sanko Ken Chergosky Rosemary Nye Jane Preate Annette Profera Vince Mecca

On the Cover: Student athletes and mascots from local colleges team up at Memorial Stadium in Scranton. Cover Photo: Alex Cena Photography Published Monthly. 350,000 copies annually. ©2012 HAPPENINGS MAGAZINE All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any process except with written permission.

Happenings Magazine published since 1969 P.O. Box 61 • Clarks Summit, PA 18411 Phone: (570) 587-3532 • Fax: (570) 586-7374 Email: info@happeningscommgroup.com

Read online at:

www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Drop Us a Line! We want to hear what’s on your mind; take a minute to send us a note!

• P.O. Box 61 Clarks Summit, PA 18411 • HappeningsMagazinePA.com • info@happeningscommgroup.com • Like “Happenings Magazine” on Facebook • Follow “HappeningsMag” and “ErAtHappenings” on Twitter

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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FROM THE ASSOCIATE EDITOR Dear Readers,

Scandal has mired sports headlines of late – performance-enhancing drugs, illegal payment for college athletes… and dare I even mention Penn State? We wanted this issue to stand in sharp contrast to these mired moments. Starting with the fantastic group of regional collegiate athletes appearing on this issue’s front cover, we sought to remind everyone about all that is good with college sports – especially at programs right here in Northeast PA! These young athletes are serious about sports as well as academics – University of Scranton cross country runner Kathleen Druther attended the shoot immediately after taking the grueling four-and-ahalf hour Graduate Entrance Exam that morning! Although, we must admit… some student-athletes somehow had to tear themselves away from a class or two to spend a sunny, summer afternoon outside at the photo shoot at Scranton’s Memorial Stadium (Professors, please consider this an official request to excuse the absence!). As you continue through the issue, you’ll find highlights of many good things related to sport at Northeast PA schools – from sportsrelated majors (page 38) and championship trainers (page 40) to successful graduates (page 26) and programs that promote true sportsmanship (page 22).

bags, many former teammates are still some of my closest friends. I’m still using skills learned through sport in my career and everyday life; there are striking similarities between working with a sports team to produce wins and working with coworkers to produce a monthly publication! Both require motivating and relying on teammates, training rookies, putting in extra hours of hard work to stay ahead of the game and occasionally making a game-winning shot at the buzzer- a.k.a. the printer deadline! Whether you compete at the collegiate level, play games in your backyard, coach your kids or follow your favorite team from an armchair, I hope this issue helps you go back to the purity and passion of all that is good in sport.

Keep Playing, My daughter Gianella looked up to the college athletes at the cover photo shoot… from this photo, it seems basketball may be her sport of choice!

Erika

Erika A. Bruckner

We asked a few college and university athletic directors to share the lifelong benefits of collegiate sports. Find their wide variety of reasons on page 18. As a former Baptist Bible College Lady Defender softball player and cheerleader, I agree with these experts. Battling through a sports season with teammates can produce resilient bonds. Although we’ve since traded duffel bags for diaper October 2012

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sunday

9/11/12

1

monday

Fall Film Festival, Dietrich Theatre, Tunkhannock. Through Thurs. 996-1500.

7

8

23rd Annual Apple & Cheese Festival, Manley-Bohlayer Farm, Canton. 673-7222.

An Extravaganza of Art & Antiques, Mary’s Home Furnishings, Montrose. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. 278-2187.

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15

Fall Festival & Lumberjack Chainsaw Competition, Sullivan Co. Fairgrounds, Forksville. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 482-4088.

Ghost Walk, downtown Scranton. Daily. 7:30 p.m. 383-1821.

21

22

28

29

8th Annual Chocoholic Frolic, Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 5-8 p.m. 346-0759.

Cemetery Walk, Grey Towers National Historic Site, Milford. 1:302:30 p.m. 296-9630

12:25 PM

tuesday

2

Get busy! It’s Financial Planning Week.

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wednesday

3

10

17

24

30

31

National Candy Corn Day

Apple Month AIDS Awareness Month Breast Cancer Awareness Month Halloween Safety Month National Popcorn Popping Month

4

thursday

Public Bog Walk, 1 p.m., Cranberry Bog,Tannersville. 629-3061.

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Capitol Steps, State Theatre, Easton. 7:30 p.m. 800-999-STATE.

October

Happy Halloween

11

18

5

friday

11th Annual Artists Open House Weekend, throughout Susquehanna Co. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Mon.

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6

saturday

11th Annual Airing of the Quilts, downtown Tunkhannock. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

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Great Flashlight Corn Maze Adventure, Roba Family Farms, Dalton. 563-2904.

Fall Foliage Festival, Sno Mountain Resort, Moosic.

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National Chocolate Cupcake Day!

Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks, Mellow Theatre, Scranton.8 p.m. 955-1455.

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26

Halloween Lantern Tours, Eckley Miners’ Village,Weatherly. 6:30-9 p.m. 636-2070.

2nd Annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk, Kirby Park,Wilkes-Barre. 9 a.m.

27 Malloween, Mall at Steamtown, Scranton. 343-3400


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Fostering Excellence in Deaf Education

Page 7

537 Venard Road, Clarks Summit, PA 18411 www.thescrantonschool.org 570-585-1000

CAT H ER I NE H. BO N E L ECT U RE I N C HE M I ST RY

ROALD HOFFMANN ,

Nobel Laureate, Professor Emeritus at Cornell University, Writer and Poet

7 P.M. • THURSDAY, OCT. 18 101 STARK LEARNING CENTER

MAX ROS E NN L ECT U RE I N L AW A N D HU M A N I T I ES

CORY BOOKER ,

Mayor of Newark, N.J.

“How to Change the World with Your Bare Hands”

7:30 P.M. • SUNDAY, OCT. 21 DOROTHY DICKSON DARTE CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Both lectures are free and open to the public. Call (570) 408-4306 for more information. Patrons requesting accommodations or services at Wilkes University or Wilkes University-sponsored events in accordance with The American with Disabilities Act (ADA) Title III: Public Accommodations are asked to contact the University at 1-800-Wilkes-U to request such services/ accommodations. It is recommended that requests be made at least 48 hours prior to any event.

October 2012

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COVER STORY

College Athletes to Watch KathleenDruther University of Scranton Cross Country Senior Biology Major

A runner since the sixth grade, Druther still gets butterflies every time she toes the starting line. Druther was drawn to the University’s biology program and the opportunity to train under Coach Burke. Individual Highlights: 2009 Landmark Conference Rookie of the Year, 2009 & 2010 Academic Honor Roll, Deans List Team Highlights: Landmark Conference Team title for the first time in the school’s history How Sports Enhances College Life: Forced me to develop excellent time-management skills and allowed me to be competitive in an area other than school. Life Skills Learned through Sport: Being flexible. Race conditions can dramatically change, as do situations in life. You have to be ready to tackle anything that comes your way Best Sports Moment: Running 18:20 for the 5k Biggest Student-Athlete Challenge: Devoting so much time to cross country when I was swamped with course work Biggest StudentAthlete Benefit: It allows me to be well-rounded

–Photography by Alex Cena

which keeps my priorities in check. It forces me to work hard around the clock which is vital if I want to succeed in both academics and racing. Goals for Upcoming Season: Stay injury-free; win the Landmark Conference title, and make the AllRegion team (top 35) at Regionals Goals for after Graduation: Medical or D.O. School Hometown: Clarks Summit Race to Watch: The Landmark Conference Championship

Ashley Murray Marywood University Women’s Basketball Shooting Guard Sophomore Spanish Major

“I was very happy with the athletic department at Marywood University, and the school has so many other great aspects that drew me in, like the homey campus feel.” Individual Highlights: Two-time Lackawanna Player of the Year; Her jersey number 3 retired at Dunmore High School; Four-Year National Honors Society; CSAC Academic Honor Roll; Holds record for threepoint shooting game with eight Life Skills Learned Through Sport: Leadership, determination and time management Favorite Part of Marywood: Faculty - someone is always around to help, whether they know you or not. Attending Marywood feels like being part of a big family. Biggest Student-Athlete Challenge: Time management. Going to classes, practices and having your homework done daily Biggest Student-Athlete Benefit: Creating a bond with your team and coaches! My teammates always have my back, and my coaches


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are people I look up to on and off the court. Goals for Upcoming Season: To improve daily as a team and become CSAC champions! Goals for after Graduation: Graduate classes and becoming a Spanish teacher or translator Hometown: Dunmore Game to Watch: University of Scranton @ Marywood, Nov. 26

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Hope Krolewski Keystone College Women’s Field Hockey Forward/Midfield Senior Early Childhood Education Major Training for games is a year-round, daily effort for Krolewski, who credits her three coaches for the team’s success and inspiration. She chose Keystone because of the sport and the strong education program. Krolewski’s parents were happy to learn the school consistently ranks as one of the best colleges in the northern region by U.S. News and World Reports.

Individual Highlights: Field Hockey Most Valuable Player; 2010 National Field Hockey Coaches Association National Academic Squad; Keystone College Athlete of the Month and Week; Academic Excellence Award Team Highlights: Program record 14-win season, CSAC title and a berth in the conference semi-finals How Sports Enhances College Life: Confidence builder! Coach Manning encourages us to do well in academics; as a result, I have developed study skills and time management techniques. Life Skills Learned Through Sport: Patience, organization, leadership, teamwork, persistence and self-discipline Best Sports Moment: Being named the Keystone College Female Athlete of the Year for scoring 13 HappeningsMagazinePA.com

goals in 2011, an all-time record Favorite Part of Keystone: Small class sizes; the faculty gets to know each student by name. Also, the administration is very supportive of sports programs. Biggest Student-Athlete Challenge: Time management Biggest Student-Athlete Benefit: Teamwork and resulting friendships Goals for Upcoming Season: To work hard, to play the best of my ability and to make the playoffs and win the championship Goals for after Graduation: To coach field hockey and teach kindergarten, possibly with Teach for America, for students in low-income communities Hometown: Bear Creek Game to Watch: Keystone College @ Marywood University, Oct. 6

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▼ Garth Lakitsky Lackawanna College Men’s Football Linebacker Sophomore Liberal Studies Major

Lakitsky chose Lackawanna College to prepare to play at a Division I school. He trains hard daily, often up to six hours. Individual Highlights: 27th in Northeast Football Conference in tackles as a freshman; First State Championship Wrestler in Tamaqua High School history Team Highlights: Led the Northeast Football Conference in touchdowns, rushing and passing yards Life Skills Learned Through Sport: Discipline and focus Favorite Part of Lackawanna College: The coaches and teachers willing to help Biggest Student-Athlete Challenge: Being focused on and off the field Goals for Upcoming Season: Going undefeated Goals for after Graduation: Attend a Division I college Hometown: Tamaqua


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Chris Sweeney

Best Sports Moment: Going five for five with three home runs and two doubles versus Manhattanville and breaking the single-season and career home run record in the process

King’s College Men’s Baseball Outfield/First Base

Senior Mass Communications Major Sweeney’s been swinging a bat since he was 4. “I always wanted to play college ball, and King’s gave me a chance to do that; it was the best fit both academically and athletically.”

Favorite Part of King’s College: The smaller size

Individual Highlights: Cal Ripken Collegiate Summer League All-Star; King’s College Career and Single Season Home Run Record Holder

Biggest Student-Athlete Benefit: You get to enjoy all the perks of college while playing the game you love for four more years.

How Sports Enhances College Life: It has taught me to work hard for things both on and off the field.

Goals for Upcoming Season: To win the MACFreedom Conference Tournament and to become an All-American

Life Skills Learned Through Sport: It’s a game where you are going to fail more than you succeed, and that has helped me deal with tough times or failures outside of baseball.

Goals for after Graduation: Play baseball at a higher level or a career in public relations or advertising

Andy Bush

Misericordia University Men’s Soccer Forward Senior Accounting Major

Biggest Student-Athlete Challenge: Time management skills

Hometown: Mountain Top

“I knew I wanted to play for a successful program in a competitive league. Misericordia was a great fit.” A soccer player for 17 years, Bush puts in around 20 hours a week to practice and play the sport. Individual Highlights: Excellence in Athletics and Academics Award 2009-2011 Team Highlights: MAC Freedom Conference Champions 2009 & 2011 Life Skills Learned Through Sport: Teamwork, leadership, hard work and creativity Best Sports Moment: Going to the NCAA tournament in 2009 and 2011 Favorite Part of Misericordia: Everyone, from students to faculty, is willing to help you accomplish your goals. Biggest Student-Athlete Challenge: Time management– making time for school-work, athletics and a positive social life Biggest Student-Athlete Benefit: Relationships with teammates and coaches Goals for Upcoming Season: Winning our conference and advancing to the NCAA tournament Goals after Graduation: Graduate school to earn a Master’s Degree in accounting and eventually become a CPA Hometown: DuBois Game to Watch: King’s College @ Misericordia University, Oct. 20


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Coach Sumoski recruited Fissel during her sophomore year in high school. She was drawn to the soccer program as well as Wilkes campus and student housing. Fissel spends up to 70 percent of her time lifting, practicing and playing the sport. Individual Highlights: Three-year captain; Impact Player of the Year; Deans List Life Skills Learned Through Sport: Working well with others as a team and developing good leadership skills Best Sports Moment: Beating DeSales University in the playoffs to make the finals; being captain and team leader

William Hines Johnson College Men’s Basketball Point Guard/Shooting Guard Sophomore Carpentry and Cabinetmaking Major

Hines has been playing ball since he was 5. He was drawn to Johnson College because of the career opportunities the trades offer. Individual Highlights: Cross country All-EPCC honorable mention; helped Johnson College basketball make the first playoff appearance in the school’s history

Favorite Part of Wilkes: The faculty and staff Biggest Student-Athlete Challenge: Balancing academics and athletics Biggest Student-Athlete Benefit: Having a “second family” while away at school Goals for Upcoming Season: Work together as one and win the MAC Goals for after Graduation: Possibly continue playing; coach at the college level, and begin my career in graphic design Hometown: Morristown, New Jersey Game to Watch: Wilkes @ Fairleigh Dickinson, -Erika A. Bruckner Oct. 6

Life Skills Learned Through Sport: To be a leader and coachable in all aspects of life Favorite Part of Being a Jaguar: Most people didn’t believe we could win a game last year let alone make the conference playoffs. Proving naysayers wrong makes winning games that much sweeter. Biggest Student-Athlete Challenge: Making sure that you are great on the court and just as great in the classroom Goals for Upcoming Season: Lead the team in assists, become a captain and get Johnson College a championship Goals for after Graduation: Play at a Division I school and work on a great-paying construction site Hometown: Philadelphia Game to Watch: Johnson College @ Valley Forge Military Academy, Nov. 27

Katy Fissel Wilkes University Women’s Soccer Center Mid Senior Integrative Media and Art Major


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THE UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

Events We are pleased to invite you to a variety of lectures, cultural events and performances available as resources to our Scranton area neighbors. October 5-7 “Prelude to a Kiss,” by Craig Lucas Presented by The University of Scranton Players. Fees Vary. McDade Center for Literary and Performing Arts. Call 941-4318 October 21 & November 4 Open House For high school juniors and seniors. Various campus locations. Call 1-888-SCRANTON October 30, 5:30 p.m. Native Son: Stephen Karam in Conversation with Paul Holdengraber Free. McDade Center for Literary and Performing Arts. Call 941-7816

International Film Festivals October 1 & 2, 5:30 p.m. Taiwanese Film and Cultural Festival Free. Moskovitz Theater DeNaples Center. Call 941-6312 November 6-8, 7 p.m. Sixth Annual East German Film Festival Free. Pearn Auditorium, Brennan Hall. Call 941-7430

November 15, 7 p.m. Spanish Film Club Series Made possible with the support of Pragda, the Secretary of State for Culture of Spain, and its Program for Cultural Cooperation with United States’ Universities. Free. Pearn Auditorium, Brennan Hall. Call 941-6160

Stay Informed…about University events, programs and resources Visit www.scranton.edu/community Subscribe to Community Relations’ Monthly E-Newsletter Email community@scranton.edu

Top right: A Year with Frog and Toad Players 2011-12 season

Mid

Questions? Call 941-4419


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College Mascots Unmasked

Wilkes University Willie Eggleston as “The Colonel”

As the mascot, Eggleston likes to think of himself as a billboard meant to draw attention to the main sporting event. The Colonel attends all home sporting events and other community and campus events. He explains,“I enjoy having the opportunity to have a positive impact on campus life by rallying students and bolstering school spirit. I am very proud to be a Colonel, and I make sure that always shows whenever I put on the suit.” History: Former Dean of Student Affairs Emeritus George F. Ralston suggested the mascot, and The Colonel became official in 1947. In 2008 the costume was revamped, featuring blue skin to figuratively and literally embody school spirit.

University of Scranton

Mascot Trivia: The total weight of the costume is over 20 pounds not including the head. Favorite Mascot Moment: Welcoming students at summer orientation. Personal: Binghamton, NY native; Pharmacy major (2014) involved in student government, ultimate Frisbee, pharmacy student senate and community service events

Daniel Haugen as “Iggy the Royal Wolf” Haugen dons the five-pound, furry, one-piece suit with matching gloves and paw-shaped shoes for basketball, soccer, field hockey and lacrosse games. Under the costume, he wears a vest with pockets for ice packs to beat the heat! “The mascot represents the school,” explains Haugen.“If you ask someone to name the best sports schools in the country, they could probably tell you both the school and the mascot of that school.” History: Two wolves were added to the college’s original seal, taken from the coat of arms from the family of St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits. The Royal Wolf mascot was named “Iggy,” pointing back to St. Ignatius. Signature Moves: The wave and “I can’t hear you” Favorite Mascot Moment: Our basketball team was losing; I got the crowd behind our team, and we won the game. Personal: Morrisville, PA native Communication major (2013) involved in intramural sports Continued on page 16

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EXPERIENCE YOUR EDUCATION. FALL OPEN HOUSE Saturday, October 13th, 9:30am Register online at johnson.edu/openhouse or call 570-702-8900

WE WORK.

For information on our 14 exciting careers, visit www.johnson.edu

Programs We Offer: Computerized Office Administration Medical Office Administration CDE Fits Into Your Lifestyle INDIVIDUALIZED FORMAT 路 HANDS-ON TRAINING JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE (for those who qualify)

Route 611 in Tannersville, PA (570) 629-2690

www.cde.edu

CDE Career Institute is a Pennsylvania Private Licensed School and is accredited by the Council on Occupational Education

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King’s College

Eric Grego as “Leo the Lion”

A beautiful

smile

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As a campus activity leader, Grego dressed up in a chicken costume to promote an event on campus.“I have loved being the mascot ever since,” he explains. He will pump up the crowd at football and basketball games and for other campus activities. A cross-country athlete, Grego says, “Being the mascot shows me what other athletes go through. It’s been an amazing experience, and I cannot wait to attend more games!” Fun Fact: When wearing the costume, Grego has very limited range of motion and cannot see anything around his feet. Favorite Mascot Moment: This past summer I attended the LIU field day event. It was an amazing experience to see the smiles on the little kids when I shook their hands and took pictures with them! Personal: Bear Creek native; Secondary Education History major, (2014) involved in cross country, student government chief information officer, campus activities leader, FYE co-leader, history society, Education Honor Society, History Honor Society and education club -Erika A. Bruckner

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EDUCATION

Fit for Life

The Long-Term Benefits of Collegiate Sports Legendary football coach Vince Lombardi had a knack for bringing the similarities between sport and life into light. Regional experts weighed in on the subject, agreeing– the benefits of being a student-athlete can last a lifetime.

Physical Wellness Clearly, athletics lead to physical benefits.“Sports encourage the concept of wellness,” explains Mary Jo Gunning, Marywood University’s director of athletics and recreation for 23 years. Studentathletes learn nutritional concepts and how to train their body.

Personal Development Toby Lovecchio, a 1985 University of Scranton graduate, began as director of athletics for his alma mater in 1997. He’s personally learned, “Athletics help people become more well-rounded and help us learn more about ourselves.” As one succeeds on the court, his or her selfimage is enhanced.“The

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confidence that develops in make the most of the skill and out of the athletics set each member brings to arena helps foster the abilithe team.” ty to embrace life’s chalEducational Motivation lenges,” Gunning adds. For some, sports are the Leadership, dedication and motivating factor to attend commitment are also fosschool.“But it is the entire tered through sport. Student-athletes spend countless hours on their sport, in addition to day-today requirements of a typical college student. The high amount of responsibility forces athletes to learn and implement time-management “The quality of each man’s life and prioritizing is the full measure of skills.

Social Aptitude Sports force individuals to work together; communication is vital to success. After enduring grueling workouts, devastating defeats and hard-fought victories, teammates forge a bond that lasts long after the season is done.“Sports enhance communication and people skills because you work within a framework of others,” continues Lovecchio.“You are not alone. You must help and challenge each other to HappeningsMagazinePA.com

that man’s commitment to excellence and victory– whether it be football… business... or government.” —Vince Lombardi

Former Head Coach, Green Bay Packers

college experience that gets a student ready for the future,” admits Lackawanna College Athletic Director Kim Mecca.“For our student-athletes, their future starts here.” In addition to maintaining great physical and mental shape, students

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are also challenged academically.“Being a student-athlete takes more than just playing the game,” continues Mecca.“When they come to Lackawanna College there is a mandatory study hall schedule; they must structure their time to fit athletics into their academic demands.” Most schools have academic standards, including minimum GPA, a student must meet in order to continue playing their sport, which serves as motivation for academic achievement. Professional Preparedness “Being part of an athletic team is a microcosm of what happens in life,” explains Lovecchio.“Athletes experience wins, losses, obstacles and working toward common and individual goals.” Skills learned through sport– leadership, teamwork, striving for excellence – are what most companies are looking for in potential employees. –Erika A. Bruckner

~ Open House ~

Sunday, November 4, 2012 12PM ~ 3PM 501 E. Drinker Street Dunmore, Pa 18512 570-346-7541 ~ www.hchspa.org

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EDUCATION

Excellence in Career and College Preparation Q. When should students begin their college search and campus visits? A. Toward the end of the student's sophomore year or early in junior year. College visits should begin by winter of junior year. Ask as many questions as possible while visiting; talk to students on campus; visit classes in the major; check out the multi-media facilities. Q. What are the stages of a college search? A. Prepare yourself. Take the right courses in high school and standardized tests (PSAT, SAT and/or ACT); participate in community and extra-curricular activities; develop a resume; attend college fairs, and visit colleges. Plan. Look at applications of desired schools and determine admissions requirements (essays, letters of recommendation, additional testing requirements, financial aid and available scholarships). Fill out applications. Watch deadlines for regular action, early action and early decision. Students should apply by fall of senior year of high school. Make rough draft copies of applications, even if you are 20

applying online. Work diligently on required essays; choose topics carefully; ask several people to thoroughly proofread. Make a deci-

sion. Once you receive acceptance letter(s), review the financial aid package, and weigh the pros and cons of each school. Perhaps, visit the campus again; sit in on classes in your major; talk to students, and observe the social scene. Can you see yourself as part of the student body? Q. When should a student take standardized tests? A. Take the SAT or ACT at least once in the junior year (preferably between March and June). Some students may take it twice in junior year. Depending on the scores, they may wish to take it again in October of senior year. Some schools HappeningsMagazinePA.com

require subject tests (SAT II); they should be taken when the student completes the course in high school. Q. Why consider a private college counselor? A. College admissions is increasingly more competitive as the number of applicants rise; a private counselor can help navigate the stressful process of researching and applying to colleges by providing information, helping find the college with the best fit and providing guidance. Private counselors can help students identify their strengths and weaknesses to assess what careers and schools might be a good fit. Students with special needs, such as learning disabilities, can really benefit by hiring a private counselor. For more answers regarding student-athletes, visit www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com! Jennifer Severini-Kresock has 20 years experience working in public high schools and also taught as an adjunct instructor at Lackawanna College and Keystone College. She earned her Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees from Marywood University.

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L A C K AWA N N A C O U N T Y L I B R A R Y S Y S T E M MERICAN MASTERS LECTURE

Words of Her Own Fran Lebowitz Author, Actress, Social Critic, Humorist Thursday, November 8 - 7 p.m. Scranton Cultural Center She’s been called the “foremost advocate of the Extreme Statement” and she has opinions on just about everything. Now she’s coming to share them with Lackawanna County. Admission free for Lackawanna County Library System card holders. Tickets are available at any Lackawanna County Library System library and the Scranton Cultural Center box office.

www.lclshome.org

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Winning the Right Way University of Scranton’s Sportsmanship Initiative

Bochicchio Sport Character Initiative Workshop for youth soccer coaches held at the University of Scranton. L-R: Jeff Bochicchio, Steve Klingman, Matt Pivorotto, Sandy Bochicchio, Gus Esgro, Colleen Murphy, Eileen Sodano, Steve Jones, Jack O'Malley, Chris Davis.

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child's sport experience should provide instruction and positive competitive experiences as well as the opportunities to learn important life lessons,” explains Jack O'Malley, Ph.D., professor of psychology emeritus and chair of the Steering Committee for the University of Scranton Bochicchio Sport Character Initiative (BSCI). Since the initiative began, BSCI has reached over 1,500 coaches, athletes and parents in Northeast PA with the message of sportsmanship. Creating a Legacy: Joe Bochicchio The project was named the Bochicchio Sport Character Initiative after the late Joe Bochicchio, who coached several Scranton School District sports, including football and wrestling, and served as the University of Scranton’s head women’s soccer coach from 1984 through 22

2006, posting a 115-10-4 record.“Joe Bochicchio was an excellent coach, friend and a man of impeccable character, ” recalls Dr. O’Malley. Training the Leaders: Coaches “It’s important to teach coaches, as players often try to emulate their coach,” explains Colleen Murphy, University of Scranton’s head women’s soccer coach, assistant athletic director and senior woman administrator. To that end, BSCI provides workshops through partnerships with the American Sports Education Program and the Positive Coaching Alliance. Tom Evans, BSCI steering committee member and North Pocono High School’s English Department chair, became a certified ASEP and PCA trainer. He emphasizes the concepts of a "DoubleGoal Coach,” someone who coaches both to win and to HappeningsMagazinePA.com

teach life lessons. Creating Partnerships: Community BSCI and PIAA District II have partnered to present a twoday conference with national presenters. Jim Thompson, founder and executive director of Positive Coaching Alliance, will be a principal speaker in the “Schools Shaping the Culture of Sport” Conference scheduled for March 2013. Michael Ognosky, superintendent of Montrose Area Schools and secretary of PIAA District II, explains,“The ultimate goal is to provide opportunities to learn valuable life lessons through sports in our schools.” Reaching the Next Generation: Students As a member of the BSCI steering committee, David Black reaches out to local continued on page 24 October 2012


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Winning the Right Way (continued from page 22) high school student-athletes. He says,“We look at sports as not merely a competitive physical challenge, but also as a broader educational opportunity; sports can teach critical thinking skills, stimulate the imagination and help develop a capacity for maintaining balance and perspective in one's life.” A leadership training program has been developed at Abington Heights High School by Student-Athlete TJ Murray, with the help of the administration and Head Football Coach Joe Repshis. The program, mandatory for all team captains, includes a pre-season leadership workshop and weekly in-season meetings with the administration. BSCI is developing a Student Athlete Advisory Committee

that will connect student leaders from across over 40 school districts and provide them with nationally recognized books about the social and ethical dimension of sports.“So often, a sports team has no clear objectives beyond a win-loss record,” Black admits.“Consequently, we try to help young athletes develop a palpable athletic culture which address not merely short-term performance objectives but also long-term team values.”

Sportsmanship Day The University of Scranton Student-Athlete Advisory Committee participates in National Sportsmanship Day each March. They teach a sportsmanship lesson titled “Honor the Game” in a local

elementary school. Old Forge School District is a past participant; high school athletes read to elementary school students and discuss sportsmanship lessons.“This is a win-win situation,” according to Old Forge Athletic Director Debbie Pepsin.“The older children love to work with the little ones, and the younger students look up to the high school athletes as role models, which makes getting the message across very easy.” BSCI’s goal is to have every single high school in PIAA District II participate in National Sportsmanship Day. For more, e-mail omalleyj1@scranton.edu or visit www.SportsCharacter.org or www.InternationalSport.org. –Erika A. Bruckner

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EDUCATION

Lackawanna College Athletes

GO PRO T hree former Lackawanna College Falcons have been selected in recent years in the Major League Player Draft. “They put in the work and didn’t take their talent for granted,” says Lackawanna’s Head Baseball Coach Chris Pensak, who was named the Region XIX Division II Baseball Coach four times.

record at the University of Pittsburgh, leading the Big East with 22. The Plains, PA native was the ninth-round selection of the Detroit Tigers in 2009. He played three years of professional baseball, working up to Class A Advanced. Sedon graduated Lackawanna with a 3.89 GPA- the highest of any athlete. He is scheduled to graduate from King’s College Sedon this spring with a degree in communications as a member of Lambda Pi Eta national honor society.“My goal is to finish school, so that comes first,” he explains.“My ultimate goal is to get back into the game.” Sedon has a tryout scheduled for an Independent League team.

Dan Winnie

Chris Sedon Schools saw Chris Sedon’s 5foot, 9-inch frame and dismissed him as being too small. But his bat proved plenty big as he hit 23 homers with Lackawanna and then went on to break the single-season home run 26

Pitcher Dan Winnie came to Lackawanna as a fastball pitcher. “We taught him an offspeed pitch, changed his mechanics and gave him the bulldog mentality of being more competiHappeningsMagazinePA.com

Photos: Todd Hiller Photography

tive,” explains Pensak. Winnie was drafted by the Atlanta Braves in the 16th round in 2010. He played in the Gulf Coast League and moved on to the Danville Braves in 2011. He is currently a free agent, released after spring training of 2012. Winnie says, “Coach Pensak prepared me in many ways for professional baseball- have a good work ethic, stay healthy and take care of your body during the season.”

Chris Kirsch Chris Kirsch was first drafted out of high school by the Pirates but chose to play at Lackawanna. Over the course of his freshman year, he developed his work ethic and team mentality. He excelled sophomore year. He was drafted in the 21st round by the Cardinals in 2011 and then in the 15th round by the Rays in 2012. He wrapped up Continued on page 28 Winnie

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EDUCATION his first season in Princeton, West Virginia with the Rookie affiliate of the Tampa Bay Rays. He has his sights on the Rays’ Class A Bowling Green Hot Rods of Kentucky for next season.

2013 Falcons In addition to the three successful athletes, 15 players went on to Division I schools last year.“It’s a pretty demanding program and definitely prepares them for the next level,” admits Pensak.“Their life is based around academics and baseball. We want to make sure they get a degree and take advantage of the whole program.”The Falcons are consis-

tently one of the top teams in the country, and in the last four years 100 percent of the players have gone on to four-year institutions. “This is probably the best freshmen class we’ve ever brought in,” Pensak says about the 2013 team.“We’ve got a great group, and I think there’s potential for three or four to have that opportunity to be

Sedon

Kirsch

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PresidentialPLATFORM College & Universities Shaping the Future of the Region “Since its founding in 1946, the mission of King’s College has been to educate the children of working-class families. The College will continue to prepare its students, more than a third of whom are local residents, in the liberal arts tradition so that they can adapt to the everchanging demands which will be placed on the regional workforce of the future. Among the initiatives of the College’s McGowan Business School is the fostering of a greater entrepreneurial spirit in its students.” -Father John Ryan, C.S.C., Ph.D., President, King’s College “As Johnson College celebrates 100 years, we will shape the future of the region by continuing to partner with industry by offering the highest quality, technology-driven education to meet the needs of the current and future workforce. We just completed the College’s largest building project in its history– the Health Science Technology Center– where the focus will be health science programs, which we see as a growing need in the region.” -Ann L. Pipinski, Ed.D., President and CEO, Johnson College “LECOM has made a quality, affordable education available for future physicians, dentists and pharmacists. Our graduates are the future of health care and are making a difference in people’s lives every day. LECOM has been recognized as a leader in primary care and has been ranked nationally in the production of primary care physicians for the Appalachian region and nationally.” -John M. Ferretti, D.O., President and CEO, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine “Misericordia University has focused upon its Trinity of Learning— rigorous academics, superb career preparation and honing within each student the passion to serve others— in order to prepare highly qualified graduates who also are willing and able to give back to their respective communities. The Trinity of Learning is helping Misericordia produce the seed corn for the region’s prosperous future as more than 70 percent of our graduates remain in Northeast PA. Our strong emphasis on career fields in the health sciences and in health-related research will also serve the region and its residents for generations to come.” -Michael A. MacDowell, President, Misericordia University

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“Marywood University has invested over $160 million in the last decade on new construction, renovation and technology. We are committed to creating an educational environment that will prepare our students to meet the ever-changing needs of our regional workforce and beyond. We are developing skilled professionals committed to service on behalf of the common good." -Sister Anne Munley, IHM, Ph.D., President, Marywood University “Lackawanna College is committed to providing affordable educational and training opportunities that address the needs of our students as well as the communities of Northeastern PA we serve. Through those programs, we prepare students of all backgrounds and abilities for today’s workforce or to further their education. We are uniquely positioned and structured to understand the needs of those communities and the businesses in our region and have a proven record of success in ensuring everyone has an opportunity to accomplish their individual goals.” -Mark Volk, President, Lackawanna College “Keystone College will help shape the future of our region by educating the leaders of tomorrow. We provide the programs and expertise needed to enable our students to become experts in their respective professions. A Keystone education produces graduates who care not only about their own advancement but about the well-being of their communities.” -Dr. Edward G. Boehm, Jr., President, Keystone College

"By providing a quality education that is values based, we enrich our students with the intellect and desire they need to make a positive contribution to the world. In addition, the University impacts the region directly through economic and service programs that include public lectures, educational programs for area children, art and performance programs, volunteer service by our students and in many other ways.” -Kevin P. Quinn, S.J., President, The University of Scranton “CDE Career Institute has been helping to shape the future of Northeast PA since 1996 by delivering career education which helps develop a workforce that has the skills and professionalism needed in today’s challenging job market.” -Justina Albright, Vice President of Operations Management, CDE Career Institute

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Presidential Platforms... (Continued from Page 31) “East Stroudsburg University’s primary responsibility is to continue to provide our students with a quality education and great life experiences that will prepare them for their future. ESU is also a committed partner in the economic development efforts in Northeast PA offering high-quality academic programs in emerging fields to help in the growth of a skilled workforce for our region. Additionally ESU’s Business Accelerator program is creating a robust entrepreneurial culture that is attracting a pipeline of inspiring entrepreneurs and early-stage companies to Northeast PA. These programs and others provide strategic opportunities for regional research and collaboration that will surely help to shape a bright future for Northeast PA.” -Marcia G. Welsh, Ph.D., President, East Stroudsburg University “Wilkes has a long tradition of fostering and supporting economic growth. Beginning with a liberal education that shapes the workforce of tomorrow, Wilkes will expand that tradition. Research partnerships with health care facilities and industry will be fostered through our new science building and new laboratories in our engineering programs. We’ll also provide the information that directs the region’s decision-making, from education about new sources of energy and their impact on the environment to research about the region’s economy.” -Dr. Patrick F. Leahy, President, Wilkes University “Mansfield University continues to shape the future of the region by preparing tomorrow’s leaders in all aspects of education, the arts and sciences. We are also responding to needs of regional industry with such new programs as Safety Management and Natural Gas Production & Services. Most importantly, our students’ liberal arts background enables them to be productive and innovative members of a rapidly changing society.” -Dr. Allan Golden, Interim President, Mansfield University.

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EDUCATION

Catholic Education in Northeast PA Holy Cross High School Carries on the Tradition t’s been five years since the merger of Bishop Hannan and Bishop Hoban High Schools– Roman Catholic schools run by the Diocese of Scranton. According to Administrator Monsignor David Tressler, a sense of stability has now settled in, and the students and faculty of the unified Holy Cross High School are thriving.

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Enrollment has steadily grown at the Dunmore campus– swelling to over 480 for the 2012-2013 school year. Holy Cross sees itself as a holistic institution, tending to the intellectual, spiritual and social needs of its student body. Monsignor Tressler says the school’s greatest asset lies in its great faith-based perspective of learning and living where students are encouraged to reach out to the community and model Christ to others. Last year students logged 16,168 hours of community service. The school as a 34

whole takes on numerous charitable endeavors– donating over $16,000 last year to different community projects. Holy Cross has also adopted a

pare them for a college education. In a program unique to Holy Cross, juniors and seniors may take college Liberal Arts courses at Marywood

Holy Cross High School’s production of “The Music Man.”

school in Haiti and to date has sent $4,000 to the impoverished country. Holy Cross students have also distinguished themselves academically. The Class of 2012 was awarded over $10 million in scholarships from over 40 colleges and universities with 98 percent of graduates pursuing post secondary education. Monsignor Tressler attributes the high rate of success to the partnership formed between students and faculty. With a 1 to 12 faculty-to-student ratio, teachers are able to work closely with students to preHappeningsMagazinePA.com

University. Students may graduate high school with up to 18 college credits and an emblem on their diploma as a distinguished graduate. A high priority is placed on technology. Classrooms are equipped with smart boards, and all the teachers are provided with laptops. In 10 years Monsignor Tressler says he sees Holy Cross High School as a thriving educational institution in the region. He describes the tight-knit community as a,“A gem in Northeast PA…something that should not be overlooked or taken for granted.” Visit www.HolyCrossHSDioceseOfScranton.org –Barbara Toolan October 2012


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An Olyphant Dubliner

AN EDUCATION

ON THE EMERALD ISLE ome. London. Paris. These cities previously came to my mind when I thought of “studying abroad.” Last Spring, as a junior at Temple University, I discovered a little-known, six-week program to Dublin, Ireland and was hooked.

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My heritage is Irish. I was tremendously excited at the idea of living in my ancestors’ homeland for half the summer. I was not sure what to expect, save for a sure stop at the Guinness Factory for a genuine taste of the dark, creamy Irish beverage. We hit the typical tourist spots such as Temple Bar, an area of Dublin full of over-priced, “authentic Irish” restaurants and pubs specializing in emptying visitor’s pockets. Then, we truly got to experience what it is really like to live in Ireland. Dublin is not a typical studyabroad destination. We explored Dublin City. We hiked up stony hills in the farm villages of Innis Moore, one of 36

the three Aran Islands off the coast of Galway whose people still speak Gaelic as their first language. The people I met in every different place were just as friendly and traditional as the ones I met in the last. The people have such a strong sense of Irish pride, which I envied. It was very powerful to be engulfed in a culture that measured thousands of years in history, not in hundreds as ours is in America. I walked along emerald hills in the fishing village of Howth over-

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looking the Irish Sea. I hiked right past the “danger” sign on the Cliffs of

“I encourage anyone who has the chance to study abroad to take it.”

Moher in County Clare and dangled my feet over the edge. I touched sculptures, castles, churches and more landmarks that were centuries old. Being in Ireland was the most powerful experience I’ve ever had, physically and emotionally. I encourage anyone who has the chance to study abroad to take it. I made new best friends and amazing memories. I cannot wait until the day comes when I get to return. Sláinte! –Jessica Durkin

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That’s a Wrap!

Marywood Graduate Finds Success as Athletic Trainer aureen Burke was interested in pursuing a career in healthcare, and she loved sports. She combined her passions into a career as an athletic trainer. Burke spends a few mornings a week working in a clinic, helping patients through physical therapy programs. Her afternoons are spent at Dunmore High School, where she’s responsible for injury prevention, management and rehabilitation. She works every practice and home game, supporting around 300 athletes in 14 sports on freshmen, junior varsity and varsity levels. “Helping an injured athlete back to his or her sport and seeing the work pay off is the best part of the job,” she explains.

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Professional Accomplishments Burke graduated from Marywood University in

2006 with a Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education/Athletic Training. She was contracted for her current position through SPRINT Physical Therapy as the athletic trainer for Dunmore High School. In 2010, she began teaching a sports first aid class at the University of Scranton.

Small Classes… Big Opportunities She especially appreciated the small classes at Marywood, which afforded her the opportunity to get to know classmates and professors. She also appreciated the wide variety of clinical sites that provided her with unique experiences.“In a hands-on field, it is really beneficial to have small classes where the instructor has the time to watch everyone individually practice crucial skills,” Burke adds.

Mentors Make a Difference “My clinical experiences and professors played huge roles in shaping who I have become professionally,” admits Burke. She credits Dr. Jane Farr, the department chair at the time, and Chris O’Brien, the athletic training education program director at the time, with encouraging her to get involved in professional organizations and experiences early in college; Shelby Yeager mentored her and helped her prepare for the board exam.

Training for the Job Marywood University’s Athletic Training Education Program prepares students for the Board of Certification Exam to qualify for advanced study and employment as a certified athletic trainer. Visit www.Marywood.edu or call 1-800-TO-MARYWOOD. –Erika A. Bruckner

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Meet Colonel Muscle Powerlifting Champion Trains Wilkes’ Athletes

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ilkes University boasts 16 varsity sports and approximately 350 athletes. Keith Klahold is the man who helps them compete at their best. A former powerlifting champion, Klahold started at Wilkes in 2003; he is fitness center coordinator and head strength and conditioning coach. pion and being a world champion. I try to convey that to our athletes,” he says.

WorldChampion Training

Science Behind the Training

Klahold won eight National Powerlifting Championships and three World Championship titles and holds six world records in powerlifting. His experience helps him teach student-athletes correct technique.“I know what it takes to be a champion and how hard you must push yourself,” continues Klahold. “You never really know what your competition is doing to prepare, so you must out-work them.”

Fitness for All Klahold manages every aspect of the 3,500 square-foot fitness center, helping students navigate stairmasters, treadmills, bikes, ellipticals, free weights, power stations and Hammer Strength machines. He writes workouts and counsels students, staff and faculty on fitness, exercise and nutrition. He didn’t realize how important nutrition was to his personal success until later in his powerlifting career.“Nutrition was truly the difference between being a national cham40

Klahold develops training plans for each sport. He studies the movements that dominate the sport or position and then picks exercises that safely mimic those movements, in addition to general strength exercises. Next comes sport-specific conditioning. For example, a wrestler needs to use all muscle groups for seven minutes. A football player needs to push for an average eight-second play with only 10 to 20 seconds between plays due to Wilkes’ fastpaced offense. Klahold helps offensive linemen prepare through conditioning and lifting programs.“The last three weeks of the summer, they do eight sets of two repetitions of squats with only 20 seconds rest between sets,” Klahold explains.“To challenge them further, I cut rest times to 10 or 20 seconds between sprints during conditioning drills.”

Loving the Payoff “I like seeing people succeed– whether it’s dropping a few pounds to fit into a dress or to alleviate lower back pain or seeing our athletes pull out a close win because they were in better shape,” Klahold explains. “Just to know that you were a part of the success is really quite a good feeling.”

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–Erika A. Bruckner October 2012


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MINERS STRIKE GOLD! NFL Player Enhances Northeast PA Football

ortheast PA Miners fans will recognize Ken Parrish as the kicker and punter who gave them an up-close view of the game by wearing a helmet camera during the 2012 season. NFL fans recognize him from “Monday Night Football.”

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College to Combine The East Stroudsburg University student generated interest from the National Football League as a two-time AllAmerican and special teams player of the year, but he opted to stay and finish earning a degree.“As much as playing in the NFL was my dream, so was graduating from college,” Parrish explains. After his 2007 graduation from ESU, he 42

went to the combine and was signed by the San Francisco 49ers. He stayed through the off-season and training camp and played in three pre-season gamesone of them featured on “Monday Night Football.” Monday Night Football “I still remember the feeling of standing in that tunnel, getting ready to run out. It’s a feeling that can’t be explained,” Parrish admits. During the game, he hit a 49-yard punt that hit and stuck on the two-yard line.“I remember running off the field as the stadium erupted in cheers, and my teammates were all congratulating me on a great punt. That’s when, for the first time, I realized I could do this.” HappeningsMagazinePA.com

E-A-G-L-E-S Eagles! Parrish then came home and joined the Stroud Area Police Department, but his NFL dreams were still alive. He resigned his job and was picked up by the Philadelphia Eagles in 2009. He stayed for training camp and was re-signed in 2010 where he played the pre-season opener. The Eagles liked his improvements, but sent him to the UFL’s Florida Tuskers to get a full season of experience. In 2011, he played three pre-season games with the Atlanta Falcons, earning a top spot among NFL punters as he averaged 50.2 yards. This year, after being brought into the New Orleans Saints summer camp, Parrish returned to Continued on page 44. October 2012


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Miners Strike Gold (Continued from Page 42)

his home field to play with the Northeast PA Miners of the Regional American Football League.

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NFL Mentality

Next Steps

In the NFL, Parrish says he learned three main things– integrity, accountability and coachability. He brought experience and talent to the Miners, who play home games at Scranton’s Memorial Stadium. He was intrigued by the raw talent of the Miners and the selfless coaching staff that cares about more than simply wins.“I realized this is an organization that has a bright future and is heading somewhere,” he explains.

“Anything I touch I want to be my best, learn the most and impact the greatest I can, Parrish admits. He says he’s ready for whatever organization he’ll be a part of next.“What luck really means to me is preparedness meeting opportunity,” he says. “Everyone has opportunities; are you preparing for yours, or just letting it pass you by?”Visit www.NEPAMiners.com

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-Erika A. Bruckner

October 2012


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BE THE STAR! Don’t See Stars…

Reduce Risk of Concussions in Sports concussion is caused by forceful impact to the head or body; it causes the brain to move rapidly inside the skull. A concussion changes how the brain functions and can have serious and long-term health effects. Symptoms of concussion include headache, nausea, fatigue, confusion, memory problems, abnormal sleep and mood changes. Many times symptoms appear immediately, although some signs may not appear until days later.

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The Stats on Concussions Athletes are most prone to concussions due to the forceful nature of competitive sports. Among student-athletes, concussions are most often caused by contact with another player, the playing surface or a piece of equipment. The leading cause of sports concussion for males is football; for females it is soccer. Among youth ages 5 to 18 years, the five leading activities that lead to concussions are bicycling, football, basketball, playground activi46

ties and soccer. “Student athletes are more prone for adverse and possible devastating effects from concussion as a result of their developing brain,” explains Michael J. Raymond, Ph. D., director of the clinical &

forensic neuropsychology program at Allied Services' Heinz Rehab Hospital in Wilkes-Barre. He says the brain does not fully develop in girls and boys until ages 18 and 21, respectively. While it is easy to diagnose concussion, it is more difficult to properly manage individuals with concussion. He continues,“The potential cumulative effects of multiple concussions over time (prior to the brain fully recovering from an initial concussion) HappeningsMagazinePA.com

can be devastating. The worst scenario is permanent brain damage or even death; this is well documented in clinical literature.” Government Action Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett signed the Safety in Youth Sports Act, which became effective July 1. Pennsylvania is the 31st state to pass a strong youth sports concussion safety law. The Act requires materials be made available which inform and educate students, parents and coaches about concussions, the risks of concussions and traumatic brain injuries and the dangers of continuing to play or practice while suffering a concussion or traumatic brain injury. In public school events, athletes showing signs of a concussion or traumatic brain injury must be removed from play and can’t return until they’ve been medically cleared by a licensed healthcare professional. Continued on page 48.

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Don’t See Stars... (Continued from Page 46) Tips to Prevent Sports Concussion From Michael J. Raymond, Ph.D. 1. Use proper helmets/headgear for each specific sport. 2. Don't play injured; orthopedic injuries (e.g., knee, ankle) may place you at risk for other injuries. 3. Develop proper techniques for tackling, heading the ball, etc. 4. Strengthen neck muscles to decrease shock following a blow to the head. 5. Adhere to specific guidelines and protocols for a safe return to play following concussion. 6. Get baseline testing, so if you are injured, your doctors will have the most information for a safe return.

Dr. Raymond is director of the clinical and forensic neuropsychology program at Allied Services' Heinz Rehab Hospital in Wilkes-Barre. He is a Credentialed imPACT™ consultant, board certified neuropsychologist, recipient of several prestigious neuropsychology-related awards and a clinical associate professor at The Commonwealth Medical College. –Melissa Sanko

7. Seek medical treatment immediately after a head injury.

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What’s Cookin’ at

THE BUTLER’S PANTRY in Montrose

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Lodge Lodge Enameled Enameled Cast Cast Iron Iron Cookware Cookware available available in in 44 qt., qt., 66 qt. qt. in in red, red, cobalt cobalt and and apple apple green. green. Shown: Red 6 qt. $139.99 Quilted 14” x 51” Williamsburg “Pembroke” Runner $27.99 Oven Mitt/Pot Holder Set $13.99 Also available: Placemat $7.99, Napkin $5.99 Special Hours for October 6,7 & 8. Artist Open House Tour Sat. 9:30-5, Sun. 10-4, Mon 10-4 570-278-2191 9/15 S. Main St., Montrose Tues-Sat 9:30-5 p.m. Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m. butlerspantry@stny.rr.com Bridal Registry

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Bullying and Pennsylvania Anti-Bullying Laws

by Atty. Karoline Mehalchick Oliver, Price & Rhodes

Having a son or daughter fall victim to a bully is a topmost concern of any parent. Research* on bullying suggests that approximately 7080% of school-age students have been involved in bullying at some point during school years, whether as bully, victim or bystander. According to a 2009 survey** about 28 percent of students ages 12-18 reported being bullied at school during the school year. Of those students, 19 percent reported being called names, insulted and such; 16 percent reported being the subject of rumors; nine percent said they had been pushed, shoved, ripped or spit upon. Six percent reported being threatened with harm. Five percent reported being purposely excluded from activities. Four percent reported that others tried to make them do things against their will, and three percent reported that their property had been purposely destroyed by others. In 2009, 22 percent of students who had been pushed, shoved, tripped or spit upon reported being injured. PA’s Office of the Attorney General reports that although boys engage in more physical bullying, girls are often more active in cyber bullying. The Office also reports that nearly nearly 60 percent of boys who are classified as bullies in grades six through nine were con50

victed of at least one crime by the age of 24. Even more dramatic, 40 percent of them had three or more convictions by age 24. Fortunately, in 2008, the PA Legislature put into place a statewide policy regarding anti-bullying in elementary and secondary public schools and private schools which receive state funding. The PA School Code mandates that every school district have an anti-bullying policy, with disciplinary and preventative attributes. The law also makes each school have a point person to whom reports of bullying are directed; mandates the policy be publicly accessible and reviewed with students at least once a year and does not require or limit schools to go after bullying off school grounds. Under current PA law bullying is defined as “an intentional electronic, written, verbal or physical act, or a series of acts... —Directed at another student or students —Which occurs in a school setting —That is severe, persistent or pervasive —Substantially interferes with a student’s education —Creates a threatening environment —Substantially disrupts the orderly operation of the school As a result of this law, every www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com

school district in PA is required to have an anti-bullying policy in place. Most local school district’s policies are readily available on the district’s website. Parents are encouraged to review and become familiar with these policies as we embark on another school year. Pennsylvania’s Office of the Attorney General further defines cyber bullying, the specifics of which are included in the full version of this article at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com * The National Association of School Psychologists (“NASP”) ** The School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey performed by the National Center of Education Statistics. Karoline Mehalchick is an attorney with the law firm of Oliver, Price & Rhodes in Clarks Summit, where she specializes in general civil and commercial litigation, education law and labor and employment law. A graduate of the Schreyer Honors College at the Pennsylvania State University and Tulane University School of Law, Attorney Mehalchick resides in Scranton with her husband and children.

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October Special B

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NEPAVoices

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Philip P. Condron, President, Condron & Company s the eldest of six who grew up in the Green Ridge section of Scranton, and the only one of our clan who returned here to raise a family, I occasionally reflect on the benefits of living in Northeast PA.

provide caring friends who will happily watch your home while you’re on vacation and share the joys and

As my wife, Joelyn, and I are both native Scrantonians, returning here as young marrieds in the early ‘70s to start a family was not a difficult decision. Both sets of parents lived here, and we had numerous friends who never left. Employment opportunities met our expectations, so we were content to remain.

challenges of raising children. Neighborhood churches are more than places of worship; they are also connection points to lifelong Since then we’ve discovered friends, both in front of and that advantageous housing behind the altar railing. Physicians are caring and proficient while our hospitals have kept abreast with healthcare advances. The 13 colleges and universities in Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties not only provide education for our offspring; they Condron’s wife Joelyn and grandchildren Matt, attract bright future Patricia, Jack and Brendan leaders from surrounding states to expand and costs enabled us to become enhance our temporary homeowners (partners with population. the bank) early on. Traditional neighborhoods Then there are the Chamber 52

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of Commerce type benefits of living here. The road network can have us in NYC or Philly in two hours, DC or Boston in four or five and the Jersey Shore in 3ish. We have four distinct seasons… most years. Although the news may not lead us to think so, we have a low crime rate (excluding the white collar shenanigans). And we have a wide selection of sports and cultural opportunities for both participants and spectators. We are fortunate to have an effective network of nonprofit organizations to assist the less advantaged among us. And they additionally provide satisfying challenges to the many area volunteers who readily step up to assist their neighbors. In the days of Vaudeville, performers who came to Scranton would boast,“If you can play Scranton, you can play anywhere.”We can rephrase it- “If you can live in the Scranton area, why would you live elsewhere?”

- Philip P. Condron, President, Condron & Company - a Scrantonbased, full-service advertising and public relations firm selected as the 2012 Small Business of the Year by the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce

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Wondering What Their Will Bring?? Getting ready for school means more than shopping for uniforms, backpacks and school supplies. It also means preparing for their financial future with Life Insurance from New York Life. Let me educate you on the options for giving your children the most selfless gift they’ll never ask for.

John Mackarey* LUTCF Agent, New York Life Insurance 220 Penn Ave. Suite 100 Scranton, PA 18503 570-969-3111 www.JohnMackarey.com

*Registered Representative, offering securities through NYLIFE Securities LLC, member FINRA/SIPC.


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Paint a Fall Scene 16th Annual Artists’ Open House Weekend

he PA Council of Arts, along with area businesses and artists will sponsor the 16th Annual Artists' Open House Weekend October 6-8, from 10-6 p.m. throughout Susquehanna County.

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The weekend includes works by 28 artists at 22 locations and will feature art ranging from paintings, prints, wood carvings, pottery, jewelry, photography and more. Art will be on sale at each studio. New this year are two guest artists Sharon DeGennaro and Mark Chuck. DeGennaro will be exhibiting her pottery and scarves at the studio of Joe DeOrio in Thompson, and Chuck will be exhibiting his

pottery at Earl Lehman's studio near Laceyville. Admission is free; local restaurants will be open. Download a map at www.ArtistsTour.com. To request a brochure, call The Butternut and Second Story Books at 570-278-4011. –Vince Mecca

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NEPA’s Premier Family-Owned, Full-Service Stove & Fireplace Shop Complete Sales & Service Fireplaces Stoves • Inserts Metal Chimneys Marble & Granite Facings Wood Mantels Skidded Wood Pellets Skidded Chestnut & Rice Coal Visit us at one of our two locations: 130 Narrows Road, Route 11, Larksville, PA 7 Woody’s Place (off Route 6) Honesdale, PA 1-800-468-7855 www.woodysfireplace.com

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AIRING of the Quilts In 2002, Jeannette Kitlan, owner of Endless Mountains Quiltworks, began Tunkhannock's “Airing of the Quilts” quilt show. She wanted to give back to her community after the town gave a warm welcome to her quilt shop the year prior. She asked homeowners and businesses if she could hang quilts on their porches and storefronts, and hundreds of people attended to see the displays. In 2010, a trolley was added to carry attendees through the onemile area that will be decorated with quilts. October 6 will mark the 11th Annual Airing of the Quilts. It will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event is a free outdoor quilt show located along the streets of Tunkhannock. Attendees will see hundreds of quilts hanging from homes, businesses and

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stores. The event will be held rain or shine. Indoor venues include The Pennsylvania Invitational Quilt Show and the Twin Tiers Shop Hop. Lunch will be served at the Tunkhannock Middle School for $5. A lecture by award-winning quilt designer Joyce Hughes will take place at Dietrich Theater at 11 a.m. A free exhibit titled “First Generation Quilt Maker” will display the life works of expert quilt maker and applique artist Louise Schelter at the Father Nallin Center. Other attractions include a walking tour along Tioga Street and a sewing machine indoor tent sale. New this year at the Wyoming County Courthouse will be a special free exhibit of quilts made by men of the community. Visit www.AiringOfTheQuilts.com

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Designer brands that claim to be “exclusively at” many stores can take a back seat to a truly one-of-a-kind creation designed by someone who knows exactly what you want...you! Wisnosky’s master craftsmen can guide you from concept to completion, using modern techniques and personal, in-store service. Drop by to see how Wisnosky Jewelers can make custom jewelry dreams a reality!

230 West Tioga St. • Tunkhannock • 570.836.5754 • www.wisnosky.com

October 2012

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SUNNY GIFT IDEAS

Find a Haven of Distinctive Gifts in Honesdale unflower Hollow is celebrating its first anniversary on Main Street in Honesdale! This 2,000square-foot, bilevel shop is a haven for specialty gift items and specializes in jewelry and handbags. The shop also carries pottery, home decor, braided

S

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Visit NEPA’s Largest and Best Kitchen and Bath Cabinetry Showroom With over 150 years of combined experience, our people make the difference. Let one of six designers help you develop the kitchen of your dreams. Choose from five brands. Our designers can work with ANY BUDGET.

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SUNNY GIFT IDEAS (Continued from Page 58)

rugs, garden items, hand-sewn quilts, candles, kitchen items, seasonal items and locally made products. Jewelry ranges from a $10 bangle to handmade silver pieces. Owner Bonnie McDonald has been offering unique items since 1995.“Our motto is ‘affordable elegance,’ and our goal is to present an array of wares not usually found in your local mall or gift shop, at affordable prices,” says McDonald. The inventory is ever-changing, as they find unique lines at trade shows many times a year. Fun and creepy Halloween products and elegant Christmas items are in stock now. Shoppers can find unadvertised specials. –Kieran Call 570-253-0411. O’Brien Kern

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Full Service jewelry repair done on premises • Watch battery installation • Engraving

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October 2012


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Major lines of furniture, executive furnishings & authentic oriental rugs, all at drastic reductions.

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In the Nation, we don’t drive safely for nothing. Nation,OCT we12don’t drive safely for nothing. PGS 51-72.qxd 9/12/12 9:35 AM Page 12

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nal feature. Annual credits subject to eligibility requirements. Max. credit: $500. Details and availability vary by state. Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Company and Affiliated Companies, wide affiliated companies are mutual companies and not all Nationwide members are insured by a mutual company. Nationwide, Nationwide Insurance, the Nationwide framemark, Nationwide is On Your ing Deductible are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. ©2012 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. GPR-0106M1 (07/12)

Nationwide is On Your Side.®

Vanishing Deductible is an optional feature. Annual credits subject to eligibility requirements. Max. credit: $500. Details and availability vary by state. Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Company and Affiliated Companies, Columbus, Ohio. Not all Nationwide affiliated companies are mutual companies and not all Nationwide members are insured by a mutual company. Nationwide, Nationwide Insurance, the Nationwide framemark, Nationwide is On Your Side, Join the Nation and Vanishing Deductible are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. ©2012 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. GPR-0106M1 (07/12) e is an optional feature. Annual credits subject to eligibility requirements. Max. credit: $500. Details and availability vary by state. Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Company and Affiliated Companies, all Nationwide affiliated companies are mutual companies and not all Nationwide members are insured by a mutual company. Nationwide, Nationwide Insurance, the Nationwide framemark, Nationwide is On Your and Vanishing Deductible are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. ©2012 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. GPR-0106M1 (07/12)

Mary’s Home Furnishings–

Take a drive up State Route 29, 18 miles north of Tunkhannock – visit Mary’s on the hilltop, South Montrose. Continuing display of original local paintings intermixed with antique furniture and home décor. Hours: Sat.10:30-5; Sun. 1-5 and by chance, or call 570-278-2187. Layaways; Visa/ MasterCard. www.antiquessusqco.com/marys

Olde Barn Centre/Antiques & SuchAn 1860s Quaker Barn filled with antique furniture of all periods. 12 antique dealers with treasures & collectibles for your home. Credit cards and layaway welcome. 1605 Rte. 220 Highway, Pennsdale. 1 mile east of exit 15 of I-180. Open daily 10-5. Info: 570-546-7493 or www.oldebarncentre.com

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THE MALL AT STEAMTOWN

Now Offering

The Mall at Steamtown , conveniently located off exit 185 of I-81, is NEPA's only two level, state-of-the-art, regional downtown center featuring Boscov's,The Bon-Ton, plus over 80 specialty shops, Marquee Cinema 8, The Station Café Food Court,Hurricane Grill & Wings and Starbucks!

Oct. 5-7 – Sports Card & Collectible Show Oct. 27 – Malloween • 10 a.m.-noon

300 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton (570) 343-3400


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& MORE

HOME DÉCOR

ary’s Home Furnishings in South Montrose will host An Extravaganza of Art and Antiques October 6- 8, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Monday.

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Ambrose of New Milford will showcase acrylics; Nance Brown of Brackney, watercolors, and Cheryl Korb of Dalton, folk art in oil. Gere will offer her shop’s fine selection of antique furniture from the 1800s and 1900s, vintage home décor and collectables.

“The building will be bursting with original art pieces, large and small, from three local artists who will be present to discuss their work,” says Mary Gere, owner of Mary’s Home Furnishings and coordinator of An Extravaganza of Art and Antiques. Anita

Visitors can enjoy refreshments, visit artists and enter to win gift certificates; $50 redeemable toward one purchase of original art or $50 toward an antiques purchase. Visit www.AntiquesSusqCo.com/Marys or call 570278-2187. –John Favini

We Buy, Trade & Sell All Types of Furniture antiques &

new!

Come in to see our large selection of oil paintings & prints!

USA Discount Stores 1007 Commerce Blvd. Dickson City • Next to Chuck E. Cheese • Open 7 days 570-487-1791 • Hours: Mon-Tues-Sun 10 a.m.-6 p.m.;Wed thru Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m.

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Visit NEPA’s Largest and Best Kitchen and Bath Cabinetry Showroom With over 150 years of combined experience, our people make the difference. Let one of six designers help you develop the kitchen of your dreams. Choose from five brands. Our designers can work with ANY BUDGET.

Also Included: • $57 s/f Granite (no hidden fees) • Choose from 10 Colors • Free Stainless Steel Sink

• Free Countertop Template • Free Delivery • Free Cabinet Design

*Save up to 40% on Dura Supreme Promotion

FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED • ALL CABINETS MADE IN THE USA • THOUSANDS OF CABINETS IN STOCK

Louis Industrial Dr. • Old Forge • 344-0443/457-6774 • mariottibp.com Daily 8 - 4:30 • Wed. & Thurs. 8 - 8 • Sat. 8 - Noon | Warehouse open until 4:30 Daily and Noon on Saturday


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“10 Things I LOVE! ”

1

My family! You are the company you keep!

Melissa Sanko, Happenings Magazine Editorial Assistant, shares 10 things she loves!

2

Hearing the sweet sound of,“Ohhh… Aunt Melissa…!”

4

Spending long weekends in Bethany Beach, DE, with family and friends! I was just two weeks old on my first trip there!

3

5

A good workout... especially at Lake Scranton, Nay Aug Park and The Lackawanna River Heritage Trail!

6

Polish food! I make sure to attend St. Stanislaus' Polish Food Festival every year!

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A finished project! (Like the photo shoot for this September 2012 issue!)

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Having that one, go-to outfit I feel confident in!

8

7

My home in Moscow that has been in my family for generations!

European-influenced design. I'm drawn to sleek, clean lines and light neutral colors.

10

Learning how to intricately decorate cupcakes with my best friend and cousin, Devon!

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Plan a scenic autumn drive in the countryside with a visit to an authentic Pennsylvania barn in a beautiful rural setting.Whether a beginning collector or a seasoned connoisseur, you will not be disappointed in the assortment of treasures you will find at Carriage Barn Antiques– the largest store of antiques and accessories in NEPA! So as you enjoy the fall foliage this October, stop by and meet our Red Fox Lab, Lucy and discover what treasures await.

Wo r t h

a

t r i p

1494 Fairview Road, Clarks Summit, PA From I-81: Take Waverly Exit 197

f ro m

a ny wh e re !

Going North: right at end of ramp, then the next two rights Going South: left at end of ramps, then the next two rights

www.carriagebarnantiques.com • (570) 587-5405


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Bewitched by Style Event Benefits Dress for Success® Lackawanna he Wine, The Witches and The Wardrobe is an autumn affair designed to remind everyone that a little black dress is still full of magic! The event will be Thursday, October 18 at POSH @ The Scranton Club in downtown Scranton from 5 to 9 p.m. Suggested attire is a little black dress, accessorized with offerings from participating retailers.

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Activities include fortune-telling by Madame Gregova, Damian the Magician, the “Witch Shoe is for You?” shoe auction, raffles, shopping and learning the latest fashion and makeup

tips. Proceeds benefit Dress for Success® Lackawanna, a non-profit organization offering services to Michael Straub Photography help women enter the workforce and maintain employment. The organization is known for providing suits to women. Dress for Success goes beyond by providing a week’s worth of work attire to the client once she is hired, including everycontinued on page 70

Affordable Elegance

Jewelry, Home Decor & Unique Gifts

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Perez - Design. Build. Remodel. We bring a unique approach and exquisite design to every remodel with a team effort that has been recognized as one of the top 50 in the nation. From initial design to the last brush stroke of paint, we make it simple and enjoyable!

Call us and see why we’ve been trusted by homeowners since 1981. – A FULL SERVICE REMODELING COMPANY –

570-333-0505 • www.perezdbr.com Inspiration Center located at 611 South State Street, Clarks Summit


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Bewitched by Style (Continued from Page 68)

thing from lipstick to shoes! The recently expanded service area now covers Lackawanna, Wyoming, Susquehanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties. Dress for Success also added new employment retention services with access to computers, networking and training opportunities. “With the need for more fund- Vendors include: Pierre’s, Runway, Tastefully Simple, ing because of our new initia- Lia Sophia, Well-Heeled, Over The Moon, Fusion Hair Design, Bella Faccia Chocolates. Twiddly Bits & Treasures, tives, we are working hard to Thirty-One, Advocare make this a night to be remembered,” says Carla Zero, we intend to have guests giddy from the chairperson of the fundraising committee moment they are greeted at the door!” and board member.“From the venue to Tickets are $35. Call 570-941-0339, or visit vendors, shoes to spooky entertainmentLackawanna@DressForSuccess.org. –Melissa Sanko

LOG HOME SEMINAR Oct. 27th 10-Noon

OPEN HOUSE Sept. 15th 1-5 p.m. RSVP

866-438-5194 • www.BarnaLogHomesPA.com 70

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95 Levitt Hill Rd., Tunkhannock, PA October 2012


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Savor Sweet Homegrown Success! PA Apple N’ Cheese Festival ropical Storm Lee devastated the grounds of the Manley-Bohlayer Farm last September, threatening to thwart the PA Apple n’ Cheese Festival held each year on the grounds in Canton.

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A Helping Hand With the hard work of volunteers, the mess was cleaned up in time for the festival.“The festival is run entirely by volunteers, so we are all working for the love of this event,” Angie Schoonover, food chairperson for the event said. On October 6 and 7, the festival will celebrate its 23rd year. About 10,0000 people are expected each day to enjoy the food, art, entertainment and activities such as wine tasting and apple butter making.

Why Apples n’ Cheese? “Our area has a long history with both apples and dairy products,” Schoonover says.“This festival was created to exhibit two great local products and to encourage people to sample the many fine products grown and made here in Bradford County.” Schoonover said many come to the festival to do their holiday shopping from the craft vendors, who feature handmade items. Local bands perform all weekend, and there are activities like pumpkin painting and pony rides for the kids. Admission is $5 for adults, $2 for 13-18 and free for kids 12 and younger. Visit www.PaAppleCheese.com. –Danielle Del Prete

Furniture of all periods... “A beautiful blend of past & present.” U.S. Rt. 220N, 1/2 Mi. East of Pennsdale • Credit Cards/ Layaway Open 10-5 Daily • 570-546-7493 • www.oldebarncentre.com

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Extraordinary Projects Begin with an Exceptional Builder Let Custom Building by Carriage Barn Make Your Dream Come True

Custom Building by Carriage Barn offers every service you need to take any renovation project from start to finish.Whatever style you’re looking for – from old-fashioned country to ultra modern – Carriage Barn’s experienced design experts will produce outstanding results, helping you achieve “the whole look” that you want.

Sam Mundrake 1 4 9 4 FA I R V I E W R OA D • C L A R K S S U M M I T • ( 5 7 0 ) 5 8 7 - 5 4 0 5


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PET TALES

Puppy Mill Pets...a Lesson in Patience

: I just adopted a Beagle who was rescued from a puppy mill. She seems sweet but is naturally timid and withdrawn. How can I gain her trust and get her to interact?

Q

: Training, which is the focus of this column, usually bolsters a dog’s confidence by establishing clear boundaries and expectations for which rewards and consequences are spelled out, enabling the dog to “control” its environment by behaving in ways that bring about predictable outcomes and thus enhance its sense of security. This will eventually be true for your new dog, but not at this stage. Now she needs time more than anything; time to get over her shell shock, acclimate to the new realities, process her place in it and gradually learn to trust.

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For your Beagle, there is no clearcut recipe for success.

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Patience is the primary ingredient and should be applied liberally in every interaction with your dog. Consistency is essential…the whole family should agree on a plan for integrating her into the household. Leniency is necessary, since home life is a foreign world and she’s clueless of her role. Understanding her perspective will help keep your expectations within a realistic framework. If your Beagle came from a “puppy mill” she may have been caged her entire life. Calling her “naturally timid and withdrawn” is to ignore her plight. Chances are, had she had a rich, stimulating, “normal” environment in which to mature, she’d be a typical happy Beagle. Dogs, like people, are not born pre-programmed with all the knowledge and understanding required to lead a well-adjusted life. Experience and sensory input during puppyhood proHappeningsMagazinePA.com

vide learning opportunities preparatory for life. Unfortunately, deprivation narrowed your dog’s reality until recently and, for her, what we call “real life” may seem nightmarish. Everything with which she is now confronted is new and virtually incomprehensible. Imagine never having seen the sun nor felt the earth and grass under your feet, splashed in water or been held or petted or talked to. She’s on sensory overload right now. Fearful, avoidant behavior doesn’t necessarily equate with past abuse; it could easily arise from mere lack of experience. View your role as being the choreographer of a sequence of positive-feedback loops. She’s not yet ready to be your pet, she needs first to realize what it is to be a dog. Give her those opportunities. Encourage her to stretch her boundaries but respect her hesitations, yet don’t baby her. Together you’ll compound a recipe that will provide the sustenance she needs to flourish. –Beth Dorton Dillenbeck www.hollowhillsgsd.com October 2012


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Who’s the Cutest of them All? et at ctober.cpom! O e t i r o v PA r youer nfaingsMagazine Vote fwo.H p p a ives ner rece The win gs bandanna! nin a Happe

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Halloween Edition! “Grace”

“Amigo”

Marsha Pa rr reigns ove ish’s 9-year-old Dom e r the Clark s Summit h stic Short Hair ome they sh are. o lives in dle mix wh o o /P se e lt evil is a Ma . -old little d ell This 4-year m with Mali Campb Da s ’ le p ip h W

“Daisy”

“Obie”

s festive in akes thing m g o d ll u English B nlon’s Old Joanne Sca bington home. A their South

The votes are in... September’s Pet of the Month is... Dudley Pacovsky of West Pittston. Congratulations!

This lil pum p lives in We kin is a 2-year-old S h st Chester with Alex Yo ih-Poo who ung.


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October 2012


Great Giving Contest

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The

Search for NEPA’s Most Philanthropic Company

Happenings Magazine is seeking to award the “Most Philanthropic Company in NEPA 2012.” Is your company passionate about giving back? Does your company culture encourage unique philanthropic endeavors, such as creative fundraising options or employee volunteerism?

Enter today!

Nominations accepted at HappeningsMagazinePA.com and become property of Happenings Magazine. Nominations due October 29. Winners will be announced in an upcoming issue.


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enise S. Cesare serves as President and CEO of Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania. Happenings Magazine recently discussed changes in health care and health insurance with her.

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Photo: Guy Cali Associates

What is your approach to tackling current issues in health insurance? The issues are those that have plagued the health care industry for the past several decades. Affordability of health care - how do we improve the alignment of the financial incentives within the health care industry (insurers, consumers, providers, government) to obtain the highest value for the price paid? The new health care law is attempting to deal with the issues of cost, quality and value; however, it focused only on the financing sector of the health care industry – the insurers.With newly created incentives for innovative approaches to tackling the cost and quality problem, we are beginning to see more collaboration among all the key constituents. Essentially we need a new financial model that incents and rewards all parties to work collaboratively to both manage health care for those who need care and to focus on improving the wellness of the population at large. Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania is continuing in its efforts to work more collaboratively with providers, through alignment of costs and quality measures and in joint ventures where possible, and will continue its efforts toward promoting wellness and prevention to improve affordability and value for our subscribers. What are your concerns about health care and insurance in Northeast PA? I remain concerned about the rising costs of health care within the community and access to quality services as we continue to see our population age. Over the past 18 to 24 months, we’ve seen a dramatic change in the delivery system landscape within NEPA.We are fast approaching having only two competitive delivery systems from which to receive services.While both systems are large and well capitalized, as they con-


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Health Insurance in

Northeast PA tinue to grow well beyond the NEPA boundaries, it will become more difficult for the community to influence which services are provided locally and at which price points.The introduction of greater transparency initiatives (and an understanding of how to use transparency information) within the health care industry, where consumers can view and compare price, quality and outcomes among insurers and providers of care will play a key role in “consumer oversight” of health care. Recruitment of physicians into our region also remains a concern. As the health care reform law is enacted, coupled with our aging population, having sufficient access to physicians will be critical.The Commonwealth Medical College will play a key role in the attraction, development and retention of physicians for our local communities. What are your thoughts on the recent hospital mergers? I see both a benefit and a potential detriment. Consolidation brings the ability to infuse capital into local hospitals which desperately needed to invest in upgrades in technology, services and people. We are already seeing the value of having Community Health System and Geisinger Health System invest in upgraded

facilities, information technology and recruitment of additional physicians and services for the region. However, as with any investment, there must be a return on that investment, and the community will be looked upon to make that happen. Ensuring the appropriate community oversight and/or influence to manage the time and rate of that return will be important, so that we don’t see a dramatic increase in the cost of health care for our region at a time when our economy is struggling. How do you advocate for healthier lifestyles? Poor health habits and lack of an active lifestyle contribute to our region’s health woes. Smoking and weight issues lead to diabetes, cardiovascular health issues and bone and joint issues. These diseases, among the most preventable, are the largest contributors to the rising cost of health care in our region. We have tried through many means to educate our subscribers and the community at large. We offer individual coaching, online educational materials and printed materials to our subscribers and proactively send this information not only to our customer but the community at large in our newsletters and materials

provided at our sales locations and in provider offices. As with so many things, until there is a need to change, most people maintain the lifestyle they currently have. I believe the best way for us to make a lasting and impactful change is to begin with the education of our youth. Exercise and healthy eating habits should be established very early in life and become a “way of life.” A partnership with the schools, insurers, the delivery system, employers and government is the type of collaboration needed to truly make a difference. Why is there a rise in health insurance costs? It can be largely attributed to the way our health system is designed. We have developed a system that rewards individual volumes of activity to treat illness rather than rewarding collaboration or activity to improve the overall health and wellness of our populations. For example, today we pay physicians for the number of “things” they do…perform procedures, consult on illness and spend time with ill patients. We pay hospitals only when they have patients in the beds or perform tests. We don’t reimburse any part of the delivery system when people stay continued on page 80


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Health Insurance in NEPA continued from page 79

Photo: James Ruane

well. Therefore, there is no incentive to keep people well. Insurance companies, who base their income on estimating the amount of claims they’ll pay and then adding a profit margin, make more money when less services are rendered. As you can see, our financial incentives are in opposite directions. This is what creates the problem. Some parts of the system need to do more in order to survive while other parts perform better when less is done. As consumers, we will only begin seeing better control of health care cost trends when all stakeholders involved in purchasing and/or delivering health care benefit by keeping people well. The system needs a major financial overhaul in order to get us all rowing in the same direction. A key contributor to rising health care costs is the cost of technological improvements, whether in clinical delivery diagnostics or information. While we continue to see significant advances in technology that help diagnose, treat and improve quality and length of life, we must realize the companies that spend hundreds of millions of dollars to develop the technology also need a return on these sizeable investments. When first introduced, new technology tends to be expensive and thus creates an incentive for those who make it available to utilize it more frequently in order to cover the costs of their purchase.

A driver in health care costs is the fact that we are living longer. As the baby boomers enter the age which has a higher level of use of services and now utilizes new technology which improves and extends life, the overall cost of health care increases. We are beginning to see a number of indicators that would cause a potential slowdown in the rate of rise in costs. The fact that consumers are sharing more of the cost of services is leading to a greater level of awareness and understanding of how utilization (use of services) drives the cost of health care. In addition, we are seeing greater levels of collaboration among insurers, providers and employers to innovate and find ways to redesign the perverse incentives which exist within our delivery and financing system today.

What are the benefits of wellness programs at work? Studies have shown that wellness programs have a dramatic impact in reducing the health care cost trends experienced by employers. The key is to find a way to engage employees and their families in a manner that will be sustained over time for each individual. Many times it takes a devastating event for us to re-examine our health habits. The benefits are obvious; better health leads to better quality of life. In addition, many employers, includ-

ing BCNEPA, offer financial incentives to promote healthier lifestyles and chronic disease management.

What effects will the Affordable Care Act bring? The Affordable Care Act has already had a dramatic effect on all of those involved in health care. This will continue and heighten as we near full implementation in 2014. For employers and individuals in particular, there will be a need for increased engagement in terms of understanding the various health insurance options that will be available in the market and taking a more active role in personal health and wellness. The advent of health insurance exchanges will further the evolution that has already begun toward a more consumer-oriented, electronic market where access to information is as close as your computer or smart phone. We find ourselves on the precipice of yet another exciting era in health care where companies such as ours hope to lead the way in helping our customers make the right choices.

How will Blue Cross be part of the solution for affordable insurance? Blue Cross is continuing to work with provider systems toward more value-based care reimbursement models which address affordability and improved outcomes. We have redesigned many of our


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product offerings to give employers and employees greater flexibility in purchasing affordable products. We will continue to offer health management services to all of our customers as part of our product offerings. Unfortunately, no one segment of the system can solve the affordability issue alone. It will require new systems of reimbursement, value-based care delivery, a greater engagement by the employer and consumer population and collaboration in the new accountable care era.

What would Blue Cross change with regard to health care reform? Because the health care system is comprised of so many independent and discrete parties, none of whom have the same financial success model, it would be very difficult for any one entity within the system to truly implement meaningful change without the engagement of all parties. Having said that, I believe the government may have gone too far in some areas while completely ignoring others. Creating a level playing field so that all insurers play by the same rules and take the same risk makes a great deal of sense. Eliminating pre-existing conditions, requiring coverage, and therefore, payment for preventative activities are all steps in the right direction. And, requiring that all individuals carry coverage is also necessary, so that people don’t simply purchase insurance when they need it and

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aughter), hley Cesare (d Cesare. ey Cesare), As se hl ni As De to d ' ce an stock (fian (husband) Michael Haro (daughter), Louis Cesare re sa Gabriella Ce

Getting Personal with Denise S. Cesare Title: President & CEO, Blue Cross of NEPA Years Experience: 30+ Accolades/Awards: Athena Award,Wilkes University Outstanding Alumni Award, Pi Alpha Alpha, Great Women of NEPA Award, American College of Healthcare Executives Regents Award Hobbies: Reading, boating and bicycle riding

drop it when their care is over. Without the mandate, it would be like allowing us to purchase fire insurance after our house has burned down and dropping the coverage once it’s rebuilt. Unfortunately, with all its good intentions, the health care reform act never addressed the underlying issue of the cost of care. By ensuring that all Americans have access to health insurance, we haven’t addressed the issue of whether there

Hometown: Wilkes-Barre Twp. Favorite Quote:“You miss 100% of the shots you don't take.”- Wayne Gretzky Greatest female role model: Amelia Earhart Advice for successful women: First, believe in yourself; then, hold to the truth; commit to the hard work necessary to succeed, and be your own best advocate.

are enough physicians and health care professionals to care for all of us. In Northeast PA, 85% to 95% of our health insurance premiums are driven by how much we use and how much we pay for health care services. Until we as a community have a better understanding of how all of these health care pieces work together, it is difficult to affect significant positive changes in our system.


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GO PINK!

GOING 60 AT 65 G

Continue the Walk until a Cure Erases the Fear! inny SnyderAshman, a vibrant 65-year-old woman and 14-year cancer survivor, is training for the Susan G. Komen ThreeDay, a 60-mile walk to fund the fight for a cure! From October 5 through 7, Snyder-Ashman will walk 20 miles each day across a variety landscapes in and around Philadelphia. As a part of “Ginny’s Journey,” SnyderAshman has committed herself to the cause, pledging, "I'll walk; I'll run; I'll crawl. I'll do whatever it takes, but I cannot– I will not– sit back and do nothing. Most importantly, I'll kneel. I'll kneel and pray that my children and grandchildren will never have to hear those horrible three words, ‘You have cancer.’"

breast cancer in 1986 at the age of 65. Snyder-Ashman was diagnosed with colon cancer at 51 and is now 14 years in remission. Many of her extended family members and friends have been affected by cancer. Norene Holeva, a dear friend and the paternal grandmother to Snyder-Ashman’s granddaughters, passed away after a long and courageous fight with breast cancer in December 2011. Before passing, SnyderAshman told

Training for the Course Snyder-Ashman began training in February, and she had difficulty completing just two miles! She now walks from five to 18 miles daily on a variety of terrains. Throughout her journey, she has struggled with swollen ankles, feet and legs from tendonitis and had to temporarily modify her training schedule to allow her body time to recover. Funding for the Cure Snyder-Ashman began fundraising for the 60-mile trek in December 2011 and to date, has raised $5,400. In August, friends hosted a fundraiser called "Ginny's Journey" at Legends Saloon in Dickson City. Visit www.the3day.org/goto/Gin nySnyderAshman, call 800996-3DAY, or send check payable to "Susan G. Komen 3-Day" to Ginny SnyderAshman, 705 N. Main St., Archbald, PA. 18403.

Personal Connection Snyder-Ashman’s mother, Louise Snyder, died of 82

Holeva she would walk in honor of her courageous fight. She finds a constant source of motivation and inspiration in women that she meets through Camp Bravehearts, a specialized oncology camp for women.

–Melissa Sanko

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2013

®

Gallery Hope OF

Awareness, screenings, early detection and intervention are the keys in the fight against breast cancer. That’s why Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania created the Gallery of Hope. Since 2000, the Gallery of Hope has been sharing stories of breast cancer survivors from across the region whose experiences help educate and motivate others to actively protect their health. If you know someone who has battled breast cancer and been an inspiration to others, we urge you to nominate them for the 2013 Gallery of Hope. Share their story. Honor their courage. Help us educate others.

NOMINATE A SURVIVOR FROM YOUR COMMUNITY FOR THE 2013 GALLERY OF HOPE ON WWW.BCNEPA.COM/HOPE BEFORE NOVEMBER 2, 2012

To display the Gallery of Hope exhibit, please visit BCNEPA.COM/HOPE Become a supporter of the Gallery of Hope on Facebook.


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GO PINK!

Ladies Go Pink! In Memory of Michele

he 6th Annual “Michele’s Ladies in Pink” event will be held October 21 from 2 to 6 p.m. at Fiorelli's in Peckville. The event is held in memory of Michele Zini who passed away from breast cancer in 2005 at the age of 46. Since then, Zini’s friends and family members have joined together and formed,“Michele's Ladies in Pink,” to carry on her spirit.

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The event has grown from 50 attendees to 400. Entrance to the allwomen event includes a buffet, raffles, entertainment and local vendors offering jewelry, purses and other accessories.“We try to add something different every year! 84

We diversify the entertainment, and we continue to surprise the winning scholarship recipients by announcing them at the event,” says Linda Canevari, vice president of the planning committee. Over the last six years, $20,000 has been raised. Funds benefit a scholarship fund for a Valley View High School senior and local families affected by breast cancer. Donations can be sent to,“Michele’s Ladies in Pink,” 131 Basalyga Street, Jessup, PA 18434. Contact Canevari at 570383-2031 or Wendy Mitchko at 570-3834162 for tickets. -Melissa Sanko

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GO PINK!

Living the Sweet Life AFTER CANCER n an early spring day in 2010, Cathy Reppert was at her annual physical exam while her husband Dave and daughter Caroline were packing for a family trip to New York. During the exam, Dr. Doug Coslett felt something out of the ordinary. Instead of a family trip, Reppert underwent a mammogram, MRI and biopsy. The diagnosis: breast cancer.

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“I was shocked,” Reppert recalls.“I wasn’t expecting it.”The accountant turned cake baker had already overcome thyroid cancer in 1997 and 1999. She was ready to do whatever it took to beat breast cancer. Within three weeks, Reppert underwent a bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction with breast surgeon Louis Blom and plastic surgeon Ira Krafchin. She chose that option to ensure that she would be cancer free.“I wanted to be cancer free; I wanted to survive– to thrive,” explains Reppert. After six months of not feeling well with no known explanation, Reppert began to feel better just five days 86

after surgery amid drains and bandages. Her husband and daughter were her rocks. Family and community support gave her time and energy to heal. Doctors advised her to get back to work as soon as possible. Within two-and-ahalf weeks, Reppert was back in the kitchen at Truly Scrumptious, her designer cake studio in Kingston. While she couldn’t fully participate in the process yet, being back doing what she loved was instrumental to her recovery. She had orders for a bridal shower cake to be delivered one month after her procedure and both a wedding cake and groom’s cake within three months.“The mother of the bride had so much faith in me; I knew I was going to do it,” says Reppert.

\skills. She drew strength from other women who had also battled breast cancer. She never expected to have this peer group; now she cherishes sharing experiences with these women. For women who may be hesitant to get checked, she advises, “Don’t ever be afraid of mammography. It’s unpleasant for five minutes. Diligence equals a greater chance of survival.” For those diagnosed, she reminds them that cancer is not a death sentence; embrace the life saving treatments. To learn more about Reppert and her cake studio call 570-283-CAKE or visit www.EatCakeFirst.com –Kieran Kern

Another key component of Reppert’s recovery was Candy’s Place, a cancer wellness and resource center in Forty Fort. She started there in the fall of 2010, participating in programs to rebuild her strength and help regain HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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COMPASSIONATE CARE CLOSE TO HOME. Serving our community since 1971. A diagnosis of cancer is life changing and answers to your treatment questions may be hard to find. When you or a loved one faces cancer, you need a team you can count on to provide the necessary expertise to treat your cancer and provide you with compassionate support throughout your treatment. Our team of seven physicians, physician assistants, nurses, and staff will be with you and your family every step of the way, providing superior care in one of our two state-of-the-art facilities.

Hematology & Oncology Associates is pleased to welcome Kishori Veerabhadrappa, M.D. to our practice. Dr. Kishori is a graduate of J J M Medical College, Davangere, India, where she earned a Bachelor in Medicine and Surgery. She completed her internship and served as Chief Resident in Internal Medicine at Brooklyn Hospital Center, Brooklyn, New York. Dr. Kishori also completed her fellowship in Hematology and Medical Oncology at the Brooklyn Hospital Center. She is board certified in Internal Medicine and board eligible in Hematology and Medical Oncology. Dr. Kishori is seeing patients in the Dunmore and Morgan Highway offices and holds privileges at our local hospitals. She is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Kishori Veerabhadrappa, M.D.

William J. Heim, MD Salvatore J. Scialla, M.D Richard G. Emanuelson, MD

Hematology & Oncology Associates of Northeastern, PA is recognized by the QOPI® Certification Program, an affiliate of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and its Quality Oncology Practice Initiative.The QOPI® Certification Program provides a three-year certification for outpatient hematologyoncology practices that meet standards for quality cancer care.

Lisa C. Thomas, MD Carl Barsigian, MD Kristin M. Liptock, DO Kishori Veerabhadrappa, MD 1100 Meade Street, Dunmore, PA 5 Morgan Highway, Suite 8, Scranton, PA (570) 342-3675 • www.cancercarenepa.org


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GO PINK!

Health & Your Family Tree Risks & Prevention for Those with Family History of Breast Cancer

f a family member is affected by breast cancer, a woman’s risk nearly doubles,” explains Richard Emanuelson of Hemotology and Oncology Associates of NEPA. The risk is 3.6 times greater for a woman with two firstdegree relatives, such as a mother or sister, who have had the disease. If a woman’s relative developed breast cancer before the age of 30, her risk is three times greater. If her relative was older than 60, her risk is 1.5 times greater.

I

In addition to annual mammograms and healthy living, there are other things that can be done for those with high risk.“Preventative surgery is most protective, including removal of the breast or ovaries if risk is high enough,” Dr. Emanuelson explains. Drugs that block hormones such as tamoxifen and anastrozole may reduce a woman’s risk if taken properly.

Not All Inherited Only 5 to 6 percent of breast cancers are associated with inherited genes, and not all genes pose the same threat. Women who carry the BRCA1 or BRCA2

gene have a 50 to 85 percent chance of developing breast cancer. According to Dr. Emanuelson, one out of every 800 to 1,000 women carry either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Genetic testing can confirm if someone is a carrier, but testing isn’t for everyone. “Only people who will proactively take steps to reduce risks should be tested. If family history is positive for breast or ovarian cancer, or if a person has breast or ovarian cancer, testing analysis should be performed to see if testing is appropriate,” Dr. Emanuelson says. –Danielle Del Prete

Take Precaution Dr. Emanuelson recommends getting a yearly mammogram beginning at age 35. Lifestyle modifications, such as maintaining a healthy weight, getting physical exercise and eating a low-fat diet, may help reduce risk. Women should also avoid smoking, minimize their alcohol intake and avoid taking estrogen supplements.

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Proud to Support

2012 Komen NEPA Race for the Cure Dr. Deborah M. Cassidy, D.C. 113 Seventh Street Milford, PA 18337 (570) 409-9500

Master Diane Meckwood Prislupsky 801 Scranton-Carbondale Highway Eynon, PA (570) 262-1386 • spakarate.com

Tobyhanna Federal Credit Union 315 Franklin Avenue Scranton, Pa. 18503-1201 1-866-TOBYFCU (862-9328) www.tobyhannafcu.org

Small enough to care, large enough to win.™

411 Jefferson Avenue, Scranton PA (866) 770-4878 www.scartelli.com

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SERENITY

Martial Arts 113 West Drinker St., Dunmore, PA (570) 207.9286 www.TraditionalHomeHealthcare.com

Abington Healthy Family Chiropractic P.C.

Dr. Erika S. Joyce B.C.A.O./Activator Technique 535 Northern Blvd., S. Abington Twp. (570) 586-1166 (570) 347-3939

400 S. State Street Clarks Summit, PA (570) 878-5392


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Proud to Support

2012 Komen NEPA Race for the Cure

Dr. Deborah M. Cassidy, D.C. 113 Seventh Street Milford, PA 18337 (570) 409-9500

Tobyhanna Federal Credit Union 315 Franklin Avenue Scranton, Pa. 18503-1201 1-866-TOBYFCU (862-9328) www.tobyhannafcu.org

Small enough to care, large enough to win.™

411 Jefferson Avenue, Scranton PA (866) 770-4878 www.scartelli.com

114 Washington Street East Stroudsburg, PA 18301 (570) 420-0994 www.thedressingroompa.com

SERENITY

Martial Arts 113 West Drinker St., Dunmore, PA (570) 207.9286 www.TraditionalHomeHealthcare.com

Abington Healthy Family Chiropractic P.C.

Dr. Erika S. Joyce B.C.A.O./Activator Technique 535 Northern Blvd., S. Abington Twp. (570) 586-1166 (570) 347-3939

400 S. State Street Clarks Summit, PA (570) 878-5392


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5 Ways to Prevent Workplace Injuries orkplace injuries can occur at any time, in any job. Injuries in manual or physical labor are generally sprains and strains and commonly involve the back. Repetitive stress injuries that result in wear and tear on the body are also common. Office workers are at risk for neck strain from poor postures at the desk and finger, wrist and elbow injuries from computer and mouse usage.

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Perry Koslow, regional vice president of Pro Care Physical Therapy, shares a few tips for preventing these injuries. 1. Be aware of your body and work environment. “Physically, your body must be prepared to perform the activities that you ask of it,” explains Koslow.

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2. Be more fit than your job duties require.

3. Use equipment correctly. This includes proper computer screen height, workstation height for a factory worker or tools for a manual laborer. 4. Modify the approach. Sit with good posture; adjust computer and chair height, and take breaks to stretch. 5. Get educated. Koslow says,“Education about job duties, work environment, and body mechanics help keep you safe at work.”

If You Think You May be Injured Koslow encourages all workers to pay attention to their bodies and take notice of any unusual pain or discomfort. Early detection of injuries is key to making a full recovery. ProCare Physical Therapy offers a wide range of therapy to prevent and treat workplace injuries. A team of physical therapists in 11 locations across North Central and Northeast PA is highly skilled to get the results that patients desire. Visit www.ProCare-PT.com. –Casey Phillips

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Mary Erwine - RN, MSN President

270 Pierce Street, Suite 101 Kingston, PA

570-288-1013

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HEALTH

Sports Injury Q & A Answers from Mark Rowan, PT, DPT, Director, Spine and Sports Medicine Center, Allied Services Integrated Health System

Q. What is the most common sport injury? A. Knee injuries comprise about 55% of all sports injuries. Shoulder injuries are also common. Q. How can a student athlete prevent injury? A. Adequately train for a specific sport. Never wait for the sport itself to get you in shape. Fitness levels do play a role in injury prevention. Injury rates and time lost to rehabilitation are less if athletes add strength training to their conditioning program. Consistent sport-specific training drills can possibly result in a significant reduction in the number muscle strain injuries. Q. What activities are best for elementary students? A. Sports should be developmentally appropriate, safe and fun. While children have traditionally been encouraged to participate in aerobic activities such as 94

swimming and bicycling, there is evidence that strength training can also be a safe and effective method of exercise for children, provided that appropriate guidelines are followed. Q. What is best for middle school students? A. Team sports, fair play and competitiveness. Many schools or local fitness centers offer sports leagues, such as basketball, volleyball, football and soccer. If they’re not available, running, biking, karate or golf provide plenty of exercise. Q. What is best for high school/college students? A. Training levels, level of condition and endurance now rest solely on the athlete. Prevention of injury and physical safety are high priorities at this age level.

Compression and Elevation. If pain, swelling and other symptoms are not improving, consult your physician. Any injury which results in severe pain, deformity or joint instability should be examined immediately by a health care professional. Q. What should a recovered athlete note as they return to the sport? A. The athlete must be ready to return. Maintain balanced physical conditioning. Staying fit while injured aids in the return to play. Athletes must be educated on the proper way to stretch. Pre- and post-event stretching is recommended. Flexibility allows the muscle tissue to gather adequate blood flow to enhance the athlete’s optimal performance. Flexibility can augment the amount of force put into an activity or sport.

Q. What should an athlete do after an injury? A. RICE, or Rest, Ice, HappeningsMagazinePA.com

October 2012


Win

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Two Tickets to the December Radio City 5th performance of the from Radio Christmas Spectacular City Christmas Abington TravelSpectacular Wednesday, from Abington December 5! Travel!

About Abington Travel...

here’s how...

Visit HappeningsMagazinePA.com to request more information or mail your request to: Happenings Magazine • P.O. Box 61 • Clarks Summit, PA Request Information from any Visitors Bureau or Attraction Listed Below: • Abington Travel • Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau • Luzerne County Convention & Visitors Bureau Just request information to be entered to win!

October 2012

Abington Travel has been a proud part of the community for more than 30 years. All agents have more than 20 years experience in the travel industry. As a full-service travel agency, Abington Travel offers competitive Internet pricing with a personalized touch. Customers are Congratu their priority as A u gust’s Ex lations to they offer winner, S plore More! expert guidtacey ance, professional ScrantoAncculto of advice and ways to save time and money. Abington Travel acts on customers’ behalf if any unforeseen problems arise before, during or after a trip. 570-586-1666 www.AbingtonTravel.com

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FOOD&DRINK

Bazil is not your father’s Italian restaurant. While its menu is full of rich flavors one might expect, the setting is distinctly modern. Owner Pete Montana describes the atmosphere as “upscale Italian.” A small garden surrounds the dining area on the outdoor patio. “It's a place you can come with a date or family or sit at the bar and enjoy dinner,” says Montana. A full-service bar stretches across one wall offering everything from fine wine to mixed drinks

Restaurant Italiano Old World Flavors in a Modern Setting

and beers. Wednesday nights at Bazil are Jazz nights. Even with the upscale appearance and high-class taste, the menu offers a wide selection of affordable fare- from pasta to fish to flatbreads. Call 570-586-5517. -John Favini www.twigsradio.com

www.twigscafe.com 96

570.836.0433 • twigscafe.com Rte. 6, Historic Downtown Tunkhannock

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Farmers Market to you! CO-OP

Fresh from the...

Open Until Thanksgiving Rain or Shine!

Mon.-Wed.-Fri. Open at Noon

THE LARGEST Farmer-Owned Farmer’s Market in Pennsylvania!

Celebrating 73 Years!

Fresh Vegetables Fruits • Flowers Fresh Meats • Jams Jellies • Honey • Breads Homemade Pies Cookies • Candy And So Much More!

Off Providence Road, Scranton • 961-8251 Located off Providence Road Exit, Scranton Expressway... Follow the Signs


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FUNDRAISER Creates a Stir!

Chocoholic Frolic, October 20

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f you cover it in chocolate, they will come! For seven years, legions of devotees have made the Chocoholic Frolic a not-tobe-missed event on their social calendar. The annual fundraiser for SCOLA (Scranton Council of Literacy Advance) has turned up the heat on the chocolate tasting event, with samplings from over 20 of the area’s best restaurants, bakeries, caterers and chocolatiers. While attendees to the October 21 event at the Scranton Cultural Center can indulge in a rich variety of cakes, mousse, ice cream and candies, the chocolate here is not just for dessert! According to Director of Development, Nancy Dressel, the trend toward savory items began three years ago. “We have some really talented chefs and bakers in the area, and this event allows them to strut their stuff,” explains Dressel.“People get adventurous; it’s exciting to see what they’re going to bring.” In the past, Carmen’s made a cocoa dusted tenderloin with white chocolate sauce that was so popular, it was added to their restaurant menu. This year’s culi-

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nary lineup includes creations from Patsel’s, Carmen’s, POSH and The Hilton Scranton & Conference Center. Dressel says people embraced this festival from the start. An initial gathering of 400 swelled to 700, prompting a change in venue and a redesign of the event layout. To accommodate the growing numbers, SCOLA also began selling advanced tickets and added a patron ticket option that allows a limited number of people the opportunity to enter an hour earlier. Dressel describes the adult-only event as a,“big, happy party.” Attendees enjoy a complimentary glass of champagne, coffee and tea while sampling as many of the chocolate-centric dishes as they desire. Rich Leonori provides

live piano music, and guests are encouraged to browse and bid on an assortment of basket raffles. Chocoholic Frolic is the only fundraiser for SCOLA, which provides adult literacy and English as a second language programs to between 200 and 300 people each year. Recently SCOLA lost all of its state funding, making the event more crucial than ever. Although most of the tutoring is done by volunteers, SCOLA needs to provide volunteer training and program materials. The event runs from 6-8 p.m. Tickets are $26 in advance and $30 at the door. Attendees must be 21 or over. Call 570-3460759.

–Barbara Toolan

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Craft Beer & Food Pairing Friday, October 19 6:30 p.m.

Employee Pumpkin Carving Contest October 27-28

Thanksgiving Thursday, November 22 Seating at 1:00 & 4:00 p.m.

Breakfast with Santa Saturday, November 24 Seating at 9:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Lunch Tues.-Fri. 11:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Dinner Tues.-Sat. Beginning at 5:30 p.m. Brunch Buffet Sunday 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. PRIVATE DINING AVAILABLE

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October 2012

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Cooper’s

... BE HOOKED! One Visit and You’ll

Cooper’s Cabana Still Open! at

Cooper’s Pittston Location Spectacular Views of the River

YOUR EXPERIENCES ARE OUR HISTORY Family owned & operated for more than 65 years! Cooper’s is rated one of the Top 100 Restaurants in The U.S. by “Restaurant Hospitality Magazine” Voted NEPA’s “Best Restaurant” in “Where the Locals Eat Magazine” NEPA’s Destination for Legendary Dining

Rich in History & Taste www.cooperscabana.com

701 N. Washington Avenue Scranton • (570) 346-6883 On the Waterfront 304 Kennedy Blvd. Pittston • (570) 654-6883

Gift Certificates AVAILABLE IN ANY AMOUNT AT BOTH LCOATIONS

For More Information and Photos, Visit our Website

Over 400 Bottled Beers &


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Seafood House Scranton & Pittston Got Plans for Halloween? How about eating a meal

S

to die for? Come for a night of mischief

At The Ship

Sun. October 28th 2012 at 4 p.m.

701 N. Washington Ave • Scranton, PA (570) 346-6883

Join us, if you dare for a four course meal paired with six ghoulish beers of the season.

On The Waterfront 304 Kennedy Blvd • Pittston, PA (570) 654-6883

Diners are invited to wear a costume for the evening. Prizes will be awarded!

Live entertainment by the Wannabes! $ 49.95 per person Reservation Required

Call 346-7049 AT COOPER’S IN SCRANTON

Since 1948

www.coopers-seafood.com over 40 Rotating Draft Beers!

Approved


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WHERE TO DINE Anna Maria’s Restaurant- Family owned and operated since 1985. Italian/American cuisine. Featured on Food Network’s “Restaurant: Impossible.”Wide variety of entrées, including pasta, steak and veal. Indulge in homemade desserts, specialty coffees. Catering available anytime. Monday-Thursday 11a.m.-9 p.m., Friday 11a.m.10 p.m., Saturday 4 p.m.-10 p.m., Sunday closed. 984 E. Drinker Street, Dunmore 570-348-0188. www.annamariasdunmore.com

Apple Valley Restaurant- Casual and affordable dining since1996. Serving burgers, grilled sandwiches, fajitas, specialty pasta, BBQ, ribs and more. Full service pub with daily food and drink specials. Seven gift shops, koi ponds, 1800s schoolhouse, tourist information booth...all on eight acres. Exit 46, I-84.104 Rte.6-Milford, Pa. 570-296-6831. www.applevalleyrestaurant.com

Arcaro & Genell- Serving original Old Forge White and Red Pizza in the “Pizza Capital of the World!” Familyowned since 1962. Traditional Italian entrees, seafood, steak, chicken and more. Open Mon-Sat. Serving lunch at 11 a.m., dinner at 3 p.m. Take out available. On and off site catering for any occasion. 443 South Main St., Old Forge. 570-457-3529/570-457-5555. www.arcaroandgenell.com

Armetta’s- see ad page 106 Bazil- see ad page 104 Carl Von Luger Steak & Seafood- A family tra-

or in our comfortable outdoor dining area. Mon-Sat 6:30 a.m. -3 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m.-3 p.m. 300 Spruce Street, Scranton. 570-871-4137. Visit www.downtowndeliandeatery.com/menu for daily specials.

Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Restaurant- Overlooking beautiful Lake Wallenpaupack, Ehrhardt’s cozy atmosphere and delicious food will have you returning time and time again. We offer a variety of steaks, seafood, salads, burgers, sandwiches and more! Open 7 days a week 11:30 a.m. Pub open later. Route 507, Hawley. 570-226-2124. www.ehrhardts.com The French Manor- see ad page 125 Garibaldi Authentic Mexican Cuisine Features freshly made burritos, enchiladas, quesadillas, guacamole, tortas (sandwiches), salads and tacos in seven varieties. Also very refreshing and natural juices. We are BYOB and Fridays are BYOT (bring your own tequila and we do the margaritas). Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 309 North Main Ave-West Side Scranton. 570-341-9030. www.letseat.at/garibaldiauthenticmexicancusine

Grassi’s- see ad page 105 Gresham’s Chop House- Dine in our beautiful dining room, cozy bar or under the awning on our deck, and enjoy dazzling views of Lake Wallenpaupack while choosing from delicious steaks, seafood, Italian specialties and more. Visit us at greshamschophouse.com Rte. 6, Hawley. Open 7 days at 4 p.m. 570-226-1500.

dition since 1887. Casual fine dining in downtown Scranton. USDA prime steaks & fresh seafood. Lunches from $5.95; dinners starting at $10.95. Entertainment. Friday Night Jazz Lounge 7-11 p.m. Sunday brunch 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Dinner dress code. Outdoor dining available. Open daily. 301 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. 570-9555290 www.carlvonluger.com

Carmen’s Restaurant & Wine Bar- see ad page 140

Coccetti's A Restaurant & Bakery- Enjoy charming decor & unique breakfast & lunch creations including baked stuffed French Toast & funky chicken salad. Daily homemade baked goods including our popular chocolate fudge iced brownies! Daily breakfast and lunch specials. Tuesday-Saturday 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Follow us on Facebook. 1124 Main St., Peckville. 570-489-4000 Coney Island Lunch- A Scranton tradition since 1923. Taste the Texas Wieners and Texas Hamburgers that made us famous. Serving homemade soups, oldfashioned rice pudding and chili-con-carne. Enjoy our legendary chili sauce, created from a closely-guarded family recipe, eat in or take it out. Open Mon.-Sat. 10:30 a.m.- 6 p.m., Sun. noon-6:30 p.m. 515 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. 570-961-9004. www.texas-wiener.com Cooper’s Seafood- see ad pages 100-101 Downtown Deli Eatery Restaurant-Scranton's

Gubbio’s- Unique Italian restaurant and bar. Award winning chef Bill Genovese serves homemade pasta dishes, Provimi veal, chicken, prime steaks, fresh seafood and large selection of appetizers. 10 draft beers, martini and wine menu. Entertainment Friday and Saturday. Yearround outdoor dining. On and off site catering. 411 Chestnut St., Dunmore. 570-955-5179. Katrina’s Pizza & Hoagies- Casual, comfortable dining. Try our popular 8-inch hoagie for $3 or our personal pizzas for $3.99. Breakfast daily 6 a.m.-noon. Lunch & dinner served Tues.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m.-11p.m. Dine in/Take out. Delivery available. Credit Cards accepted. 813 Boulevard Ave. Dickson City. 570-489-8955.

BEST New York style deli/restaurant serving breakfast and lunch daily...breakfast available all day! Dine inside 102

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WHERE TO DINE Settlers Inn- see ad page 60 Six East Restaurant- see ad page 106 Smuggler’s Cove- see ad page 107 State Street Grill- Cozy & casual street-side dining. Award-wining patio. Voted Best Chef 2008, Best Ambience 2011, Friendliest Bar 2012. Popular for cocktails and small plates. Wide ranging American Cuisine. Lunch Mon.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Dinner Mon.-Sat. 410 p.m. Sunday Brunch 10 a.m. 114 S. State St., Clarks Summit. 570-585-5590 www.thestatestreetgrill.com

Kelly’s Pub & Eatery- Established in 1990 by the Cosgrove sisters. Family, friendly atmosphere. Serving, soups, appetizers, sandwiches, burgers, pizza, fries, cold beer and Award Winning Hot Wings. Take out orders available and gift certificates. Credit cards accepted. Handicap accessible. 1802 Cedar Avenue, Scranton. 570-346-9758. www.kpehotwings.com

La Tonalteca- see ad page 108 Ledges- see ad page 125 Leggio’s Italian Ristorante- Affordable family dining in a Tuscan / Mediterranean decor. Breakfast. Tues.- Fri. 7-11 a.m. Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Lunch & Dinner Sun. - Thurs.11a.m.-10 p.m. Fri. & Sat.11a.m.-11p.m. Full Bar. Happy Hour. Food Prepared to order. Appetizers. Seafood, chicken, veal, pasta. Pizza, sandwiches/wraps. 64 East Center Hill Rd. Dallas 675-4511

Manhattan Manor- Carbondale's newest upscale restaurant/bar/lounge offering small plates (for sharing) of Italian, American and International cuisine. Meet friends for drinks or relax with family in the casual nonsmoking atmosphere. Owned and operated by the Wallis family. New outdoor patio opening this spring! Open Tues-Sat from 4 p.m. 8 Salem Ave. 570-282-2044 Patsel's- see ad page 99 Perkins Restaurant & Bakery- see ad page 138 P.J.’s 1910 Pub- Unwind in our relaxing & warm pub for camaraderie & spirits. Open daily at 4 p.m. offering classic snack fare, featuring everything from burgers & wings to soups & salads. Friday happy hour from 5-7 p.m. with complimentary hors d’oeuvres & drink specials. In Scranton’s newest luxury hotel, the Hilton Scranton & Conference Center, 100 Adams Ave. 570-343-3000.

Quaker Steak & Lube- see ad page 138 Sand Spring Modern Cuisine- Exciting food made from fresh, vibrant ingredients. Casual atmosphere with personalized service and a dynamic wine list. Awarded Open Table’s “Fit for Foodies,”“Best Service,” “Best Wine List,” and “Best Overall” in the Pocono Mountains and Philadelphia Suburbs. 570-595-3015. Reservations recommended. Dinner Wed–Sun. Sand Spring Rd., Cresco www.sandspringdining.com October 2012

Stirna’s Restaurant & Bar- More than 100 years in service. Catering on & off premises seven days a week, for all your needs- large or small. Exclusive caterer for LaBuona Vita, formally the Parish Center, Dunmore. Visit our smoke-free bar & restaurant. Hours: Tues.-Sat. 4 p.m. Until closing. 120 W. Market St., N. Scranton 570-961-9681 570-343-5742 Stone Bridge Inn & Restaurant- Quaint European village nestled on a hilltop, surrounded by rolling countryside – discover Northeast PA’s best-kept secret! Excellent cuisine in a casual atmosphere, multilevel tavern & patio with entertainment. Monthly Wine Tasting Dinners. Serving dinner Wed.-Sun. I-81, Exit 206, Rt. 374 East two miles past Elk Mountain, Union Dale. 570-679-9500. www.stone-bridge-inn.com Terrace Garden Cafe - Enjoy a front row seat to the beautiful changing seasons. Lunch Tues-Sat, dinner Thursday-Friday-Saturday during winter. Great new menu by Executive Chef, David Howe. Enjoy a cocktail at our full service bar. Private parties available Sun. & Mon. 829 Old State Road-Clarks Summit. 570-319-1441

Tiffany’s Tap & Grille- see ad page 118 Tokyo Tea House- Authentic Japanese cuisine, sushi & vegetarian specials. The finest miso soup & traditional Japanese desserts including Mochi & green tea, ice cream, Kids favorites. Open for lunch & dinner, Saki, beer, cocktails. Easy to get to from anywhere in NEPA, 1/4 mile west of Interstate 380, Rte. 940 Pocono Summit. Closed Tuesdays. 570-839-8880. www.tokyoteahouse.us

Trolley’s Bistro at Casey’s Corner- Casual dining inside the Hilton Hotel. Featuring an expansive breakfast buffet daily and lunch buffet Monday-Friday. Menu service and private dining also available. Open for dinner nightly. Enjoy a relaxed atmosphere and fabulous menu items including fresh seafood flown in daily. Validated parking in the Medallion Garage. Hilton Scranton & Conference Center, 100 Adams Avenue, Scranton. 570-343-3000.

Twigs- see ad page 96 Yume Sushi, Seafood & Grill-

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see ad page 109

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FOOD

Haunted Hallowed Acorn Squash with Witches Mushroom Risotto From the kitchen of Michael Davis, Executive Chef Susquehanna Health

Acorn Squash Two Acorn Squash, tops cut off, seeds removed. Season with salt and pepper, 1 tsp. butter, 1 T. brown sugar. Place on cookie sheet, with open hole facing down. Bake at 375 until fork tender, about 45–60 minutes. While squash is cooking, cook risotto. Mushroom Risotto 1 1/2 cups Arborio rice 4.5 cups hot chicken broth 1/2 small onion diced 1 T. butter 1 cup sliced sautéed mushrooms 1/2 cup Romano cheese Salt and pepper to taste

In sauce pan, melt butter; sauté onions until tender; add Arborio rice; stir on medium heat for two minutes. Slowly add hot liquid, one cup at a time, stirring until liquid is absorbed. Continue this process until rice is tender. Just as the liquid is about to be absorbed, add sautéed mushrooms, half cup Romano cheese and 1 T. butter. Serve Risotto in roasted acorn squash, top with Romano cheese.

DAY WEDNES HT IG JAZZ N G IN R U T A FE O K MAR KO MARCIN

A BEAUTIFUL SETTING FOR ANY OCCASION BRIDAL SHOWERS • BABY SHOWERS • ANNIVERSARY PARTIES SERVING DINNER NIGHTLY • CALL FOR RESERVATIONS

CLOSED SUNDAYS FOR PRIVATE PARTIES • CALL FOR INFORMATION JOIN US FOR TRADITIONAL SUNDAY DINNER SAUCE EVERY DAY

1101 NORTHERN BLVD. • CLARKS SUMMIT, PA • OWNER: PETE MONTANA • 570-586-5517 • ALLABOUTBAZIL.COM

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Our spacious dining room and cozy martini & wine bar are the perfect backdrop for a memorable gathering! Savour a wide array of homemade pasta, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood and top quality meats; enjoy salads, soups and a variety of desserts elegantly prepared by our pastry chef. A separate function space can accommodate groups of 20 to 120 guests for any celebration or business meeting.

Where you will eat well.

Wed.-Thu. 5-9 p.m. • Fri.-Sat. 5-10 p.m. • Sun. 5-8 p.m.

1092 State Route 502 • Spring Brook, PA • 570-471-3016 • www.grassis.net


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Tailgate Buffet at Quaker Steak & Lube

Quaker Steak and Lube in Dickson City is hosting a weekly $11.99 Tailgate Buffet every Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The buffet includes macaroni and cheese, pierogies, build-your-own sandwiches, meatballs, wings, broccoli bites, rice and ribs!

Banquet Facilities Available Scranton-Carbondale Hwy. • Dickson City, PA Phone: 489-8974 • Fax: 489-6414

Hours: Tues.-Sat. 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. Sunday 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. • Monday - Closed

sixeastdiner.com

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ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

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Football will be on screen all season, with prizes offered on select weeks, such as a jersey giveaway and Steelers or Eagles glass plates for the first 24 people! Happy Hour is from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. every night, with $2 margaritas and half-off select appetizers. –Vincent Mecca Call 570-489–5823 (LUBE).

So many great things HAPPENING, we need way more than 140 pages.

• Expanded Events Calendar • Deleted Scenes & Photos Happening This • What’s Weekend? Email Service

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316 Main St. Dickson City (570) 382-3446 Exit190BeerDeli.com

Buster th be at SmugegCrab will Oct. 27 - Delec.rs Cove 1st

Serving Lunch and Dinner Everyday Unlimited Soup and Salad Bar Everyday from 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Only $7.99 Separate Children’s Menu Located on Rt. 611 in Mt. Pocono 570-839-9678

October 2012

www.baileyssteakhouse.com

Serving Lunch Lunch and and Dinner Dinner Every Every Day Day Serving Unlimited Soup Soup and and Salad Salad Bar Bar Every Every Day Day Unlimited from 11:30 11:30 a.m. a.m.-2 -2 p.m. p.m.Only Only $7.99 $7.99 from Separate Children’s Children’s Menu Menu Separate Located on on Rt. Rt.611 611 in in Tannersville Tannersville Located 570-629-2777

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www.smugglerscove.net

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Spooktacular Trick or Treats!

When witches, ghosts and goblins come knocking at your door on Halloween, don’t be scared; be prepared with unique, locally made treats!

Candy Apples from Bella Faccias Personalized Chocolates and Gifts, LCC in Scranton Molded Chocolate from Chocolates by Leopold in Montrose

Find more ideas at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com! 108

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825 N. Keyser Ave. Scranton • 570-963-9433 October 2012

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Little Northeast PA Residents Celebrate Halloween

Sophia Glogowski, Scranton

Zoriannah Taylor, Scranton

Ricky Johns, Old Forge

Haileigh Brown, Dickson City

Jackson Ronaldo Bohanski, Scranton

Chase & Madelyn Newhart, Factoryville ŠGuy Cali Associates

Robby Opalka, Carbondale

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Thomas, Chloe & Michael Lynch, Dunmore

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Ethan Depoti, Greenfield Twp.

October 2012


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Chocoholic Frolic

United Neighborhood Centers Presents The 8th Annual

Sunday, October 21, 2012

Scranton Cultural Center 6-8 p.m. (One hour earlier admission for Patrons) Chocolate themed items from approximately 20 restaurants, caterers, bakeries & chocolatiers – both sweet & savory Live entertainment • Basket Raffles • Cash Bar Complimentary glass of champagne, coffee & tea Proceeds benefit SCOLA • Must be 21 to attend Tickets are $26 in advance $30 at the door for general admission $50 for patron tickets www.uncnepa.org • 570.346.0759 Sponsors include:

October 2012

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Lily Mackarey, Archbald

Madeleine Mackarey, Scranton

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Sean Jr., Abby & Bailey LaBadie, Thornhurst

Lauren Friedman, Scranton

Timmy Naylor, Factoryville

Kendal Depoti, Greenfield Twp.

Lillianna Fells, Covington Twp.

©Guy Cali Associates

Emily McGowan, Scranton

Noah, Cole & Reagan West, Madison Twp.

Joshua Toolan, Greenfield Twp.

Submit your child’s 2012 Halloween costume photo at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com! Your child may be in a future issue!

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The First. Still the Best.

State Theatre Center For The Arts Easy Access From RT 33 South!

Haunted Illusions

Capitol Steps Tue., Oct. 23

7:30 PM - $30/$25 Sponsored by WAEB AM 790 and 69.1 WFMZ-TV

The Magic of David Caserta

Sat., Oct. 27 3 PM & 7 PM 20/$10 (child 10 & under)

$

Steve Martin & Golden Dragon Acrobats The Steep Sun., Nov. 4 Canyon Rangers Sat., Nov. 3 - 8 PM 100 (Gold Circle)/$80/$60

$

Sponsored by B104 and 69.1 WFMZ-TV

www.statetheatre.org

October 2012

1 PM & 4:30 PM 20/$10 (child 10 & under)

$

Capital BlueCross Family Series

Visit www.statetheatre.org for full season schedule! 453 Northampton St., Easton, PA 610-252-3132  1-800-999-STATE

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Haunted Happenings

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Open Everyday. Night Maze on Fri. & Sat. open until 9 p.m.

GROUPS WELCOME!

also U-PICK Pumpkin Patch! Mazeplay© Mazeplay©

fall decorations apples • ice cream

1009 Owego Turnpike • Honesdale, PA • 570.488.5683

Pumpkins Gourds • Corn Stocks Indian Corn • Straw Bales Kiddie Maze • Animals Halloween Decor www.reginafarms.com Rt. 209 -3 mi. north of Marshalls Creek • 570-223-8358 HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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2y9etahr!

Halloween Lantern Tours

A hands-on whimsical spooktacular! Haunted fun house. Mad scientist lab. Magical pumpkin coach. Beware! Fun is every where!

Eckley Miners’ Village October 12, 13, 19, 20, 26 & 27 Oct. 14, 21 & 28 Rain Dates Doors open 6 p.m., tours begin at 6:30 p.m. Last tour 9 p.m. • $10 Adults; $5 Children 6-12 Directions/information: 570-636-2070

60 Morgan Rd., Binghamton, NY thediscoverycenter.org 607-773-8661

www.eckleyminersvillagemuseum.com

7 PM All Year! $5 discount.

4 hour Psychic Evening & Seance

Named by PA Dept of Tourism as one of the most haunted places in the state. PsychicTheater.com

Scranton Ghost Walk

90 min walk of USA’s eeriest haunted city. $3 discount. ScrantonGhostWalk.com RESERVATIONS 383-1821

Birthday Packages Available!

Horror Hall Pennsylvania’s Premier Haunted Attraction

Opening night Fri., September 28 Open September 28, 29 30 & every weekend in October Fridays & Saturdays 6 p.m.-midnight Sundays 6-10 p.m. 11-19 East East Poplar Poplar Street, Street,West West Nanticoke Nanticoke 11-19 For tickets tickets && more more info info visit visit www.horrorhall.com www.horrorhall.com For October 2012

REAPER’S REVENGE

HAUNTED HAYRIDE

Haunted Hayride Lost Carnival Pitch Black

Weekends Sept. 21-Nov. 3

Montdale, PA re a p e rs re v e n g e . n e t

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Haunted Happenings Oct. 1-31, Ghost Walk, 7:30 p.m., downtown Scranton. 383-1821.

2828 Rock Drive, Clarks Summit. www.draculasforest.com

Oct. 1-31, Ghostly Images of Gettysburg Nightly Walking Tour, downtown Gettysburg. 717-334-6296.

Oct. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28, Hotel of Horror, The Legendary Abandoned Lake House Hotel, Rte. 115, Saylorsburg. 992-3278.

Oct. 1-31, Haunted Brewery, Barley Creek, Tannersville. 629-9399. Oct. 1-31,“Haunted! Mysteries of the Beyond,” 7 p.m., Houdini Museum, Scranton. 383-9297. Oct. 1-Nov. 3, Reaper’s Revenge Haunted Hayride, Montdale. www.reapersrevenge.net Oct. 5-6, 12-13, 19-20 & 2627, Night Maze, 6-9 p.m., Yatsonsky Farm, Honesdale. 488-5683. Oct. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28, Gravestone Manor 14: Grimm Inheritance Haunted House, Fri.-Sat. 7-11 p.m., Sun. 7-9:30 p.m. , Trion Warehouse, Wilkes-Barre. 821-6500. Oct. 5-7, 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, Great Flashlight Corn Maze Adventure, Roba Family Farms, Dalton. 563-2904. Oct. 5-7, 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, Horror Hall, Fri.- Sat. 6 p.m.midnight, Sun. 6-10 p.m., 11-19 East Poplar St., West Nanticoke. www.horrorhall.com Oct. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28, Brokenharts Asylum, Fri. Sat. 7 p.m.- midnight; Sun. 711p.m. Luzerne County Fairgrounds. 760-8027. Oct. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28, Dracula’s Forest, Fri.-Sat. 6:30-10:30 p.m., Sun., 6-10 p.m.

Oct. 20 & 26-27, St. Stanislaus Youth Group 19th Annual Trail of Terror, 7 p.m.10 p.m., YMS of R Park, Scranton. 343-6017. Oct. 21,“The Omen,” Pocono Community Theater, East Stroudsburg. 421-6684.

Oct. 6-7, 13-14, 20-21, 27-28, The Great Pocono Pumpkin Festival & Fright Nites, Country Junction, Lehighton. 610-377-5050.

Oct. 24,“Frankenstein and The Bride of Frankenstein,” Great Escape 14 with IMAX, Scranton. www.FathomEvents.com

Oct. 7 & 14, Dunmore Cemetery Tour, 2- 4 p.m. Cemetery Gates, 400 Church St., Dunmore. 344-3819.

Oct. 25, Bumps in the Night, 8-9 p.m., Touchstone Theatre, Bethlehem. 610-867-1689.

Oct. 7, Ghost Stories From The Mines, 2 p.m. Eckley Miners’ Village Visitor Center. 636-2070. Oct. 7, Pets on Parade, Central Park, Honesdale. Oct. 12-13, 19-20, Historic Ghost Walks of PA, 7-9 p.m., Old Mill Village Museum, New Milford. 434-3353. Oct. 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, Haunted Lantern Tours, 6:309 p.m., Eckley Miners’ Village, Weatherly. 636-2070. Oct.13, Sunbury Historic Spruce Street Cemetery Tour, 6-9 p.m., rain date October 20. 286-7768. Oct. 20, 2012 Pocono Mountain Elvis Festival “Spooktactular” After-Hours Party, 10 p.m., Fernwood Event Center, Bushkill PA. 518- 681-7452. Oct. 20, Haunted Museum Day, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Children’s Museum, Bloomsburg. 389-9206.

Oct. 25, Safe Halloween, Trick-or-treat begins at 6 p.m. Viewmont Mall, Dickson City. Oct. 25, Halloween Parade, 7 p.m., downtown Honesdale. Oct. 26, Children’s Fall Festival, 3:30-7 p.m., Danville Community Center. Must preregister. 925-314-3400. Oct. 26,“Ghosts,” a Presentation by Judy Cook, 7:30 p.m., Eastern Monroe Public Library, Stroudsburg. 421-0800. Oct. 26, Trick-or-Treat, 6-8 p.m., Children’s Museum, Bloomsburg. 389-9206. Oct. 26, Blackmore’s Night, Sherman Theater, Stroudsburg. 420-2808. Oct 26-27, Halloween Haunted Village, 7- 10 p.m. Old Mill Village Museum, New Milford. 434-3353. Oct. 26-28, Haunted Mine Tours, 5-10 p.m., No. 9 Coal Mine & Museum, Lansford. 645-7074. continued on page 118

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ONLINE TICKETIN G

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Haunted Happenings (continued from page 116) Oct. 27, Haunted Illusions, State Theatre, Easton, 610-252-3132.

Holiday of the Dead Movie, Sherman Theater, Stroudsburg. 420-2808.

Oct. 28, A Night of Mischief, 4 p.m., Cooper’s Seafood House, Scranton. 346-7049.

Oct. 27,“Rocky Horror Picture Show”, Sherman Theater, Stroudsburg. 420-2808.

Oct. 27, Halloween Party, noon-2 p.m., Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, Scranton. 342-8300.

Oct. 29-30, SPRI Ghost Hunting 101, 6-8 p.m. & 9-11 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 344-111.

Oct. 27, PEEC-A-BOO, 4-7 p.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319.

Oct. 27, Edgar Allen Poe Halloween Reading, 6-9 p.m., Grey Towers National Historic Site, Milford. 296-9625.

Oct. 29, Halloween Night Hikes, 6:30 p.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061.

Oct. 27, Malloween, Mall at Steamtown, Scranton.

Oct 28, Cemetery Walk at Grey Towers, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Grey Towers National Historic Site, Milford. 296-9630

Oct. 31, CAB Event: Halloween Party, all day event, Penn State Wilkes-Barre.

Oct. 27, Trick or Treat Parade, Activities at noon, parade at 1:30 p.m., Roba Family Farms, Dalton. 563-2904. Oct. 27, Masquerade Ball to Benefit Children’s Advocacy Center, Camelot, Waverly. 969-7313. Oct. 27, Zombie Walk &

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Oct. 28,“The Dawn of the Dead,” Pocono Community Theater, East Stroudsburg. 421-6684.

Oct. 31, Halloween Parade, 6 p.m., downtown Hawley. Oct. 31, Halloween Party, 5-8 p.m., downtown Waymart.

Oct 28, Mystery at the Masonic, 6-9 p.m. Scranton Cultural Center. 346-7369.

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October’s

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Can’t-Miss Events

Autumn Timber Festival

October 6-7, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Shawnee Mountain Ski Resort Get a taste of all that nature has to offer and enjoy the beauty of fall. The festival includes three daily Timber Team Lumberjack Shows, the Marvelous Mutts dog show, live music, pig races, scenic chairlift rides, chainsaw sculptures, food, craft vendors and other live entertainment. Festival parking is free. www.shawneemt.com/sumfall.html 570-421-7231

Haunted Illusions

October 27, 3 & 7 p.m. State Theatre, Easton Celebrate the Halloween season by seeing Haunted Illusions starring David Caserta. The show is packed with magic, illusions and humor for all ages, and it includes disappearing acts, levitation and other unique illusions. Ticket prices range from $10-$20, and advance ticket purchases are recommended. www.StateTheatre.org

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Corky’s Garden Path Greenhouse Fall Open House

October 5-8, Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun. noon- 5 p.m. Corky’s Garden Path Greenhouse, Scott Township Celebrate fall and the start of the holiday season with Corky’s! In addition to special sales on the greenhouse’s extensive collection of plants, gardening products and gifts, customers can enjoy door prizes and delicious refreshments. The open house also boasts the Christmas tree preview sale, offering 30 percent off all pre-lit Christmas trees, the best price of the season! www.CorkysGardenPath.com 570-586-9563

Scranton Community Concert: Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks

Friday October 19, 8:00 p.m. Mellow Theatre at Lackawanna College Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks have been performing since 1976; they will bring their popular sounds to Scranton this fall. The group has played concerts at the Waldorf Astoria, the Rainbow Room, Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and at Jazz Festivals all around the world. The group was nominated for a 2012 Grammy Award, best compilation for visual media, for their work on the HBO series “Boardwalk Empire’s” first soundtrack CD. Tickets range from $20-$30. www.lackawanna.edu/communityconcerts/index.html

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COME VISIT THE ENDLESS MOUNTAINS O F N O R T H E A S T E R N PA !

COME ENJOY THE BOUNTY AT

FALL HARVEST SHOW October 6-7 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday & Sunday Live Music Sat. 2-5 SEA HAG SOAPS & ART MERCANTILE

Tuesday - Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday Noon to 4:30p.m. 1044 McCormack Road, Brackney PA

570-663-2297 | www.seahagsoaps.com

• BAR • RESTAURANT • CATERING • 11 GUEST ROOMS • 24 ROOM ANNEX

Contact the Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau to receive your FREE Visitors Guide 1-800-769-8999 www.endlessmountains.org

54 Main Street, Wyalusing, PA 570-746-1204 • wyalusinghotel.com

www.endlessmountains.org • 800-769-8999


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Historic Ghost Walks of PA October 12-13 & 19-20 • 7-9 p.m.

Costumed storytellers guide small groups by lantern light through the village relating Pennsylvania ghost stories. Admission $5 ages 6 and up Reservations recommended; required for groups of 10 or more Tours depart every 20 minutes

Halloween Haunted Village October 26-27 7-10 p.m. Come see a different side of the Village! A just-for-fun, scare-yourself-silly event! Admission $15 ages 10 and up

Old Mill Village Museum “Where Antiquity Lives”

570-434-3353 • www.oldmillvillage.org Off I-81 exit 223 PA Rte. 848, New Milford, PA

Firenze Vases 16" tall and gorgeous for any decor!

J.R’s HALLMARK Towne Plaza • Tunkhannock • 570-836-6458 Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. • Sat. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. • Sun. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

16th Annual

Open House Weekend

2012

An Art-Lover’s Tradition on Columbus Day Weekend:

October 6, 7 & 8 • 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily 28 ARTISTS AT 19 LOCATIONS!

Dining in Montrose Summerhouse Grill 32A S. Main St. Lunch Dinner Fri. 11:30-1:30 5:30-8 Sat. 11:30-1:30 5:30-8 11-2 Sun. brunch Mon. Closed (570) 278-2000

The Inn at Montrose 26 S. Main St. Lunch Dinner Fri. 11-1 5-9 Sat. 11-1 5-2 a.m. Sun. Closed Mon. 11-5 5-11 (570) 278-1124

Featuring locally grown, organic and sustainable foods

Visit the Butternut Art Gallery 204 Church St., 2nd Floor, Montrose

Tour Brochures Available At: The Butler’s Pantry & Chocolates By Leopold

For more information call (570) 278-4011 or visit www.artiststour.com

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COUNTRY INNS / B&BS Come and enjoy Pennsylvania hospitality at its finest. Call to reserve your special occasion package. Winter ski or summer golf packages, we will cater to guests all seasons of the year. New meeting room and free Internet in rooms. 25161 Route 11, Hallstead. 570-879-2162 or 1-800-290-3922. www.ColonialBrickInn.com COLONIAL BRICK INN & SUITES–

Reserve our cabin in the woods in the heart of the Poconos. Stone fireplace, wood paneling, canopy bed with TV, Jacuzzi for two, covered deck and balcony. Nearby find a spa, casino, antiquing, outlet shopping and outdoor activities. Enjoy our pub and restaurant. Paradise Valley. Cresco, PA 800-392-9400. www.CrescentLodge.com CRESCENT LODGE–

THE FRENCH MANOR– Romantic country inn modeled after a French chateau. Gourmet French cuisine, excellent wines. AAA 4Diamond Award Winner for lodging & dining. Luxurious suites with fireplace, Jacuzzis & balcony. New GREEN spa, Le Spa Foret. Includes indoor pool, hot tub, fitness room, couples’ massage suite, fireplace, pedicures & more. South Sterling, PA. 1-877-720-6090. www.TheFrenchManor.com.

THE JAMES MANNING HOUSE– Enjoy a peaceful stay at this historic 1819 Federal-style house two miles north of Honesdale, PA.Three guest rooms, each with private baths, central AC,TV and WI-FI, feature handmade quilts and antiques. Hearty breakfasts include home-baked goodies served with genuine PA Dutch hospitality. Bethany, PA. 570-253-5573. www.JamesManningHouse.com

MOUNTAINTOP LODGE- Lake Naomi Club, Northeast’s only Five-Star Platinum Club Community has reopened the newly purchased, totally refurbished, 14room mountain-style Bed & Breakfast retreat. Full gourmet breakfast and temporary membership to the prestigious Lake Naomi Club included. Full Coffee/Pastry open to the public. Rte 940 Pocono Pines, PA. 570-646-6636 or 855-LNLODGE. www.MountaintopLodge.com

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COUNTRY INNS / B&BS POCONO PINES MOTOR INN & COTTAGES– Tall pines shade this year-round family resort next to “The Big Lake” & winter ski slopes. Cottages, kitchenettes, motel rooms & a three-bedroom lodge with fireplace are available. Cable TV, DVD,VCR, outdoor pool, BBQ’s & private boat docks. Boating, fishing, shops & restaurants close by. 345 Rte. 507, Tafton. 570-226-2772. www.PoconoPinesMotorInn.com

STONE BRIDGE INN & RESTAURANT– European-style inn, restaurant & tavern in a spectacular country setting. 13 charming rooms, with private baths,TV, A/C, several with fireplaces, free WI-FI. Continental breakfast, indoor pool/hot tub, horseback riding. Excellent dinner cuisine. Exit 206, Rt. 374 East two miles past Elk Mountain, Union Dale. 570-679-9200. www.Stone-Bridge-Inn.com.

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Civil War Living History October 6-7 noon-5 p.m.

Commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War. See reenactments of Civil War era camp life, battles and civilian life. Special exhibit focuses on life in Susquehanna County circa 1862 at home and on the battle front.

Admission $5 ages 12 and up Special School Tour Program Fri., Oct. 5 For info & reservation, call 853-4158

Old Mill Village Museum “Where Antiquity Lives”

570-434-3353 • www.oldmillvillage.org Off I-81 exit 223 PA Rte. 848, New Milford, PA

Leaf Peeping Find Foliage & Fun!

Autumn has arrived! A new publication from the Luzerne County Convention and Visitors Bureau can help visitors plan the perfect route for experiencing the natural colors and cool-weather activities of the scenic season! The 2012 Fall Foliage Driving Tour Brochure highlights parks, attractions, driving routes and points of interest to help visitors experience all autumn has to offer. Request a brochure by calling 888-905-2872 or visit www.TourNEPA.com to download a brochure!

Luzerne County You’ll Find it all Right Here!!

Wilkes-Barre Hazleton

Visit Luzerne County to view Mother Nature’s spectacular fall foliage show. Our Pennsylvania fall foliage driving brochure highlights some special spots and attractions that will capture your interest this season. This is a spectacular time of year to hike and bike on diverse trails ranging from family friendly Rails-to-Trails to more adventuresome terrain. Call 888.905.2872 for a copy of the PA fall brochure or www.tournepa.com

Oct. 4-6 Wilkes-Barre Greek Food Festival at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox church, Wilkes-Barre from 11a.m.-8 p.m. daily, 570-823-4805 or www.greekfoodfestival.webs.com Oct. 12-13 Haunted Lantern Tours at Eckley Miners’ Village, Weatherly, doors open at 6 p.m., 570-636-2070 or www.eckleyminersvillagemuseum.com Oct. 21 5th Annual Tastes of Hazleton at Hazleton Health & Wellness Center, Hazleton, from more information call 570-455-1509 Oct. 28 Martina McBride: One night 2012- presented by PenTeleData at Penn’s Peak, Jim Thorpe, 866-605-7325 or www.pennspeak.com

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Playing at

NOVEMBER 1-4. 2012 Get your tickets at ticketmaster.com today


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FUN FOR

FALL W I T H ROBA FARMS hen autumn chills the air, thousands throughout Northeast PA realize its time to visit Roba Family Farm in Dalton.

W

The farm offers a variety of attractions to appeal to all ages including pumpkin picking field trips, a five-acre cornfield maze and a variety of tasty treats. On a typical fall evening, guests may have a choice of freshly made apple cider doughnuts, funnel

cakes, potato pancakes and hot chocolate. The farm will mark two decades in business this year with a 2012 theme,“20 years of family fun.”The cornfield maze is cut each year to fit the theme. A design is selected during the winter, and the field is cut at the beginning of June. In an average fall season, between 40,000 and 50,000 guests will –Mike Verbickas visit.

Save the Date FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2012 THE LACKAWANNA HISTORICAL SOCIETY WILL PRESENT

A GARDEN PARTY CHAMPAGNE AND DESSERT AT THE CATLIN HOUSE 6-8 P.M. $25.00 PER PERSON WITH

570.344.3841 WWW.LACKAWANNAHISTORY.ORG

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JOIN US AS WE MARK 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE CATLIN HOUSE!

THE

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OCTOBER HAPPENINGS Special Events Oct. 1-4, Fall Film Festival, Deitrich Theatre, Tunkhannock. 996-1500. Oct. 5-7, Savour Fall Wine Harvest Festival, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY. 800-745-3000. Oct. 5-8, 16th Annual Artists Open House Weekend, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., throughout Susquehanna Co. 278-4011. Oct. 6, Pages & Places Book Festival, downtown Scranton. Oct. 6 Joel Hill Sawmill Tours & Demonstration, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Joel Hill Sawmill, Lookout. 224-6722. Oct. 6, Hawley Harvest Hoedown, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., downtown Hawley. Oct. 6, 13, 20 & 27, Downtown Scranton Walking Tour, 11 a.m., Lackawanna Co. Historical Society, Scranton. 344-3841. Oct. 6, 13, 14, 21, 27, 28, Steam Train Excursion to Moscow, 12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Steamtown National Historic Site, Scranton. 340-5204. Oct. 6 & 7, 23rd Annual Apple & Cheese Festival, Manley-Bohlayer Farm, Canton. 673-7222. Oct. 6 & 7, Autumn Timber Festival, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Shawnee Mtn. Ski Area, Shawnee-on Delaware. 421-7231. Oct. 6 & 7, Harvest Moon Festival, Main St., Montrose. 278-1504.

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Oct. 6 & 7, Civil War Living History, noon5 p.m., Old Mill Village Museum, New Milford. 434-3353.

OCTOBER

1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 31

SUN MON TUE

7 14 21 28

Oct. 6 & 7, Harvest & Heritage Days, downtown Honesdale.

Oct. 6 & 7, 38th Annual Harvest Festival, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm, Stroudsburg. 992-6161. Oct. 7, Steamtown Marathon, Forest City to Scranton. 823-2212 Oct. 7, Classic & Antique Car Show, noon-4 p.m., Bingham Park, Hawley. Oct. 12, Garden Party at the Catlin House, 6-8 p.m., Lackawanna Historical Society, Scranton. Oct. 13, Fight for Air Walk, 10 a.m., Nay Aug Park, Scranton. 823-2212. Oct. 13, Out of the Darkness Walk to Prevent Suicide, 9 a.m., Courthouse Square, Scranton. www.outofthedarkness.org Oct. 13, Annual Octoberfest, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Miller Park, East Stroudsburg. 424-7540. Oct. 13-14, Fall Festival & Lumberjack Chainsaw Competition, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sullivan Co. Fairgrounds, Forksville. 482-4088. Oct. 13, Fall Foliage Festival,

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WED THUR

FRI

SAT

Snö Mountain Resort, Moosic.

Oct. 14, A Dream Come True Bridal Show, 1-4 p.m., Split Rock Resort, Lake Harmony. 888-802-2348. Oct. 14, Tour de Pike County, 9 a.m., Milford Beach, Milford. 296-2827. Oct. 18, 6th Annual Taste of Success, 5:30-8:30 p.m., JA of NEPA, Pittston Twp. 602-3600. Oct. 20, 2nd Annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk, 9 a.m., Kirby Park, Wilkes-Barre. Oct. 20, Fall Foliage Train Excursion, 11-3 Steamtown National Historic Site, 340-5204. Oct. 20 & 27, Special Glassblowing Demonstrations & Factory Tours, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Gillinder Glass Factory, Port Jervis, NY. 845-856-5375. Oct. 21, 5th Annual Tastes of Hazleton, Health & Wellness Center, Hazleton. 455-1509. Oct. 21, 8th Annual Chocoholic Frolic, 6-8 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 346-0759. Oct. 27, Masquerade Ball for Children’s Advocacy Center, Camelot, Clarks Summit. 969-7313

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OCTOBER HAPPENINGS Community Events Oct. 1-31, Order Reflective Address Markets, Paupack Twp. Building, Lakeville. 226-3115. Oct. 3, 15th Annual Sports/Celebrity Memorabilia Auction, 7 p.m., Diamond United Methodist Church, Hazleton. 454-4661. Oct. 4, 12th Annual Pink Light Walk, 6 p.m., East Stroudsburg University. 422-1700. Oct. 4-6, Greek Food Festival, 11 a.m-8 p.m., Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, Wilkes-Barre. 823-4805. Oct. 5-6, Rummage Sale, Fri. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. & 5-7 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-noon, United Methodist Church, Dalton. Oct. 6, 13, 20 & 27, Barryville Farmers Market, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Barryville, NY. Oct. 6, SPCA 22nd Walk for the Animals, 11 a.m., Frances Slocum State Park, Kingston. Oct. 6, German Style Dinner, 3-7 p.m., Blooming Grove Volunteer Fire Dept., Lords Valley. 775-7355. Oct. 6, Free Electronics Recycling Day, 9 a.m.-noon, United Methodist Church, Clarks Summit. Oct. 6, PAWS Walk & Blessing of the Pets, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Tobyhanna State Park, Tobyhanna. 350-8798. Oct. 6 & 8, Fall Rummage Sale, Sat. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Mon. 14 p.m., Maple Lake United

October 2012

Methodist Church, Spring Brook Twp. 842-6776. Oct. 7, Oktoberfest, 6-8 p.m., Abington Community Library, Clarks Summit. Oct. 7, Blessing of the Animals, 3 p.m., St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Wilkes-Barre. 825-6653. Oct. 10-11, Fall Rummage Sale, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Wilkes-Barre. 825-6653. Oct. 11, Fundraiser for Aubree DeFazio, 5-9 p.m., Backyard Ale House, Scranton. 343-2258. Oct. 13, Friends of the Abington Community Library Book Sale, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., United Methodist Church, Clarks Summit.

Heights H.S., Clarks Summit. Oct. 20, Night at the Races, 7:30 p.m., Holy Family Parish, Luzerne. 287-6600. Oct. 20, Country Christmas Fair, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., United Methodist Church, Clarks Summit. 587-2571. Oct. 21, Pancake Breakfast, 7:30-11:30 a.m., Pine Mill Community Hall, Equinunk. 224-8500. Oct. 21, Little Sisters of the Poor Annual Homemade Roast Beef Dinner, noon-4 p.m., Holy Family Residence, Scranton. 343-4065. Oct. 21, Hope is on the Horizon, 1 p.m., R. Dale & Frances Huges Cancer Center, Stroudsburg. 977-0872.

Oct. 13, Pork & Sauerkraut Dinner, 4:30-6:30 p.m., United Methodist Church, Dalton.

Oct. 24, Diva Night Out, 6-9 p.m., Inn at Nichols Village, Clarks Summit. 585-2740.

Oct. 13, Chicken or Ribs Barbecue Dinner, noon-3 p.m., St. Michael’s Orthodox Church Center, Jermyn. 876-1456.

Oct. 27, TJWC Fall Fest Arts & Crafts Show, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Tunkhannock Area H.S., Tunkhannock.

Oct. 13, Fall Craft Show, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Newton Ransom Volunteer Fire Co. Hall, Clarks Summit. Oct. 14, Annual Fall Festival/Bazaar, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sts. Peter & Paul Catholic Church, Scranton. Oct. 15, Safe Haven Golf Tournament, Lords Valley Country Club, Lords Valley. 296-2827. Oct. 20, Rummage & Bake Sale, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Abington

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Oct. 28, Craft Fair & Home Showcase, 10 a.m., Holy Cross H.S., Dunmore. 346-7541.

Concerts Oct. 7, Craig Ferguson, 7 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. Oct. 19, Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks, 8 p.m., Mellow Theatre, Scranton. 955-1455. Oct. 19, Steep Canyon Rangers, 8 p.m., Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Events Gallery, Bethel, NY. 866-781-2922. ☛ 133


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OCTOBER HAPPENINGS Oct. 20, A Night of Doo Wop & Rock n Roll, 7:30 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE.

Oct. 20, The Koresh Dance Company, 8 p.m., Mitrani Hall, Bloomsburg University. 389-4409.

Oct. 20, Robert Dale Chorale– Looking Up, 8 p.m., St. Nicholas Church, WilkesBarre. 871-0350.

Oct. 23, Capitol Steps, 7:30 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE.

Oct. 21, Robert Dale Chorale– Looking Up, 3 p.m., St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Scranton. 871-0350.

Theatre Oct. 1-2, Taiwanese Film & Cultural Festival, DeNaples Center, University of Scranton. 941-6312. Oct. 3-4,“Menopause The Musical,” F.M. Kirby Center, Wilkes-Barre. Oct. 5-7,“Prelude to a Kiss,” McDade Center, University of Scranton. 941-4318. Oct. 6,“A Stoop on Orchard Street,” 8 p.m., Jewish Community Center, WilkesBarre. 888-322-7626. Oct. 18,“Animal Farm,” Keystone Theatre, Towanda. 268-2787.

Oct. 1-31, Elegant Corrosion, Steamtown National Historic Site, Scranton. 340-5200.

Oct. 25-Nov. 3,“Laugh Lines,” Shawnee Playhouse, Shawnee-on-Delaware. 421-5093.

Oct. 1-31, What Can Be Found Under the Ground in the Railroad Yard, Steamtown National Historic Site, Scranton. 340-5200.

Oct. 26-Nov. 3,“Much Ado About Nothing,” Shawnee Playhouse, Shawnee-onDelaware. 421-5093.

Oct. 6, Harvest Quilt Show, 9 a.m., Pleasant Mount Community Center, Pleasant Mount. 798-0211.

Art Exhibits

Seminars & Lectures

Oct. 1-15, The Countryside in Art & Southern Literature, Anita Shapolsky Art Foundation, Jim Thorpe. 325-5815.

Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29, We Didn’t Need Dialogue We Had Faces, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Brennan Hall, University of Scranton. 941-7816.

Oct. 1-26, Glimpses of Wonder, Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506.

Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30, Bullets, Ballots & Bombs: Making War & Peace in Ireland, 17981998, 6-7:15 p.m., Weinberg Memorial Library, University of Scranton. 941-4089.

Oct. 1-31, The Wonderful Story of Planters Peanuts, Luzerne Co. Historical Society, Wilkes-Barre. 823-6244, ext. 3. Oct. 1-31, Across the Great Divide: Photographs by

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Roberta Rice, Museum at Bethel Woods, Bethel, NY. 866-781-2922.

Oct. 3, Extremity Neurological Problems, 5 p.m., Heinz Rehab Hospital, Wilkes-Barre Twp. 888-REHAB-PA.

Fritz Brothers Well Drilling Continuous Service Since 1930

Water Systems Pipe & Fittings Water Conditioning 100 Cliff Street, Honesdale, PA 18431 Located on Route 6 (570) 253-2660

Member of PA & NY & National Water Well Associations

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OCTOBER HAPPENINGS Oct. 3, Managing Parkinson’s Disease, Allied Rehab Hospital, Scranton. 888-REHAB-PA. Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, Chivalry: Knights & the Ladies Who Love Them, 6-7:15 p.m., Weinberg Memorial Library, University of Scranton. 941-7816. Oct. 4, Back Mountain Bloomers Club Luncheon with Author Stephanie Cohen, 11:30 a.m., Irem Country Club, Dallas. 388-2585. Oct. 6, Computers for the Terrified, 9-11 a.m., First Presbyterian Church, Clarks Summit. 563-2402. Oct. 6, Birdfeeding Basics, 10 a.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Oct. 10, $5 Can Buy You Artistic Drama, 11:30 a.m., Hughes Public Library, Stroudsburg. 420-0283. Oct. 11, Pizza– Start to Finish, 6:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, Clarks Summit. 563-2402. Oct. 11, AARP Driver Safety, 1-5 p.m., Hawley Senior Center, Hawley.

Oct. 13, Forestry Field Day: From Timber to 2x4s, 9 a.m.noon, Schoonover Property, Bushkill. 656-6672. Oct. 17, History of Green Ridge, 7 p.m., Genealogical Resources Center, Peckville. 383-7661. Oct. 18, Silk Scarf Art, 6:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, Clarks Summit. 563-2402. Oct. 18, Save Energy & Money: Whole House Energy Auditing, 6:30 p.m., Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506. Oct. 18, Nobel Laureate Roald Hoffmann, 7 p.m., Stark Learning Center, Wilkes University. 408-4306. Oct. 20, Genealogical Resources at the PA State Archives, 1 p.m., Genealogical Research Center, Peckville. 383-7661. Oct. 21, Mayor Cory Booker, 7:30 p.m., Darte Center, Wilkes University. 408-4306. Oct. 22, Financial Benefits of Land Conservation, 7-9 p.m., PPL Environmental Learning Center, Hawley. 226-3164. 63 rd

YE AR

CINEMA-FLEA FAIR NE Pennsylvania’s Largest Flea Fair Sundays, 7 a.m. - 4 p.m.

CIRCLE DRIVE-IN Cinema: Fri., Sat., & Sun. nights Phone 489-5731 for features & times

THEATRE

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489-5731 or 876-1400 • circledrivein.com October 2012

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Oct. 25, Fall Comfort Foods, 6:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, Clarks Summit. 563-2402. Oct. 28, African Drum & Dance Workshop, 3 p.m., School of Visual & Performing Arts Center, Stroudsburg. 424-0501. Oct. 28, Unity Fundamentals Classes in Basic Truth Teachings, noon, Unity: A Center for Spiritual Living, Wilkes-Barre. 824-7722.

Nature Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24 & 31, Fall Cranberry Bog Walks, 1-3 p.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Oct. 4, Fall Warbler Migration Walk, 6 p.m., Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506. Oct. 5-6, Great Monroe Co. Snipe Hunt, Monroe Co. Environmental Ed. Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Oct. 6, Close Encounters with Birds of Prey, 12:30 p.m., Tobyhanna State Park, Tobyhanna. 350-8798.

Learn and Grow Early Childhood Center Programs We Offer: Infant Program: 6 weeks-12 mos Young Toddler Program: 13-24 mos Older Toddler Program: 2 yrs Preschool: 3 yrs Pre-Kindergarten: 4 & 5 yrs Before & After School Program: Kindergarten & up 1228 Saint Ann Street, Scranton, PA (570) 961-1552

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OCTOBER HAPPENINGS Oct. 7, Go Green Bike Tour, Lackawanna State Park, Fleetville. www. countrysideconservancy.org

Oct. 14, Nature at Night, 6-8 p.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319.

Oct. 7, McDade Trail Hike, 9:15 a.m., meet YMCA, Dunmore. 343-5144.

Oct. 14 & 21, Fall Foliage River Tour, Kittatinny Canoes, Matamoras. 296-4905.

Oct. 4, Terrific Trees, 6 p.m., Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506.

Oct. 11, Interpreting Our Forested Landscape Walk, 5:30 p.m., Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506.

Oct. 18, Senior Citizen Outing to Martins Creek, 9 a.m., meet YMCA, Dunmore. 343-5144.

Oct. 6, Oktoberfest for Children, 3-4 p.m., Abington Community Library, Clarks Summit.587-3440.

Oct. 18-21, North American Orienteering Championship, Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319.

Oct. 11, Nature Detective, 1-2 p.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061.

Oct. 13, Birds of Prey Migration Watch, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. Oct. 14, Annual Bog Day, 1-5 p.m., Cranberry Bog, Tannersville. 629-3061.

Oct. 20, Disco Hike, 10 a.m.noon, Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061.

Oct. 14, Walk ‘n Wag Pet Hike, noon, Varden Conservation Area, Lake Ariel.

Oct. 21, Godfreys Ridge Hike, 9:15 a.m., meet YMCA, Dunmore. 343-5144.

Oct. 14, Sunday for Singles Hike, 1-3 p.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319.

Oct. 25, Live Raptor Program, 6:30 p.m., Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506.

Oct. 14, Fall Hike, Crystal Lake Wild Forest, 10 a.m.noon, Delaware Highlands Conservancy, Hawley. 226-3164.

Kids Corner Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30, Children’s Clayplay, 6-8 p.m.,

Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506.

Oct. 11, Flow Circus, 4-5 p.m., Abington Community Library, Clarks Summit. 587-3440. Oct. 18, Spooky Spiders, 1-2:30 p.m., Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506. Oct. 25, Feathered Friends, 1-2 p.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Oct. 26-27,“Balto: A True Story of the Bravest Dog in America,” Fri. 10 a.m., Sat. 11 a.m., Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock. 996-1500.

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Way BEYOND the printed page.

www.Facebook.com/HappeningsMag

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Find more October events at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com!

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Advertisers’ DIRECTORY

Abington Travel Accentuate Caterers Alex Cena Photography Allied Services Amanda Grace Images Armetta’s B-Dry System of Northeast PA Back Mountain Veterinary Center Barna Log Homes Bazi Bazil Bella Faccias Big Brown Fish Blue Cross of Northeast PA Bucci Laser Vision Butler’s Pantry Carriage Barn Antiques CDE Career Institute Chateau Lafayette Reneau Chocoholic Frolic Chocolates by Leopold Circle Drive In Cooper’s Seafood House Corky’s Garden Path Greenhouse Cosmetic & Dental Implant Center Country Inns/B&Bs Custom Building By Carriage Barn Delta Medix Breast Care Center Eagle Cleaners East Stroudsburg University Ecotech Spray Foam Ehrhardt’s Electrical Distributing Company Endless Mountain Visitors Bureau Erwine Home Health Everything Natural Exit 190 Explore More Fidelity Bank Fine Line Homes French Manor Fritz Brothers Well Drilling Geisinger Ghostly Images of Gettysburg Grassi’s Restaurant Guy Cali Associates Haunted Happenings Hazzouri Dentistry Hematology and Oncology Associates Holley Ross Pottery Holy Cross High School Hospice of the Sacred Heart I Do Jennifer L Gifts & Antiques Jessica Davis Photography Johnson College Kaiser Fine Photography Kathy Pope’s Hair Fashions Kelly McCool Salon Spa Electrolysis Keystone College King’s College La Tonalteca Lackawanna College Lackawanna County Library System Lackawanna Historical Society Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

54 54 76 85 68 106 136 76 70 43 104 99 28 83 33 49 67 15 109 111 113 135 100 71 49 124 73 131 39 25 47 76 47 122 93 39 107 95 35 56 125 134 2 117 105 48 114 16 87 134 19 89 62 49 44 15 33 89 93 19 33 108 29 21 130 17

Learn & Grow Ledges Hotel Luzerne County Convention & Visitors Bureau Mall at Steamtown Mansfield University Mariotti Building Products Marywood University Minooka Subaru Misericordia University Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza Nationwide Insurance NEPA Career & College Counseling Associates New York Life Nye Jewelers Old Barn Centre Old Mill Village Oliver, Price & Rhodes PA Cyber Charter School Patsel’s Penn Furniture Penn Security Bank Perez Builders Perio Health & Dental Implants Pink Pages Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeons PNC Bank ProCare Physical Therapy Pure Medi Spa Quaker Steak & Lube Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel Roba Family Farms SAGE Awards Sanderson State Street Salon Scranton Co-Op Farmers Market Scranton Prep Scranton School for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Settlers Inn Sherman Theater Shoppes at Montage Six East Restaurant Skytop Lodge Smuggler’s Cove Split Rock Resort & Golf Club State Theatre Center for the Arts Steve Pronko Jewelers Sunflower Hollow Terrery Dental Tiffany’s Tap & Grill Treasure Hunting Twigs University of Scranton USA Discount Vince Carolan Vince Mecca’s World of Custom Cabinetry Waverly General Store Wayne County Ford Wayne Memorial Hospital Where to Dine Wilkes University Wisnosky Jewelers Woodloch Woody’s Fireplace WVIA Wyoming Seminary Yume Sushi, Seafood and Grill

135 125 126 63 27 59 & 65 23 24 21 127 62 23 53 60 72 126 41 27 99 61 58 69 37 91 85 45 93 89 138 140 117 128 57 97 27 7 60 117 139 106 121 107 111 113 51 68 43 118 62 96 13 64 29 55 45 29 85 102 7 57 119 55 129 23 109


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DICKSON CITY Exit 191a off of I-81 4005 Commerce Boulevard 570.489.LUBE (5823) There's ALWAYS something happening at The Lube! From Tuesday's All-You-Can-Eat Wing Night, Everyday Happy Hour from 8-10 p.m. and Half Price Appetizers from 8 p.m.-close... and so much more! QUICK LUBE ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT LUNCH BUFFET Monday-Friday 11 a.m.-2 p.m. featuring our famous Wings, Hot EntrĂŠes, Full Salad Bar, Soup & More! $ 9.49 MONDAY - KIDS NITE 5-8 p.m., $1.99 kids meals (with adult purchase), free face painting, play Wii on the big screen, Crafts with Coop our mascot on select nites! EVERY NITE IS MOVIE NITE at THE LUBE! Stop by the Lube to Win FREE IMAX Movie Gift Cards daily on our prize wheel! $15 Movie Meal Deal - Lube Burger, Side & Fountain Beverage plus Movie Ticket.* Present your ticket stub for daily discounts and specials! *Regular Movie ticket not valid on IMAX or 3D GET READY FOR SOME FOOTBALL! All the games, All the Time on our 24 Flat Screens... Sunday Tailgate Buffet $10.99 11am-3pm featuring our Award-Winning Wings, Ribs and much more! Tailgating at home? Feed the whole team - Pre-order for pickup at our Wingo Window!

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GsftiBjs/  GsftiTuzmf/

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Exit 182A off I-81 | Montage Mountain Road | www.shoppesatmontage.com | 570.341.3271


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October 2012 Happenings Magazine!  

Northeast PA college athletes to watch... How sports might help your career... Health care effects in Northeast PA.... Things to do in Scran...

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