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contents M AY 2 0 1 3

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Rob Lettieri Photography

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Wife. Mom. Student.

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See how this mom juggles everything to pursue her dream.

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Campus Treasures Discover spectacular spaces for the community (King’s College pictured above).

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Historic Attraction Visit 16 spots that bring history alive today (Sonnenburg Gardens pictured above).

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Mother’s Day Gifts

Marvelous May Things to do, where to go, everything you need to know!

Find something perfect for Mom!

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Mother’s Day Dining Indulge her in a meal she doesn’t have to prepare or clean up after!

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Spring Wedding Guide Be inspired by real weddings (Amanda Darbenzio & Jarrett Hoffman pictured above).

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Pet Corner Vote for your favorite animal!

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Revitalization Series Healthcare leader speaks out.

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Celebrating Nurses Honor caregivers during National Nurses Week.

May 2013

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MAILBAG Dear Happenings, I just had the opportunity to review the March issue of Happenings online. Congrats on yet another great monthly publication. I enjoyed reading many of the articles and getting to know Angelo Medico’s story (Wings of Life, Angelo Medico Honored by MDA). I also added several events to my personal calendar so that I can continue to enjoy the region’s cultural, dining and entertainment options– many of which I probably would not have known about had it not been for Happenings.The online version had a small glitch– the second paragraph on page 47 appeared twice and not at all on the previous page. So I kind of joined the “interview” halfway through. Aside from the small glitch, the issue looked and read great! –Eric Joseph Esoda, CPA, Executive Director NEPIRC, Inc. Dear Happenings, Everything looks wonderful. The cover is beautiful (April 2013). Every year you create a gorgeous cover and interesting articles on our volunteers and the agency programs and services. People attend the event from far away because of the way Happenings captures the essence of the day and encourages others to join in on the fun. –Deb Peterson, Executive Director, Voluntary Action Center

Publisher Managing Editor Art Director Associate Art Director

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Barbara Toolan Lisa M. Ragnacci Peter Salerno

Administrative Assistant

Katherine Kempa

Associate Editor

Erika A. Bruckner

Account Representatives

Contributors

Interns

Ken Chergosky Rosemary Nye Jane Preate Annette Profera Kieran O’Brien Kern Shannon Lesniak Casey Phillips Julie Korponai Dan Curry April Dakoske Kelsey Healey Kyle Shupp

On the Cover: Veterinary Technology major Danielle Debonise poses on the Johnson College Scranton campus with her children, Liam and Ella, and her dog, Belle. Photo: Stan Warunek, Montage Photography Published Monthly. 350,000 copies annually. ©2013 HAPPENINGS MAGAZINE All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any process except with written permission.

Happenings Magazine published since 1969 Phone: (570) 587-3532 • Fax: (570) 586-7374

Read online at:

www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Tell Us What’s Happening!

Dear Happenings, Thanks for sending the digital version of the April issue and thank you for featuring the House & Garden Show on your calendar. As always, I look forward to reading it from cover to cover! –Denise Reinhart, Development Coordinator, Waverly Community House Dear Happenings, Very informative articles on gardening (April 2013). –R. W. Martucci , Peckville

Paula Rochon Mackarey

facebook.com/ HappeningsMagazinePA twitter.com/ HappeningsMag pinterest.com/ HappeningsMag Email:

info@happeningscommgroup.com

Snail mail:

P.O. Box 61 Clarks Summit, PA 18411

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

May 2013


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Help Us Welcome Executive Chef

Donnie Schmidt to the

Hilton Family!

Please Join Us for

Mother’s Day Brunch

MEET DONNIE: Hometown: Scranton Family: Wife: Amanda; Children: Donnie Schmidt Jr. 10 yrs and Jaykob Schmidt 2.5 yrs Hobbies: Spending time off with my family Professional Experience: 17 years Cooking Style: American/Italian Favorite Cuisine: South American/Latin Most memorable day on the job: When I was at another facility, we had two high-end weddings going out at the same time.There was a very strong wind storm and the entire hotel lost power for about three hours. But,“the show must go on.”As a chef,You MUST be creative and opportunistic to be able to deal with and overcome every obstacle without letting the customer see or feel any of the “drama” behind the swinging door. So we made a call to our “competition” across the street The Hilton Scranton Conference Center.They were very helpful in letting us pack our van and bring 20 or so hotel pans of hors d’oeuvres, appetizers and entrees and use all of their equipment in order to help us execute our functions. It shows the camaraderie this industry offers...

May 12 • 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

$35 for Adults plus tax & gratuity $32 for 55 & over plus tax & gratuity $12 for children 4-12 plus tax & gratuity Children 3 and under free 100 Adams Avenue • Scranton, PA • 570-343-3000 • www.scranton.hilton.com


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sunday

monday

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Comedy Pet Theater, State Theatre, Easton. 1 & 4 p.m. 610-252-3132.

It’s National Nurses Week!

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3rd Annual Car Show, Scranton School for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Children, Clark Summit. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 947-6599.

Celtic Festival, Shawnee Mountain Ski Area, Shawneeon-Delaware. www.shawneem t.com

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Memorial Day

tuesday

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wednesday

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Great Chefs XXII, “Chopped Challenge,” Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, Scranton.

May

2

thursday

National Day of Prayer

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friday

Ballet Theatre of Scranton’s “Phantom of the Opera,” Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 8 p.m. 344-1111.

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Voluntary Action Center Run for the Roses, Waverly Country Club,Waverly. 3 p.m. 347-5616.

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17 19th Annual 18

50 Shades! The Musical, Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 7:30 p.m. 342-7784.

Fungus, Moss & Lichen Walk, Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506.

Fine Arts Fiesta, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Through Sun. www.finearts fiesta.org

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Wish Upon a Star Dinner Dance & Silent Auction, Stroudsmoor Country Inn, Stroudsburg. 6-11 p.m. 800-676-9474.

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35th Annual Penn State Night with Bill O’Brien, Genetti Manor, Dickson City. 6:30 p.m. 342-7022.

The Blood is the Life: Vampires in Art & Nature, Everhart Museum, Scranton.Through July 1.

It’s National Bike to Work Week

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30 NEPA Bluegrass Festival, Lazybrook Park, Tunkhannock. Through Sun. 721-2760.

24 Frog Slog,

Varden Conservation Area, Varden. 5:30 p.m. 676-0567. Fourth Friday, downtown Tunkhannock. 6-9 p.m. 687-1584.

saturday

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Introduction to Fishing, Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 9:30 a.m.-noon. 828-2319.

Chocolate & Wine Festival, downtown Montrose. 2:30-7:30 p.m. www.chocolatewinefestival.com

25 Victorian Fashion Show, Eckley Miners’ Village,Weatherly. 1-4 p.m. 636-2070.

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Murder in the Gallery, Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 5:30 p.m.

May is... Clean Air Month Lyme Disease Awareness Month National Preservation Month Preeclampsia Awareness Month Motorcycle Safety Month National Physical Fitness & Sports Month


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FROM THE PUBLISHER Dear Readers, National Nurses Week runs May 6 through May 12. In this issue we highlight some of the region’s finest on page 120. I always enjoy reading about the personal backgrounds that motivate a person to become a nurse, because if I were not in my present career, it is, secretly, what I wish to be. I especially appreciate why nurse Diane Jaghab, LPN, chose to work at St. Mary’s Villa. “I choose to be with older adults,” she notes.“They’ve spent their lives taking care of family, friends, had jobs and so on. Now it’s their time to be taken care of with dignity and respect.” Admittedly, my first fascination with desiring to be a nurse stemmed from the entertainment industry, especially the ‘70s show, “Emergency.” Living the exciting life of nurse Dixie McCall (played by Julie London) seemed to be the ultimate career! Being able to wear the pretty white uniforms with the matching white nurses’ cap very much appealed to me as a child; playing nurse would always involve bobby-pinning a white envelope to my head.

In this issue we also interview Gretchen Eagen (page 114) who has been a recruiter and career coach for over 25 years, specializing in healthcare for the past 15. (Coincidentally Gretchen’s late father Jim was one of the founders of Happenings Magazine, back in 1969!) Gretchen states that there are more than 300,000 RNs, LPNs and CNAs in Pennsylvania, The closest I got to a with 18,000 employed nursing career: posing in NEPA! And on page for a local medical brochure in the ‘90s. 116, John Wiercinski, Regional Vice President for Geisinger, discusses the connection between regional economic development and the healthcare profession. It’s very exciting that May 2013 will see the first graduates of The Commonwealth Medical College– one our region’s most significant achievements to date! (see page 22.) All involved in regional healthcare agree that Northeast PA has to do a much better job with being proactive with our personal health. The high rates of smoking, drinking and obesity need to be sharply reversed! We at Happenings Magazine like to promote a healthier culture. On page 6- you’ll note that it is National Bike to Work Day! Many of our cities and towns have installed bike racks downtown which help make this possible. Let’s work together to make May 2013 the start of a healthier YOU!

Fondly, y Troup d Bobb Call) an c M ra g ie ro m ix vision p ndon (D Julie Lo ) from the tele rly (Joe Ea cy.'' en ''Emerg

Paula

Paula Rochon Mackarey


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COVERSTORY

Going Back to Move Forward One Mother’s Story of Continuing Her Education lmost every mother with small children will agree that life is a hectic adventure. Between introducing her 3-year-old daughter to princesses, taking her 7year-old son to Cub Scout meetings and taking her dogs for a walk, one Tobyhanna mom has added another activity to her daily routine – pursuing a life-long dream.“I’ve always wanted to work with animals,” explains Danielle Debonise. She enrolled in the two-year Veterinary Technology program at Johnson College and plans to graduate this May. “I wanted to show my kids that it’s never too late to follow your dreams.”

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Debonise earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice from Bloomsburg University and then moved to Germany with her husband, who was stationed in Mannheim with the U.S. Army. During their three years in Germany, their son was born. She’s worked since 8

Photo: Stan Warunek, Montage Photography

then as a stay-at-home mom and in various positions in early childhood development. She admits,“I have anyways wanted to be a veterinarian, but I figured that ‘ship had sailed,’ both time and money-wise. Johnson’s Vet Tech program provided a way I could care for animals, and that’s what it has always been about for me.” Higher education is demanding for any student, and adding a mother’s responsibilities only heightens the challenge. Debonise says her biggest obstacle is simply, time. “Traditional students can go home after class and study. I go home, pick up HappeningsMagazinePA.com

the kids, help my son with his homework, take care of the dogs, figure out dinner, give baths and put the kids to bed, all before I can work on my own school assignments,” she explains. Liam understands and appreciates her hard work since he started Kindergarten the same time his mom started as a student at Johnson College. “Liam thinks it’s pretty cool,” says Debonise.“He often asks what I did or what kind of animals I worked on. He also likes to go through my books.” Married eight years ago to Robert Debonise, Jr., she says her husband is her biggest May 2013


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supporter. In addition to simply making it possible for her to go to school by transferring part of his GI bill, he has stepped up to take care of many responsibilities at home.“Most importantly, he has listened to all my complaining, put up with my doubts, took the brunt of a bad day and the stress of exams, helped me study, encouraged me to do better and helped me keep my head up when I was completely overwhelmed,” Debonise notes. “He has been my rock throughout this whole process, and I wouldn’t have been able to do it without him!” Debonise plans to finish

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her academic experience with an internship at Wright Veterinary Medical Center in Bethlehem, PA, and then she hopes to attain a Certified Veterinary Technician position. She appreciates the hands-on experience gained through Johnson College’s Animal Care Center on campus as well as the investment of professors like Dr. Rosemary Cook CVT, Ph.D., chairperson of the Veterinary Technology Program and the Health Sciences Division. “She is amazing,” describes Debonise.“You can tell she really loves what she does and truly wants all of her students to succeed.”

Through all the exams and dinner preparations, classes and Cub Scout meetings, study sessions and goodnight kisses, Debonise has this advice for other moms considering continuing their education,“Go for it. It’s going to be challenging, but it’s worth it. Make sure you have a support system, aren’t shy about asking for help and have fun. It’s easy to get so wrapped up in studying that sometimes you’ll forget that it’s ok to push it all aside and have a dance party in the middle of your living room with your kids!” –Erika A. Bruckner

Meet the Debonise Family Meet Danielle: Full-Time Mom,Veterinary Technology Major at Johnson College. Loves reading,TV, shopping, pets and the Philadelphia Flyers Meet Robert: Senior Signal Systems Specialist in the PA Army National Guard. Loves computer and video games, working on cars, bowling and Flyers hockey Meet Liam: Turns 7 on May 12. Attends Clear Run Elementary Center. Loves playing video and computer games, Legos and Cub Scouts Meet Ella: Age 3.Attends Tobyhanna Child Development Center.Loves puppies and princesses, especially Cinderella Meet the Pets: Ally, a Miniature Schnauzer, Belle, a Border Collie and Mila, a cat

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Pet Project: Academic Program Prepares Students for Career in Veterinary Technology ccording to the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges 2010 Annual Report, 95 percent of Johnson College graduates have been employed in their industry within a year of graduation. In today’s job market, this is no small accomplishment. “Many believe the hands-on experience the students receive at Johnson College makes it a leader in its field,” explains Rosemary Cook, CVT, Ph.D., chairperson of the Veterinary Technology Program and the Health Sciences Division.

A

Danielle Debonise poses in the Operating Room.

Johnson’s two-year Veterinary Technology program prepares students to join an animal care team as entry-level technicians and to become Certified education and like Veterinary the enthusiasm of Technicians upon the students,” passing the according to Cook. Veterinary The Veterinary Technician National Technology program Exam (VTNE). The also hosts an annual class of 2012 had an Spay Day, offering 84 percent pass rate reduced-fee spaying for the VTNE. 49 stuVeterinary Technology Program students Sinea and neutering servdents are currently Gallagher ‘12 (left) and Justine Olsommer ’12 (right) volices for pets. enrolled in the prounteering during Johnson College’s Spay Day 2012. gram. Cook says stuStudents can register for a reduced credit dents and graduates seem to appreciate load to extend their education over three the personal attention by the faculty and years instead of the typical two-year prohands-on experience. gram. The program is one of 14 offered by In addition to internships at veterinary hos- Johnson College.“A student’s experience in pitals, labs, emergency centers and with the the classroom and lab is what he or she will experience in their field upon graduation,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, secondCook explains. “This course is very study year students complete clinical rotations in intensive with high qualifications to gain the Animal Care Center, a pet wellness cenentry. The end result is a career that has ter on campus. The center opened in 1997 outstanding rewards, both personally and is open two days a week for nine weeks during the fall and spring semesters. and professionally.” Visit www.Johnson.edu or call 800-2WE-WORK. Owners of dogs, cats, rabbits, snakes and –Erika A. Bruckner pocket pets,“Seem to enjoy being a part of 10

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CampusTreasures Discover College Hot Spots Open to the Community

way from Monroe Avenue and Linden Street to Linden Street and Clay Avenue. The exhibit will showcase the creation of the sculptures and the ideals represented, with detailed photographs and information about each structure.“The diverse structures represent different aspects of the University’s identity as a Catholic, Jesuit institution of higher learning,” explains Miller-Lanning.“’Christ the Teacher’ by Trevor Southey was created with a simple yet important ideal in mind– whatever happens on campus, Jesus should be a part of it. The sculpture, located outside the Weinberg Memorial Library, is an example of interactive art– art that involves spectators as well as the structure itself. Whether it is students studying, children climbing or someone simply taking a moment to sit on its extended stone base, the sculpture and its message constantly evolve.”

Hope Horn Gallery at the University of Scranton, Scranton “The Gallery is devoted to fostering the arts in Northeast PA, says Director Darlene Miller-Lanning, Ph.D.“Exhibitions and programming are designed to complement the University’s curricula, encourage campus and community collaborations, support regional artists, provide arts in education opportunities and showcase students’ work.” All exhibitions and lectures are open to the public free of charge. Exhibits run during the academic year, during which the gallery is open Sunday through Friday from noon to 4 p.m. and Wednesdays from 6 to 8 p.m. The current exhibit,“Imagination and Spirituality,” runs through May 10. Several, large-scale public sculptures are alongside the University’s Commons, the brick path12

The J. Carroll McCormick Campus Ministry Center at King’s College, WilkES-Barre The Center was dedicated on February 18, 1984 and houses the Campus Ministry office, the Basil Anthony Moreau Auditorium and the Chapel of Christ the King. The chapel seats up to 250 people and incorporates an in-the-round seating plan.“There are no columns to block one’s view, and the primary focus is the altar of sacrifice and ambo from which Sacred Scripture is proclaimed,” describes Marie Lendacky, administrative secretary/sacristan. Renovated and redecorated in 2009, all the major appointments were designed and sculpted by local arti-

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sans Marshall Rumbaugh, Tom Noone and Hank Fells. A handcarved crucifix, new altar, ambo, credence tables and Stations of the Cross were added. The meditation chapel also holds the anthracite altar, commissioned in 1953 by the Rev. James Flood and carved by the late Edgar Patience from a massive piece of anthracite coal mined in Wanamie, PA.

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The chapel is open to the public to celebrate Mass Mondays through Fridays at 12:05 p.m. and on Sundays during the academic year at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. The Moreau Auditorium is available through the Events Office for meetings. “The Campus Ministry team strives to provide Sunday liturgies that are inviting,

vibrant and prayerful and engage the worshiping community in a meaningful service as well as provide an appealing, quiet space to meditate, study or join the greater community in prayer,” Lendacky says.

The Sterling Strauser Gallery at East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania, East Stroudsburg Currently located in a temporary gallery on the third floor in the ESU Innovation Center on Independence Road, the collection will be displayed in a permanent gallery upon completion of phase one of the university’s Keystone Center, scheduled to open in 2016. The new Gallery will be approximately 3,150 square feet, and the space is being specifically designed to house this collection. May 2013

“The Strauser Gallery offers members of the campus and local communities an opportunity to learn about outsider art,” explains Brenda Friday, director of university relations.“It also puts into perspective the importance of these artists to the Pocono Region as many of them lived in or near the Stroudsburg and East Stroudsburg communities.”

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Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Covington Twp.

The Gallery features the work of Sterling Boyd Strauser, (1907–1995), who was born in Bloomsburg; he later moved to East Stroudsburg, with his wife, Dorothy. “They were quick to influence the arts throughout the Pocono region, as wellknown collectors and promoters of folk and outsider art,” explains Friday.“Sterling was well-known for his encouragement and support of emerging artists, which can only come from someone with great knowledge and genuine passion for local art.” Strauser also served as a teacher and principal of the grade school in Mount Pocono and worked at the International Boiler Works in East Stroudsburg. Strauser’s art is included in the permanent collections of the American Museum in England, Vanderbilt University, Maier Museum of Art and many regional galleries and private collections. The collection at ESU includes Strauser’s “Spring is Bursting Out,” a self-portrait and his signature floral pieces.

The institute was founded in 2005.“Our goal is to foster a connection to the natural world in order to develop informed, responsible individuals who can play positive roles in their own communities,” explains Sharon YanikCraig, education coordinator. The Institute offers school field trips, nature walks, lectures on current conservation and sustainability topics, summer day camps, college degree and certificate programs, professional development workshops for teachers, nature-based art workshops and nature pre-school. Several of the college’s science majors, including students pursuing the Ecological Sustainability Degree, visit LCEI for field-oriented experiences to study natural history, ecology and conservation. LCEI is located on the 42-acre Moffat Estate, featuring diverse habitats, walking trails, a pond, a children’s playground and a picnic pavilion. Bi-monthly environmental-themed art exhibits are open to the public. LCEI building hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The grounds are open to the public from dusk until dawn. In addition to the Moffat Estate, a new, LEED certified, stateof-the-art facility on 217-acres in Covington Township is scheduled to open this June.“The expansion was necessary due to the unprecedented growth and success of the numerous programs held at the LCEI,” explains Yanik-Craig. She continues,“Environmental issues related to a sustainable future are complex and multidisciplinary. The arts are important because creativity and imagination are essential traits in solving global environmental issues. Also, outdoor recreation opportunities foster active healthy communities; the people who take part in these activities will learn to love nature and therefore have reason to protect it.” continued on page 16

Friday describes the Gallery as a, place of quiet reflection.“We believe cultural and artistic events on campus add value to lifelong learning,” she explains. The public can view the collection during occasional special evening hours, which are posted at www.ESU.edu. Special arrangements to view the Gallery may be made by calling 570-422-7920. 14

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Johnson College is pleased to introduce our newest program, Physical Therapist Assistant Technology, and our state-of-the-art Health Science Technology Center.

If you have an interest in promoting overall fitness and wellness, as well as a strong desire to help people, call 1-800-2 WE WORK or visit us online for more information.

WE WORK. May 2013

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

1-800-2WE-WORK WWW.JOHNSON.EDU

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Green Spaces at Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre “Former Wilkes first lady Patty Gilmour was an ardent environmentalist committed to a green campus,” explains Director of Public Relations Vicki Mayk.“The Learning Garden and the Grayson Arboretum were developed during her husband, Tim Gilmour’s, tenure as Wilkes president. Dr. Gilmour retired in May 2012.” Over 250 trees and shrubs were planted on campus under Gilmour’s lead. “The Learning Garden allows people to get back in touch with nature, to become acquainted with plants native to this area and to observe organic gardening, which does not use chemicals and emphasizes allnatural approaches to weed control and composting,” notes Mayk. Featured plants are Bee Balm, Chokeberries and Spicebush. The garden is located to the left of Fenner Hall on South Franklin Street.

several variations of native trees including Dogwood, Red Cedar, Copper Beach and Fringe Trees. One tree of note is named, “The Franklin Tree,” located between Stark and Cunningham Halls. According to Mayk, the plant was discovered by a Philadelphia botanist in Virginia. John Bartram propagated the tree and named it after his father’s friend, Benjamin Franklin. The tree blooms in the fall and has an unusual bark. A “Katrina Rose” on campus was planted from a rose bush that survived Hurricane Katrina. A Bluestone labyrinth, across the walk from Kirby Hall, was installed in 2008 and moved to its current location in 2011. It was a gift of Wilkes alumnus William Miller, a member of the Class of 1981.“This is a space for meditation and reflection in nature,” describes Mayk. “People walking the labyrinth can enjoy the outdoors while enjoying quiet reflection.”

Plantings scattered over campus include

Chef’s Table Restaurant at Keystone College, LaPlume

house,” describes Susan M. Cappelloni, Chef’s Table supervisor with Keystone College and Sodexo.

Chef’s Table Restaurant is a student-run, open-to-thepublic, by-reservation-only restaurant.“As part of the sophomore curriculum in the Culinary Program at Keystone College, the students create and prepare a

Diners at Chef’s Table indulge in four courses. Menu items include appetizers like New Zealand Mussels and Blue Cheese and Pear Crepes. Diners can choose from two types of salads, two types of soups

menu for the restaurant and then staff the restaurant for nightly service, filling the positions in both front and back of the

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and entrees like filet mignon, roasted salmon with edamame puree and vegetarian spring rolls with bok choy and peanut dipping sauce. Desserts change weekly based on local ingredients.“When creating the menu, Chef Mark Seibert, CEC, CCE, puts together dishes that not only complement each other, but also focus on seasonal ingredients. We use the best quality vendors and as much local, seasonal produce and ingredients possible,” notes Cappelloni. “For about $30 per person, you can expect an amazing dining experience,” says Cappelloni.“Dinner usually

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lasts about two hours and is truly an enjoyable night out.” The BYOB establishment offers complete tableside service of wine and cocktails. Diners further the student’s education by giving feedback on service and food.“The patrons also enjoy being able to interact with the student chefs and servers and get to meet them at the end of service every evening,” explains Cappelloni. Tips go toward the Culinary Club, which funds field trips and special events for the students. “Before my education at Chef’s Table, I had no previous kitchen experience. Because of the opportunity

with Chef’s Table, I feel more prepared to enter the workforce after graduation,” says B. Luce, class of 2013. Chef’s Table Restaurant, located in Hibbard Hall, is open September through May and is closed for holidays and scheduled school breaks. Between 15 to 25 students run the unique restaurant each year. Anywhere from 25 to 45 guests are served each evening, with four seatings from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Reservations are required, and tables of up to six people are available.

Cars on Campus, Johnson College, Scranton Hundreds of people are expected to get up close to classic cars at the annual Cars on Campus event on September 8. Gates open at 8:30 a.m. to reveal 200 cars on display. Car registration is $10; public admission parking is $5. Johnson’s car show began in the 1980s and then took a long hiatus. Thanks to the dedication of a student, the event returned in 2010.“Many students volunteer at the event,” says Stephanie Orzalek, coordinator of institutional

advancement.“It’s a chance for people in the community to come and enjoy the campus, get to know our students, staff and faculty and see what is unique about Johnson College and our type of education.” In addition to the cars, the event boasts a DJ, 50/50 raffle and other raffle prizes. All proceeds go to the Cars on Campus Scholarship; last year the event raised nearly $8,000 in scholarships. During the show, faculty and staff members offer tours of the campus including the newest building, The Health Science Technology Center. All program areas are open for the public to enjoy. Orzalek adds,“It’s a fun day to come out, support your community and enjoy some great cars!”

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CAREER & COLLEGE COUNSELING ASSOCIATES

Individualized assistance with the College Admissions Process,Testing, Essay Topics & Editing, Financial Aid/ Scholarships, Resume Writing Skills, Interviewing Skills, Career Shadowing Experiences & College Tours. Jennifer L.Sevirini-Kresock, M.S. For students Grade 8-12, Private Career and College Counselor transferring college students, returning adult students, career or college-bound special needs students.

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Each year, TCMC shares with the public its community and healthfocused research and project posters by medical students, master’s students and faculty. This free event will be May 9 from 4 to 6 p.m. and May 10 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday’s event will include keynote speaker Marianna Garrettson, MPH, of the Injury Prevention Research Center at UNC and Society for the Advancement of Violence and Injury Research, who will be speaking about community outreach and faith-based organization engagement.

is a perfect opportunity for community members to experience TCMC’s dedication to improving health and health care in Northeast PA through advocacy and communitybased, evidence-based research.” Past projects have looked at topics such as care for the uninsured and underinsured, cancer screening advocacy, diabetes care quality improvement initiatives, school nutrition, anti-smoking awareness and mental health services. The research is done in conjunction with strong community partnerships such as the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute and Commonwealth Health.

The audience may view 40 projects.“Research projects are varied and diverse,” explains Mark White, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Family, Community and Rural Health. “This event

“TCMC strives to produce physicians that will possess all the skills needed to lead healthcare into the 21st century,” adds White.

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–Erika A. Bruckner

Visit www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com to find more Campus Treasures plus events open to the public at local colleges.

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EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY of Pennsylvania

Believe it... Achieve

it... at ESU.

Facilities including the state-of-the-art Hoeffner Science and Technology Center and the Mattioli Recreation Center

Stunning student suite-style Residence Halls

Nearly 60 undergraduate degree programs, over 30 graduate degree and certification programs, and much more!

Degree completion and graduate programs available at off-campus centers in the Lehigh Valley and Philadelphia.

Discover your career path at ESU, where learning is good for life! OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION 570-422-3542 or 877-230-5547

GRADUATE COLLEGE 570-422-3536 or 866-837-6130 LEHIGH VALLEY CENTER 610-419-2516

www.esu.edu A MEMBER OF THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION


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TCMC Honors First Graduating Class raduation is always a special time, but for students and supporters of the newest medical school in PA, this year is especially exciting. The Commonwealth Medical College in Scranton will celebrate the graduation of its first class of medical students this May.

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In August 2009, The Commonwealth Medical College welcomed its first class. In May 2013, those students will graduate as the first medical doctors to emerge from the school. Since its founding in 2008, TCMC has aimed to serve people who reside in Northeast PA. The school’s mission includes a devotion to the community and a patient-centered ethic. The core of the students’ educa-

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tion is rooted in service, especially in rural locations. In March, the students celebrated Match Day, when each member of the graduating class found out where they will be spending the next several years of residency training in their respective fields. For the past four years, the students have worked and grown together in the close-knit school community. Now, they will continue their professional journeys at residency programs across the country. TCMC will celebrate another exciting milestone this May– the fourth graduating class of Master of Biomedical Sciences students and the largest MBS class to date. The MBS students will go

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on to attend healthcare and professional programs that will utilize their strong foundation at TCMC. This year’s commencement speaker will be Dr. George E. Thibault, MD, who became the seventh president of the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation in January 2008. The public is invited to attend the graduation ceremony and share this milestone with the TCMC community. Commencement will take place at the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza in Wilkes-Barre on May 11. Doors open at 10:15 a.m.; the ceremony will begin at 11 a.m. Visit www.TheCommonwealthM –Kelsey Healey edical.com

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Summer at Wyoming Seminary Combines Learning & Fun eep creativity going through the summer months by joining Summer at Sem. Drawing over 400 students and performing artists each year from Northeast PA and around the world, Summer at Sem offers several different courses for a variety of ages and creative interests.

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The Early Summer Fun program is designed for toddlers through middle school-age. It engages children in learning and exploring through workshops that emphasize hands-on experiences combined with lots of fun! High school students will find that the College Prep Institute offers challenging four-week courses designed to further enhance their secondary learning experiences. Students can choose courses that will deepen their knowledge on particu-

lar subjects or interests. The Performing Arts Institute offers serious students ages 10 to 18 the opportunity to fully immerse themselves in the arts of music, dance and theatre. The Junior PAI program encourages students in grades five through eight to improve music skills in a fun and upbeat atmosphere. The Lady Blue Knights Basketball and the Futures Wrestling Clinics allow young athletes to work with an experienced coaching staff on developing fundamental skills and self-confidence. “Wyoming Seminary, founded in 1844, is one of America’s oldest coeducational college preparatory schools. We have helped thousands of children and young adults discover aca-

demic excellence while also guiding their development of values and interests. Continuing to offer these opportunities during the summer was a natural progression,” explains Gayle Sekel, director of summer enrollment and operations. “We challenge our students to discover their talents and their passions by offering programs rich in artistic, athletic and academic opportunities.” Over 30 different vocal and instrumental concerts will be presented this summer, along with the PAI presentation of “Les Miserables,” July 31 and August 1 at the F.M. Kirby Center in Wilkes-Barre. Programs take place at Wyoming Seminary’s Lower School in Forty Fort and on the 22acre Upper School campus in Kingston. Visit www.WyomingSeminary.or g/summer or call 570-270-2190. –Casey Phillips

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Saturday, May 11, 2013

11 a.m. • Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza • Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

Commencement ceremony for the awarding of ••••••The first •••••• DOCTOR OF MEDICINE DEGREE and the MASTER OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES DEGREE TO RSVP visit www.thecommonwealthmedical.com/commRSVP


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Lehigh Valley Teen Takes on the “World”

Sabrina Carpenter Stars in “Boy Meets World” Sequel

young actress from the Lehigh Valley recently landed a starring role in the upcoming Disney series “Girl Meets World.” 13year-old Sabrina Carpenter started taking acting classes in 2009. She landed her first television role in 2010 on an episode of “Law and Order SVU.” Carpenter will play “Maya Fox," best friend to the lead character, "Riley Matthews” in the highly anticipated sequel to the 1990s sitcom “Boy Meets World.” Carpenter will work alongside members of the original “Boy Meets World” cast, as well as a new generation of talent.

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Of the experience thus far, Carpenter says,“I'm so excited and ready to take on the challenge of Maya's personality! I'm also ready for the "World" to get to know her 26

and the rest of the cast. In the short time filming this pilot, I've worked with some of the best and most talented people. From the creator to the writers, I just think they're genius!” The young actress must manage a busy schedule in order to balance her acting career with her schoolwork. Sabrina and her two older sisters attend the Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School. This, their parents say, has made a world of difference. David and Elizabeth Carpenter were always interested in the possibility of homeschooling their children. When they discovered PA Cyber, they were immediately impressed with the school’s curriculum and enrolled their eldest daughter. After witnessing her positive experience, the Carpenters enrolled their other two children. According to their parents, HappeningsMagazinePA.com

the cyber school experience has instilled in the girls a sense of personal responsibility and self-discipline. David Carpenter says, “We really just felt it was the best thing to do for our children. We have noticed they are very disciplined in knowing what needs to get done and hold themselves accountable to finish their assignments.”The charter school has been instrumental in helping Sabrina pursue an acting career, as it allows her family to travel and pursue opportunities that would not otherwise be accessible. For instance, the girls can be in class and on the road at the same time. What’s next for Sabrina? She looks forward to her acting projects coming to the big and small screens this year and to releasing her first EP with Hollywood Records. To keep up with Sabrina’s journey, visit www.SabrinaCarpenter.com To learn more about the PA Cyber Charter School, visit www.PACyber.org –Kelsey Healey

May 2013


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Dr. Andrew Taylor, DDS Dr. Aldan Lori, DDS Dr. Shin, DDS VISIT OUR NEW LOCATION! CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT

570.586.9717 • taylor-family-dental.com 790 Northern Blvd., Abington Professional Plaza Suite L • South Abington Township

May 2013

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Book Reading Time with Children

Early Childhood Reading Points to Later Success eading is one of the most important skills that young children learn,” admits Amber Cholish, Children’s Program Coordinator at Library Express in the Mall at Steamtown in Scranton.“It is said that one that can read can do anything.”

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Start Reading Early Laureen M. Maloney, Head of Children's Services at the Lackawanna County Children's Library, says this lifelong skill begins at a very young age.“The most important time in brain development is between the ages of birth and three years of age,” she explains. “Research has shown how babies grow and develop early language and literacy skills. There is more activity happening in their brains than those of college students! This development must be nurtured.” In addition to fostering language and literacy skills from birth, reading provides a

bonding time with the child.“Reading to babies, toddlers and preschoolers sparks their brain development and creativity. It helps them succeed later when they enter school,” Maloney adds. Multiplying Life Skills While reading at home is vital, attending a library story hour provides both academic and social benefits.“Young children need to experience positive interaction with other children, especially their peers,” says Cholish. “Children who listen to stories being read with expression tend to be effective readers themselves and will most likely develop strong comprehension skills.” For each story hour held at Library Express, a branch of the Lackawanna County Library System and a new and used bookstore, Cholish chooses a theme. Activities like singing with corresponding movements help children develop fine

and gross motor skills and listening skills. The Children’s Library story time activities include songs, stories, puppet shows, crafts and rhymes. “Children learn through play,” says Maloney. “By having engaging interactive story times, children become part of the activities.” Kids especially love puppet shows with their friend, Cal! “There is a wonderful camaraderie that occurs,” admits Maloney.“The children learn a routine, how to behave in a large group setting and basic social skills such as listening, sharing and cooperation -

especially when playing at the train table. Diplomats could learn some lessons!” Reading for All Studies show those most at risk of entering school with continued on page 30

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L A C K AWA N N A C O U N T Y L I B R A R Y S Y S T E M

Dig Into Reading Discover fun at the library Summer is a time to uncover treasures at the library. Join the Summer Reading Club and you will encounter exciting new worlds. Find fun, activities, and programs at the library all summer long. Summer reading clubs are for kids 6 to 14. Join at any Lackawanna County Library System library – where everything is free!

www.lclshome.org

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less prior knowledge in literacy prerequisites are children who are less likely to have children’s books in their homes and are less likely to be read to frequently (Celano, 2001, Meyers, 2002, Rosenthal, 2004). The Lackawanna County Library System seeks to remedy that. Maloney explains, “Our libraries act as economic equalizers in the community, providing materials and services to all ages and literacy-rich opportunities to children who might otherwise miss out. The library’s important role is to promote early literacy, to explain it and to model behaviors for parents and caregivers.” In a 2001 evaluation report, the

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Pennsylvania Library Association reported that preschool literacy activities are a significant focus for most libraries. Nearly 91percent offer story time for preschoolers each week. Maloney adds,“Public libraries in Northeast PA are well suited to address the literacy needs of the entire family.”

Librarian’s Tips for Parents: 1. Make reading fun! Use expression! Read books that your child loves! 2. Read every day! The more, the better! 3. Ask questions about the story! It develops comprehension skills!

Call 570-348-3000 x 3015 or 570-558-1670 or visit www.library-express.com or www.LCLSHome.org

4. As you are reading point to the words, so your child can “read” along with you. Saying and looking at each word will help the child recognize words on his or her own.

Link to the full schedule of children’s events at all Lackawanna County Library System Libraries through www.HappeningsMagazine PA.com! –Erika A. Bruckner

5. Forget the finish line! Reading is beneficial, even if it’s only a few minutes. Eventually the child’s attention span will grow, and you’ll make it to the end of the story!

Presents

Cinderella MAY 31 & JUNE 1 • 7:30 p.m. JUNE 2 • 2 p.m. Darte Center for the Performing Arts at Wilkes University Wilkes-Barre, PA Adults $20 Students & Seniors $15 To purchase call 570.821.8525 For more information contact us at balletnortheast.org

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Instead of buying your kids more stuff, help protect their future with Life Insurance from New York Life. Call me about giving your children the most selfless gift they’ll never ask for.

John Mackarey*, LUTCF Agent, New York Life Insurance 220 Penn Ave. Suite 100 Scranton, PA 18503 570-969-3111 www.JohnMackarey.com *Registered Representative, offering securities through NYLIFE Securities LLC, member FINRA/SIPC.


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Mom

Remember Mother’s Day Gift Ideas

Because She’s Unique Go forth and sparkle! Liztech Jewelry, handmade in Stroudsburg. Variety of pins & earrings Retail: $37 & up Available at: Everything Natural, Clarks Summit

Because She Has Good Taste! Layers of Leopold's Chocolates including truffles, nuts and solids all in an elegant jewel of a box. Retail: Small ($20), Medium ($35) Large ($50) Available at: Chocolates by Leopold, Montrose

Because of the Memories She Made! Pandora Jewelry’s newest collection, filled with great new beads for spring and Mother’s Day. Retail: Bracelets starting at $45; beads start at $25 Available at: 3 Sisters, Kingston

Because She Has Style Jilzara clay bead jewelry–great for adding some color to any outfit! Retail: Starting at $7.99 Available at: Corky’s Garden Path, Justus

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Because She’s a Gem!

Because She’s Always Knows Where Everything Is!

Fresh-water cultured pearl with diamond accent on 16” white gold chain. Available in Soft Lilac, Sunset Gold, White and Dusty Pink. Retail: $265 Available at: Glint of Gold, Scranton

Vera Bradley Cosmetic Trio. Triple the cosmetics, triple the organization! In varying sizes and lined with wipeable taffeta, great for traveling! Retail: $40; free with every $100 Vera Bradley purchase Available at: Waverly General Store, Waverly

Because She Sparkles Long-wearing textured, matte and sparkle Zoya PixieDust. Formaldehyde-free, vegan-friendly, cruelty-free nail color. Retail: $8 Available at Bella Natura, Clarks Summit

Because She Needs to Relax All weather wicker and deep seat cushion set from Telescope Casual Furniture. Available in stock or custom order. Retail: $1,235, on sale for $899 delivered. Available at Rave Patio, Clarks Summit

Because She Always Knows What to Say Lenny & Eva leather bracelets come in many different colors. The sentiments are set in brass or silver tone and feature many different sayings. Retail: $53 Available at: Wisnosky Jewelers, Tunkhannock continued on page 34 May 2013

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Because She Rocks! Genuine Jade Pendant on Autumn Jasper natural stone adjustable 18"-20" necklace with Autumn Jasper Natural stone earrings. Retail: Pendant & Necklace $62; Set with Earrings $78 Available at: Bella Faccias, Scranton

Because She Means So Much! Pandora Mother’s Day gift set featuring a sterling silver bracelet, two “Beveled” clips, one “Mom” charm and a charm of your choice valued up to $35 with a travel jewelry case. Retail: $200 Available at: Steve Pronko Jewelers, Clarks Summit & Dickson City

Because She’s Cultured Gift cards fit every Mom! State Theatre Gift Cards come in any amount, do not expire and may be redeemed for any State Theatre produced show! Available at: State Theatre, Easton

Because She’s Sweet A beautiful array of Swiss Chocolate hand painted roses on floral stems in a decorative vase. Guaranteed to make any mom happy. Retail: $23.95 Available at: Chocolate Creations, Peckville & Scranton continued on page 36 34

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Because She’s Enchanting The rose gold diamond signature collection. Available at: Jerry Land Jewelers, Honesdale

Because She Wears Many Hats! Garden hats, gloves and tools for the flower lovers. Unique styles and fun designs. Retail: Hats $24; Gloves $9-$25; Tools $15 and up. Available at: Creekside Gardens, Tunkhannock

Because She’s Gentle 40 scents to choose from, and smaller sizes available for party favors bridal showers, baby showers, birthdays and anniversaries. Retail: Soap $6; four or more soaps are $5.50 per bar; Lip Balm $3.50 Available at: Sea Hag Soaps, Brackney

Because She’s Beautiful! Roses so fresh… they’re guaranteed for seven days! Available at: Weis Markets

Because She Has the Right Touch Bare Minerals customizable get started kit. 20 shades, three finishes, 100 percent match. Available at: Head to Toe Salon & Spa, Tunkhannock 36

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Motherhood

IS THE FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE Protect your Children • Teach your Children

The Children’s Advocacy Center/NEPA is a non-profit organization whose mission is to provide excellence in the assessment & treatment of child abuse & neglect.CAC/NEPA provides 24/7 medical assessments and child forensic interviews for victims of abuse and neglect and coordinates a multi-disciplinary team response to child abuse and neglect in Lackawanna and surrounding counties of Northeastern Pennsylvania. The Center provides child abuse prevention education.

THERE’S NO EXCUSE FOR CHILD ABUSE. 1710 Mulberry St. Scranton • 570.969.7313

Mother’s Day Bracelet Gift Set Available Starting April 15 "OULEVARD!VEp$ICKSON#ITY 33TATE3TREETp#LARKS3UMMIT WWWSTEVEPRONKOCOM

Purchase the PANDORA Mother’s Day gift set for $200, featuring a sterling silver bracelet, two “Beveled� clips, one “Mom� charm, and a charm of your choice valued up to $35 with a travel jewelry case (a retail value of $250).* *Good while supplies last. See our store for details.

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Finding a Forever Family “ E verything has been so backwards in my life, but I wouldn’t change a bit of it,” laughs Jean Ruhf. When celebrating Mother’s Day with a child of her own seemed beyond her grasp, she received a phone call that would change everything.

Several years ago Jean began dating Paul Ruhf. Their relationship flourished through their commonality of each having close relationships with their nieces and nephews. Seeing how nurturing Paul was made her see that he needed to be a father despite their inability to have biological children due to their age. The week leading up to Easter 2011 yielded an unexpected phone call from her sister regarding a 5-year-old girl who was in need of a foster family. Her sister saw this as the opportunity for Jean and Paul to finally have the family they had always wanted.“I had always thought about taking in a foster child,” said Jean.

“If we hadn’t gotten the phone call, we wouldn’t have pursued it. At the age we were at, we were set in our lives.” Lexi arrived in their home days later. Jean and Paul began the process of officially becoming foster parents while planning their September 2011 wedding.“Lexi was the flower girl in our wedding. She didn’t think it was Paul and I getting married, she thought of it as the three of us getting married,” explains Jean. The formal adoption took place on 10/11/12. Jean cherishes motherhood and continues to enjoy what she describes as “the little things,” such as Lexi’s budding self-assurance and learning to write and add her numbers. Lexi is a “girly-girl” with an active imagination; she loves her dance classes and being a Girl Scout. Having recently turned 50, Jean and Paul love the energy she brings to their home.“My girlfriends’ kids are graduating and getting married, and I have someone in first grade! But it all seems right,” exclaims Jean. Jean admits to relying on her brothers and sisters, two of whom have adopted children of their own, for parental advice. She holds the moment that her father met Lexi before his passing close to her heart, and she continues to instill motherly traditions in Lexi that she learned from her own mother. Ironically, Jean became a mother at the same age her mother was when she passed away. These traditions are important for Lexi to learn and eventually pass on to her own children. As Jean says,“we’re not an adopted family, we’re a forever family.” Jean is the Executive Director of the Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau, and Paul is the Charmin Material leader at Proctor and Gamble in Mehoopany. The couple resides in Tunkhannock with Lexi and their Shih Tzu, Cocoa. –Kathleen Manley

Photo: Guy Cali Associates


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Fairytales Do Come True! Ballet Nor theast

P r e s e n t s “ C i n d e re l l a ” ven in the 21st century, fairytales still capture our imaginations. Modern re-makes abound, but there is no replacement for a true classic. This spring, the Ballet Northeast dance company will present its rendition of "Cinderella" at the Dorothy Dickson Darte Center at Wilkes University on May 31.

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Established in 1984, Ballet Northeast has adhered to the highest standards of excellence in the performing arts. For 29 years, the company has provided dancers throughout Northeast PA with highquality training and the opportunity to perform in major productions. Ballet Northeast strives to help young dancers develop artistic ability, maturity and self-esteem. Additionally, this nonprofit company is committed to the relationship between the arts and 40

the community and regularly takes part in charity events.

1986, and it has since become one of their signature pieces. Choreographed by Peter Degnan and Kristin Kristin Degnan-Boonin has Degnan-Boonin, the ballet served as Ballet Northeast’s will feature approximately co-artistic/artistic director 80 dancers, from ages 5 to since its founding. During 86. It is a “delightful, romanthe company’s tic, whimsical early years, version that “A delightful, romantic, she also perremains true formed as its whimsical version that to the original prima ballerifairytale,” remains true to the na. DegnanDegnanBoonin now original fairytale” Boonin says. works alongside co-directors Sara Gravine and Karla Ballet Northeast's Kovatch, managing staging "Cinderella" will open on and artistic responsibilities. Friday, May 31 at 7:30 Degnan-Boonin says of the p.m. at the Dorothy dance company,“We are Dickson Darte Center, professionally structured Wilkes University, in Wilkes and have accomplished Barre, PA. Encore performartists working with our ances are Saturday, June 1 dancers in an authentic at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, environment. That is what June 2 at 2 p.m. Tickets cost sets us apart.” $20 for adults and $15 for Ballet Northeast originally performed “Cinderella” in

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seniors and students. –Kelsey Healey

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KidDilly’s PTA $1K Giveaway! Vote for Your School District to win $1,000! ant your school’s parent teacher association to win $1,000? For the third consecutive year, KidDilly will be awarding that coveted prize to the one PTA who receives the most votes at www.KidDilly.com. Participants can join KidDilly (for free!), join their school district group and vote once per day through December 31!

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The KidDilly PTA $1K Giveaway Contest encompasses all schools in Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties with students in grades K8; public, private and charter schools are all included. (If yours is not already listed, please email info@KidDilly.com).The winner will be announced in January 2014.

Donna Boock, co-founder and president, says,“Our mission is to serve Northeast PA families, and the PTA $1K Giveaway is an extension of that mission.” The 2010 winner was Jefferson Elementary School.“They specifically set a goal to raise money for a new playground and came together to make it happen. Even though Jefferson Elementary has one of the smallest student bodies for a public school in our region, their enthusiastic and consistent response made them rise to the top,” explains Boock. continued on page 44

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What’s Cookin’ at

THE BUTLER’S PANTRY in Montrose April showers bring May flowers. Secret Garden by Now Designs. Floral print placemats, napkins, mug and kitchen linens matched with Fiestaware.

Chocolate Chocolate && Wine Wine Festival Festival Sat., Sat.,May May 18th, 18th, Montrose Montrose 570-278-2191 9/15 S. Main St., Montrose Tues-Sat 9:30-5 p.m. Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m. butlerspantry@stny.rr.com Bridal Registry MASTERCARD

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Tunkhannock PA 570.836.3595 • creeksidegardens.com

344-4NYE FASHION MALL • RT. 6, DICKSON CITY

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KidDilly has nearly 2,000 members and over 25,000 readers. It began as a blog in February 2009, and KidDilly.com launched in September of that year.“As a parent in Northeast PA, I started KidDilly.com as a natural progression of doing what I love to do best – connecting with others and sharing meaningful information on events, programs and services as well as discussing hot topics,” says Boock.“Whether a reader or contributing member, we are all connected by the common goal –wanting the best for our family.” In addition to the PTA $1K Giveaway, KidDilly has initiated numerous fundraising events. Visit -Erika A. Bruckner www.KidDilly.com

• We buy gold, silver, coins and estate jewelry • Full Service jewelry repair done on premises • Watch battery installation • Engraving

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Breaking Ground in Spoken Art

Poet Andrea Gibson Performs in Scranton

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amous spoken word poet Andrea Gibson will perform at the Century Club in Scranton on Saturday, May 18. “I live by the ‘Field of Dreams’ motto that ‘if you build it, they will come,’” says Katie Wisnosky, an English teacher at Tunkhannock High School and mentor to The Breaking Ground Poets, a community-based group of students. They have been fundraising to bring Gibson to Scranton to share their love of spoken word poetry with others.

Andrea Gibson

“Andrea Gibson’s poetry has an energy behind it that is very emotional,” says Wisnosky.“She honestly and emotionally tells the stories

of events which we confront every day, but she does it in a way that makes you want to create change.” Gibson continued on page 48

Be Good to Mom Liz Tech Jewelry Trunk Show May 8th-12th Up to 25% off & Free Raffles Go Forth and Sparkle!

Click or call for more info

Clarks Summit 586.9684 • www.everythingnaturalpa.com 46

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NOBODY SAYS “I DO” LIKE WE DO.

570-253-5881 Corner of 9th & Main • Honesdale

www.jerrylandjewelers.com

Attention brides—complimentary make-up consultation featuring Phyt's organic make-up A full-service salon specializing in organic hair color, products and services

1 Gravel Pond Road • Clarks Summit

11 West Tioga Street Tunkhannock PA 570.836.2514

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was the first winner of the Women’s World Poetry Slam and has headlined prestigious performance venues coast to coast with powerful readings on war, class, gender, bullying, love and spirituality. She has five fulllength albums and two published books of poetry, and her work has been featured on BBC, Air America and C-SPAN. The Breaking Ground Poets are a community group of young writers. “Our goal this year is to promote creative writing, public speaking, emotional literacy and civic engagement within the youth writing communities of Northeast PA,” says Wisnosky. The Poets believe that through storytelling and positive reinforcement they can help to build a stronger generation of readers, writers and thinkers. They aim to host free writing workshops and open mic events each month. The poets have built partnerships with local adult writers and poets such as Amye Archer,

Dale Wilsey, Andrea Talarico McGuigan and Jim Warner. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m., and the show will start at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at www.BrownPaperTickets.com, and Wisnosky encourages those interested to book quickly.“It is rare to have a poet of this caliber in our area; you will see art being created, and that will make you want to create art when you leave.” Visit the Breaking Ground Poets Facebook page, or email kwisnosky@frontiernet.net. –Casey Phillips

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Sterling silver charms from $25

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Great personalized favors/gifts for:

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Hear the Colors of Spring L e c t u re a n d C o n c e r t I n f u s e s C u l t u re s espite origin of birth, talent or profession people all over the world have a lot in common. Colors of Spring-A Musical Journey by Sanjukta Sen will unite cultures through several art forms. The event on May 11 will introduce all ages to the world of Indian music.

D

Dipti Pancholy, program director, says that her vision is to,“share my enthusiasm for this ancient art form with participants of all ages and bring people together on the framework of what we all have in common: an appreciation of music.” Pancholy meets many people through her volunteer work at a clinic. She’s discovered people from Ecuador, Brazil, Afghanistan, Nepal and Burma have recently moved to Lackawanna County.“In an effort to bring a better understanding and a feeling of unity in the community, this project will attempt to connect cultures,” says Pancholy. Performer, teacher and composer, Sen (above right) will use her rich voice and eloquent style of music to present classical Indian songs. She wishes to use the joyous mood of Indian music to “conjure the romanticism and the colorful nature of spring.” The ultimate goal is for people to gain a new appreciation for the depth and beauty of a

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different culture with similar interests. Colors of Spring will be held May 11 at 4:45 p.m. at the Waverly Community House in Waverly. A seminar will introduce participants to the world of Indian music. It is free of charge; registration is required. A taste of Indian food will be offered afterwards. The musical journey will begin at 6 p.m. Admission for the concert is $5 for students and $10 for others. Call 570-586-8191 or visit www.waverlycomm.org

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–April Dakoske

Tapan Modak, Tala and Tabla instructor

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COOPER’S

NOW OPEN AT BOTH Cooper’s Cabana now open at Cooper’s Pittston Location Spectacular Views of the River along with Great Cocktails, Beers & Live Music!

O

L

YOUR EXPERIENCES ARE OUR HISTORY Family owned & operated for more than 65 years! Cooper’s is rated one of the Top 100 Restaurants in The U.S. by “Restaurant Hospitality Magazine” Voted NEPA’s “Best Restaurant” in “Where the Locals Eat Magazine” NEPA’s Destination for Legendary Dining

Rich in History & Taste 701 N. Washington Avenue Scranton • (570) 346-6883

YOUR MOM IS WORTH

A LOT OF CLAMS CELEBRATE MOTHER’S DAY AT COOPERS MAY 12 TH Serving 11 a.m till Midnight

On the Waterfront 304 Kennedy Blvd. Pittston • (570) 654-6883

For More Information and Photos, Visit our Website

More than 400 brands of beers and ales, with a

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OUTDOOR DECKS LOCATIONS Scranton & Pittston

At The Ship 701 N. Washington Ave • Scranton, PA (570) 346-6883

On The Waterfront 304 Kennedy Blvd • Pittston, PA (570) 654-6883

Scranton Outdoor Deck & Lighthouse Pub NOW OPEN! It’s the Place to be Seen

Food, Music & Great Beverages SCRANTON: Serving Great Lunch Daily 11 a.m.–3 p.m.

Since 1948

www.coopers-seafood.com Approved

rotating selection of drafts from around the world!


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WHERE TO DINE Cooper’s Seafood House- see ad pages 52 & 53 Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Restaurant- Overlooking beautiful Lake Wallenpaupack, Ehrhardt’s cozy atmosphere and delicious food will have you returning time and time again. We offer a variety of steaks, seafood, salads, burgers, sandwiches and more! Open 7 days a week 11:30 a.m. Pub open later. Route 507, Hawley. 570-226-2124. www.ehrhardts.com

Fern Hall Inn-see ad page 80 The French Manor- see ad page 57 Grassi’s- A new era of casual elegance! Enjoy a progresApple Valley Restaurant- Casual and affordable dining since 1996. Serving burgers, grilled sandwiches, fajitas, specialty pasta, BBQ, ribs and more. Full service pub with daily food and drink specials. Seven gift shops, koi ponds, 1800s schoolhouse, tourist information booth...all on eight acres. Exit 46, 1-84, 104 Rte. 6, Milford. 570-296-6831. www.applevalleyrestaurant.com

sive menu of authentic Italian fare in a Tuscan-inspired ambiance. Family-owned & operated. Featuring traditional Italian entrees & American cuisine. Relax in the martini/wine bar. Wed.-Thurs. 5-9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 5-10 p.m. , Sun. 5-8 p.m. 1092 Rte. 502, Spring Brook. 570-471-3016. www.grassis.net

Arcaro & Genell- On Main Street, Old Forge since 1962. Carrying on the family tradition of homemade Italian specialty entrees, seafood, steak, chicken, veal & much more. Old Forge Red & White Pizza. Open Monday -Saturday, lunch at 11 a.m., dinner at 3 p.m.; takeout available. Private parties Sun. Catering services available on and off premise. www.arcarongenell. 570-457-5555.

Blu Wasabi- see ad page 57 Carl Von Luger Steak & Seafood- A family tradition since 1887. Casual fine dining in downtown Scranton. USDA prime steaks & fresh seafood. Lunches from $5.95; dinners starting at $10.95. Entertainment. Friday Night Jazz Lounge 7-11 p.m. Sunday brunch 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Dinner dress code. Outdoor dining available. Open daily. 301 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. 570-955-5290 www.carlvonluger.com

Carmen’s Restaurant & Wine Bar- see ad page 160

Coccetti's A Restaurant & Bakery- Enjoy charming decor & unique breakfast & lunch creations including baked stuffed French Toast & funky chicken salad. Daily homemade baked goods including our popular chocolate fudge iced brownies! Daily breakfast and lunch specials. Tuesday-Friday 7 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m.-noon. Follow us on Facebook. 1124 Main St., Peckville. 570-489-4000. Coney Island Lunch- A Scranton tradition since 1923. Taste the Texas Wieners and Texas Hamburgers that made us famous. Serving homemade soups, oldfashioned rice pudding and chili-con-carne. Enjoy our legendary chili sauce, created from a closely-guarded family recipe, eat in or take it out. Open Mon.-Sat. 10:30 a.m.- 6 p.m., Sun. noon-6:30 p.m. 515 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. 570-961-9004. www.texas-wiener.com

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Gresham’s Chop House- Dine in our beautiful dining room, cozy bar or under the awning on our deck, and enjoy dazzling views of Lake Wallenpaupack while choosing from delicious steaks, seafood, Italian specialties and more. Visit us at www.greshamschophouse.com Rte. 6, Hawley. Open 7 days at 4 p.m. 570-226-1500. Jim’s Place- Back in a new location. Featuring a cozy & family friendly dining area, spacious outdoor deck & original menu of salads, grinders, burgers & the pizza that made us famous. BYOB and just like before....No Wings, No Karaoke....No Kidding. Lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Dinner 4-10 p.m. Open 7 days. 206 Grand Ave., Clarks Summit. 570-587-8686. Kelly’s Pub & Eatery- Established in 1990 by the Cosgrove sisters. Family, friendly atmosphere. Serving soups, appetizers, sandwiches, burgers, pizza, fries, cold beer and Award-Winning Hot Wings. Take out orders available and gift certificates. Credit cards accepted. Handicap accessible. 1802 Cedar Avenue, Scranton. 570-346-9758. www.kpehotwings.com La Tonalteca- see ad page 61 Ledges- see ad page 129

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WHERE TO DINE Leggio’s Italian Ristorante- Affordable dining in a Mediterranean decor. Breakfast. Wed.-Fri. 8-11 a.m. Sat. & Sun. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Lunch & Dinner Sun.-Thurs.11a.m.-10 p.m. Friday & Sat. 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Full Bar. Happy Hour. Food to order. Appetizers. Seafood, chicken, veal, pasta. Pizza, sandwiches/wraps. Catering. Memorial Luncheons. 64 East Center Hill Rd. Dallas. 570-675-4511 Manhattan Manor- Family-owned restaurant, bar, and lounge in downtown Carbondale. A unique dining experience featuring steaks, pastas, flatbreads and a variety of delicious unique chef inspired dishes. Large contemporary wine and martini menu. Live music, outdoor patio, on and off site catering available. Hours 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. 8 Salem Ave. 570-282-2044 Reservations accepted. www.manhattanmanor.net Mecca’s Place - An Italian family tradition of great food & friends. Buffet-style catering for any party or gathering. Accommodating up to 145 people. Take-outs available. Reservations accepted. Open: Thursday, Friday & Saturday, Bar 3 p.m., Dining Room 5 p.m. Bar Open for Monday night football. 224 Erie Street, Dunmore, PA (Bunker Hill Section) 570-961-9498. Patsel's- see ad page 57 Perkins Restaurant & Bakery- see ad page 158 Quaker Steak & Lube- see ad page 158 Settlers Inn-- see ad page 129 Six East Restaurant- see ad this page 127 Smith’s Restaurant- We're your stop for all on- or

Banquet Facilities Available Scranton-Carbondale Hwy. • Dickson City, PA Phone: 489-8974 • Fax: 489-6414

Hours: Tues.-Sat. 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. Sunday 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. • Monday - Closed

sixeastdiner.com ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

off-site catering. Offering a wide variety of menu options and seating for up to 100. Stop by for our $6 meal deals and homemade specialties. Open daily 7 a.m.-3p.m. Extended hours available for special events. Located at 1402 Cedar Ave. Scranton. 570-344-4403.

Sonic Drive-In- See ad page 59 Stirna’s Restaurant & Bar- More than 100 years in service. Catering on & off premises seven days a week, for all your needs- large or small. Exclusive caterer for LaBuona Vita, formerly the Parish Center, Dunmore. Visit our smoke-free bar & restaurant. Hours: Tues.-Sat. 4 p.m. Until closing. 120 W. Market St., N. Scranton, 570-961-9681 570-343-5742.

Stone Bridge Inn & Restaurant- Quaint European village nestled on a hilltop, surrounded by rolling countryside – discover Northeast PA’s best-kept secret! Excellent cuisine in a casual atmosphere, multilevel tavern & patio with entertainment. Monthly Wine Tasting Dinners. Serving dinner Wed.-Sun. I-81, Exit 206, Rt. 374 East two miles past Elk Mountain, Union Dale. 570-679-9500. www.stone-bridge-inn.com Twigs- see ad page 111

May 2013

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ark chocolate is coming out of the shadows and into the forefront of the healthy revolution. Research recently surfaced about its antioxidant-rich and flavonolfilled nature. This could be the answer to chocoholics need for their daily chocolate “fix.” Chocolate contains up to four times the antioxidants found in tea, which makes it a great way to begin the day! A cup of hot cocoa can also be a healthier choice than a similar serving of red wine giving way to a sweet ending to a long day.

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We all love chocolate, but there is a side of chocolate most people don’t see....the dark side. Studies done at Cornell University add to the growing evidence of health benefits of cocoa and point to a tasty alternative in the quest to maintain a diet rich in antioxidants, the chemicals that have been shown to fight cancer, heart disease and aging. Similar studies have shown that people with high blood levels of flavonoids can lower cholesterol and blood pressure levels and reduce the risk of asthma and Type 2 Diabetes.

been eating chocolate daily during pregnancy were more active and “positively reactive” in traits such as smiling and laughter. By adding one to one-and-ahalf ounces of dark chocolate per day, chocolate lovers are not only curbing confection cravings; they also get sweet health benefits. —JoAnn Marianelli Finnerty

What about expectant mothers who crave chocolate? According to a study at the University of Helsinki, Finland, babies born to women who had

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1008 Scranton-Carbondale Hwy., Dickson City, PA

570-307-3282

Mother's Day Buffet Sunday, May 12 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m., & 4:30 p.m.

Craft Beer and Food Pairing Friday, June 7 6:30 p.m.

Father's Day Brunch Buffet

Sunday, June 16 10:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Lunch Tues.-Fri. 11:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m. • Dinner Tues.-Sat. Beginning at 5:30 p.m. Brunch Buffet Sunday 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. • PRIVATE DINING AVAILABLE

Routes 6 & 11, Clarks Summit, PA May 2013

570.563.2000 • www.patsels.com

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Take Mom Out for Mother’s Day! Blu Wasabi, Dickson City, Special menu 4-9 p.m. 570307-3282

Brunch 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Reservations required. 570-839-7111

Settlers Inn, Hawley, Brunch noon-3 p.m., Dinner 5:30-8 p.m. 570-226-2993

Carl Von Luger, Scranton, Brunch, 11a.m.-2 p.m., lunch 2-5 p.m. 570-955-5290

La Tonalteca, Clarks Summit & Dickson City, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., special menu. 570-969-0966

Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort, Shawnee on Delaware Buffet, noon-4 p.m., standard menu, 6:30-9 p.m. 570-424-4000

Cooper's Seafood, Scranton & Pittston, noon-10 p.m., special menu. 570-654-6883 Ehrhardt's Waterfront Restaurant, Hawley, Buffet, noon-4 p.m., regular menu, 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Reservations required. 570-226-2124 Fern Hall Inn, Clifford, Brunch, lunch/dinner 11 a.m.-6 p.m., classical guitarist. 570-222-3676 The French Manor, Newfoundland, noon-4 p.m., Brunch and a lunch/dinner. 570-676-3244 Gresham’s Chophouse, Hawley, 1-8 p.m., special menu. 570-226-1500 Hilton Scranton & Conference Center, Scranton Brunch, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 570-343-3000. Inn at Pocono Manor, Pocono Manor,

Nichols Village Hotel & Spa, Clarks Summit, Seatings from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., chef-attended stations, children’s buffet. 570-587-1135 Pastel's, Clarks Summit, Seatings at 10:30 a.m., 12:30 2:30 and 4:30 p.m., brunch all day, outside seating. 570-563-2000 POSH, Scranton, Seating at 11 a.m., noon and 1:30 p.m., Special menu, food stations. 570-955-5890 Quaker Steak and Lube, Dickson City, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Reservations recommended 570-489-5823 Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, Scranton. Brunch, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., live piano music. Family Fun Brunch, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., DJ and card-making for kids. 570-558-3929.

Skytop Lodge, Skytop, Brunch, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; spa specials. 855-345-7759 Stone Bridge Inn and Restaurant, Union Dale, noon-8 p.m., special menu, horse and buggy rides 11a.m.-4 p.m. 570-679-9200 Twigs Café, Tunkhannock, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., special menu. 570-836-0433 Woodloch Pines Resort, Hawley, 8:30-10 a.m., 12:30-2 p.m., 6-8 p.m., special menu. 1-800-966-3562 Wyalusing Hotel, Wyalusing, Land and Sea Buffet, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 570-746-1204 Zacharellis Garden, Elmhurst, Brunch, 1 p.m., catered by Constantino’s 570-842-4975


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between exits 180 and 182B from I-81

May 2013

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Perfect Pairings for Sweet Fun Montrose Chocolate and Wine Festival he community that serves together celebrates together. The Montrose Chocolate and Wine Festival will showcase regional food and drink on May 18. Chocolates by Leopold in Montrose was asked to create a festival six years ago around its hand-crafted chocolate creations. Around the same time, the shop had partnered with local wineries by infusing the chocolate with select wines. Combining the two coveted edibles in a festival was a natural and successful pairing.

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Main events include the FOCUS art show and factory tours at Chocolates by Leopold. The art show will take place at the Butternut Gallery and Second Story Books. The Factory Tours will be given by chocolatemaker Leopold himself, with fresh chocolate samples available each hour. Tours begin at 1, 2:15, 3:30 and 4:45 p.m. Other crowd-pleasing events include three bands, a BBQ cook-off and a Cupcake War cooking

contest. Everyone is invited to join in judging for the BBQ. The Lonnie Griffiths band, a rock/blues band from Montrose, will open the festival. Another blues band, Merchants of Groove, will hit the stage next with The Kelly Bell Band to follow. With over 3,000 people attending, the festival has donated over $100,000 to community organizations, such as The Susquehanna County Library and the Endless Mountains Health System. Starting this year, the festival will help fund a Healthy Snack program for Montrose elementary schools, which will include healthy, locally grown snacks and a small greenhouse. The event will be held on Chestnut Street in Montrose from 2:30 to 7:30 p.m. on May 18. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Visit www.ChocolateWineFestival.com â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April Dakoske

Ladies enjoy a girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; day out at the 2012 Chocolate & Wine Festival 60

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Mother’s Day Brunch Idea French Toast with Strawberry Marsala Sauce French Toast Panettone, white bread or your favorite bread of choice, sliced 3 eggs, cracked and beaten 1/4 tsp. vanilla extract 1/4 tsp. orange extract 1/2 cup of milk Grated fresh nutmeg 1/2 tsp. cinnamon Orange zest Mix all ingredients together except orange zest. Dip bread in to coat well. In a heated and buttered skillet cook the battered bread until golden brown on both sides. Sprinkle with orange zest before serving.

Strawberry Marsala Sauce 1 pint of strawberries, chopped or sliced 1 tsp. sugar 1 cup maple syrup 1/4 cup sweet Marsala wine 2 Tbsp. butter Sprinkle sugar over chopped strawberries in a bowl, and let sit for a few minutes. In a small sauce pan, melt butter and Marsala. Stir in maple syrup until it heats through. Add strawberries and their juice to the syrup-butter-Marsala mix. Heat until the strawberries are heated through. Ladle over French toast, and enjoy. Whipped cream and extra butter are optional. –Chef Kate Gabriele, host of Cooking with Kate at Rustic Kitchen inside Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.

Great Performances At YOUR

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Mon., June 10 & Tue., June11 7 PM - $60/$55 Sponsored by The Express-Times, 69.1 WFMZ-TV, Carrabba’s Italian Grill and Adams Outdoor Advertising Butz Broadway Performance Series Capital BlueCross Family Series

Peter Yarrow & Noel Paul Stookey

Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Peter, Paul & Mary Fri., June 21 - 8 PM - $40/$35

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Sponsored by WAEB AM 790

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The Amazing Kreskin

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www.statetheatre.org

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Bridal Guide

Late Spring 2013

Bride Amanda Darbenzio shows off her Anne Barge dress and Christian Louboutin shoes. Photo by Rob Lettieri Photography


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BRIDAL GUIDE

T

Nikki Finella

&

Trevor Cozza 66

hey started dating after high school; 10 years later Trevor gave Nikki a cardboard puzzle piece on her birthday. Through the next few weeks, Trevor would leave puzzle pieces in everyday places, such as the cup holder of her car, tucked inside her purse or under her drink at the bar. Trevor took her to their favorite restaurant for dinner and gave her all the rest of the puzzle pieces. She put them together to find an anagram which asked,“Will you marry me?” and then discovered Travis on one knee. They married August 25, 2012 at St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton. As an interior designer, the bride placed high priority on coordinating details. For flowers and colors, she chose

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BRIDAL GUIDE rich jewel-tone shades like eggplant, fuchsia, raspberry, magenta and gold to set the foundation for a royal feel through the event. The Scranton Cultural Center hosted 225 guests, with a meal by Constantino’s Catering. For the maid of honor and best man speeches, the sisters of the bride told inspiring and touching stories of growing up together in Dunmore. The brother of the groom told humorous tales, and all three even performed a dance which incorporated the band performing and impromptu song. Nikki surprised Trevor with a groom’s cake in the shape of a New York Giants football helmet. The couple honeymooned in Hawaii and now lives in Rutherford, New Jersey. –Erika A. Bruckner Photos: Marygrace Mailen


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Most Memorable Moments... Photographer Shares Glimpses of Unforgettable Weddings

Liz Langsfeld and Ben Bachrach wanted a non-traditional wedding on the slopes! Instead of a first dance, they took a first run down the slopes at Elk Mountain!

Alicia Zuk and Frank Lapera held the reception under a beautiful tent in bride’s parents’ backyard.

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essica Davis, studio owner of Jessica Davis Photography, loves creating fun and relaxed, interactive images. She captures some of the best moments during a private “first look,” followed by bridal party photos (which allow the couple to enjoy cocktail hour instead of posing for photos!) “The best part is, the wedding guests have no idea- they think the bride and groom are seeing each other for the first time at the ceremony,” notes Davis. “Believe me, it's still so specialmany tears still flow!” Here is your own first look at some of the most memorable wedding moments Davis has captured. Visit www.JessicaDavisPhoto.com

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Jenna Francisco and Kenny Main, married in Naples, Florida, had many fun-loving friends in the bridal party.

Adrienne Fallon and Carter Young married at the Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel. They traveled by trolley to locations around town that meant something to them including the University of Scranton and Courthouse Square.

Megan Shinn and Bill Pregmon share a laugh near Stone Bridge Inn in Union Dale.

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..

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Our Personal Attention to Every Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Brunch Sunday, May 12th Reserved seatings at 11 a.m., 12 noon and 1:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘ $32.95 Baby and Bridal Shower Packages starting at $18.95 per person and weddings at $39.95 per person

Book a small shower or intimate rehearsa l dinner in The Mulbe Room and enjoy the rry architectural details of the original parlo dining room as well r and as delicious cuisine an d white glove servic e.

The Colonnade

event space and boutique hotel a posh life l.l.c. property

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bathrooms; rious second floor suite. Private Spend your wedding night in a luxu d to your door. vere deli t kfas and a continental brea Egyptian cotton sheets;freeWi-Fi

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y

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Detail at Two Exceptional Venues. Serving Sunday Brunch 11 a.m.- 2 p.m.

Lunch Tuesday - Saturday 11:30 a.m.- 2 p.m.

Dinner POSH's Fashion Lounge is a stylish yet intimate environment for small rehearsal dinners or cocktail parties.

Wednesday - Sunday at 5 p.m. Wednesday all bottles of wine are1/2 off Thursday Night $5 appetizers and drinks

storical setting, a beautiful and hi in ng ni di ale sc ican cuisine for Providing up d delicious Amer an e tiv va no in es POSH serv Sunday Brunch. lunch, dinner and

POSH @ The Scranton Club 404 North Washington Avenue The Oak Bar at POSH offers distinctive co cktails, delicious appetizers and week ly live entertainmen t.

Scranton PA 570-955-5890 â&#x20AC;˘ WWW.POSHATSC.COM


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Meet the Talented Stylists of

Call today for an appointment. Suite 104 3350 N.Main Ave. Scranton

570.558.2277 Tues.-Sat.

Pictured clockwise from left: Laurie, Denise, Jenny & Kim

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Exclusively You Bridal and Formal Wear

Weddings • Rehearsal Dinners Showers and More!

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" LIFE ISN'T MEASURED IN MINUTES BUT IN MOMENTS"

53 W. Main St., Bloomsburg • (570) 784-6652

280 Main St., Dickson City, PA • 383-0321

May 2013

Hours: Mon., Wed, Thurs. 11-8; Tues., Sat. 10-5; Fri., 11-5 www.exyoubridal.com

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BRIDAL GUIDE Nadine Loncosky

&

Neil Lane

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adine and Neil lived near each other as children, but growing up six years apart, they didn’t know each other until mutual friends introduced them in 2007. Neil proposed two years later during a private dinner on the beach in Jamaica, complete with a huge heart in the sand made out of seashells. Rose petals in the center of the heart spelled out,“I love you.” The pair were married August 4, 2012 at Nativity BVM in Tunkhannock. The men in the wedding party paired Crocs with their tuxedos from Sarno & Son, and the bride added flourish with a hot pink “peeka-boo” tulle sewn into her slip. The black and pink color scheme accented the reception at Stonehedge Country Club in Factoryville. The couple went to Seneca Lake in the Finger Lakes region of New York to choose wine to give as favors to each guest. After the ceremony, they held a butterfly release, and a double rainbow followed a few lucky raindrops! The

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BRIDAL GUIDE couple made the church programs, hand-tying each bow. Family played a large role as the cousin of the groom made the wedding cake and the aunt of the bride arranged the flowers. Candles were lit at the church to remember the sister of the bride and the father of the groom. The bride and groom were each baptized and completed all other sacraments thus far in the church in which they were married. The bride is a surgical tech at Geisinger- CMC; the groom is a technician at Proctor & Gamble. They honeymooned in Jamaica and Canada and now reside in Tunkhannock. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Erika A. Bruckner

Photos: Tammy Martines Photography


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GROOM FASHION: COLOR IS KING Men’s Wedding Trends According to Savvi by Sarno and Son he traditional black tuxedo is in style during every season. According to Charlie Smith, marketing director for Savvi by Sarno and Son, many grooms are choosing alternate colors, depending on the season.“Grey tuxedos and

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Tan Allure Men by Jean Yves

suits are all the rage this year for spring and summer weddings with tan and white being the standards,” he explains.“The brown tuxedo is generally more popular with fall weddings.” The variety of color options can help groom’s tailor their style to a variety of venue types. Fashion-conscious grooms-to-be will want to consider Allure Men by Jean Yves. The new line of wedding tuxedos showcases high quality materials, an updated slimmer silhouette and modern styling with color options in black, heather grey, steel grey and tan.“Now destination weddings, semi-formal daytime weddings and formal black-tie weddings all have the perfect formal 76

counterpart,” explains Smith. The Allure Men by Jean Yves line of formal wear is only available through Savvi Formalwear by Sarno and Son. When it comes to accessories, color continues to reign. Smith says greens are a popular trend this season, from delicate mint to rich emerald. Many grooms are also choosing a vest that matches the jacket.“This offers the look of a suit with the elegance of a tuxedo,” explains Smith. Vests with matching color backs are new this year, allowing the men to show off their colors when they remove their jacket to hit the dance floor!

Heather Grey Allure Men by Jean Yves

Guys can feel free to show their colors, as Savvi by Sarno and Son promises they can match any bridesmaid dress color from any Full color back vest lets men show their colors manufacturer. when going sans jacket Visit a location in Dickson City, Scranton, Edwardsville, Stroudsburg and Wilkes-Barre, call 570-356-5725 or visit www.SavviBySarno.com HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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BRIDAL GUIDE

Bria Butler

B

&Adam Barletta

ria and Adam met through mutual friends at West Scranton High School. They became friends, and after dating eight years, Adam proposed on Bria’s 24th birthday in her favorite place – New York City. They married August 11, 2012 at St. Mary’s of Mt. Carmel in Dunmore.

As the bride and her father were waiting to walk down the aisle, a butterfly landed on her bouquet, which she took as a sign that her deceased grandparents were there on her special day. She chose to use purple, the favorite color of her only living grandmother, who couldn’t attend the wedding. Purple lighting by MCR Productions added a glamorous touch to the ballroom of the Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel continued on page 80 78

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6&5$17 21 ‡ ', &.621 &, 7 < ‡ 67 528'6%85* ‡ (':$5'69 , / / ( ‡ :, / .(6 %$55(

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BRIDAL GUIDE in Scranton. Signature drinks were “Purple Passions,” with purple custom napkins and matches. The bride’s white rose bouquet was accented with a vintage brooch. Roses and white hydrangeas were continued into the reception with custom rose linens on the cake table and sweetheart table. The flowers highlighted three different centerpiece arrangements, which also boasted plenty of crystals and bling!

Photos: Carol McDonald

Fashion reigned as the bride wore shoes and a clutch by Jimmy Choo. The bridesmaids’ and bride’s dresses transformed from formal ceremony gowns into cocktail dresses for the reception. The six-tier wedding cake by Truly Scrumptious was lit with LED lights to show off the crystals, rhinestones and fresh flowers atop the layers filled with peaches and cream and chocolate peanut butter flavors. Guests enjoyed using the photo booth. The couple’s first dance was to “Then” by Brad Paisley; the bride and her father danced to “I Loved Her First” by Sugarland. The bride is a hair stylist at Finalé Hair Salon; the groom is an excavator with Butler Excavating. They reside in Scranton. –Erika A. Bruckner 80

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Skytop, for your “very special” event. Experience a naturally inspired wedding at one of the most esteemed lodges in the country—Skytop. This grand historic estate features the very best in accommodaons, fine dining and limitless recreaon throughout 5,500 prisne acres of breathtaking vistas nestled in the picturesque Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania. “One of America’s Best All-inclusive Resorts” Travel+Leisure

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Northeast PA Weddingsâ&#x20AC;Ś By the Numbers According to Results from Happenings Magazine 2011/2012 Newlywed Survey

62% 32 Used Magazines in Wedding Planning

Average Age of Groom

30

138

Average Age of Bride

Average Number of Guests

40% Said they Would Not have Changed Anything About Their Big Day

18% of wedding colors included a shade of purple

8 82

August was the Most Popular Month for Weddings, followed by June

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22%

of weddings were paid for by the parents of the couple

30%

of weddings were paid for by couple

48%

of weddings were paid for by both the couple and parents

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veryone dreams of having the perfect wedding, or hosting the event of the season. John Phillips, of MCR Productions, helps make that dream a reality. He is anything but a traditional event planner. Getting his start in banquet facilities and marketing (in addition to having his own party band,“UUU”), Phillips used his experience and passion to create his own innovative company that specializes in giving the traditional– and sometimes not so traditional– a new twist. “The difference between us and everyone else is that we offer so much. You’re getting a planner as much as a facilitator,” explains Phillips. In addition to offering a band, DJs, décor, non-floral centerpieces, lighting and linens, MCR also provides custom-built and LED furniture.“We also are ordering a special new dance floor and have what’s probably the area’s most technologically advanced photo booth,” 84

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says Phillips. Whether it’s designing and planning the Scranton Chamber of Commerce SAGE Awards, the American Heart Association Heart Ball in Harrisburg, Wish in the City or elaborate Indian weddings, Phillips and his team are there from start to finish. They begin by building a diagram of the entire room or space. On event day, a team member is kept on-site on stand-by for troubleshooting to ensure everything goes

off without a hitch. Even with all his successes and creativity, Phillips remains appreciative of his colleagues in the event-planning industry.“I’ve learned very much from my wife and other peers HappeningsMagazinePA.com

in the area,” admits Phillips. “This business can be very cutthroat, and it shouldn’t be. And I won’t take credit for things I’m not good at– I’d rather call someone for help with something than just say ‘we can do that’ if we can’t. That’s the key to everythingusing the people that are the best.” He plans to eventually expand the business into Philadelphia and the Charlottesville, Virginia area, hoping to capitalize on what those markets are currently missing. With events like weddings and bar and bat mitzvahs becoming more and more artistic, Phillips’ best advice for any host or bride-to-be is to stop thinking inside the box. “Nothing is too radical or impossible; it’s just a matter of what you want and communicating that,” he advises. Call 570-878-3320 or visit www.BookMCR.com –Nicole Krempasky

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Photos: © Rob Lettieri

230 West Tioga St. • Tunkhannock • 570.836.5754 • www.wisnosky.com

Contact Contact Lindsay Lindsay Pross Pross 570.674.6545 570.674.6545 lpross@golf-huntsville.com lpross@golf-huntsville.com 1334 Market Street • Dallas, PA www.golf-huntsville.com

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BRIDAL GUIDE

Amanda Helene Darbenzio

&

Jarrett Reid Hoffman

Mutual friends introduced Amanda and Jarrett. They claim love at first sight when they met in 2011. She moved to New York City to close the distance gap, and he proposed in 2012 after a day at their favorite places in the city. They married September 9, 2012 at the Scranton Cultural Center. Invitations and other stationery were hand-painted with original artwork. Out-of-town guests were treated to a five-course dinner the night before the wedding. The couple chose to do a â&#x20AC;&#x153;first lookâ&#x20AC;? at Lake Scranton. The moment when the bride and groom see each other for the first time prior to the ceremony, is captured in photos and video. The bride wore a couture bridal gown by Anne Barge and shoes by Christian Louboutin. The groom wore a grey suit and violet Burberry tie. Bridesmaids continued on page 88 86

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BRIDAL GUIDE wore Amsale dresses with contrasting green orchids, while groomsmen donned Calvin Klein suits with Burberry ties. The intimate, candle-lit, Jewish ceremony was under a chuppa built by family members. The couple exchanged hand-written, personal vows and were married by long-time friend and rabbi, Daniel Swartz of Temple Hesed. The couple served champagne to family members, symbolizing the welcoming of each other’s families and the sweetness of the moment. Following the ceremony, guests enjoyed cocktails and hors d’oeuvres on the ballroom balcony. Guests were seated at a single communal table in the shape of an “H” for Hoffman, and covered in gold crushed linen and surrounded by gold chiavari chairs. Purple delphiniums and gold willow branches were arranged in tall black urns, while other

tables featured roses, hydrangea and celosia surrounded by votives. Dramatic amber and red lighting added to the ambience. Epicurean Delight provided stations in themes such as Asian offerings, comfort foods and traditional fare. The wedding cake by Truly Scrumptious featured different flavors – coconut cake with lemon mascarpone, almond cake with chocolate hazelnut ganache and banana cake with chocolate ganache. The Superman-themed groom’s cake added red velvet with cream cheese frosting. The newlyweds’ first dance was to “That’s How Strong My Love Is” by Otis Redding. Guests joined a DJ club-style dance party, in the middle of which, Amanda and Jarrett were hoisted up for the traditional chair dance, while guests danced the “Horra.” After a honeymoon in Mexico, they now live in New York City. –Erika A. Bruckner

Photos: Rob Lettieri Photography


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QUALITY • SERVICE • VALUE 531 South State St. (near Talbot’s) Clarks Summit • (570) 587-5580 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m-7 p.m. | Sat 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.


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Weddings on the Green Special Events at Huntsville Golf Club

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ucked away in the Back Mountain area of Shavertown, Huntsville Golf Club boasts a beautiful 473-acre Rees Jones Golf Course. The rolling terrain and vast expanses of lush greenery make for a beautiful backdrop for wedding ceremonies and receptions. According to Lindsay Pross, food and beverage director, “Everywhere you look is a perfect photo location.” The clubhouse, designed by world-famous architect Peter Bohlin, features intimate gathering areas and delicious food options. For larger parties, the patio is the place to be. The recently installed patio is 5,000 square feet and holds a beautiful clear-span 90

tent and the ability to accommodate 250 guests for a sitdown, served event. A flexible range of setups on the patio offers different sizes and configurations to fit each event perfectly. With celebrity Chef Michael Langdon at the helm in the kitchen, guests can expect the

best in both food and presentation. A contestant on season 11 of FOX’s television show, “Hell’s Kitchen,” Langdon takes great care in each dish he makes.“Michael takes much pride in not only how the HappeningsMagazinePA.com

food tastes, but how it is presented,” said Pross.“Your food won’t look mass-produced as it often can at other venues. The food quality, impeccable service and beautiful surroundings make Huntsville Golf Club an ideal location for a wedding.” The majority of Huntsville weddings take place in the spring and summer months, and the venue is available year-round. The staff specializes in customizing each couple’s big day to truly reflect the tastes of the bride and groom, and they pledge to handle all events with an unparalleled sense of caring and professionalism. www.GolfHuntsville.com or call 570674-6531. –Casey Phillips Photos: Paul Mazza

May 2013


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Irish Escape

November 13-18, 2013

Maximize a long weekend in Ireland with this fournight tour including these must-see destinations: Dublin, the Ring of Kerry, Blarney and the medieval town of Kilkenny. Enjoy nightlife & shopping in these fabled Irish towns with plenty of time to “Pub Crawl.” Includes: 4 nights hotel, full breakfast daily & 2 dinners. R/T airfare from Newark $1278 per person/double

317 Davis St.• Clarks Summit, PA

570.586.1666 • 800.242.8076 www.abingtontravel.com

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Fine Arts Fiesta A beautiful

Creatively Coming Together

smile

cumulative 58 years of tradition does not dampen anticipation for the longest-running art show in PA. The Fine Arts Fiesta, an event so big it takes four days to complete, will be held on May 16 to 19. Downtown Wilkes Barre will be active with artist markets, food vendors, art shows, performers and poster contests.

A

is your best

accessory.

Annette Evans and Alfred Groh founded the fiesta in 1956 when they saw the need for the community to come together and celebrate diversity through talent, passion and friendship. This year’s theme is “Rockin’ the Arts on the Square” and is expected to draw more than 60,000 people to Public Square.

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The Fine Arts Fiesta operates rain or shine. The Artists Market offers everything from jewelry and photography to art, clothing and furniture. Food vendors will serve food as diverse as the people attending. The Art Shows are juried, with one for adults and one for students. Both display creative designs in painting, sculpture, construction, watercolor, graphics, crafts and photography. Numerous awards will be given. Performers are all local. The Poster and Program Cover Contest welcomes students grades 3-12. The chosen artist will have his/her artwork displayed as the event’s theme piece. Community members are asked to pick their favorite and judge the entries. Whether it be a craft, talent or artistic ability, the public is welcome and encouraged to contribute to all events. Children’s activities are also available. Visit www.FineArtsFiesta.org

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–April Dakoske

May 2013


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The Latest Options from Top Value Kitchens

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op Value Kitchens in Shavertown PA has been a family-owned business supplying exquisitely made, fine wood cabinetry for kitchens, homes and offices since 1990 and prides themselves on being the supplier of choice for perceptive buyers throughout Northeast PA.

Robert Nause, president and owner of Top Value Kitchens says that in kitchens today, “Efficient use of space remains the number one priority for kitchen remodeling. Consumers are looking to create open space.”Top Value Kitchens offers many types of setups and remodeling options to achieve this look. As authorized dealers in many fine products and companies, Top Value Kitchens has a wide variety of products to choose 94

from when renovating. Top Value Kitchens offers cabinetry from many of the leading manufacturers in the United States, such as Dynasty, Omega, Kraftmaid, Aristokraft and Contractor’s Choice. These brands offer over 150 door styles, in a variety of wood species including Cherry, Maple, Oak, Walnut and finishes such as stains, paints, glazes and brush strokes. The countertop selection at Top Value Kitchens is also expansive. From cost effective options such as laminate, to the top-of-the-line options of Granite and Quartz, all of the countertops at Top Value Kitchens are high quality and HappeningsMagazinePA.com

come in many different color options to perfectly complement any kitchen or bathroom. In addition to beautiful surfaces and cabinetry, Top Value Kitchens also sells features such as cookware racks, counter stools and decorative hardware, along with other wooden furniture. Easing the anxiety that comes with a major remodel is one of the main goals for the staff at Top Value Kitchens. They share the homeowner’s wish of a beautifully completed project, and promise to be with customers every step of the way. Call 570-675-7083, or visit www.TopValueKitchens.com –Casey Phillips May 2013


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CoaltownThrowdown Is Northeast PA the New Center of the Trout World? re trout strong enough to pull you into the water? Dalton fisherman Greg Gondella believes trout will pull 24 anglers into the Lackawanna River and Tunkhannock Creek! Gondella promises to ’hook’ art, sport and history together as he and A&G Outfitters of Dickson City stage the inaugural Coaltown Throwdown for May 18 and 19.

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The Throwdown is a fly-fishing tournament open to 24 competitive anglers from across the US. There’s never been a tournament like this in the region, and Gondella is casting to make this a yearly event.“Competitive fly fishing is very different from what most people would expect,” reports Gondella, who has been tested in fresh and saltwater tournaments and is both a sponsored competitor

Greg Gondella (left) and Adam Nidoh, Manager A&G Outfitters.

and professional fishing guide.“This is a rare chance to watch highly accomplished anglers in our local waters,” adds Gondella. Spectators can follow threehour sessions in the morning and afternoon, and contestants will rotate between specific sections of water in pursuit of stocked and wild Brown and stocked Rainbow Trout. Much of the tournament is along riverside trails, so spectators can get on the path banks to watch. The Electric City battleground is the Lackawanna River just downstream of the I-81 Main St. bridge in North Scranton and downstream of the South Side Sports Complex in South Scranton.“A splendid showcase for our trophy-trout river,” beams Gondella! “The

Lackawanna has become one of the top five rivers in the state for wild trout. To be able to have a tournament of this caliber in a river that at one time you would never set foot in– it is huge!” The Wyoming County venue is the Tunkhannock Creek below Keystone College and a section starting from Lackawanna Trail Elementary School.“Here the Creek offers stunning views of rural PA, so folks with a camera can take home a trophy image,” notes Gondella. “Seems like an ideal spot to write some colorful fishing history,” smiles Gondella.“I hope the trout are ready to rumble!”Visit trout legend.com/forum/ sanctioned-competitions2013/(silver)-coaltownthrowdown-may-18-19–Bill Risse scranton-pa/

To read more about the history of these waterways, visit www.Happenings MagazinePA.com!


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HOUSE OPEN 5th! May 2 p.m. .- 5 1 p.m VP RS

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95 Levitt Hill Rd., Tunkhannock, PA

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A Wife’s Crusade Against Lyme Disease

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n the surface, the Thomas family of Falls, PA looks like a healthy young couple just starting their family. Appearances can be quite deceptive. Eric Thomas was diagnosed with Lyme Disease two years ago. Initially, wife Karen celebrated, thinking the agonizing days of muscle spasms and excruciating aches were over. The truth is that unless caught early, Lyme Disease is a devastating illness that often leaves its victims looking normal, but in constant pain and suffering. It can affect the eyes, brain, nerves and joints. With the Eric’s pain becoming too much, he had to quit his job as a forklift driver. He could no longer sit for the time required, and pain from using his hands became too great.

Unfortunately, diagnoses and information regarding Lyme seem to be confusing. The supposed telltale ‘bulls-eye’ rash does not occur in all patients, and testing is quite controversial. According to Karen, insurance-approved blood tests are sometimes less than 90 percent accurate, and the CDC guidelines don’t recognize chronic Lyme. After years of constant suffering, the Thomas’ sought answers from one of the country’s leading Lyme specialists, Dr. Daniel Cameron, who practices in Mt. Kisco, NY. He discovered Eric’s Lyme was low, but the coinfections resulting from the disease were appalling. The doctor found his red blood cells weren’t round anymore. They were actually exploding!

The effects of the disease also take their toll on 3year-old daughter, Olivia. “Some days I just don’t feel like doing anything. I can’t sit for extended periods; I can’t stand for too long. Sometimes it hurts just having my daughter sit on my lap,” explains Eric. Olivia is aware her father is hurting, but she is too young to understand that medicine doesn’t make him feel better.

With his list of pains, a specialist’s diagnosis and years of medicine, Eric’s Lyme Disease is still not acknowledged by some friends and even medical professionals. Karen notes,“It doesn’t have the look of a chronic illness. Unless people see a graphic illness or treatment, it gets overlooked.”With this prognosis, there are still no clear answers or remedies for Eric. For this reason, Karen has made it her mission to

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spread the word about the disease. She invited Dr. Cameron to speak at North Pocono Middle School on May 11 for Lyme Disease Awareness Day. Doors will open at 1 p.m. The public can meet patients with Lyme Disease and view the documentary “Under Our Skin.” Following the documentary, Dr. Cameron and colleague John Darcy will speak, and hold a question-and-answer session.“This disease can be so debilitating– not just for the patient, but the stress to everyone else. You feel so alone. You’re denied health coverage, you’re watching a loved one suffer, maybe die,” explains Karen. The Thomas family’s advice is to treat a tick bite seriously, and find a specialist. –Nicole Krempasky

Visit HappeningsMagazinePA.com for 10 Facts You Should Know About Lyme Disease May 2013


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Extraordinary Projects Begin with an Exceptional Builder Let Custom Building by Carriage Barn Make Your Dream Come True

Custom Building by Carriage Barn offers every service you need to take any renovation project from start to finish.Whatever style you’re looking for – from old-fashioned country to ultra modern – Carriage Barn’s experienced design experts will produce outstanding results, helping you achieve “the whole look” that you want.

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Local School’s Car Show Drives Up the Fun!

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ot rods and classic cars will make their way to the Scranton School for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children for The Annual Car Show! Held on the school’s Clarks Summit campus on Sunday, May 19, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., over 1,000 people are expected to attend.

Community members can display cars at no cost. The event has a great family-filled environment and offers music, food and fun. Raffles, a 50/50 drawing and grilled food are often the most popular attractions- in addition to the cars, of course. Each year 100

the car show displays around 300 cars of different makes, colors and customizations. Spectators can vote for cars, and awards will be given for Best in Show, CEO’s Award, Student Choice, Best Truck, Best Customization and five surprise awards. New this year, $2,250 in cash prizes will be awarded. The first show was organized over ten years ago by a group of volunteers to help raise funds for students. The event has grown to offer new features each year.“Not only is it HappeningsMagazinePA.com

an impressive car show, it is a great day to spend with the family.” Admission is free; donations are requested which directly benefit students. The Scranton School is the newest school for deaf and hard of hearing children in the nation. A program of the Western PA School for the Deaf, the school offers academic, residential and support services to students at no cost to their families. American Sign Language, sign-supported English and spoken English are practiced at the school where programs are developed around students’ individual needs. Call 570-947-6599 or visit www.TheScranton School.org –Dan Curry

May 2013


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313 Davis Street Clarks Summit (behind Benetton) • (570)-586-7750 • www.ravepatio.com

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May’s

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Can’t-Miss Events West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival

Under the Street Lamp May 4 • State Theatre of the Arts, Easton This vocal group brings back old classics. The quartet features recent cast members of the musical “Jersey Boys” who will perform selections from the Beach Boys, The Beatles, The Four Seasons and other rock, doo-wop and Motown favorites. The group is often featured on PBS. Tickets start at $35. www.StateTheatre.org 610-252-3132

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May 4 & 5 Susquehanna Ave., West Pittston A parade at noon on Saturday is followed by the Little Miss Cherry Blossom contest. Any girl between the ages of 4 and 7 is invited to compete. After the contest will be live entertainment by local bands and dance studios. An arts and craft tent will feature over 70 vendors. The festival benefits several organizations and funds a $500 scholarship for a qualified resident of West Pittston. 570-655-7780 continued on page 104

May 2013


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FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED • ALL CABINETS MADE IN THE USA THOUSANDS OF CABINETS IN STOCK Louis Industrial Dr. • Old Forge • 344-0443/457-6774 • mariottibp.com Daily 8 - 4:30 • Wed. & Thurs. 8 - 8 • Sat. 8 - Noon | Warehouse open until 4:30 Daily and Noon on Saturday


May’s

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Can’t-Miss Events Shawnee Celtic Festival

Armed Forces Day Parade May 18, 11 a.m. • Downtown Scranton Respect, honor and celebrate the service of local veterans. The parade features those who have served their country as well as several non-profit organizations. In addition to the parade, there will be a 5k race starting at 9 a.m. and several military displays set up through the afternoon. 570-961-2696

May 25 & 26, 11 a.m. -6 p.m. Shawnee Mountain Ski Area, Shawnee on Delaware Absorb the sounds; observe the culture and enjoy the experience of Ireland. On Memorial Day weekend, nonstop Celtic music and a variety of craft and food vendors will be available. Fan favorites include the Pocono Highland Dancers and the Pocono Region Pipes & Drums Band. Kids can enjoy magic shows, face-painting, juggling and a petting zoo. Tickets range from $12-24. 570-421-7231

Opening Day May 25th • Season Passes Available

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Q THE

YEAR WA S

1906

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THE WHITE SOX WON THE WORLD SERIES AGAINST THE CUBS. In 1906, the White Sox won the world series against the Cubs, the most winning team in baseball history with a record of 116-36. The same year we began to assemble our own winning team to help you deal with the unexpected. And our new law firm began getting attention, not only because of our lawyers' skill, but because of how they treated their clients. More than a century later, Powell Law is respected as our region's most experienced firm for personal injury and business law. If you need legal help, we'll show you why we've stood the test of time.

N E PAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; S O L D E S T P E R S O N A L I N J U R Y F I R M SCRANTON 570-961-0777

TAYLOR 570-562-2420

MOSCOW 570-842-4281

www.powell-law.com

STROUDSBURG 570-517-0403


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MURDER IN THE GALLERY! MYSTERY DINNER THEATER EVENT rab your detective notepad and magnifying glass! There’s a murder to be solved and fun to be had at a unique event coming May 31. “Murder in the Gallery,” a Murder Mystery Dinner Party, will take shape in Shopland Hall at the Scranton Cultural Center. The historic venue will be transformed into an art gallery – and murder scene!

G

“People love to grab dinner and see a movie. This is even better; it’s dinner and a live theater production!” explains

new exhibition, tensions (as well as prices) are high. By the end of the night someone will be dead; a murderer will be unmasked, and a piece of work will likely be sold for FAR more than it is worth! Guests will receive their first clue as they register. The event starts at 5:30 p.m. with cocktail hour – but stay alert! Murder mystery characters will be mingling with guests as they peruse the art, and anything guests see

This evening will be especially unique because of its effort to include regional ties.“Sponsorships for this event are not only reasonably priced, but super creative,” explains Barber. For example, the featured drink during cocktail hour will be Lackawanna Lemonade, in honor of reception sponsor Lackawanna College. Murder weapons, props and detective notepads will creatively tie in other regional businesses.

e Scen - Crim e n e c S Crime ene c S e - Crim “Character sponsorships Scene e m i r e - C n e could be really creative,” c or overhear S Crime e adds Barber,“because an n just might lead to another e Sc Crime Nicole A. actor in the show could be clue! As guests feast on Barber, director of a banker at Pennstar Bank dinner and dessert by Leadership Lackawanna. or cashier at Dunkin Constantino’s Catering, "Murder In The Gallery" is a Donuts– two of our sponprofessional actors from dark, comedic tale of mursors!” The Vintage Theater will der and mystery customtake the stage to perform written specifically for this “The original script, unique their original production; event. On the evening of sponsorships and creative the Theater’s first custom, fictional Eric Van Der Hue's atmosphere truly make this interactive murder mysa perfect way to spend a tery event. The evening Friday evening,” Barber concludes as guests try to adds. Funds benefit solve the mystery. Leadership Lackawanna, a Accusations will be collectlocal nonprofit dedicated to ed, and guests who are the leadership and professional best detectives will receive development. Call 570-342prizes such as gift baskets 7711 x125, or visit and gift certificates.

www.LeadershipLackawanna.com –Erika A. Bruckner

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e Scen

Bugaboo Young America Bloom 4moms Serena & Lily Naturepedic Aiden & Anais Bob Dwell Studio

Major lines of furniture, executive furnishings & authentic oriental rugs, all at drastic reductions.

Baker Henredon Milling Road Century Drexel Heritage Ralph Lauren Hancock & Moore Lexington Thomasville

97 Lackawanna Ave., Downtown Scranton • (570) 346-6591 • Free Parking next to our store. Mon.-Sat.: 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Mon. & Thurs. until 8 p.m.• Sun.: Noon-5 p.m.


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TREASURE HUNTING Alley Cats/Dogs Thrift & GiftOver 4,000 square feet of name-brand clothing and accessories, antiques, collectibles, furniture, housewares and much more. Hours: Thurs.-Fri. 10-5, Sat. 10-3. 500 Bridge St., Old Forge, PA. Check us out on Facebook and Ebay. 570-862-3090.

Bridge Street Marketplace– Over 7,000 square feet of shopping encompasses a consignment area as well as a multi-vendor co-op. Antique, vintage, gently used, new, hand-crafted and trash-to-treasure items. Credit cards accepted. Call for hours. Bridge St. (Rte. 29), Tunkhannock. 570-836-4456.

Jukebox Classics and Vintage Slot Machines– Specializing in Game Room Collectables, Pin Ball Machines, Juke Boxes (old & new), barber shop poles & chairs, Vintage Gas Pumps, Cookie Jars, Salt & Pepper Shakers, Paintings, Neon Signs, Jewelry, Rugs, Coca Cola items, Betty Boop items and more.

210 Main Ave, Hawley. Phone 570-226-9411 or 570241-6230, email: jukesslots@aol.com

Mary’s Home Furnishings– 10766 SR29, So. Montrose PA. Sat. & Sun. & by chance or call 570-278-2187. General line antiques – cupboards, tables, lamps, glassware, postcards, linens, rugs. Paintings by Anita Ambrose, Cheryl Korb and Nance Brown. Stop by on route to the Chocolate & Wine Festival in Montrose, Sat. May 18. www.chocolatewinefestival.com www.antiquessusqco.com/marys

Olde Barn Centre/Antiques & SuchAn 1860s Quaker Barn filled with antique furniture of all periods. 12 antique dealers with treasures & collectibles for your home. Credit cards and layaway welcome. 1605 Rte. 220 Highway, Pennsdale. 1 mile east of exit 15 of I-180. Open daily 10-5. Info: 570546-7493 or www.oldebarncentre.com

Furniture of all periods... “A beautiful blend of past & present.” U.S. Rt. 220N, 1/2 Mi. East of Pennsdale • Credit Cards/ Layaway Open 10-5 Daily • 570-546-7493 • www.oldebarncentre.com 108 108

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he Carriage Barn features two floors of room-like settings displaying authentic antiques & glassware. Carriage Barn boasts over 6,000 square feet of antiques. Custom refinishing, woodworking and delivery. Add a classic piece of the past to complement your life today!

From I-81: Take Waverly Exit 197 Going North: right at end of ramp, then the next two rights Going South: left at end of ramps, then the next two rights

1494 Fairview Road, Clarks Summit, PA www.carriagebarnantiques.com â&#x20AC;˘ (570) 587-5405


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PET TALES

Puppy Packing Extra Pounds? It’s Just a Few Steps to Healthier Pet Q: We adopted a 5-year old Shepherd mix from the shelter. He’s a bit overweight and clearly raised on table scraps...begging is a problem. Any advice on how to set new eating habits and exercise off the pounds? A: Don’t assume that your boy beefed up on table food just because he begs. Unmannerly dogs beg; it’s more the norm than the exception. Premier dog kibble will go untouched while Fido covets the delicacies on your dining table. Without training in proper etiquette, he’ll naturally attempt to persuade his owners to share. It doesn’t take more than a tidbit or two to reinforce the begging habit. Convincing him to mind his manners is as simple as deciding what you expect of 110

him during dinner (lying on his mat in the corner? Being quiet in his crate? Staying out of the kitchen?) or as difficult as exercising the willpower to reinforce the expected behavior. I can’t say it often enough: a solid “down/stay” is essential to every pet’s bag of tricks. Work up to a 30 minute down…yes, your dog can! But remember, train and reward each step leading towards the ultimate goal. The “down” and “stay” are taught and rewarded away from the dinner table, where the dog can focus on the lesson. A one-minute “down” is rewarded and reinforced before asking for incremental increases to a ten-minute “down,” and so on. Before testing the results during mealtime, HappeningsMagazinePA.com

accept that you will need to get up from the dinner table to take him back to his spot, potentially repeatedly over the course of several meals. Shelters offer minimal space for exercise and not much to do but eat. The food is often donated, thus not a higherend product. Nutritionally, shelter life is comparable to lying around on your couch eating take out for a few weeks. It’s likely that a sedentary lifestyle, neutering and lower quality dog food (rather than table scraps) are responsible for your dog’s paunch. Obviously regular jaunts around the neighborhood and a healthier diet would help. A vet check is wise, in case of underlying heart issues, but otherwise try a pair of sneaks, a leash and the great outdoors! May 2013


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Unless you’re a marathoner, even a heavy-set dog is capable of more mileage than most people. Use a pedometer or other mileage tracker; it’s too easy to imagine you’ve gone further than you have. Don’t let the dog dictate the pace, their noses interfere with exercise. Too many people are walked by their dogs – either dragged hither and yon or standing idle while the dog investigates every scent. Move briskly and purposefully- set a minimum three mph pace (four is better!) and commit an hour a day. Break it into two walks if you can’t manage at first…then, increase to 45 minutes each. I guarantee your own energy and health will increase inversely with Fido’s decreasing waistline! (http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2013/apr/05/brisk-walk-healthier-running-scientists)

ng r mi ou r! for ith aine w w r No ses pet t s cla ified rt e c

–Beth Dorton Dillenbeck, Hollow Hills German Shepherds blogging at www.instinctiveimpressions.blogspot.com/

We invite you to support Endless Mountain Animal League. EMAL is a non-profit dedicated to alleviating pain, fear and suffering to animals through education, enlightening the public on animal care, engaging ourselves in legislative issues and promoting awareness, respect and compassion for all living things.

www.emaleague.com • emaleague@gmail.com

Become a member today. Call 570-045-3391 May 2013

www.facebook.com/emaleague

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Who’s the Cutest of them All? “Lucy”

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Vote for your favorite May pet at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com! The winner receives a Happenings bandanna !


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l? “Maddi”

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The votes are in... April’s Pet of the Month is Ranger Whitehill of Kingsley. Congratulations! America’s Premier Boarding Facility

BOARDING • DAYCARE • SALON

245 N. Sherman Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-270-3711 www.PreppyPet.com


NEPAVoices

Gretchen Ann Eagen, Recruitment Specialist, Regional Hospital of Scranton

“A

single nurse can make a difference for an entire community. The finest nurses, while impacting thousands, treat every patient as the unique individual he/she is. Nursing isn’t about disease or sickness, medications, IVs, bed baths or dressing changes. Nursing is about people.

I have been fortunate to be a part of the healthcare profession as both a caregiver and as recruiter. As a recruiter, I seek unique individuals who possess the educational and clinical training to become a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN), Registered Nurse (RN) or Nurse Practitioner (NP) and who also have the extraordinary attributes of compassion, commitment, passion and intuitiveness. They also must have excellent communication skills and be flexible and calm under pressure. It is a privilege to find that special person; I am indirectly responsible in making a difference in lives every day, as a nurse does. I have been a recruiter and career coach for over 25 years while specializing in healthcare for 15. I began my career in the Washington, DC metropolitan area and returned home to Northeast PA, 10 years ago settling in Waverly. I have recruited individuals nationally and inter114

nationally. I have placed over 50,000 individuals in all professions and over 20,000 in the nursing profession. There are currently more than 300,000 RNs, LPNs and CNAs in PA with more than 18,000 employed in Northeast PA. Nurses can work in hospitals, home healthcare services, physician’s offices, nursing care facilities, schools, camps, correctional facilities, schools, government and military. They work in specialties such as cardiac care, clinical care or emergency and can combine specialties such as oncology and pediatrics. It is the type of career which offers flexible hours, including part time and full time and opportunities for leadership or research. Nursing is also a profession that provides ongoing learning and is competitive technically.

for care giving. She signed up for nursing school, receiving some grant money, and took a school loan. Two years later she became an LPN, and next fall she is returning for her RN! I have the best of both worlds. I'm a nurse’s aide on weekends where I can make a difference in the lives of those people who allow me to care for them, and during the week I help place intelligent, caring individuals in the healthcare system of Northeast PA.

-Gretchen Ann Eagen, daughter of Shirley W. Eagen and the late James Michael Eagen, Jr, one of the founders of Happenings Magazine

Not too long ago, a friend was looking for a second job for extra income. I recommended that she look into becoming a personal caregiver with a local agency. Soon after, she was laid off from her office employment of 25 years. Her second job had awakened a passion Gretchen Ann Eagen, right, with her daughter Brianna

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Healthcare Outlook

In Northeast PA

J

ohn Wiercinski may not be your typical healthcare executive. In fact, this former high school wrestler and football player at times may not have even looked like a typical executive. His varied and interesting background includes a stint in a college seminary while studying to become a priest but also involves serving as a Captain and Assistant Hospital Administrator with the United States Air Force Hospital at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. It is ironic, yet fitting, that after traveling and studying the world extensively, and even sporting a ponytail for part of his career, he and his wife Kathleen should end up in Dickson City, PA, residing in his childhood home, with their family of four children and two dogs. Wiercinski returned to the region in 2005 as Chief Administrative Officer at Geisinger South WilkesBarre; he was promoted to Regional Vice President for Geisinger in 2007. He is a graduate of Scranton Prep, The University of Scranton and Xavier University. Prior to joining Geisinger, he previously held executive

positions at Shamokin Area Community Hospital and Bradford Regional Medical Center. In addition, he was appointed by Governor Robert P. Casey as director of the Bureau of Health Planning for the Commonwealth of PA. Why did you choose this career? Both my parents were involved in healthcare. My dad, Frank, is a pharmacist, and my mom, Florence, was a lab technician. Instead of the clinical end of medicine, I desired to know the managerial operations of how to deliver healthcare services. What lessons have you learned working elsewhere that you bring to our region? Many of the issues are the same in Northeast PA as those I have encountered working in other PA locations. The patients, for the most part, present with similar medical conditions and needs. The providers want to do what is best for their patients. Healthcare organizations are all faced with the same reimbursement shortfalls. I learned a long time ago that much more is accomplished when people work together toward an appropriate goal– and when it doesn’t matter who gets the credit

for getting the job done. It’s all about people– and doing what is best for the patient. Despite all our medical advancements, one thing remains constant,“It doesn’t cost anything to be nice.” Is it the healthcare providers’ responsibility to reduce risk factors for patients? Healthcare providers and insurers have a responsibility to set the proper example in living healthy lifestyles; in fact, doing so adds to overall credibility. Wouldn’t it appear somewhat hypocritical if I am counseling someone on smoking cessation yet am a tobacco user myself? At Geisinger, we encourage individuals to lead healthy lifestyles and encourage employees to sign up for our MyHealth Rewards Program. A health coach helps each employee achieve their health goals. This also saves employees money through discounted premiums for health insurance. How does healthcare help shape Northeast PA? Healthcare is a major employer and driver of the local economy and makes the region attractive to individuals and companies interested in relocating here. Recent developments with the BioScience Initiative have prompted additional interest in areas such as


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direct patient care, research and pharmaceutical development.

How is Geisinger helping the region? Geisinger is a nationally recognized integrated healthcare delivery system known for many innovations that are enhancing patient care and improving outcomes such as our ProvenCare and ProvenHealth Navigator programs. Our electronic health record is an asset to health care providers and patients. It helps coordinate care to minimize duplication and fragmentation, ensure best practice guidelines are followed and appropriate preventive measures are taken. continued on page 118

Photo Guy Cali Associates

How could BioScience initiatives impact the region? Any time there is a genesis and/or growth of a responsible industry, the region will be affected positively. It is no different with the bioscience sector. We are already building upon a solid foundation of established health care facilities, institutions of higher learning and infrastructure. With that foundation, the possibilities for potential growth exist in a number of areas, including direct patient care, medical equipment manufacturing, pharmaceutical development, research and testing, medical information storage and processing, services and logistics.


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Healthcare Outlook

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We are experiencing wonderful success with recruiting physician specialists and subspecialists to the area. What is today’s biggest healthcare challenge? Many challenges must be met. The current payment system, which pays for the volume of care rather than the quality of care, needs to be re-focused to reward providers for good outcomes. This is changing, and Geisinger has been recognized nationally for quality outcomes generated by evidenced-based medicine. A perfect storm is brewing that will create a significant challenge. Health reform is increasing the number of individuals with insurance; which is good, because those with insurance are more likely to see their doctor sooner before medical conditions deteriorate, and they will be more proactive with tests and other preventive measures. At the same time, providers are challenged to provide the necessary access to care for thousands and thousands of new patients. Do you consider yourself healthy? I consider myself a work in progress. I had two major health issues in the last eight years, (I am a cancer survivor) which fortunately turned out well. I get to the gym as often

Jake, Grace, Mike and Emily Wiercinski

Getting Personal with John P. Wiercinski Title: Regional Vice President, Geisinger Health System Years Experience: 28 Hometown: Dickson City Resides: Dickson City Hobbies: Kids’ school and athletic events, fishing, travel, reading Family: Wife, Kathleen; Children, Emily, Mike, Jake and Grace Favorite Quotes: “Never

as I can, and I’m enrolled in the Geisinger MyHealth Rewards program, an incentive-based program that helps Geisinger employees achieve their health goals and save the employees money through discounted contributions toward health coverage. What is your favorite part of teaching at the University of Scranton? I thoroughly enjoy showing students how theories and principles are put into practice. It’s a bit of paying it for-

miss an opportunity to make a difference in someone’s life.” Three Things He Can’t Live Without: Family. iPhone. Music. Most Daring Accomplishment: Backpacked through eight European countries Dream Vacation: Dubrovnik on the Adriatic Coast of Croatia and Northern Saskatchewan for trophy Pike fishing

ward to our next generation of healthcare leaders. Tell us about your family: My wife and I are very blessed with four wonderful children, each having a distinct and unique personality that blends so easily together. Our children bring us more joy than we could have imagined; so much more than anything we could ever do for them.


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“I use my 40 years of nursing experience every day.” MARY ANN WANKO RN & Care Coordinator

Our care coordinators are more than just registered nurses and social workers. They’re people who care for you like family—giving you the personalized support you need, when you need it. | www.bcnepa.com


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NURSES

Celebrat ing

NORTHEAST PA NURSES National Nurses Week, May 6 through 12

Hospice of the Sacred Heart

Diane Baldi, RN CHPN Chief Executive Officer, Hospice of the Sacred Heart Experience: 30 years • Resides: Scranton • Education: Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, Marywood University, University of Scranton, Misericordia University • Family: Husband, Michael Baldi; daughters, Mary Kate DePrimo and Carolyn Catalano; son Michael Baldi; grandson, Jack • Hobbies: Painting, reading and movies “I was drawn to nursing because of a passion and desire to care for patients during an illness; to nurse, to educate, to listen, to be empathetic to their needs and always to

Health tip: “Take time to take care of yourself at all levels: physically, mentally and emotionally.” Interesting fact: Baldi was the first employee at Hospice of the Sacred Heart, and she laid the framework for their licensure andcertification as a hospice agency. about 40 patients. I am responsible for scheduling diagnostic testing and surgeries and handle patient calls and concerns. I call all of our surgical patients post-operatively to see how they are and to answer any questions. I enjoy the flexibility nursing provides. You can change your shift, change your setting, work part-time or full-time and change the specialty you work in. As your life changes, nursing can change with it. You can be a bedside nurse, an educator or further your education and become an advanced practitioner. The opportunities

Delt a Medix

Karen Loftus RN Nurse Manager, Delta Medix Experience: 27 years • Resides: Archbald • Education: Robert Packer Hospital School of Nursing • Family: Husband, Joe; children, Kelsey, Colin and Tara • Hobbies: Reading, Pinterest, family beach vacations “On a normal office day, we generally see 120

be an advocate for patients. Nursing allows us to make a positive difference in patients' lives. We learn to get patients through a crisis no matter how big or small. I ensure that all patients and families receive the best quality care and that our wonderful staff is well-supported, well-educated and well-prepared. My job also involves maintaining financial responsibility and ensuring that our organization is compliant and provides high-quality care.”

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are endless. Personally, I enjoy meeting patients and their families and helping them through the maze that is modern health care. It is scary when you are not feeling well and facing tests or surgery, and I try to put people at ease, let them know what to expect and make it a smooth process.” Health tip: “Be proactive with your own health care! Follow the guidelines for prevention. Get your mammograms; have a screening colonoscopy at age 50. There are so many things we can do to detect problems at their earliest and enable us to lead long and healthy lives.” Interesting fact: “Two years ago, my mom was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. I was able to see from the perspective of a daughter. To honor my mother, I recently signed up for a beginners running class in hopes of being able to run a 5K with my three children in June, as part of purple stride to raise funds supporting pancreatic cancer research.”

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Yvonne Brogan, RN, CPEN, CEN, SANE Clinical Coordinator at Geisinger- Community Medical Center’s Emergency Department Experience: 14 years • Education: Penn State University, Graceland University • Resides: Scranton • Husband: Tom • Hobbies: Zumba • Associations: Emergency Nurses Association, Sigma Theta Tao International Association of Nurses

Geisinger Community Medical Center

“My mother is also a nurse and graduate of CMC School of Nursing. She worked in the CMC labor and delivery departments for at least 25 years and is currently an international nursing consultant. Because she also provided care for both of my aging grandmothers in our home, I grew up learning to be a caregiver and learning the importance of providing dignity and respect for all ages of life. It just came naturally for me to help my mother care for my grandmothers from my early teens until I became a nurse myself. I assess and treat patients with acute and urgent illnesses and injuries, and I supervise daily patient care. In some instances, I communicate with law enforcement and government agencies and provide direct care for more critical patients who are more critical. I love having the ability to see improvement in patients and have them tell me that they are feeling better.” Health tip: “Have a good relationship with your primary care physician. So many unnecessary tests, treatments and delays could be avoided if you ask questions and communicate directly with your doctor.” Interesting fact: Brogan also plays the piano

Diane Jaghab LPN Staff Nurse, St. Mary’s Villa Experience: 20 years • Education: Penn State, University of Scranton,Warren County Technical School of Nursing • Resides: Scranton • Hobbies: Reading, traveing and learning about interesting places • Family: Husband, Jason; daughter Angela Thomas; a Bischon named Muppy and Bailey the cuddly Pitbull “I've always been fascinated with the medical field but didn't know where to channel my interest. I entered nursing school in my mid-thirties, and I absolutely made the right decision. I couldn't be happier. I had just graduated from nursing school when first my dad and then my mom became seriously ill with cancer. I feel that was the reason I was chosen for continued on page 122 May 2013

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NURSES St . Mary’sVilla

nursing. That's also why I choose to be with older adults. They've spent their lives taking care of family, friends, had jobs and so on. Now it's their time to be taken care of with dignity and respect. And I'm still learning from them. A typical day would include medication administration, supervising PCA's,

observing the health of the residents and reporting concerns to their doctors--all usual nursing duties. But in addition, we fix TV's, make toast, wipe tears, joke around, talk about our families and listen to interesting stories. Personal care is so different from hospital nursing. Nurses as well as all of the staff here at St. Mary's are privileged and honored to be a special part of the residents’ lives as they are in ours.”

Joanne Romance Nurse Manager, Wayne Memorial Hospital

Mary Grace Fino Registered Nurse, Erwine Home Health and Hospice, Inc.

Erwine Home Healt h

Experience: 37 years • Education: Pittston Hospital School of Nursing, King’s College and Philadelphia College of Textiles • Hobbies: Cooking, gardening, kayaking and camping • Associations: PA Association of HomeCare, Pittston Alumni Association, Picc Line Certified • Awards: The Florence Nightingale Award, 1999 Philadelphia; Community Partnership Award, 2000, Philadelphia; Quality of Life Advocacy Award, 2003, Philadelphia “My day varies with anything from IV therapy and wound care, to consoling a patient and their family. I find nursing very gratifying; to care for others and affect their lives in such a positive way. I love the patients, meeting their families and treating them in their own environment.” Interesting fact: “I was on a bike ride one morning in West Pittston when I noticed that a house was on fire. I alerted the family and saved the occupants and their pets.”

Experience: 46 years • Education: St Joseph’s School of Nursing • Resides: Waymart • Family: Husband, James Romance; Son, Jeffrey Correll; Daughter, Jennifer Correll; Grandson, Dustin Correll • Hobbies: Gardening, Baking, Sewing, Genealogy “When I was growing up, my mother would tell me how much she wanted to be a nurse but that her family could not afford to send her to school. I always liked working and caring for others especially children and the elderly. I decided that by choosing a career in nursing I would be able to help people get well and stay healthy. I work with the nursing management team to coordinate staffing

Wayne Memorial Hospit al

and the day-to-day operations related to patient care. I like the interaction with patients and families, not only providing and coordinating patient care but also providing emotional support to the patients and their families. As nurses, we can help patients and their families cope with illness and emergencies and also have the opportunity to help promote health and prevent illness through education.” Health tip: Eat healthy and in moderation. continued on page 124

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NURSES

Janet B. Eisele, MSN, CRNP Certified Registered Nurse Practitioner Pediatric Practices of NEPA Experience: 23 years • Education: University of Scranton • Resides: Honesdale • Family: Husband, Kurt W. Eisele PhD.; children, Jason K. Eisele, Matthew R. Eisele and Nicole E. Duda; 11 grandchildren • Hobbies: Entertaining, quilting, sewing, cake decorating, painting glassware, reading and community involvement • Associations: University of Scranton, Misericordia • Acolades: Sigma Theta Tau International Nurse’s Honor Society,Woman of the Year nominee, 1988 “I provide primary care for children from birth to 21 years old. The children in my practice are a big part of my life. Children are very unpredictable and so too is pediatric medicine. I have made a full circle. My patients from my early career are now the parents in my later career. I will carry in my heart each and every experience I've had and will forever remain humbled by the faith in which my families have in me. There is no better profession for me other than being a Nurse Practitioner. I knew I wanted to follow a path in nursing 124

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Pediat ric Pract ices of NEPA from the age of 14 years. I was inspired by my Great Aunt Leila, my mother and my husband. My great aunt was the last credentialed Registered Nurse in my family. I inherited her nursing bag, diploma, graduation picture, thermometers, medical books and note-

books. Born in the early 1900s, she practiced medicine from the 1920s through the 1950s. She devoted her life to her profession with expertise, education and confidence and provided hospital care, care for the wounded soldier and home care through the Great Depression, times of war and floods. In 1930 my Aunt Leila assisted in one very important home birth, the birth of my mother, Leila. My mother was born at home, two months early and weighed less than two pounds. Her mother, my grandmother, developed rheumatic fever late in her pregnancy, which brought upon early labor. The doctor felt as though there was no hope for my mother to survive the immediate newborn period.

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He turned his attention to saving my grandmother’s life. My Aunt Leila had a differing opinion regarding my newborn mother and supported life in this tiny preemie, wrapping her in hot water bottles and blankets and feeding her homemade formula. What amazes me, each time I share this story, is that especially by today's standards, the odds were stacked very much against my mother's survival: premature by eight weeks, underdeveloped lungs, no incubator, no IVs, no oxygen, no medications at home and despite all of this she still survived. I attribute this to my Aunt's knowledge of medicine and ability to provide support to the frailest of human bodies. (read more about these inspiring people at www.HappeningsMagazine PA.com) Health Tip: The body loves balance. Balance out your stress and rest. Pay attention to your nutrition and fitness, and your body will take care of everything else. Interesting Fact: I promised my son when he returned from war that I would skydive with him and get a tattoo. I tandem skydived three times at 47 years old and got a hummingbird tattoo. continued on page 126 May 2013


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Mary M. Greenley RN, B-C CRRN Registered Nurse at Allied Services Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

Allied Services

Mary Erwine - RN, MSN President

270 Pierce Street, Suite 101 Kingston, PA

570-288-1013 Practices P PN Pediatric of Northeastern PA P Infants • Children • Adolescents Now with walk-in hours at our Honesdale location: Saturday & Sunday, 9 a.m.-noon

Honesdale Office Milford Office 570.253.5838 570.296.4901 Waymart Office Sterling Office 570.488.9550 570.689.7565 Appointment hours Monday through Friday

Experience: 36 years • Broome Community College, SUNY New York, Keystone College • Resides: Nicholson • Family: Husband, Carl; children, Chris, Josh, Jeremy and Dillon; granddaughter, Cassie • Hobbies: Farm animals, volunteering with Factoryville Ambulance and Allied Services • Accolades: CRRN award for a scholarship in Chicago “I enjoy the fact that I can help people get better and go home when they are able. I also like being able to help residents adjust to the lifestyle that they have, as well as helping families learn how to deal with whatever the resident’s new limits are. A typical day includes a lot of resident contact and interventions. I love the pace as well as the contact with the residents and staff. I enjoy the role of unit manager as I still have the day-to-day contact, which includes direct resident care, along with the running of the unit. Becoming a nurse was a great decision as it does not feel like ‘going to work’ because I love my job and I love what I do. I plan to remain at Allied Services for the remainder of my career as they have great job opportunities.” Health Tip: Keep stress levels under control. A lot of people do not realize how stress can cause physical symptoms. Learning how to deal with stress is a great asset. -Kelsey Healey

New Patients Welcome • Hours By Appointment We participate with most insurance plans.

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YOUR DAY JUST GOT A LITTLE MORE DELICIOUS.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

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1⁄4 lb.** SONIC® Burger & Small Tot

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BLT and Small Tot OR 3 Piece Chicken Strip Grilled Cheese & and Small Tot Small Tot

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2 Corndogs & Small Tots No substitutions

Half-Price Drinks & Slushes, 2 - 4 P.M.

755 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre (Wyoming Valley Mall)

58 Station Circle, Hazleton (I-81), Exit 143, Hazleton 924)

4 West Olive Street, Scranton (Providence Rd, Across from Scranton HS)

www.nepasonic.com

Facebook.com/Nepasonic Follow us on Facebook for special offers & promotions!

**1⁄4 lb. precooked. Single-patty burger only; excludes specialty burgers. Add-Ons cost extra.

Luzerne County You’ll Find it all Right Here!!

Wilkes-Barre Hazleton

May 1 Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth at the F.M. Kirby Center, Wilkes-Barre, 570-826-1100 or kirbycenter.org

May 4 Tanya Tucker in concert at Penn’s Peak, Jim Thorpe, 877-764-6328 or www.pennspeak.com

May 4-5 West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival on the banks of the Susquehanna River, for more information go to www.wpcherryblossom.com

May 16-19 The Fine Arts Fiesta on Public Square, Wilkes-Barre, 888-905-2872 or www.fineartsfiesta.org

May 30 Lee Brice in concert at Penn’s Peak, Jim Thorpe at 8pm, 877-764-6328 or www.pennspeak.com

1.888.905.2872 • www.tournepa.com May 2013

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RiverFest Celebrates the Lackawanna River or over 25 years RiverFest has encouraged the community to enjoy spring and one of the region’s natural treasures – the Lackawanna River. On June 1, the CanoeA-Thon starts the day at 10 a.m. Those who want to compete or simply enjoy the paddle at their leisure will launch at one of two Mid Valley launch sites and finish at the Olive Street Bridge in Scranton. Paddlers can register in six different classes; registration begins at 8 a.m.

F

Live music, food and educational displays will open at noon and run through 5 p.m. Also at noon are the Kayak excursions, which cost $25 per person. The Regatta, the most artistic event of the afternoon,

begins at 1:30 p.m. Personally designed flotation devices will parade downstream. “People have to have a creative imagination to make something colorful that can move downstream,” explains Executive Director Bernie McGurl. The most creative, colorfully designed vehicles will win; costumes are encouraged. The Duck Race takes off at 5 p.m. Raffle tickets are available for $5, and the winning duck is worth up to $500!

Funds raised at this signature event of the Lackawanna River Corridor Association will support the conservation of the river and future events. More than 200 volunteers help make the event a success. Visit www.lrca.org –April Dakoske

Big Brown Fish & Pay Lakes

Where the fish are always biting!

5 % OFF

FISH PURCHASE ONLY

Rte. 115 North Effort, PA

Must present this ad at time of purchase.Fish & Pay Lakes only.Fish from Hatchery excluded. HM NO LICENSE REQUIRED

(570) 629-0427

www.bigbrownfish.com email: bigbrownfish@verizon.net

Paradise Fishing Preserve Quality Since 1902

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Must present this ad at time of purchase.Fish & Pay Lakes only.Fish from Hatchery excluded. HM

Rte. 191 North Paradise Valley, PA

(570) 629-0422

www.paradisetrout.com email: pbtc1@verizon.net

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NO LICENSE REQUIRED

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Win

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a Family 4-Pack of Tickets to Montage Waterpark!

ulations Congrat winner, h’s to Marc euck of S a Tin t , PA! Dushore

here’s how... Visit HappeningsMagazinePA.com to request more information or mail your request to: Happenings Magazine • P.O. Box 61 • Clarks Summit, PA

Request Information from any Visitors Bureau or Attraction Listed Below: ❥ ❥ ❥ ❥

Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau Luzerne County Convention & Visitors Bureau Valley Forge Convention & Visitors Bureau Montage Mountain

Just request information to be entered to win!

Montage is Back! Montage Water Park is just minutes from downtown Scranton at the top of Montage Mountain! One admission price to the worldclass water park includes exciting water rides such as Tundra Tornado, Baby Moose Watering Hole, Cross Country Canal, Bumper Boats and a Wavepool. There's also a zip rider, miniature golf and batting cages. For more, go to www.MontageIsBack.com or call 570-969-7669/1-800-468-7669

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Explore the Past...

Exhibiting local artists • Providing creative enrichment for children • Exhibiting artistic and cultural shows from outside the area.

Showing this Spring & Summer: Water Ways: the art of Nature with paintings by Alice Kelsey and Jeanne McKinney in Partnership with the Centre County Conservation District and Clearwater Conservancy with several programs exploring the waterways and ecology of Centre County.

On the first Sunday of every month we offer: • FREE ART CLASSES for children taught by an artist in our Creativity Center • An opening reception for a local artist showing in our Community Gallery.

FREE ADMISSION Hours: Friday-Saturday - 1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. & by appointment School Classes Welcome! 133 N. Allegheny St. • Bellefonte • 814-355-4280

bellefontemuseum.org

Take a Walk Back in Time Visit an example of a planned nineteenth century coal mining town

Eckley Miners’ Village 2 Eckley Main Street • Weatherly PA www.eckleyminersvillagemuseum.com 570-636-2070 132

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Discover the Fun! FARM MUSEUM & HISTORIC VILLAGE

Set in the heart of the Endless Mountains, one of the most scenic regions of NEPA

PA Heritage Festival Sept 21 & 22 Children’s Church, One Room School, Carriage House, Sugar Shack, Barber Shop, Inn & Museum with artifacts reflecting 200 years of local agricultural heritage. Museum Hours: Thurs.-Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m. other times by appointment One half mile north of Rt. 6 & 14 in Troy, PA

570-297-3410 • www.troyfarmmuseum.org www.paheritagefestival.com

PLAN YOUR VISIT! 240 Main Street • Goshen, NY • 845.294.6330 www.harnessmuseum.com May 2013

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Explore Pennsylvania Connections www.pamilmuseum.org Located in Boalsburg, PA (Centre Co.)

PENNSYLVANIA

MILITARY

MUSEUM 速

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Schuylkill County Historical Society

EN! NOW OP

Civil War Gallery

Museum & Research Library Open Wednesday - Saturday

151 Charlotte St., Canandaigua, NY 585.394.4922 Nine Formal Gardens, Victorian Mansion, Café, Sonnenberg Gift Shop Daily Wine Tasting at Finger Lakes Wine Center

www.sonnenberg.org

305 N. Centre St. • Pottsville • 570-622-7540 www.schuylkillhistory.org • sch.hist@comcast.org May 2013

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GOLF GUIDE BUCK HILL GOLF CLUB–

Legendary. Loyalty to the soul of the game is a centuries old tradition.The timeless design of legendary architects Donald Ross and Robert White has grown into a 27-hole treasured masterpiece offering all the amenities of a country club.The Fairway Grille & Bar is open daily. 570-595-7730. Golf Drive, Buck Hill Falls, PA www.buckhillgolfclub.com COUNTRY CLUB AT WOODLOCH SPRINGS–

Woodloch’s spectacular 18-hole championship golf course winds its challenging way over 6,579 yards of fern-carpeted forests, lush wetlands and broad upland meadows. Four sets of tees on every hole so all levels can be accommodated. 4.5 STARS- Golf Digest’s Best Places to Play. Outside tee-times can be made up to four days in advance. 570-685-8102. FERNWOOD RESORT–

18 hole, par 71 resort course presents challenging holes tucked into the rolling hills of the Poconos. Golf shop, club rentals, practice hole and lakeside dining at Wintergreens Patio Grill. 10 Play Any Day Book on sale for $350 including cart. Special golf/villa stay packages available for groups and individuals. FernwoodGolfCourse.com 888-337-6966 HUNTSVILLE GOLF CLUB–

18 hole Rees Jones designed course located in Dallas features the risk/reward challenge that golfers of all skill levels can appreciate. Huntsville is ranked the 5th Best Course in Pennsylvania by Golf Digest. Golf, Social and Non-Resident memberships are available without initiation fees. 570-674-6545 golf-huntsville.com THE INN AT POCONO MANOR–

Celebrating over 100 years of golf! Two challenging mountain-top courses. George Fazio-designed West Course favors long ball hitters. East Course, designed by Donald Ross, offers challenging water hazards & breathtaking view. Pro shop, practice greens, driving range, Golf Lessons, Restaurant & Bar. Golf Getaway Packages available. Route 314 Pocono Manor, PA 800-233-8150 Ext. 7433 PoconoManor.com 136

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LAKELAND GOLF CLUB–

Well groomed, small, nine-hole course with lovely country setting. Light lunches served in the beautiful clubhouse. Course is challenging enough for the advanced golfer, yet perfect for beginners... just 20 minutes from Scranton and only five minutes from Lackawanna State Park. Located on Rte. 107 between Fleetville corners & Lake Sheridan, Fleetville, Pa. 570-945-9983. MAHONING VALLEY COUNTRY CLUB-

Nestled in the picturesque Mahoning Valley. Established in 1926. Open to the public. Boasting a challenging 18-hole golf course with bent grass tees, rolling fairways and undulating greens. Practice areas, cart, bag services, a fully stocked pro shop. Open 7 days a week. 323 Country Club Rd., Lehighton. 570-386-2588. www.mahoningvalleycc.com MOUNTAIN LAUREL GOLF CLUB–

The premier golf destination in the Poconos. Fully stocked golf shop, 18 beautiful holes featuring bent grass greens, wonderful elevation changes and a user-friendly design. The restaurant facilities are second to none.The Club is available for general play, outings, banquets and dining. Call for tee times. 570-443-7424. White Haven www.mountainlaurelgolfclub.com SCOTT GREENS GOLF CLUB–

Nicely maintained and challenging nine-hole golf & teaching facility in Scott Township. Home of "A Swing for Life" Golf Academy featuring Teaching Professionals Scotty McAlarney a "Top 100" Instructor, W.G.T.F., and Corey McAlarney, a Jim McLean certified instructor and master club fitter. Minutes from Clarks Summit, Rt. 81 and Scranton area. Great membership level rates. 570-254-6979 www.Scottgreensgolfclub.com SCOTTISH GLEN GOLF COURSE

Play on our scenic nine-hole, award-winning course. Located on Crystal Lake in the middle of an old-growth forest– it's absolutely beautiful. Mention this ad when reserving your Tee Time, and receive a voucher for 50% off a 2nd Entree on a Dining reservation. Rte. 247, Clifford. 570-222-3676. www.fernhallinn.com SHADOWBROOK INN & RESORT–

Local 18-hole, 6,000-yard golf course that is located in the heart of the Endless Mountains. Part of the beautiful Shadowbrook Inn and Resort.The perfect place for all your events. Fundraising, wedding, banquet, meetings, etc. Check us out on Facebook today! Play the Brook. 201 Resort Lane, Tunkhannock, PA 18657 570-836-5417 continued on page 138


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SHAWNEE INN & GOLF RESORT–

27-hole championship course located on an island in the Delaware River. Breathtaking views accompany each swing. Driving range, practice facility, golf academy and the best 19th hole around, the Gem and Keystone Brewpub.Three minutes from Route 80. www.shawneeinn.com, 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, PA. For tee times call 570-424-4000 SKYTOP LODGE–

Rated 4.5 stars by Golf Digest for places to stay and play. A mountain-style course that plays over rolling terrain, with wide, tree-lined fairways and small challenging greens above average in speed. Back tees measure 6,656 yards with a slope rating of 133 and forward tees 5,789, with a 122 slope rating. www.Skytop.com 570-595-8910 SPLIT ROCK GOLF CLUB–

Open to the public. Beautiful 27-hole tree-lined course with picturesque views in Lake Harmony. Fully stocked Golf Shop, practice facility, restaurant/bar, Locker facilities. 18 holes: $40 midweek, $55 weekend pre-season & $55 midweek, $65 weekend in-season including cart.Yearly memberships & weekly specials. Great Tournament and Outing Course- Tee times/directions 570-722-9901 www.golfsplitrock.com STONE HEDGE GOLF CLUB–

18-hole championship golf course masterfully carved out of lush rolling hills and meadows of Northeast Pennsylvania's beautiful Endless Mountains. A relaxing natural habitat to play the game at its best. Golf our mature links. Stay and enjoy dinner on our covered deck overlooking the 18th green. 570-836-5108 www.stonehedge-golf.com TREASURE LAKE GOLF–

We are offering Stay & Play Packages- two beautiful USGA rated courses – Unlimited Play, Cart, Lodging, Meals. $299 per person, based on four person occupancy for Friday, Saturday & Sunday. Two nights lodging in spacious condos, two breakfast buffets, two dinners. Gold Course 814-913-1482, Silver Course 814-913-1480 www.treasurelakepoa.com. 138

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COUNTRY INNS / B&BS 1811 ADDISON HOUSE BED & BREAKFAST

A warm welcome awaits you at this fully restored historic home. Enjoy a full gourmet breakfast in our sumptuous dining room. Spend your day cross-country skiing, hiking, antiquing, or travel the wine trail. Relax in our library. Excellent nearby restaurants. Located in Susquehanna County– Choconut PA, Route 267 South. 570-553-2682. www.1811addison.com COLONIAL BRICK INN & SUITES–

Come and enjoy Pennsylvania hospitality at its finest. Call to reserve your special occasion package. Winter ski or summer golf packages, we will cater to guests all seasons of the year. New meeting room and free Internet in rooms. 25161 Route 11, Hallstead. 570-879-2162 or 1-800-290-3922. www.ColonialBrickInn.com CRESCENT LODGE–

Reserve our cabin in the woods in the heart of the Poconos. Stone fireplace, wood paneling, canopy bed with TV, Jacuzzi for two, covered deck and balcony. Nearby find a spa, casino, antiquing, outlet shopping, skiing & sleigh riding. Enjoy our pub and restaurant. Super Pasta Night every Wednesday! Paradise Valley. Cresco, PA 800-392-9400. www.CrescentLodge.com THE FRENCH MANOR– Romantic country inn modeled after a French chateau. Gourmet French cuisine, excellent wines. AAA 4Diamond Award Winner for lodging & dining. Luxurious suites with fireplace, Jacuzzis & balcony. New GREEN spa, Le Spa Foret. Includes indoor pool, hot tub, fitness room, couples’ massage suite, fireplace, pedicures & more. South Sterling, PA. 1-877-720-6090. www.TheFrenchManor.com. THE JAMES MANNING HOUSE– Enjoy a peaceful stay at this historic 1819 Federal-style house two miles north of Honesdale, PA.Three guest rooms, each with private baths, central AC,TV and WI-FI, feature handmade quilts and antiques. Hearty breakfasts include home-baked goodies served with genuine PA Dutch hospitality. Bethany, PA. 570-253-5573. www.JamesManningHouse.com

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COUNTRY INNS / B&BS POCONO PINES MOTOR INN & COTTAGES– Tall pines shade this year-round family resort next to “The Big Lake” & winter ski slopes. Cottages, kitchenettes, motel rooms & a three-bedroom lodge with fireplace are available. Cable TV, DVD,VCR, outdoor pool, BBQ’s & private boat docks. Boating, fishing, shops & restaurants close by. 345 Rte. 507, Tafton. 570-226-2772. www.PoconoPinesMotorInn.com STONE BRIDGE INN & RESTAURANT– European-style inn, restaurant & tavern in a spectacular country setting. 13 charming rooms, with private baths,TV, A/C, several with fireplaces, free WI-FI. Continental breakfast, indoor pool/hot tub, horseback riding. Excellent dinner cuisine. Exit 206, Rt. 374 East two miles past Elk Mountain, Union Dale. 570-679-9200. www.Stone-Bridge-Inn.com.

NOW OPEN!

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O Say, You Should See...

Eckley Miners’ Village

Can’t Miss Historic Sites & Museums Schuylkill County Historical Society Museum It’s only fitting that a museum dedicated to preserving the history of the county be housed in one of its landmarks. The former Female Grammar School in Pottsville was built in 1863. The three-story red brick structure was renovated by the Historical Society to house its collection. Visitors may take a self guided tour of three main galleries home to the General George A. Joulwan Exhibit, the Schuylkill Gallery dedicated to anthracite mining history and the newest exhibit– Schuylkill County in the Civil War. Don’t miss “Deep Miner’s a display by Scott Herring, known as the last anthracite photographer. www.schuylkillhistory.org • 570-622-7540. Getting there: I-81 South to exit 124A (St. Clair). 305 N. Centre St., Pottsville

Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion Historic Park

Bellefonte Art Museum for Centre County

The Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame Goshen, NY has been a hot bed of harness racing in America for over 170 years. On the grounds of the museum is Goshen Historic Track– a National Historic Landmark. Established in 1838, it is the oldest active harness racing track in the country and a training facility for some of the top Stadardbreds in the world. The museum and hall of fame opened in 1951 to preserve, protect and promote the history and traditions of this Americanborn sport. Originally housed in a former stable dating to 1913, the facility has expanded to 40,000 square feet boasting a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, textiles, horsedrawn vehicles, art, books, films and periodicals. Check out a hoof ink well from Gloster– a champion trotter bred by Franklin Roosevelt’s father in 1866. Visitors may also see,“The Story of Harness Racing By Currier & Ives,” featuring original lithographs and a never before seen display of the museum’s collection of historic bronze horse statues dating from 1850 to today. www.harnessmuseum.com • 845-294-6330 Getting there: Take I-84 East to NY 17 East exit 124. 240 Main St., Goshen, NY. 142

Happenings Magazine

One stroll through the preserved 18th century neighborhoods of Bellefonte it’s easy to see how the town became dubbed,“Central Pennsylvania’s Victorian Secret.” One of its oldest buildings, the John Blair Linn House, became an art museum 10 years ago. The structure, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, houses six galleries which, “celebrate the human spirit through the arts with exhibits and cultural shows from around the world and around the corner.” The current exhibit titled,“Central PA Waterways: Natural Beauty, Conservation and Recreation,” runs through July. www.bellefontemuseum.org 814-255-43280. Getting there: 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte

May 2013

A must see for any history buff, architecture enthusiast or nature lover. The 50-acre estate in the Finger Lakes region of New York, boasts nine historic gardens that the Smithsonian Institute hailed as,“one of the greatest late Victorian gardens created in the United States that has survived completely intact.” Stroll through the Italian Garden, Japanese Garden with Tea House, Old-Fashioned Garden, Rose Garden, Blue and White Garden and Roman Bath. Take a tour of the 40-room Queen Anne-style mansion built by New York City bank financier Frederick Ferris Thompson. Visitors can see much of the 1887 home, including the impressive Great Hall, billiard and trophy rooms, library, drawing room, dining room and master bedroom. Also on the grounds are a café, gift shop and the Finger Lakes Wine Center which offers daily wine tastings. www.sonnenberg.org • 585-3944922 Getting there: located eight miles south of NYS Thruway exit 44 in Canandaigua, NY.

LancasterHistory.org Who doesn’t want to see how a Commander in Chief lived? Wheatland is the home of the 15th President of the United States and the only one to have hailed from the Keystone State. James Buchanan lived at Wheatland prior to taking office in 1856. He died there in 1868. Docents in period clothing offer guided tours of the 1828 Federal style home, into the president’s library, formal dining room, bedroom and office. Period furnishings and artifacts grace each room. Check out the Emperor’s Bowl– a gift from the Emperor of Japan and believed to be the largest porcelain bowl ever made. Visitors are also welcome to roam the grounds, which include a carriage house, ice house, privy, lush gardens and frog pond. The Lancaster Historical Society has operated the historic site since 1935. www.lancasterhistory.org • (717) 392-4633. Getting There: Off Harrisburg Pike on President Ave., Lancaster continued on page 144

This 1850s era coal mining patch town is so authentic you can almost see immigrant families going about their daily chores and miners heading to and from the company colliery. Visitors may take a 90 minute guided tour of the town, which includes 11 buildings, original to the property. Watch the 17minute orientation film in the Visitors Center and peruse a variety of artifacts on display before heading into town. A 1.5-mile stroll down the street takes visitors past the mine boss’ home, laborer’s dwelling, slate pickers’ dwelling, doctor’s office, blacksmith shop and seamstress shop. The company store is a replica built for the 1960s movie,“The Molly Maguires,” which was filmed at the historic site. Visitors may go inside two former churches, which served the town from the 1850s to the 1920s. The gift shop is housed in the former Catholic Church rectory. 570-636-2070 www.eckleyminersvillage museum.com Getting There: 3 miles south of Freeland off Highland Road (off Foster Avenue/ Route 940)


O Say, You Should See...

Eckley Miners’ Village

Can’t Miss Historic Sites & Museums Schuylkill County Historical Society Museum It’s only fitting that a museum dedicated to preserving the history of the county be housed in one of its landmarks. The former Female Grammar School in Pottsville was built in 1863. The three-story red brick structure was renovated by the Historical Society to house its collection. Visitors may take a self guided tour of three main galleries home to the General George A. Joulwan Exhibit, the Schuylkill Gallery dedicated to anthracite mining history and the newest exhibit– Schuylkill County in the Civil War. Don’t miss “Deep Miner’s a display by Scott Herring, known as the last anthracite photographer. www.schuylkillhistory.org • 570-622-7540. Getting there: I-81 South to exit 124A (St. Clair). 305 N. Centre St., Pottsville

Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion Historic Park

Bellefonte Art Museum for Centre County

The Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame Goshen, NY has been a hot bed of harness racing in America for over 170 years. On the grounds of the museum is Goshen Historic Track– a National Historic Landmark. Established in 1838, it is the oldest active harness racing track in the country and a training facility for some of the top Stadardbreds in the world. The museum and hall of fame opened in 1951 to preserve, protect and promote the history and traditions of this Americanborn sport. Originally housed in a former stable dating to 1913, the facility has expanded to 40,000 square feet boasting a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, textiles, horsedrawn vehicles, art, books, films and periodicals. Check out a hoof ink well from Gloster– a champion trotter bred by Franklin Roosevelt’s father in 1866. Visitors may also see,“The Story of Harness Racing By Currier & Ives,” featuring original lithographs and a never before seen display of the museum’s collection of historic bronze horse statues dating from 1850 to today. www.harnessmuseum.com • 845-294-6330 Getting there: Take I-84 East to NY 17 East exit 124. 240 Main St., Goshen, NY. 142

Happenings Magazine

One stroll through the preserved 18th century neighborhoods of Bellefonte it’s easy to see how the town became dubbed,“Central Pennsylvania’s Victorian Secret.” One of its oldest buildings, the John Blair Linn House, became an art museum 10 years ago. The structure, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, houses six galleries which, “celebrate the human spirit through the arts with exhibits and cultural shows from around the world and around the corner.” The current exhibit titled,“Central PA Waterways: Natural Beauty, Conservation and Recreation,” runs through July. www.bellefontemuseum.org 814-255-43280. Getting there: 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte

May 2013

A must see for any history buff, architecture enthusiast or nature lover. The 50-acre estate in the Finger Lakes region of New York, boasts nine historic gardens that the Smithsonian Institute hailed as,“one of the greatest late Victorian gardens created in the United States that has survived completely intact.” Stroll through the Italian Garden, Japanese Garden with Tea House, Old-Fashioned Garden, Rose Garden, Blue and White Garden and Roman Bath. Take a tour of the 40-room Queen Anne-style mansion built by New York City bank financier Frederick Ferris Thompson. Visitors can see much of the 1887 home, including the impressive Great Hall, billiard and trophy rooms, library, drawing room, dining room and master bedroom. Also on the grounds are a café, gift shop and the Finger Lakes Wine Center which offers daily wine tastings. www.sonnenberg.org • 585-3944922 Getting there: located eight miles south of NYS Thruway exit 44 in Canandaigua, NY.

LancasterHistory.org Who doesn’t want to see how a Commander in Chief lived? Wheatland is the home of the 15th President of the United States and the only one to have hailed from the Keystone State. James Buchanan lived at Wheatland prior to taking office in 1856. He died there in 1868. Docents in period clothing offer guided tours of the 1828 Federal style home, into the president’s library, formal dining room, bedroom and office. Period furnishings and artifacts grace each room. Check out the Emperor’s Bowl– a gift from the Emperor of Japan and believed to be the largest porcelain bowl ever made. Visitors are also welcome to roam the grounds, which include a carriage house, ice house, privy, lush gardens and frog pond. The Lancaster Historical Society has operated the historic site since 1935. www.lancasterhistory.org • (717) 392-4633. Getting There: Off Harrisburg Pike on President Ave., Lancaster continued on page 144

This 1850s era coal mining patch town is so authentic you can almost see immigrant families going about their daily chores and miners heading to and from the company colliery. Visitors may take a 90 minute guided tour of the town, which includes 11 buildings, original to the property. Watch the 17minute orientation film in the Visitors Center and peruse a variety of artifacts on display before heading into town. A 1.5-mile stroll down the street takes visitors past the mine boss’ home, laborer’s dwelling, slate pickers’ dwelling, doctor’s office, blacksmith shop and seamstress shop. The company store is a replica built for the 1960s movie,“The Molly Maguires,” which was filmed at the historic site. Visitors may go inside two former churches, which served the town from the 1850s to the 1920s. The gift shop is housed in the former Catholic Church rectory. 570-636-2070 www.eckleyminersvillage museum.com Getting There: 3 miles south of Freeland off Highland Road (off Foster Avenue/ Route 940)


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Pennsylvania Military Museum Citizens of the Keystone State have a long and illustrious history in armed service to its country. Opened in 1969, the museum houses a vast collection of vehicles, small arms and artifacts that depicts Pennsylvania’s military history from 1747 to today. The facility underwent a major overhaul in 2007, better uniting and unifying its outdoor displays and indoor exhibits. Visitors may walk the grounds to see static displays such as a Sherman Tank, Howitzer guns and two massive BB-38 Guns from the USS Pennsylvania. Take a moment at the 28th Division Shrine. Many monuments honor the service of the 28th Infantry Division (PA National Guard) from 1911 to present day. The Shrine area also includes two memorial walls with the names of the Company’s fallen soldiers from WWI and WWII. Summer brings a number of special events and reenactments held on site. www.pamilmuseum.org Getting there: I-80 West, exit 16; 51 Boal Ave., Boalsburg, PA

Peter J. McGovern Little League Museum Next month the museum will re-open after a nine-month $4 million renovation. Improvements include cutting edge interactive displays and immersive media that enhances the museum’s collection of artifacts and memorabilia preserving the history of little league baseball. The re-opening also marks

the start of a 14-month celebration of Little League’s 75th anniversary. Check out little league memorabilia from big league greats including the cap worn by Mike Schmidt, Dale Murphy’s shoes and a homemade baseball card drawn by Mike Mussina. Take a walking tour of the 72-acre complex to get a glimpse of two stadiums home to the Little League World Series. www.littleleague.org Getting there: I-80 West, exit 210, Rte. 15, Williamsport

PA Anthracite Heritage museum Almost everyone has a relative who worked in a coal mine. So it’s easy to connect with the displays and artifacts here that preserve, document and interpret the heritage of the people who lived and worked in Pennsylvania’s hard coal region during the mid-19th through early 20th centuries. Vivid exhibits recreate scenes from everyday life– a coal miner’s wash house, home kitchen, neighborhood pub and even a church. Check out the 1900s era Harness Loom used by area women in the lace and silk manufacturing industry that once thrived here. Located across town, but part of the complex, is the historic Scranton Iron Furnaces. The four giant contiguous stacks are relics from the iron industry that boomed in Northeast PA from 1840-1902. www.anthracitemuseum.org 570-963-3208 Getting there: Located in McDade Park, off Keyser Ave, Scranton. continued on page 146


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Bethel Woods Center for the Arts

Home Textile Tool Museum In 1840s America, nine out of 10 people lived on a farm and used natural materials to make their own clothes, linens, towels and rugs. This museum seeks to preserve that way of life through demonstrations, displays and visitor participation. Tools and demonstrations are housed in five buildings including a Federal-style home and Threshing Barn which dates to 1810. The collection includes over 20 American antique flax, wool and cotton spinning wheels. Of special note are the 1864 Lyman Wight patent pendulum wheel and a rare small accelerating wheel signed by J. Farnham of Owego, N.Y., one of only three still in existence. Don’t miss a changing schedule of live demonstrations every Saturday from May 25 through August 24. www.hometextiletoolmuseum.org • 570-247-7175. Getting there: 2 miles off Rte. 187, 1819 Orwell HIll Rd., Orwell. the mine shaft, past the miner’s hospital and the 900 Few places let you delve into foot deep original elevator shaft used to haul coal. The the past like this. Visitors original miner’s Wash Shanty board a train for the 1,600 now serves as a museum. foot ride into the mountainside and through a for- Displays include replica scenes from the miner’s life, mer coal mine. The No. 9 operated from 1855 to 1972 artifacts, tools, maps, signs, lamps and more. and has the distinction of being the oldest continuous- www.no9mine.com (570) 645-7074. ly operated anthracite coal mine in the U.S. Re-opened in Getting There: I-476, exit 34. 2002 as a historic site, guides Follow Rte. 209 to Landsford. lead a walking tour through

No. 9 Mine Museum

What inspired four young men to create Woodstock, the largest music festival of all time? Why did it take place in Bethel, NY instead of the town it was named for, and what did it take to pull it all together? The answers to all these and more may be found at this museum built on the same property that hosted the festival. The Permanent Gallery features stateof-the-art interactive exhibits and displays including quotes and performance clips from Woodstock performers. See artifacts, images and icons that explore the tumultuous years of the 1960s from Civil Rights to the Cold War and the growing counterculture movement. Don’t miss a nine-minute immersive multimedia presentation that gives visitors the Woodstock experience from the audience perspective. The site also includes a Special Exhibit Gallery, museum shop, cafe and 1,000 seat outdoor theater which hosts some of today’s most popular musicians. www.bethelwoodscenter.org 866-781-2922. Getting there: I-84 East to exit 34. Off Rte. 17, Bethel, NY. continued on page 148

Pearl S. Buck House “The Good Earth” is on many required high school reading lists. A visit to the author’s home in Berks County gives insight into the life and work of this Pulitzer and Nobel Prize winner. Born in West Virginia and raised in China by her missionary parents, Buck purchased this 300-year old farmhouse in 1935. Next month the home will re-open as the culmination of an eight year project towards full restoration and preservation of the home’s interior and exterior. Visitors will get increased access to rooms in the house, collections stored within built-in cabinetry and enhanced interpretation. Visit the 1827 red barn, home to the welcome center and awards room. Take time to walk the paths and trails of this 68-acre property featuring gardens, sculptures and ponds. The Trail to Remember leads to Pearl S. Buck’s gravesite. www.pearlsbuck.org • 215-249-0100 Getting there: I-476, exit 44 toward Quakertown/Pottstown. 520 Dublin Rd., Perkasie. 146

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Everhart Museum Dr. Isaiah F. Everhart built the museum in 1908 to house his collection of Pennsylvania’s native birds and animals. The esteemed Civil War veteran, physician, businessman and Scranton resident was a skilled taxidermist whose collection of mounted specimens was one of the largest in the U.S. at the time. He provided and endowment fund to provide perpetual care for the museum after his death in 1911. Over the years the natural history collection was augmented with plant and insect specimens, fossils, rocks and minerals. Today the two-story museum houses a diverse collection that includes folk art, 18th century contemporary American art, African art, ancient works and oceanic cultures and locally made Dorflinger Cut Glass. Its most famous resident may be Spike, a full-scale skeletal stegosaurs. In addition to its permanent collection, the museum also hosts a rotating series of special exhibits. The Blood is the Life: Vampires in Art & Nature is currently on display through July 1.www.Everhart-Museum.org 570-346-7186 Getting There: Located at the top of Mulberry Street at the entrance to Nay Aug Park in downtown Scranton.

Bradford County Farm Museum It’s not hard to envision life in19th century rural America when you visit this site. The museum housing 200 years of local agricultural history has expanded to include a historic village populated by places of importance for early settlers. The 1822 Gregory Inn was a stop on the stagecoach route between Elmira, NY and Williamsport PA. On a tour visitors may see the original woodwork and fixtures as well as displays of 1850s era furniture, clothing, quilts and sewing machines. The Children’s Church was built in 1937 by a group of children who converted a chicken coop into a chapel. Don’t miss the Thomas One Room School House, circa 1844 and a Sugar Shack which was part of a nearby working farm. www.troyfarmmuseum.org 570-297-3410. Getting there: Off Rte. 6, Troy, PA.

Valley Forge, PA Have a long weekend and a hankering to learn more about Pennsylvania’s role in the American Revolution? Take the Magical Mystery Tour. The three-day itinerary planned by the Valley Forge Convention and Visitors Bureau takes you to the heart of the conflict. Visit Paoli Battlefield, considered one of the most pristine Revolutionary War battlefields, unchanged since the early 1800s. Tour Deshler-Morris House, George Washington stayed here twice during his presidency making it the oldest presidential residence. It’s known as Germantown White House. At Clivden, there are bullets still embedded in the stone walls where British soldiers tried to barricade themselves against an American attack. The site where General Washington’s rag tag Army spent a now infamous winter is preserved in a 3,500 acre national park. Points of interest at Valley Forge National Historic Site include replica log huts used by soldiers, Washington’s original headquarters, the National Memorial Arch and Washington Memorial Chapel. www.vfescapes.com • 610.834.1550 –Barbara Toolan

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Civil War Living History Weekend

Take a ride & explore all the wonderful wineries of the beautiful Endless Mountains. For a wine trail brochure contact: Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau www.endlessmountains.org becky@endlessmountains.org 570-836-5431

May 4-5 Old Mill Village New Milford, PA noon-5 p.m. www.oldmillvillage.org

Annual Chocolate & Wine Festival May 18 2:30-7:30 p.m. Chestnut St., Montrose, PA www.chocolatewinefestival.com

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MAY HAPPENINGS Special Events May 1, Great Chefs XXII Chopped Challenge, 5:30 p.m., Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, Scranton. 346-4460, ext. 239. May 1-31, Ghost Walk, 7 p.m., downtown Scranton. 383-1821. May 2,Wine Down 2013, 6:15 p.m., Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock. 836-3924. May 4,Voluntary Action Center 7th Annual Run for the Roses at the Kentucky Derby, 3 p.m.,Waverly Country Club,Waverly. 347-5616. May 4, 2nd Mixed Martial Arts/Tri-State Cage Fight, 7 p.m., Best Western Inn, Matamoras. 243-1703. May 4, River Towns Marathon & Half Marathon, 7 a.m., Danville to Bloomsburg. 336-2060. May 4, 27th Annual Spring Fling, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., downtown Danville. 284-4502. May 4, 2013 Luzerne Co. Kentucky Derby Gala, The Westmoreland Club,WilkesBarre. 822-9438. May 4-5, Dirty Girl Mud Run, 8 a.m.,Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain, Moosic. 646-495-4002. May 4-5,West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival, downtown West Pittston. 888-905-2872. April 5,World Laugher Day Scranton, noon-4 p.m., McDade Park, Scranton. www.laughtolive.net. May 5, Judi H. Memorial Fund Rock On 3, 5-10 p.m., 152

Scranton MAY Cultural Center, Scranton. 800- SUN MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT 424-6724. 1 2 3 4 May 8, 35th 5 6 Annual Penn 12 13 State Night 19 20 with Bill O’Brien, 8:30 26 27 p.m., Genetti Manor, Dickson City. 287-1302.

May 12 & 26,Trolley Excursion to PNC Field, 12:15 p.m., Electric City Trolley Station & Museum, Scranton. 963-6590, May 13, Armed Forces Week Proclamation, noon, Lackawanna Co. Commissioners Office, Scranton.

7 8 9 10 11 14 15 16 17 18 21 22 23 24 25 28 29 30 31 Challengers,White Haven. 443-9532.

May 19, Car Show, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Scranton School for Deaf & Heard of Hearing Children, Clarks Summit. 947-6599. May 24, Swingin’ on Vine, 5-8 p.m., 500 Block Vine St., Scranton.

May 15, Armed Forces Luncheon, noon, St. Mary’s Center, Scranton. 961-2696.

May 25-26, Shawnee Celtic Festival, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Shawnee Mtn. Ski Area, Shawnee-on-Delaware. 421-7231.

May 16-19, Fine Arts Fiesta, Public Square,Wilkes-Barre. 888-905-2872.

May 25-26, MayDay Music Festival, noon-10 p.m., Kirby Park,Wilkes-Barre.

May 17, 19th Annual Wish Upon a Star Dinner Dance & Silent Auction, 6-11 p.m., Stroudsmoor Country Inn, Stroudsburg. 676-9474.

May 26, Historic House Tour, 1-4 p.m., Nathan Denison House, Forty Fort. 288-5531.

May 18, Armed Forces Day Veterans’ Parade, 11 a.m., downtown Scranton. May 18, Chocolate & Wine Festival, 2:30-7:30 p.m., downtown Montrose. chocolatewinefestival.com May 18, Mon-Tour Bicycle Race, 8:30 a.m., Montour Recreation Area, Danville. 336-2060. May 19, Branden’s Heart Everybody Can Do It Triathlon, 11 a.m.,Whitewater HappeningsMagazinePA.com

May 30-June 2, NEPA Bluegrass Festival, Lazybrook Park,Tunkhannock. 721-2760. May 31, Murder in the Gallery, 5:30 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 344-1111. June 1, LRCA Riverfest, Olive St. Bridge, Scranton. 347-6311.

Community Events May 3, Scranton H.S. Football Benefit Pasta Dinner, 5-8 p.m., Scranton H.S., Scranton. 702-7209. May 2013


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MAY HAPPENINGS May 3, Fiesta for 505, 5:30 p.m., Electric City Trolley Museum, Scranton. 963-6590.

May 13, 10th Annual Safe Haven Golf Tournament, 8:30 a.m., Lords Valley Country Club, Lords Valley. 296-2827.

May 21, Chicken-n-Biscuit or Ham Dinner, 4-6 p.m., United Methodist Church, Clifford.

May 3-4, Spring Rummage Sale, Fri. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. & 8 a.m.noon, Sat. 8 a.m.-noon, United Methodist Church, Dalton.

May 18, 12th Annual Whole Road of Yard Sales, N. Turnpike Rd., Dalton. 563-1248.

May 24, SPCA of Luzerne Co. 4th Annual Golf Tournament, 8 a.m., Sand Springs Country Club, Drums. 825-4111.

May 4, Annual Citywide Yard Sale, 9 a.m., throughout Port Jervis, NY. 845-858-4017.

May 18, ABPA Customer Appreciation Day, throughout Clarks Summit. 587-9045.

May 25, Summer Lunch Box– Planting Day Community Fair, 11 a.m., Hop Bottom. 604-9017.

May 4, Community Pride Event, 8 a.m.-noon, throughout Newport Twp. 736-6637.

May 18, 4th Annual Yard Sale Benefit, 9 a.m.,VNA Hospice of Monroe Co., East Stroudsburg. 421-5390.

May 25,Wayne Co. Historical Society Benefit Yard Sale, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Lock 31 House, Palmyra Twp.

May 18-19, Children’s Advocacy Center Dodgeball Tournament, West Scranton H.S., Scranton. 969-7313.

May 25, Suicide Survivors Picnic, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., McDade Park, Scranton. 575-2343.

May 4 & 6, Maple Lake Spring Rummage Sale, Sat. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Mon. 1-4 p.m., Maple Lake United Methodist Church, Spring Brook Twp. 842-6776. May 5, 5th Annual Chili Challenge, noon, United Methodist Church, Daleville. 842-6776. May 5, 12th Annual Victorian Tea & Chinese Auction, 1 p.m., Community Women’s Club of Greentown & Newfoundland, Newfoundland. 676-3111. May 5, Cinco de Mayo, 1 p.m., Cooperstown & Charlotte Valley Railroad, Milford. 432-2429.

May 19, Service of Consecration & Open House, 10 a.m., Countryside Community Church, Clarks Summit. www.countrysidechurch.org. May 19, L.C.S.D. Motorcycle Unit 3rd Annual Ride on the Side of the Law, 1 p.m., Grotto Pizza, Harvey’s Lake. 814-9664. May 19, All You Can Eat Breakfast, 8 a.m.-noon, Fire Co. #1, Clarks Summit.

May 5, Open House, noon, Abington Senior Community Center. 586-8996.

May 19, Polish Food Fest, noon-6 p.m., St. Stanislaus Youth Center, Scranton. 342-2224.

May 7, Girls Night Out Camp Bravehearts Benefit, 5-9 p.m., St. Mary’s Center, Scranton. 842-2960.

May 19, Pancake Breakfast, 7:30-11:30 a.m., Pine Mill Community Hall, Equinunk. 224-8500.

May 11, Cancertactular 5K, 9:30 a.m., Hose Co. #1, Archbald. 466-0658.

May 19, One Room School Open House, 1-4 p.m., Hoover School, Clifford.

May 11, Craft Fair & Chicken Barbecue, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., United Methodist Church, East Benton. 563-2218.

May 19, Roast Beef Dinner, noon, Sts. Peter & Paul Russian Orthodox Church, Scranton. 343-8128.

May 2013

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

May 25, Annual Memorial Day Weekend Flea Market, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., St. Joseph’s Church, Rileyville. 729-7024. May 25-26, Art & Craft Bazaar, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Old Lumberyard District, Milford. 201-919-0459. June 1,Tracey’s Hope Hospice & Domestic Pet Rescue 5th Annual Memorial Pet Walk, 11 a.m., McDade Park, Scranton. 457-1625. June 2, Serving Seniors’ Annual Summer Picnic, 3-7 p.m.,Waldorf Park, Scranton. 344-3931.

Concerts May 1, Ensemble Evening: Choirs & Bands, 7:30 p.m., Lemmond Theater, Misericordia University. May 2, Comedian Dana Carvey, 8 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. May 3, Steep Canyon Rangers, 8 p.m., Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY. ☛ 866-781-2922. 153


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MAY HAPPENINGS May 3-4, Beatlemania, Mauch Chunk Opera House, Jim Thorpe. 325-0249. May 4,The Gold Magnolias, 7:30 p.m., Hawley Silk Mill, Hawley. May 4, Under the Streetlamp, 8 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. May 4, 30th Annual World Premiere Composition Series Concert, 7:30 p.m., HoulihanMcLean Center, University of Scranton. 941-7624. May 5, Guitar Music of Mexico, 3 p.m., Dietrich Theater,Tunkhannock. 996-1500. May 5,Violinist Karen Gomyo & Pianist Dina Vainshtein, 3 p.m., Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY. 866-781-2922. May 5, Choral Society of NEPA Children/Youth Choirs Graduation Concert, 3 p.m., St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Scranton. 343-6707. May 10, Robert Dale Chorale– A Night at the Oscars, 8 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 344-1111.

May 10, Lindsay Lou & the Flatbellies with JacobsStrain, Mauch Chunk Opera House, Jim Thorpe. 325-0249. May 11, Colors of Spring– A Musical Journey, 6 p.m., Waverly Community House, Waverly. 586-8191.

May 3,“Othello,” 11 a.m., Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY. 845-295-2521. May 3,“Dreamgirls,” 7:30 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE.

May 11, Alice & the Glass Lake, 7:30 p.m., Hawley Silk Mill, Hawley.

May 3-4, Ballet Theatre of Scranton’s “Phantom of the Opera,” Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 344-1111.

May 11, Choral Society of NEPA Symphonic Chorus, 8 p.m., St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church,Wilkes-Barre. 343-6707.

May 3-5, Lakeside Players Present “Double Occupancy,” 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m., Grace Episcopal Church Hall, Lakeville. 226-6207.

May 18,The Coal Town Rounders, 7:30 p..m., Hawley Silk Mill, Hawley.

May 3-19,“Sin, Sex & the CIA,” Shawnee Playhouse, Shawnee on Delaware. 421-5093.

May 19, Lizanne Knott PAWS Benefit Concert, 1 p.m., Sycamore Grille, Delaware Water Gap. 426-1200. May 25, Matt Simons, 7:30 p.m., Hawley Silk Mill, Hawley. May 26, Lighten Up Blues Band, 6-9 p.m., Ledges Hotel, Hawley. 226-1337.

Theatre May 1,“Bill W.” Movie Event, 7 p.m., Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock. 996-1500.

May 5, Comedy Pet Theatre, 1 & 4 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. May 9-12 & 18-20, Actors Circle Presents “Arms & the Man,” 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m., Providence Playhouse, Scranton. 342-9707. May 10,The Temptation of the Muses by the Nai-Ni Chen Dance Co., 8 p.m., Mitrani Hall, Bloomsburg University. 389-4409.

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MAY HAPPENINGS May 10-11, Nuremberg Community Players Present “Café Murder,” 6:30 p.m., Christ Lutheran Church, Conyngham. 384-4407. May 10-12,“Dreamgirls,” Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. May 10-18,“Pride & Prejudice,” Vintage Theatre, Scranton. 507-9671. May 11,“Green Fire,” Movie Q & A, 11 a.m., Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock. 996-1500. May 11-June 15,“Mozart– A Musical Timeline,” Shawnee Playhouse, Shawnee on Delaware. 421-5093. May 19,“Romeo & Juliet,” 3 p.m., Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock. 996-1500. May 26, Breaking Ground Poets Poetry Slam, 5-8 p.m., Dietrich Theater,Tunkhannock. 996-1500. May 31-June 2, Ballet Northeast’s “Cinderella,” Fri.Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m., Darte Center,Wilkes University. 821-8525

Art Exhibits

Seminars & Lectures

May 1-10, Imagination & Spirituality: Public Sculptures of the University of Scranton Commons, Hope Horn Gallery, University of Scranton. 941-4214.

May 1, Holistic Elements from Within, 6:30-8 p.m., Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506.

May 1-June 1,The Blood is the Life– Vampires in Art & Nature, Everhart Museum, Scranton. 346-7186.

11:30 a.m.,VFW, Montrose. 278-1881.

May 1-June 3,Three Artists from Elmhurst, Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506.

Candles & Birch Wood Candle Holders, 9 a.m.-noon, Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506.

May 3, Chronic Disease SelfManagement Program, 1-3 p.m., May 1-19, Our People, Our Northern Wayne Community Land, Our Images, Sordoni Art Library, Lakewood. 253-4262. Gallery,Wilkes University. May 4, 5th Annual Authors 408-4325. Luncheon with Marta Perry,

May 7, Alzheimer’s Assoc Greater PA Chapter Conference, May 1-June 2, PA from “A Practical Look at Above, Photographs by Peter Alzheimer’s,” 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, Stern, Friedman Art Gallery, Wilkes-Barre. 674-6400. Misericordia University. 674-6400. May 11, Art in Nature: Beeswax

May 1-June 14, Mark Cohen: Italian Riviera, Maslow Gallery, Marywood University. 348-6278. May 1-June 30, Northeast PA Professors Ceramic Arts Exhibit, Moscow Clayworks, Moscow. 357-1627.

May 11, A Bird in the Hand: Songbird Mist Netting, 8:30 a.m.-noon, Nescopeck State Park, Drums. 403-2006. May 15, Abandoned Railroads of Northeast PA, 7 p.m., Genealogical Research Society, Peckville. 383-7661. ☛ 64

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CIRCLE DRIVE-IN THEATRE Cinema: Fri., Sat., & Sun. nights Phone 489-5731 for features & times Business Rte 6 • Scranton/Carbondale Hwy.

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MAY HAPPENINGS May 17, PA Tree & Wildflower Identification, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Promised Land State Park, Greentown. 676-0567. May 18, Herpetology with Dr. Thomas LaDuke, 3-8 p.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. May 23,Wayne Co. Genealogy Group, 4:30 p.m., Wayne Co. Public Library, Honesdale. 253-5468.

May 17, Evening Bird Walk, 6 p.m., Promised Land State Park, Greentown. 676-0567. May 17-19, Neotropical Birding Weekend, Promised Land State Park, Greentown. 610-796-3699. May 18, Bird Walk, 8-10 a.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319.

Nature

May 18, MAYbe We’ll See a Bear Hike, 9 a.m., Promised Land State Park, Greentown. 676-0567.

May 4, Annual Earth Day Park Cleanup, 9 a.m.-noon, Promised Land State Park, Greentown. 676-0567.

May 18, Eagle Viewing with the Naturalist, noon-1 p.m., Promised Land State Park, Greentown. 676-0567.

May 4,Wildflower Walk, 1 p.m., Nescopeck State Park, Drums. 403-2006.

May 23, Frog Slog, 5:30 p.m., Varden Conservation Area, Varden. 676-0567.

May 5,Wildflower Walk, 9 a.m.-noon, Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319.

May 24, In Pursuit of Amphibians, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Promised Land State Park, Greentown. 676-0567.

May 11, Introduction to Fly Fishing, 9:30 a.m.-noon, Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319.

May 25, Discover Lehigh Gorge Walk, 11 am., meet White Haven Community Library,White Haven. 403-2006.

May 16, Healthier Selves Walking Tour, Masonic Village, Dallas. 866-851-4243.

May 31, Sustainable Landscape Bus Tour, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., depart Kirby Park Natural Area, Wilkes-Barre. 825-1701.

Kids Corner May 4, Free Children’s Movie, “The Jungle Book,” 11 a.m., Dietrich Theater,Tunkhannock. 996-1500. May 9, Natural Wonders: Forest Floor, 1-2:30 p.m., Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506. May 11, Mothers, Aunts & Grandmas’ Day, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Children’s Museum, Bloomsburg. 389-9206. May 18, National Physical Fitness Month Activities, 2-3 p.m., Abington Community Library, Clarks Summit. May 19,“Peter & The Wolf,” 11 a.m., Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock. 996-1500. May 21, Make It,Take It Craft Time, 3-5 p.m., Abington Community Library, Clarks Summit. May 23, Natural Wonders: Garden Fun, 1-2:30 p.m., Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Moscow. 842-1506.

What’s Happening

Find more MAY events at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com!

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May 2013


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Advertisers’ DIRECTORY

3 Sisters Abington Travel Accentuate Caterers Al Mia Amore Allied Services Amanda Grace Images Anthracite Heritage Museum B-Dry Ballet Northeast Bella Faccias Bella Natura Bellefonte Art Museum Big Brown Fish & Pay Lakes Blu Wasabi BlueCross of Northeastern PA Butler’s Pantry Carriage Barn Antiques Children’s Advocacy Center Chocolate Creations Chocolates by Leopold Circle Drive-In Cinema & Flea Fair Colonnade Cooper’s Seafood House Corky’s Garden Path Country Inns/B&Bs Creekside Gardens Crossings Premium Outlets Custom Building by Carriage Barn DeCoverly Kennels Delta Medix Allergy Center Drs. Quinn, Mariotti & Abod Eagle Cleaners East Stroudsburg University Eckley Miners’ Village Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Restaurant Electric City Trolley Museum Endless Mountain Visitors Bureau EnviroVentures Erwine Home Health & Hospice Everhart Museum Everything Natural Exclusively You Explore More Eye Care Specialists Fairfield Inn & Suites Farm Museum & Historic Village Fern Hall Inn Fidelity Bank Fine Line Homes First Liberty Wealth Management French Manor Fritz Brothers Well Drilling Geisinger Wyoming Valley Glass Wine. Bar. Kitchen. Glint of Gold Golf Guide Grassi Restaurant Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce Guy Cali Associates Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame Hazzouri Dentistry Heritage Explorer Bike Tour & Festival Hilton Scranton & Conference Center Holley Ross Pottery Home Textile Tool Museum Hospice of the Sacred Heart Huntsville Golf Club Inn at Pocono Manor Jennifer L Gifts & Antiques Jerry Land Jewelers Jessica Davis Photography Jim Barna Log & Timber Homes Johnson College KDA Hair Designs Keystone College King’s College La Tonalteca

49 91 91 73 123 72 135 154 30 49 47 132 128 57 119 43 109 37 47 43 155 71 52 & 53 93 140 44 35 99 112 27 91 89 21 132 73 147 150 & 151 149 126 132 46 73 130 27 141 133 59 95 101 115 57 154 2 129 43 136-138 59 64 41 133 92 149 5 155 133 123 85 72 47 47 73 97 15 72 23 19 61

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147 17 29 48 134 149 127 51 103 127 83 129 59 131 104 63 133 19 31 135 44 108 19 134 128 57 134 126 20 107 11 158 70 105 113 111 158 160 101 125 79 135 29 129 128 159 55 15 81 127 135 79 62 37 & 69 37 42 102 27 25 132 97 108 111 145 87 41 125 156 39 54 85 77 45 134 139 23 69


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DICKSON CITY Exit 191a off of I-81 4005 Commerce Boulevard 570.489.LUBE (5823) There's ALWAYS something happening at The Lube! From Tuesday's All-You-Can-Eat Wing Night, Everyday Happy Hour from 8-10 p.m. and Half Price Appetizers from 8 p.m.-close... and so much more! QUICK LUBE ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT LUNCH BUFFET Monday-Friday 11 a.m.-2 p.m. featuring our famous Wings, Hot Entrées, Full Salad Bar, Soup & More! $ 9.99 MONDAY - KIDS NITE 5-8 p.m., $1.99 kids meals (with adult purchase), free face painting, play Wii on the big screen, Crafts with Coop our mascot on select nites! EVERY NITE IS MOVIE NITE at THE LUBE! Stop by the Lube to Win FREE IMAX Movie Gift Cards daily on our prize wheel! $15 Movie Meal Deal - Lube Burger, Side & Fountain Beverage plus Movie Ticket.* Present your ticket stub for daily discounts and specials! *Regular Movie ticket not valid on IMAX or 3D REV UP YOUR WEDNESDAY WITH QUAKER STEAK & LUBE BIKE NITE from 6 ’til close all summer long! Great Food & Drinks, Entertainment & Happy Hour from 8-10 p.m.! See you at The Lube®! Also Located in BLOOMSBURG Exit 232 off of I-80 211 Columbia Mall Drive 570.389.WING (9464)

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May 2013 Happenings Magazine  

Mother's Day Ideas, Regional Campus Treasures, National Nurses Week and all the best of Northeast PA - Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Endless Mount...