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contents AUGUST 2013

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Kim Winey Photography

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Timeless Weddings Historic love comes to life at a vintage-style wedding in Susquehanna County.

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What’s Your Wedding Style? Choose from three unique themes for a wedding to remember.

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Treasure Hunting

Find where to eat outside and where to choose a healthy entree.

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Summer Fun Get ready to hit the hot spots this season, such as fairs and festivals!

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Discover where to hunt for unique treasures and collectible antiques.

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Foodie Corner

Astounding August! Things to do, where to go, everything you need to know!

Inspiration at Home Meet a community who made home sweeter for a deserving family, and get ideas for your own space.

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Back to School Learn how to find the right backpack for your child; brush up on health tips and study up on college prep.

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NEPA Tech Revolution See how the technology industry is changing the region.

August 2013

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MAILBAG Dear Happenings, Happenings should put in the schedule for Steamtown (National Historic Site). If they have excursions I know that I would want to know the price and where the excursion is going. Good summer planning. –Terri Zezza, Exeter Dear Happenings, Thanks for your help promoting the 8th Annual Tour of Historic Churches of Greater Pittston (June 2013). It was a great success with over 50 people attending a fine talk by Father Bertha as well as musical selections and a reception put on by the congregation of the Italian Christian Church. –Jan Lokuta, via email

Publisher Managing Editor Art Director Associate Art Director

Paula Rochon Mackarey Barbara Toolan Lisa M. Ragnacci Peter Salerno

Administrative Assistant

Katherine Kempa

Associate Editor

Erika A. Bruckner

Account Representatives

Contributors

Dear Happenings, Thank you for picking our dog this month (June 2013 Pet of the Month)! Juliet appreciates it very much especially since she was a rescue dog. –The Glinskys, via Facebook

Interns

Ken Chergosky Rosemary Nye Jane Preate Annette Profera Kieran O’Brien Kern Shannon Lesniak Casey Phillips Julie Korponai Christopher Cosgrove Melissa Durante Aleni Mackarey

On the Cover: Fiddle Lake Farm in Susquehanna Co. Photo: Kim Winey Photography

Dear Happenings, Great coverage of the Lake Region (July 2013)! Beautiful issue! –Krista Gromalski, Heron’s Eye Communications

Published Monthly. 350,000 copies annually. ©2013 HAPPENINGS MAGAZINE All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any process except with written permission.

Happenings Magazine published since 1969 Phone: (570) 587-3532 • Fax: (570) 586-7374

Read online at: Dear Happenings, I’ve been an avid and dedicated reader of Happenings for years, since my dad introduced me back in 1969. I read your article (Letter from the Associate Editor, July 2013), and I just had to let you know it was a well-written, beautiful, touching article. And it just hit home when your opening line was,“I was a self-admitted list-maker, schedule-packer…” and wondering how you get to relax when you come to the lake. It just looks like a beautiful shot, written well, and I just wanted to applaud you on that. It was wonderful reading; it made my day. –Maria Augelli-Grudeski, Scranton 4

www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Tell Us What’s Happening! facebook.com/ HappeningsMagazinePA twitter.com/ HappeningsMag pinterest.com/ HappeningsMag Email:

info@happeningscommgroup.com

Snail mail:

P.O. Box 61 Clarks Summit, PA 18411

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

August 2013


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FROM THE PUBLISHER Dear Readers,

Weddings from 50 years ago were, in many ways, very different from the affairs that we attend today. For starters, average wedding costs in 1963 topped $5,000 to $6,000. Contrast that with many of today’s weddings reaching $30,000 to $50,000. A typical 1963 bride could plan a wedding in about three months, comThe late Floyd and Eil27een 3 196 , (Mayer) Bowen - April pared with the minimum of 12 to 14 months that most require today! Brides in 1963 were not concerned with savethe-date cards, writing their own vows or, of course, consulting popular websites like TheKnot.com! The 1963 bride’s hair was worn high and in a bouffant.The bridal veils and headdresses were often similar to the Jackie Kennedy pill-box hats of the era and focused on added height on top. The floral corsage headdress was almost like a modern fascinator.The bride was concerned with her trousseau (clothing and linens) and had carefully chosen silver, china and glassware patterns. She also had painstakingly selected a “going-away outfit,” which she would wear immediately following the wedding reception as she and her new husband would have a strategic exit

The late Josep d Pa tricia (Cardoni) Carey - hOcantob er 10, 1964 August 2013

to their decorated getaway car, often showered by confetti.

The late Attorney Albe Wedding late Marg t Nanrt(SB. and the guests purnlon) Mackarey are - Oc“tober” 17,ca196 4 chased items such as vases or candle-holders for the new couple, which were put on display for all to view. Instead of rented limousines, Cadillacs or large cars were borrowed from friends and decorated to transport each couple in the bridal party. While the last 50 years have brought so many changes and twists to what was considered “traditional,” a wedding invitation today still continues to bring anticipation as to how the betrothed couple will choose to celebrate their day of marriage. Pictured on this page are regional couples married nearly five decades ago. In this issue we celebrate couples recently married (beginning on page 8). nlon) Cheers to ca (S e ar Cl y ar M Michael & - July 11, 1964 all the couSeechock ples included in this issue, and be sure to send us photos of other couples married 50 years or more!

Fondly,

Paula

Paula Rochon Mackarey

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Antique Show & Sale, Wallenpaupack Area H.S., Hawley. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 296-3539

151st Annual Wayne Co. Fair, Fairgrounds, Honesdale.Through Sat. WayneCountyFair.com

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Blake Shelton in concert, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY. 800-745-3000.

75th Annual Montour-DeLong Community Fair, fairgrounds, Danville.Through Sat.

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Trolley Excursion to PNC Field, Electric City Trolley Station & Museum, Scranton. 12:15 p.m. 963-6590.

tuesday

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August

wednesday

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15 Little League Baseball World Series, Lamade Stadium, Williamsport. Through Aug 25. 326-3607.

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Kiwanis Wyoming County Fair, fairgrounds, Meshoppen. 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Through Mon.

21st Annual Our Lady of Snows Country Bazaar, St. Benedict Church grounds, Clarks Summit. 6-11 p.m. Through Sat.

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18th Annual Christy Mathewson Days, Keystone College & downtown Factoryville. Through Sat.

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Pittston Tomato Festival, downtown Pittston. Through Sun. 655-1424.

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August is American Artists Appreciation Month National Golf Month Children’s Vision & Learning Month National Orange & Papaya Month

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saturday

34rd Annual Blueberry Festival, Village Green, Montrose. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 278-1881

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Woofstock 2013, Salt Springs Park, Franklin Forks. Noon-7 p.m. 278-1228.

17 Susan Winter in concert, Wildflower Music Festival, White Mills. 6 p.m. 253-5500.

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Wally Lake Fest, throughout Hawley. Through Sat.

Fiddlin’ Around, Central Park, Honesdale. 7:30 p.m.

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friday

27th Annual Pocono State Craft Festival, Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm, Stroudsburg. 10 a.m.6 p.m.Through Sun.

Railfest, Steamtown National Historic Site, Scranton. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.Through Sun. 340-5204.


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t

100 Adams Avenue Scranton, PA 570-343-3000 www.scranton.hilton.com


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COVER STORY

A

Love

Letters Inspired Styled Photo Shoot

uthentic love letters from the early 20th century. A rustic barn and a naturally breathtaking Susquehanna County setting. Elaborate details from a team of creative Pennsylvania wedding professionals. It all came together in a vintage-themed photo shoot inspired by a real-life NEPA sweetheart story from the past and featured on the cover of this issue.

Inspiring Spaces

Julie Manwarren, owner of Frosted in Clarks Summit, provided the concept for the styled shoot as well as the custom cake. She helped develop the vision for the shoot after a visit to Fiddle Lake Farm early last year.“Fiddle Lake Farm, located in Susquehanna County, boasts a beautiful Photos by Kim Winey Photography

The 1820s farm house, lovingly restored by Craig and Pam Benson, and vintage car available for couples who wed at Fiddle Lake Farm.


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The tablescape offered varying heights of beautiful floral arrangements by Wildflowers by Design, as well as personal letters for the guests, which served as place cards.

barn surrounded by a charming property, an 1820s farm house and more. We wanted to show what a wedding would look like at this venue with an elegant, vintage wedding shoot using love letters as our theme,” she explains.

Love Story

The cake, by Frosted, was designed with lines from the original love letters written on fondant.

Fiddle Lake Farm Owners, Craig and Pam Benson, discovered letters from the early 1900s tucked away in the attic when they refurbished the 1820s farm house. The letters, written from Mamie Dunn to Johnnie Wells during their courtship, served as inspiration for the shoot. Pappy and Tomlynn Biondo, who celebrated their one-year wedding anniversary the same week as the photo shoot, played the roles of bride and groom.“The chemistry you see in the images photographer Kim Winey captured was real for these newlyweds,” says Manwarren. Other professionals played guests; Craig Benson posed as father of the bride.

Historic Ties

Mamie Dunn and Johnnie Wells met prior to 1904; they went on to be married and have three daughters.“I love history and research,” continuned on page 10 August 2013

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A “No Look Nook” allowed the bride and groom to exchange love letters through a mail slot in a door before the ceremony without seeing each other. The doors were decorated with lace and quotations from famous love letters.

admits Manwarren.“With the help and blessing of the Bensons, who now live on the property that was once owned by the Wells family, I researched Mamie and Johnnie extensively.” Johnnie grew up in the house and moved away with Mamie after they were married. The couple returned years later to take over the farm. Manwarren interviewed relatives and friends and plans to write a story documenting the couple’s lives in NEPA.“Pam and Craig Benson and the Fiddle Lake Farm staff were hospitable and so helpful, giving a lot of time to help us pull everything together. The planning for our shoot was coordinated by Danielle Pasternak whose expertise kept us organized and helped bring everything together,” explains Manwarren.

Vintage Celebrations

Fiddle Lake Farm, in Thompson, is an organic farm set on 130 acres. It offers lodging as well as wedding ceremonies and receptions on the grounds. The farm house, once home to Mamie and Johnnie, combines family heirlooms and antique furnishings with cable TV and wireless internet. A lake house built in 1926 offers additional charming accommodations. Craig Benson’s 10

1953, ivory white, right-handdrive MG TD convertible (featured on the cover) adds another layer of nostalgia. Sweethearts can tie the knot in a lakeside ceremony or in a lush meadow with Elk Mountain overseeing the nuptials from a distance. For today’s brides looking for a unique setting, the rustic barn brings vintage weddings to life. Antique tables and chairs, eclectic throwback furniture and décor from yesteryear add to the classic atmosphere and can be enhanced with a penny candy counter or an old-fashioned root beer float stand! Details include an antique pink marbletopped server ready to hold the wedding cake. The upcycled dance floor was crafted from 200-year-old barn wood and is covered by a pavilion that can be enclosed for a rainy-day ceremony. For more, call 570-7562089 or visit www.FiddleLakeFarm.com

Find more about the photo shoot, as well as links to the team of wedding professionals, at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com!

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

–Erika A. Bruckner

August 2013


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230 West Tioga St. • Tunkhannock • 570.836.5754 • www.wisnosky.com August 2013

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BRIDAL GUIDE

& Jason Leone

Amber Davidson

J

ason and Amber met at a pub in Scranton, and they were engaged just over one year later. They married August 24, 2012 at St. Peter’s Cathedral.

A welcome party kicked off festivities for family and the 25-member bridal party. The next day the ladies went for a manicure and pedicure and the men went golfing. A rehearsal dinner was held at POSH at the Scranton Club, followed by the wedding on Friday. The couple emphasized ceremony music, choosing classical sounds with organ, trumpet and violin to accentuate 12

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BRIDAL GUIDE the majestic setting; Michele Conaboy provided vocals. Simple white roses adorned the church, while the reception at the Scranton Cultural Center popped with bold colors and a variety of flowers. As transplanted residents of Northeast PA, the couple welcomed many out-oftown guests, so they wanted to help visitors experience the best sights and flavors of the region. Jason and Amber chose the Scranton Cultural center to “show off one of the most beautiful buildings” in Scranton. The couple admits, they can’t find pizza in Syracuse that can compare with pizza from Northeast PA. Constantino’s catering featured Old Forge-style pizza as one of the hors d’oeuvres, which was a big

hit with guests from New York. Welcome bags for hotel guests included a copy of Happenings Magazine. Cocktail hour began in the lobby with a three-piece band. Later, the full live band welcomed a few guest singers, including the groom, who sang “New York, New York!” In lieu of wedding favors, the couple made a donation to a local Think Pink Foundation and both the Northeast PA and Central New York affiliates of Susan G. Komen for the Cure. The gesture honored the mother of the groom and cousin of the bride, one who is a breast cancer survivor and one currently battling breast cancer. The newlyweds honeymooned in California and reside in East Syracuse, New York. -Erika A. Bruckner

Photos: Oaktree Photography


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Our Personal Attention to Every

Bridal

Open House at POSH &The Colonnade Sunday, September 15, 3 - 6 p.m.

Book a small shower or intimate rehearsa l dinner in The Mulbe Room and enjoy the rry architectural details of the original parlo dining room as well r and as delicious cuisine an d white glove servic e.

The Colonnade

event space and boutique hotel a posh life l.l.c. property

570-342-6114 401 Jefferson Ave Scranton www.TheColonnade401.com

bathrooms; rious second floor suite. Private Spend your wedding night in a luxu d to your door. vere deli and a continental breakfast Egyptian cotton sheets;freeWi-Fi

D


y

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Detail at Two Exceptional Venues. Serving Sunday Brunch 11 a.m.- 2 p.m.

Lunch Tuesday - Saturday 11:30 a.m.- 2 p.m.

Dinner POSH's Fashion Lounge is a stylish yet intimate environment for small rehearsal dinners or cocktail parties.

Sunday - Saturday at 5 p.m. Wednesday all bottles of wine are1/2 off Thursday Night $5 appetizers and drinks

rical setting, beautiful and histo a in ng ni di ale n cuisine for Providing upsc delicious America d an e tiv va no in POSH serves Sunday Brunch. lunch, dinner and

POSH @ The Scranton Club 404 North Washington Avenue The Oak Bar at POSH offers distinctive cockt ails,delicious appetizers and weekly liv e entertainment.

Scranton PA 570-955-5890 • WWW.POSHATSC.COM


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BRIDAL GUIDE

What’s Your Wedding Style? Three Themes for NEPA Weddings Weddings come in many different styles, and every detail adds to the overall feel of the day. What’s your wedding style… vintage, natural or ultra formal? Let your per-

sonality guide you as you customize the day with some of these ideas. The best part is, all of these elements are available locally!

VINTAGE Love is in style through every era. Vintage brides love classic elements of bygone days, incorporating antique pieces and fashion that gives a nod to icons of the past. Gown: The delicate lace and high neckline of this gown are reminiscent of fashions of days gone by. The richly beaded belt adds an unexpected touch of old-time glitz and glamour. Get it: Exclusively You, Bloomsburg Hair: A simple French twist brings a timeless look. Get it: Bella Natura, Clarks Summit

Setting: Opulence and sophistication are created by mixing older decor with modern LED white uplighting. Silver chiavari chairs and white lighting bring a sense of timeless class. Get it: Styled by MCR Productions at the Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre continuned on page 18 16

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Weddings • Rehearsal Dinners Showers and More! " LIFE ISN'T MEASURED IN MINUTES BUT IN MOMENTS "

280 Main St., Dickson City, PA • 383-0321 www.thetrattoria.com

It’s not just any dress... It’s

THE

dress.

Weddings Proms Mother of the Bride Special Occasion Tuxedos Accessories

53 W. Main St., Bloomsburg • (570) 784-6652 Hours: Mon., Wed. 11-8; Tues., Sat. 10-5; Thurs., 11-6; Fri. 11-5 www.exyoubridal.com

201 Jefferson Ave. Scranton, PA 570.344.9021 • 1.800.669.9021 • boccardojewelers.com August 2013

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BRIDAL GUIDE ULTRA FORMAL Today’s formal brides love to mix grand tradition with modern touches. Their wedding is a lavish affair with exclusive touches. Gown: This gown's lustrous satin fabric, structured bodice and super-full skirt makes it perfect for a formal affair. The heavy beading on the bodice and lace-up back make it fit for a bride who wants to feel like a princess. Get it: Exclusively You, Bloomsburg

Setting: Creating a lounge for guests can provide a relaxing environment and add the wow factor modern brides want. A white dance floor gives a sense of grandeur. Get it: Styled by MCR Productions at Hilton Scranton & Conference Center, Scranton

Hair: Traditional meets modern with this sophisticated look. Get it: Kelly McCool Salon, Scranton

continuned on page 20

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Newly Remodeled!

Wedding Shower Birthday Graduation

Consultation by appointment only

Cathy Reppert • 570.283.CAKE (2253) 271 Wyoming Ave., Kingston, PA eatcakefirst.com August 2013

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BRIDAL GUIDE

NATURAL The natural bride aims for simple splendor. They appreciate the pure beauty that surrounds them and will want to hold their festivities in the open air. Dress: For a simple yet elegant statement, this dress has floral lace, a slim silhouette and a delicate, short train. Perfect for an outdoor ceremony, the gown is lovely without being overdone. Get it: Exclusively You, Bloomsburg Hair: This natural look leaves hair free and loose, and works well for a destination wedding where the bride may not have access to a salon. Get it: Bella Natura, Clarks Summit Setting: Rolling hills and grassy fields replace ornate walls for a natural setting. Get it: Fiddle Lake Farm, Thompson Fiddle Lake Farm photo by Kim Winey Photography

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–Erika A. Brukner

August 2013


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Contact Lindsay Pross 570.674.6545 lpross@golf-huntsville.com

1334 Market Street • Dallas, PA www.golf-huntsville.com


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BRIDAL GUIDE Gina DiVizio

&

Jeffrey O’Neill

G

ina and Jeffrey lived three blocks away from each other their entire lives; yet they never met until they were adults through an introduction by Jeff’s cousin. Less than two years later, they were engaged in the “Little Italy” section of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, fitting for two people of Italian heritage. They married at St. Ann’s Basilica in Scranton on July 13, 2012. The bride, who had attended the annual Novena to St. Ann since she was a child, chose the church as both families felt St. Ann was instrumental in answering the prayers that led the pair together. The bride wore a satin dress with embroidery encrusted with crystals and pearls. Her mother and grandmother accompanied her to Exclusively You in Bloomsburg to choose the dress. Her bouquet was entwined with rosaries from her grandmother and late, great aunt. She carried the purse her mother carried on her own wedding day. The groom’s ensemble was from Savvi by Sarno & Son. Family and faith were woven through the day, marked by elegance and tradition. They posed for pictures on the grounds of the Basilica, including a photo of the couple next to a granite bench, which was a memorial for the bride’s maternal great grand-

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BRIDAL GUIDE parents. Flowers adorned entry doors, hurricane lamps, pews, altar railings and the choir loft. After the ceremony, guests greeted the newlyweds with the release of ivory balloons. The flowers continued at the reception for over 300 people at the Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel in Scranton. Blooms draped the front entrance and embellished win-

A slideshow of photos of the bride and groom played through the reception. Favors were cupcakes decorated to resemble a pink hydrangea and a bookmark with a photo of the bride and groom leaving the church. The bride is an elementary school counselor for North Pocono School District; the groom is chief of the Counter Fire Division at Tobyhanna Army Depot. The couple honeymooned in Hawaii and reside in Dunmore. –Erika A. Bruckner

dows, tables and doorways, as well as the grand lobby’s signature fountain. A fresh flower tree sat on the place card table, and flower-filled, tall, glass vases decorated each table. A memory table was displayed at the reception, which included wedding day pictures of the bride and groom and their parents and grandparents. Upon arrival, guests were welcomed by the newlyweds and their parents and served champagne and strawberries. Photos: I’mage Photo Studio August 2013


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BRIDAL GUIDE

Gown But Not Forgotten

Eagle Cleaners Garment Preservation

G

irls dream of their wedding gown for years, search for the perfect one for weeks and adore wearing their dress on their big day. After the last guest clears the dance floor, the bride can choose to preserve the beauty and memories of the most important dress of her lifetime with gown preservation.

fabric. After air-drying, the gown is placed in dual boxes with a window displaying the dress inside. Air circulation is permitted in this acid-free box, which is essential in maintaining the original color of the fabric. Eagle Cleaners then stuffs the dress with acid-

“It’s important to bring in your gown as soon as possible,” explains Buddy Croft of Eagle Cleaners in Clarks Summit.“The stains are there even though you may not be able to see them,” continues Croft.“The sugars will oxidize, caramelize and create a brown spot that is extremely difficult if not impossible to remove.” Once the dress arrives, blemishes are sought out. Loose beading and torn hems are also scouted, so damages can be fixed. Depending on the material, the dress is dry cleaned or wet cleaned in a washer with a slow rocking motion, so the material is not tumbled. It is then treated with detergents and conditioners that will ultimately prevent the yellowing of the 24

1911, gowns that are 20 years old and even one that was caught in a basement flood,” explains Croft. In addition, he recently restored his grandmother’s wedding gown from 1941– pictured here (left & inset) with the matching headpiece that was not restored for comparison. Wedding gown preservation can link past weddings to future generations. “Some women are planning to have their daughters or granddaughters wear their dress,” admits Croft.“People have also used the fabric down the road to have baptismal or communion gowns made for their children.”

The process may take anywhere from two to six weeks. Preservation is not free tissue paper to avoid limited to wedding gowns. wrinkling over time. This service is also available for baptismal gowns, comThose who have been stor- munion gowns and other ing their nuptial attire in a heirlooms. For more, call dark corner for several years 570-587-5580. –Katie Manley should not be discouraged. “I’ve restored linen from HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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Passion from Italy. La Nard is the exclusive dealer for Ti Sento Melano.

216 East Drinker Street, Dunmore, PA 570-941-9222 Fine Jewelry & Diamonds Gold Buyer

www.lanardjewelrynepa.com

August 2013

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BRIDAL GUIDE Alison Marie Taroli

&

Eric Gelsleichter

A

lison and Eric grew up only 15 minutes away from each other, but they didn’t meet until they were students at King’s college. They started dating the last semester of their senior year. Nearly five years later, Eric proposed while the pair was on a hike, surrounded by fall foliage in Shenandoah National Park in Virginia. They married October 13, 2012 in the garden at The Highlands in Dallas, PA. A reception was held at the Highlands at Newberry Estate.

The bride, who grew up participating in local, community theater, used Broadway show tunes as ceremony music, including “Sunrise, Sunset” from “Fiddler on the Roof,” “Some Enchanted Evening” from “South 26

Pacific,”“I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face” from “My Fair Lady,”“One Hand, One Heart” from “West Side Story” and “Listening to You” from “Tommy.” Each bridesmaid carried a different color, organic-style bouquet. The bride’s bouquet was made of a combination of flowers from each of their bouquets. Since scouring used book sales is one of the couple’s favorite things to do together, they turned their love of books into a theme for the wedding day. The bride’s aunt and godmother gifted them a wedding cake depicting some of the books most meaningful to the couple, including “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald and

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BRIDAL GUIDE “John Adams” by David McCullough.“The Pleasure of Finding Things Out” By Richard Feynman, which inspired Eric to pursue a career in science, and “Once a Runner” by John L. Parker, Jr., in honor of the first marathon the couple ran together, were also featured. Invitations and programs were book themed, and the escort cards were presented in an antique library card catalog. The ring bearer chose his own favorite book to hold the rings as he carried them down the aisle. The bride carried a family Bible, over a century old, down the aisle, just like 12 brides in her mother’s family had done before her. Vintage hardcover books, heart-shape confetti made from book pages and table numbers cut from an open book adorned tables. The bride’s musical family entertained guests as Alison and her matron of honor sang a duet, the father of the bride sang “Ring of Fire” by Johnny Cash, and the brother of the bride played guitar along with the band. They performed the traditional Polish bridal dance in honor of Alison’s family heritage. Donations in honor of each guest were given to Blue Chip Farms Animal Refuge in Dallas, PA. The bride is a patent and trademark attorney; the groom is pursuing his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree. They honeymooned in New Zealand and now reside in Virginia. Photos: Chris Taroli Photography

–Erika A. Bruckner


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BRIDAL GUIDE ou’ve said yes! Now it’s time to get your beauty regimen on track before the big day! Kelly McCool, a professional stylist and owner of Kelly McCool Salon Spa and Electrolysis in Scranton, offers a timeline of tips to get your primping planned.

Y

Pre-Wedding

Months Before PAMPERING • Six “At around six months before the wedding, start thinking about a salon that can accommodate your needs PLANNER and the size of your bridal party, and book it.” McCool

Timeline to Wedding Day Beauty

also recommends finding a salon that not only does makeup application, but also sells the cosmetics they use. This way, you’re well prepared to match your dayof makeup for any necessary touch-ups.

• • •

Two Months Before Two months before the wedding, go into your previously selected salon and consult with the stylist about your likes, dislikes and vision. Discuss colors and the type of look you’d like, whether it’s retro, modern or classic. Six Weeks Before Approximately six weeks before the wedding, go in for a trial run of both your hairstyle and makeup. Three Weeks Before At about two to three weeks before your wedding, consider a facial for glowing, radiant skin. McCool says you can see results almost immediately, particularly with the type of facials found at her salon.“We use high-end, medical grade products. It’s not over the counter; you can’t find this at Sephora or Clinique. You’ll see a dramatic reduction in fine lines and wrinkles.” One Week Before At the beginning of the week of your wedding, take care of any waxing you may want to have done, both facial and body. Have it done as close as possible to the day, but leave enough time to recover from any redness. Rounding out the week, manicures and pedicures are typically done a day or two before the nuptials. Finally, on the big day, your pre-booked salon might have a continental breakfast ready for you and your bridal party while all the magic happens. –Nicole Krempasky

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BRIDAL GUIDE

& Jeffrey Biondo

Janine Oakley

J

anine and Jeffrey were introduced through a mutual friend. As one of her favorite songs,“January Wedding,” played at an Avett Brothers concert, Jeffrey dropped to one knee and proposed.

They married September 1, 2012 at Mon Cherie Garden in Clifford. Nearly 200 guests stayed for a reception on the grounds. To incorporate their two daughters into the day, the theme of the wedding was a family tree. The save-the-date cards and recycled paper invitations depicted trees. Evergreen trees were given as favors; guests could also choose to donate their tree to the Lackawanna River Corridor Association. The cake was airbrushed and etched to mimic tree bark; it sat on a tree trunk cake stand made by the groom. Instead of a guest book, guests signed dots that were affixed to a tree poster; it now hangs in the family’s home. The ceremony was in front of the house made of trees on the great lawn. Guests followed a sunken walking path to cocktail hour on the stone

patio. The reception was held under a large tent with lighted paper lanterns. The statement,“Marry in September’s shine so that your life is rich and fine!” was printed around a tree on the menu tents and placed at each reception table. The statement also appeared in Italian as a nod to the bride’s family heritage. They married on the 67th

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BRIDAL GUIDE anniversary of the grandparents of the bride. The couple, now in their 90s, cut and fed each other cake after the newlyweds. The groom and his brother made three kinds of home-brewed beer to serve at the reception, “Matrimoni-ale,”“True Love Triple” and “I do PA.” Chalkboards listed the names, and custom labels were used on each bottle. The bride crafted the boutonnières from fresh hops and wheat as a nod to the homebrew. The sister and brother-in-law of the bride made homemade wine, which was labeled as table numbers. Burlap table runners, the ring bearer pillow and signage was made by the bride and the sister-inlaw of the groom. White flowers filled milk glasses at the center of the tables. Family photos were on display. At the end of the reception, family members took over for the band and encircled the newlyweds to sing “Sweet Judy Blue Eyes.” The bride works for Cigna Healthcare; the groom is a freelance worker and stay-at-home father to the couple’s daughters, Isabelle and Sadie. The family resides in Blakely. –Erika A. Bruckner

Photos: Ana Buranich of Simple Moments Photography


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BRIDAL GUIDE

&

Nadia Malinak

N

Allen Lucas

adia and Allen met as teenagers while working as dietary aids at Moses Taylor Hospital. Just weeks before he was to be deployed to Afghanistan, Allen flew Nadia down to where he was stationed at New River Marine Corps Air Station in North Carolina to propose. They married August 4, 2012 at St. Anthony of Padua Parish in Dunmore. The traditional ceremony incorporated the bride’s favorite colors of peach, Tiffany blue and white. Invitations were designed at Waverly General Store. The intimate reception at The Colonnade in Scranton had a shabby-chic glam feel for 100 guests. The wedding bands were engraved with “In sunshine and in shadow,” lyrics from the Irish song “Danny Boy,” to honor the late grandfather of the groom.

With Allen in his Marine Corps dress blues and Nadia in a Priscilla of Boston wedding gown, the couple sat at a sweetheart table to add to the intimate feel of the celebration. They posed for pictures at Lake Scranton and the historic Colonnade building. Guests received monogrammed chocolate hearts from Bella Faccias, and they enjoyed a custom cake by Truly Scrumptious. continued on page 34 Photos: Angelo Godino

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570.969.1705 • 1016 R iver Street, Scranton

August 2013

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BRIDAL GUIDE The fun-loving couple emphasized music at the reception. They sang to each other and playfully danced their first dance to Bob Marley’s “Is this Love.” The mother/son dance was to Bob Dylan’s “Wagon Wheel;” the father/daughter dance was to The Grateful Dead’s “Lady with a Fan.” The bride recently graduated from Marywood University’s Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology program. The groom, a former Cpl. Of the United States Marine Corps with two combat deployments to Afghanistan, is a Production Supervisor at BAE Systems and a student in Penn State Worthington Scranton’s Information Science and Technology program. The St. Thomas honeymoon was coordinated by Abington Travel. The couple resides in Dunmore. –Erika A. Bruckner

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Receptions • Bridal/Baby Showers Rehearsal Dinners • Corporate Meetings Holiday Parties • Fundraisers

702 St. Mary’s Villa Road Elmhurst Twp. PA zacharellisgardens.com

570-842-4975 August 2013

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Posh and The Colonnade Elegant Events Accessible to Ever yone

osting a celebration can be daunting, exhausting and expensive. Joshua Mast and Paul Blackledge of Posh LLC know that it doesn’t have to be. Their properties The Colonnade and POSH at the Scranton Club look back to the classic elegance of Scranton while maintaining a modern color palette and sensibility. Both properties have been restored in a modern interpretation while maintaining the aesthetic integrity of the historic home and club respectively.

H

POSH and The Colonnade can handle everything from a bridal brunch or afternoon tea to an elegant dinner. Built in 1873 as a residence, The Colonnade can accommodate 10 to 200 people. Small functions can be cozy in the Mulberry Room, the original parlor of 36

the stately home. Cocktails can be savored in the Music Room. The main dining room can comfortably seat 120 or 200 with tenting. Formerly a private club, POSH is now open for the first time to the public. It melds the glamour and exclusivity of the historic private club with a modern, elegant twist in the main restaurant, the Oak Bar and the Fashion Lounge. The event space upstairs can hold 300 people. The properties are beautiful settings for pictures. The Colonnade’s art, woodwork and glorious baby grand piano combine to make every space at the Colonnade perfect for pictures. The double staircase and the Fashion Lounge are favorites at Posh for photo opportunities. Mast and Blackledge pride themselves on personal HappeningsMagazinePA.com

service. They are with their clients every step of the way and want to take away the stress of planning events. Not only do they supply the venue, tables and linens, the Posh LLC team has the capability to assist with all facets of planning including décor and floral elements.“At our venues, elegance does not have to be out of reach,” Mast explains. Their whiteglove service and attention to detail combine in what Mast refers to as “Being a guest at your own event.” Established event planners, they guide their clients through every step of customizing their day, from menu, flowers, décor and linens to entertainment. All they need to know is the event date, number of guests and budget. At Posh and the Colonnade elegance can be achieved at almost any price point. –Kieran O’Brien Kern

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Bridal Bling... How to Ring in a Wedding! “Will you marry me?” The question remains the same through the ages, but the style of ring that accompanies that question can vary greatly. The once-popular marquis, pear and oval cuts have

waned in popularity, ushering in an age of new designs flaunted by brides-to-be. Today’s engagement rings show off individuality, like these options available locally.

Angel’s Halo Designed by Christopher Designs, this 1.25-carat, round brilliant cut with .87 carats in the mounting to enhance the center stone, epitomizes the popular halo ring style. Retail: $10,360 Boccardo Jewelers, Scranton, 570-3449021 www.boccardojewelers.com

Made by Hand Handcrafted, Danish-designed, Pandora rings crafted in sterling silver and cubic zirconia work well as wedding or anniversary bands. Retail: $60-$135 3 Sisters Jewelers, Kingston, 570-288-3147 www.3sisters.com

Center Stage Available in different sizes to take center stones ranging from .25 to 2.5 carats, this halo bridal set features a semi-mount engagement ring and matching wedding band in 14 K white gold. As pictured, the engagement ring is 1/5 carat total weight (without the center stone), and the wedding band is 1/8 total weight. Retail: $1,295 engagement ring; $895 wedding band Roth Jewelers, Dallas, 570-675-2623 www.oscarrothjewlers.net

Encircled Love Set in 18K white gold, this contemporary, 1.5-carat ring with an art deco touch combines four solitaire diamonds in the center surrounded by small micro pave diamonds. Retail: $3,900 Nye Jewelers, Scranton, 570-344-4693

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Princess Story This modern princess cut is sure to become a classic for brides looking for simple beauty. The one-carat diamond is set in14K white gold. Retail: $3,000-6,000 LaNard Jewelers, Dunmore, 570-941-9222

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FROM

TO CUSTOM DESIGNS

CLASSICS Roth Jewelers 2925 Memorial Hwy Dallas, PA • 570.675.2623

August 2013

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A full-service salon specializing in organic hair color, products and services..

Students Back to School Special 10% off Haircut NEW ULTRA SANITARY PEDICURE TUB. CHECK US OUT FOR EXPRESS PEDICURES WED. THRU SAT.! 1 Gravel Pond Road • Clarks Summit

570-319-1849 • www.bellanatura.net

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BRIDAL GUIDE Rebecca Lynn Mannick

&

Kevin James Park

M

utual friends introduced Rebecca and Kevin. They dated for two years and moved to Florida, but they moved back when they wanted to start a family. Their baby boy was born in Augus 2007. In 2008, he was diagnosed with Nesch-Nyhan Syndrome (read his story on page 62). Instead of tearing the couple apart, they drew closer together. After getting through a year and a half of continuous doctor appointments, Kevin took Rebecca to the Christmas festivities in Bethlehem, PA. They finished a candlelight tour of the town, and at dinner Kevin gave her an early Christmas present – an engagement ring. They married June 2, 2012 at Stone Bridge Inn and Restaurant in Union Dale. “The Perfect Pair” theme grew through the evening, inspired by three pear trees in the couple’s backyard. They used fresh pears from those trees to make pear honey, given to guests as favors. Instead of a guest book, guests wrote their wishes on “Perfect Pair” cards to place in a pearshaped cookie jar. Four tiers of vanilla champagne pear cupcakes with caramel cream cheese frosting were Continued on page 44.

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BRIDAL GUIDE decorated with green hydrangea and pears. Tables were named for types of pears, including Bartlett, Asian and Bosc. The bride gave bridesmaids rhinestone earrings and a necklace shaped like pears. The bride’s dream was to have their son walk down the aisle using his walker as he was the ring bearer. When this wasn’t possible, the flower girl pulled him

down the aisle in a decorated wagon with a sign that read “The Perfect Pair” and pears dragging behind. After the courtyard ceremony, the reception continued at Stone Bridge. The couple danced to “Then” by Brad Paisley. Halfway through the song, their son began to cry. Kevin picked him up from his wheelchair, and the three of them finished the dance together as a family.

The bride is a labor and delivery nurse at Moses Taylor Hospital. The groom is employed at the James T. O’Hara Construction Company. After a honeymoon in Mexico, they reside in Waymart. –Erika A. Bruckner

Photos: Amanda Myers Photography 44

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Show us the Doors When one door closes… Take a picture!

of Nor theast PA! Photo Contest

Take a photograph of a Northeast PA door, and submit it at www.Happenings MagazinePA.com to be eligible for a door prize we think you’ll love– a $100 gift certificate to Corky’s Garden Path Greenhouse in Clarks Summit. Here’s what you need to do. Take a picture of a door in Northeast PA (door should be on a public building or your own home, please! No playing paparazzi in front of an unsuspecting neighbor’s private residence!). We’ll share entries in future issues and announce the winner in March 2014. To enter, upload the fullresolution, digital file at www.HappeningsMagaz inePA.com with entry information.

RULES 1. Photographs must be original. 2. Digital file must be at least 1 MB in size. 3. Photograph must be taken in one of the following counties: Bradford, Carbon, Lackawanna, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, Sullivan, Susquehanna,Wayne,Wyoming. 4. Photographs must be of public buildings or photographer’s own residence, or photographer must secure permission of owner before photographing property. 5. Happenings has the non-exclusive right to publish all submitted photos online or in print.

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The doors pictured here can help you get your creative juices flowing! Your inspiration this month comes from Courtney Brenner, who submitted these photos of doors in Luzerne County! Keep those submissions coming!

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Treasure Hunting Spotlight:

Carriage Barn Antiques At Carriage Barn Antiques in Clarks Summit, 6,000 feet of space is filled with unique treasures and exceptional finds. More than 40 years ago, The Carriage Barn was home to dozens of cows. Today, customers can find a jelly cupboard from the 1800s, a precursor to today’s arcade pinball machine from the 1920s and a dining room table. The beautiful display of remarkable objects from days past have tantalized customers’ senses for decades. Shop owner Sam Mundrake, explains more about the

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largest antique store in NEPA. Why did you open the store? I was formerly a pipefitter, and there wasn’t very much work. I started repairing furniture in the basement of the barn 40 years ago, and the business grew from there. Where do you find merchandise? Today it’s easy. There are fax machines to send pictures and the internet to see things on-line. When I first started, there was none of that. I had to hunt for finds, travel to see a piece, go to auctions and establish a network of vendors. After 40 years, the HappeningsMagazinePA.com

phone never stops ringing. Over the years, I purchased seven planes and learned to fly to make finding pieces easier. 99 percent of the merchandise in the store comes from roughly a 150-mile radius. What furniture is popular today? Whatever your grandmother’s furniture was. When I started, it was country style, then oak, and the latest phase has been the dark woods and mahoganies from the 1920s. The most soughtafter item is a Governor Winthrop Desk. If I could buy continued on page 50 August 2013


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From Concept to Completion... Extraordinary Projects Begin with an Exceptional Builder Let Custom Building by Carriage Barn Make Your Dream Come True

Custom Building by Carriage Barn offers every service you need to take any renovation project from start to finish. Whatever style you’re looking for – from old-fashioned country to ultra modern – Carriage Barn’s experienced design experts will produce outstanding results, helping you achieve “the whole look” that you want.

Sam Mundrake 1 4 9 4 FA I R V I E W R OA D • C L A R K S S U M M I T • ( 5 7 0 ) 5 8 7 - 5 4 0 5 August 2013

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100 of them, I could sell them all. What is your favorite piece? An authentic Chippendale clock from the 1750s. I bought if over 30 years ago in Lovelton, PA. It has a price tag on it, but I won’t sell it. What was your biggest mistake? I once bought a wooden cigar store punch figure in Lake Henry. I needed money to buy a new airplane and sold it for $10,000. Three months later, I saw it in the Sotheby’s catalogue listed for $170,000. Somebody knew something I didn’t. Where is the furthest a customer has come from? A woman from Australia once visited the store. A friend of hers had purchased some items and showed her our catalogue. When she came here, she had an eight-yearold catalogue with her that she had held on to hoping that one day she would walk through our doors and see it for herself. What is your favorite style? I’ve been exposed to the best and can appreciate all styles art deco, art nouveau, Victorian. I’m a generalist. I

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have a lot of knowledge about stuff and an eye for what’s good. Good is always good if you have an eye for quality. Why should someone buy antiques? You should buy an antique

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

because you like the way it looks. Age can be a determining factor in the value of an antique, but if a piece has a horrible look, it often it has no value. If it’s an investment, you need to do your homework on the specifics of the collectable. For example, not all gumball machines or clocks are valuable; they need to have certain qualities. Call 570-587-5405, or visit www.CarriageBarnAntiques.com –Julie Korponai

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OPEN Augus HOUSE t 17th 1-5 p .m. RS VP

Come See Us at the Fairs! Harford Fair: 8/19-24 Wyoming Co. Fair: 8/28-9/2 Bloomsburg Fair: 9/21-28

866-438-5194 • www.BarnaLogHomesPA.com

August 2013

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95 Levitt Hill Rd., Tunkhannock, PA

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TREASURE HUNTING Bridge Street Marketplace– Over 7,000 square feet of shopping encompasses a consignment area as well as a multi-vendor co-op. Antique, vintage, gently used, new, hand-crafted and trash-to-treasure items. Credit cards accepted. Call for hours. Bridge St. (Rte. 29), Tunkhannock. 570-836-4456.

Jukebox Classics and Vintage Slot Machines– Specializing in Game Room Collectables, Pin Ball Machines, Juke Boxes (old & new), barber shop poles & chairs, Vintage Gas Pumps, Cookie Jars, Salt & Pepper Shakers, Paintings, Neon Signs, Jewelry, Rugs, Coca Cola items, Betty Boop items and more. 210 Main Ave, Hawley. Phone 570-2269411 or 570-241-6230, email: jukesslots@aol.com

Mary’s Home Furnishings– 11 West Tioga Street Tunkhannock PA 570.836.2514

TUES-THURS & SAT:11-5 • FRI 11-6 • SUN 12-4

10766 SR29, So. Montrose Pa... Sat. & Sun. & by chance or call 570-278-2187. General line antiques– cupboards, tables, lamps, glassware, postcards, linens, rugs. Paintings by Anita Ambrose, Cheryl Korb & and Nance Brown. We have lots of recent acquisitions, great antiques from area homes. Come see. www.antiquessusqco.com/marys

Olde Barn Centre/Antiques & Such-

What’s Cookin’ Cookin’ at at What’s

THE BUTLER’S PANTRY in Montrose Montrose in Nature’s Canvas by Wedgwood

Casual Dinnerware 4pc. placesetting Reg. $75

sale $59.99

An 1860s Quaker Barn filled with antique furniture of all periods. 12 antique dealers with treasures & collectibles for your home. Credit cards and layaway welcome. 1605 Rte. 220 Highway, Pennsdale. 1 mile east of exit 15 of I-180. Open daily 10-5. Info: 570-546-7493 or www.oldebarncentre.com

Olde Engine Works Antique Co-opOver 100 dealers inside a 100-year-old machine shop in downtown Stroudsburg. Open seven days a week 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Take Route 80 to exit 307 to Main Street to Third Street. Convenient off-street parking, snacks & clean rest rooms. Friendly dealers on-hand to assist. 570- 421-4340 www.OldeEngineWorks.comer

Available in Limestone and Sandstone MASTERCARD

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Come to the Green in Montrose August 2nd and 3rd for the Annual Blueberry Festival benefitting the D I S C Susquehanna OVER CAR D County Library 570-278-2191 9/15 S. Main St., Montrose Tues-Sat 9:30-5 p.m. Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m. butlerspantry@stny.rr.com Bridal Registry

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Sabika Austrian Crystal JewelryTheresa M. Driebe is your Sabika jewelry consultant for NEPA. Handmade by women in Austria and Germany. Antique metal finishes are our specialty, adding depth and casual richness to the jewelry. Buy it from Theresa or book a party and earn free jewelry. Call 570-445-0810.


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Heavenly Flowers at Down to Earth Prices

Complete Garden Center featuring: Produce, Organic Produce, Fresh Brown Eggs, Lawn Furniture, Windmills and Lighthouses

Minutes off I-84,to 191 or 507 South • Downtown Newfoundland PA

Open 7 Days a Week

313 Davis Street Clarks Summit (behind Benetton) (570)-586-7750 • www.ravepatio.com

570-676-3766 All Major Credit Cards Accepted

Furniture of all periods... “A beautiful blend of past & present.” U.S. Rt. 220N, 1/2 Mi. East of Pennsdale • Credit Cards/ Layaway Open 10-5 Daily • 570-546-7493 • www.oldebarncentre.com

August 2013

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PET TALES

Who’s Walking Whom? How to Stay in Step with Your Pooch clarity. If their behavior is cooperative, my mind and body have harmoniously conveyed my intent to the dog. To walk in tandem with a dog, both individuals must agree that only one of you leads. It’s fine if the Q: I often find myself dog wants to sniff; it’s not either being dragged along on walks with my 6- fine if he dictates when. It’s also fine if he wants to go year-old Lab or trying to coax him along to no avail fast; it’s not fine if he dislocates your shoulder at will! when he finds a scent he likes. Any advice on how I Unless you know what you expect and when, how will can set the pace for our he know? If you’re asking, walks? begging, pleading, hoping he’ll behave…you need to A: Walking meets a variety of needs for dog and owner. work on you, first. Visualize the desired behavior: your In order for both to come dog on a loose lead slowhome feeling fulfilled, you ing, moving briskly and should establish clarity of purpose before you set out. stopping in unison with Do you want to burn physi- you. Feel the accordance of it. Your clear mental expeccal energy or bird watch? tations will translate into Share a social stroll with body language, and that other dog walkers or blaze decisive body language will new trails? Practice obedience or go for an enthusias- give your dog the direction he needs. But a dog that’s tic romp (or both)? been doing his own thing for six years won’t magically Establishing clarity will set the stage for success. I transform even when you personally find that dogs (or successfully manifest clear leadership. You’ll have to most animals) will reveal establish new rules first. whether I do or don’t have 54

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Again, your clarity will prevail. Start with appropriate equipment. A six-foot leather leash won’t burn your palms if he pulls. I recommend a martingale collar, but don’t be afraid to ask a trainer to size him for a pinch collar if necessary. A new collar will come to signal new behavioral expectations. Set as brisk a pace as you can maintain for as long as you can. Don’t waver; don’t adjust your pace to his. If he slows down, let the lead suddenly snap tight as your forward momentum carries you past the dog. If he speeds up, do a U-turn and let the lead snap tight as he hits the end. You want the dog to experience the lead corrections as natural repercussions of his inattention to you; i.e. put the responsibility on the dog, with karmic consequences. After each instance, give calm verbal encouragement- “let’s go” or “what happened?” but no commands. Persistence. Patience.

–Beth Dorton Dillenbeck, Hollow Hills German Shepherds blogging at www.instinctiveimpressions.blogspot.com

August 2013


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he Carriage Barn features two floors of room-like settings displaying authentic antiques & glassware. Carriage Barn boasts over 6,000 square feet of antiques. Custom refinishing, woodworking and delivery. Add a classic piece of the past to complement your life today!

From I-81: Take Waverly Exit 197 Going North: right at end of ramp, then the next two rights Going South: left at end of ramps, then the next two rights

1494 Fairview Road, Clarks Summit, PA www.carriagebarnantiques.com • (570) 587-5405


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Who’s the Cutest of them All? “Jeter”

few of this guy’s s in the car are a ar-old into her ive dr d an rk pa e Walks in th ted the 8-ye inda Haynos adop favorite things.L Archbald home.

“Jake” Kate Lang’s Po mer and go to the do anian loves to lay in the sun g park near th eir Throop home.

“Bella”

“Trigger

This 4-yearo Rozaieski a ld loves his pal Tyso n,h n Scott Twp.H d grazing like a cow is owner Paul in the yard e h a te s b ath very clumsy in but a lovin s but loves the lake an g,dependa ble Pitbull d is .

o a sweet Shih Tzu wh r 4-year-old pup as ranton home. he s ibe scr de cz wi Amy Guzie er in their Sc up with her daught loves to play dress

Vote for your favorite August pet at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com! The winner receives a Happenings bandanna ! America’s Premier Boarding Facility

BOARDING • DAYCARE • SALON

245 N. Sherman Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-270-3711 www.PreppyPet.com


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? “Otis” “Jimmy ”

This 9-yearo Depoti of M ld Jack Russell/Beag le mix was ayfield.He treats,cud re dling,tubb loves barking,doing scued by Sandy tricks for h y time and is g oing for w tellialks. ie is very in ow to ll o C ld o rr 3-yea nows h ott says he and even k Sarah Trusc and one-of-a-kind nkhannock home. le Tu gent, lovab nd cabinets in their ” a rs o o d n “Buster e p o

“Oscar”

Pen Argyl the farm in making n o fe li s old love ickens & etic 1-yearchasing ch This energ r Accatino.He loves e with Jennif the lambs and cats. h it w s d n ie fr

Michael & Pe has a grea ggy Capalongo say th t personali eir 8-yearty.H run and pla o y at home e love people and ld boy loves to in Old Forg e.

The votes are in... July’s Pet of the Month is Marvin Mazzucca of Throop. Congratulations!


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HOME&GARDEN Cooking up a Change:

A New Kitchen for Every Budget stainless steel sink is a terrific way to keep your project within budget and still get an over-the-top look," he says. "Our showroom has all the colors, edge profiles and sinks on display."

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hinking about creating the kitchen of your dreams? It's high time to get to a showroom. Eugene Mariotti, owner and manager of Mariotti Building Products in Old Forge, suggests that the first thing people should do when planning a new kitchen is look through magazines for ideas. A trip to a showroom will help put your ideas in order. Mariotti says some people prefer painted cabinets while others prefer wood-stained. A lot of customers are even mixing paint and stain in the same project which offers an upscale look. Mariotti's can help direct ideas in cabinets, countertops and fixture options in three cost categories. Splurge ($15,000+) "When splurging for a kitchen, custom finishes will make your kitchen stand out above the rest," says Mariotti. 58

"With Dura Supreme Cabinetry, if you can dream it, we can build it." There are hundreds of door styles with countless finish options. A Dura Supreme kitchen should be topped off with a quartz countertop or granite. Both surfaces are stain resistant. "All of our granite has a 15-year Sensa sealer available at no extra charge," he says. The showroom offers more than 30 full kitchen displays featuring both quartz and exotic granite from around the world as well as fixtures. Moderate ($8,000-$14,999) "If you’re on a tight budget and want quality construction and finish, Homecrest and Century Cabinets are the way to go," says Mariotti. Both brands have beautiful doors and stain finishes. "Our promotional granite, available in 10 colors with four edge options and a free HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Budget ($5,000 or less) With four door styles in six colors, Wolf Classic cabinets compete with any of the big box or import brand cabinets, Mariotti says. "Like all of our cabinet brands, Wolf Cabinets are made in the USA and are all-wood construction. No particle-board, no long lead times, no problems. If you’re looking for the best value, look no further than Wolf Classic cabinets." A great addition to Wolf Cabinets can be a Wilsonart hi-definition laminate countertop made on-site in the Mariotti shop. No matter where you shop for kitchens, Mariotti says consumers should be sure that the dealer and contractor they choose is reputable. Ask questions like,“How long has your company in business?” “How long has the designer been with the company?” and,“Do you have references?” Mariotti Building Products has the largest kitchen cabinetry showroom in NEPA and has been in business for more than 60 years. Call 570-457-6774 or visit www.mariottibp.com. –Christine Fanning August 2013


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Ways to Create Curb Appeal

nomically from any garden center.

2.

Front Door Makeover. The focal ometimes it’s the little things that can make one house stand out, creating a warm and inviting feel, while others remain plain and ordinary. There are definitely simple and inexpensive things everyone can do to improve their home’s curb appeal. Here are five things you can do to change the look and feel of your home.

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1. Start with the front yard. As simple as it may sound, just keeping your yard neat and clean can add curb appeal. Make sure that the grass is cut and trimmed and that shrubs and trees are well maintained. Adding color is one of the best and easiest things you can do for your yard to add curb appeal and create an impact. This can be done with plantings or by using ready-made containers, which can be purchased easily and eco60

point of your home should be the front entry. Create an impact by giving your front door a blast of color. When my wife and I moved into our current home, we were going to replace the original wooden door with a new, steel, front door. My father-in-law pointed out that that the custom wooden door already in place would be unique and make a statement. A little wood putty, sanding and a coat of bright red paint has made all the difference. Add to the entrance with new hardware for the front door, or clean and polish what is currently in place.

3. Add window boxes. Window boxes can bring instant charm to any home. There are many styles to choose from, including copper or sandstone; however, I prefer the more traditional wooden boxes which can be painted to match your HappeningsMagazinePA.com

home. You can then simply mix and match the flowers already planted in the yard.

4. Edge the driveway. If your home has a driveway, one thing that I truly believe creates a clean, elegant look is to edge the driveway. You can use stone, pavers or bricks, making them level with the ground or, as I prefer, elevating them to keep cars from driving on your lawn. This may sound like a big project, but depending on the length of your driveway really isn’t too bad.

5.

Replace your mailbox. Your mailbox is not simply a tool that is used to pick up your mail as you walk in the house at the end of the day. It, like everything else, creates an impression. Choose a mailbox that matches your home’s style and feel. If the mailbox is located at the curb, consider planting flowers around the post for even more color. –Tim Toolan, Realtor,®

Coldwell Banker Town & Country timtoolan1231@gmail.com www.facebook.com/TimToolanRealtor www.coldwellbankernepa.com August 2013


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A Home for Brody Park

A True Tale of Turning Lemons to Lemonade

stay-at-home mom in Lake Ariel and a Honesdale middle school teacher teamed up to turn lemons into lemonade for a 5-year-old boy who suffers from a genetic disorder called Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome. This story starts out lousy, but has a good ending – and shares the lesson that there are many good people in NEPA’s little towns willing to help in astonishing ways.

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ents have directed their endless commitment and modest resources to their son.“Everyone who knows Kevin or Becca sees their tremendous love and dedication for Brody in the face of this horrible disease,” says project co-coordinator Christina (Beauchamp) Pane.“Each day is a challenge, but it’s one they meet with an ever-present

smile and unending optimism.” Because of his immobility and spastic movements, getting him safely to his second floor bedroom was becoming unmanageable, and the only bathroom is on the ground level. This made nightly tube-feedings and middle-of the-night Continued on page 64

Brody Park is the son of Rebecca (Mannick) and Kevin Park, and he is challenged by a pretty tough illness that presents impaired speech, immobility, the need for tube feedings, gout, kidney issues and, most devastating, self-injurious behavior. Brody’s par-

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Rebecca, Brody and Kevin Park.

emergencies particularly challenging. “Brody has a night nurse for part of a week, and as he grows there isn’t enough room for Brody, the nurse and the equipment that he requires.” A home built in 1800s was not going to work for the Park family. “Becca and I met in pre-school, have been close friends since, and our kids were born 36 hours apart in Moses Taylor Hospital,” beams Wayne Highlands teacher Courtney Krajkovich.“We could all see, that despite the wheelchair and restraints and medical

challenges – there was an absolutely wonderful little guy that needed big help now. I launched a Facebook page to solicit support to build an addition on the home, and we received the first offer of help within 15 minutes!” Help came in from businesses in three counties and from people everywhere. Krajkovich also drafted her parents, Elwood and Kathy Merring, to help. “We broke ground on May 24, began framing on June 7, and we had a watertight addition by June 24. Business competitors were working together, side by side, or picking up where one left off. Families came from out of town for long-weekend, volunteer shifts. It’s been seamless and amazing to see a community come together to help the Park family,” says Krajkovich. “To be honest, I think we have all gotten just as much out of this experience and from knowing Brody and his mom and dad. I would tell anyone to take a chance and do something to help a neighbor, or even a stranger, to see how much of a gift you are really giving yourself too!” Visit www.facebook.com/HomeMakeoverWaymartEditionForBrodyPark –Bill Risse

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Bugaboo Young America Bloom 4moms Serena & Lily Naturepedic Aiden & Anais Bob Dwell Studio

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Major lines of furniture, executive furnishings & authentic oriental rugs, all at drastic reductions.

Baker Henredon Milling Road Century Drexel Heritage Ralph Lauren Hancock & Moore Lexington Thomasville

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A Waiting Game Local Man Seeks Kidney Donor f Christopher Polk had his choice, he'd be building a career and enjoying an active life with his family and friends. Instead, this 24year-old Eagle Scout from Dickson City is constrained by end-stage kidney failure, which requires four-hour hemodialysis treatment, three times a week.

I

Though very thin and weakened by his condition and the rigors of treatment, Polk’s attitude is spirited. "His diagnosis has been extremely difficult physically, financially and emotionally for everyone in the family," says his mother, Joanne Polk. However, his ability to stay positive has really helped pull everyone through this difficult time." His loved ones hope Polk’s two-year wait for a live kidney donor is around the corner. Polk graduated in 2007 from Mid-Valley High School and studied horticulture and landscape design at Luzerne County Community College. Physically, he now isn't able to work in horticulture, and he is looking forward to pursuing a degree in education after his transplant. He works part time as a home theater specialist for HHGregg and volunteers as 66

L-R: Gregory, Joanne, Christopher and Sarah Polk

an assistant Boy Scout Troop Leader. He had difficulty concentrating and keeping up in his physically demanding classes, which he found disheartening. His physicians believe much of those difficulties were early symptoms of fatigue. His mother remembers that a few months prior to diagnosis, "Chris developed what seemed to be a resistant cold and fatigue, congestion and an unusual loss of appetite." Polk frequently suffered from fatigue, says his mother, but he thought it was due to the life of a busy college student. When he became ill after eating a small meal, he sought medical attention. Doctors were unable to diagnose a reason for his kidney failure. "After a multitude of tests, 49 vials of blood and a kidney biopsy, the only thing the doctors could determine was the HappeningsMagazinePA.com

presence of scar tissue on my kidneys," he explains. Polk receives dialysis at Davita Dialysis Center at Allied Services, Scranton. He has high blood pressure, eats a special diet and takes five to six different medications daily. Polk can continue dialysis until a living donor or matching cadaver kidney can be found. However, there are lifethreatening risks associated with being on dialysis for an extended period of time. With more than 100,000 patients on the waiting list for a cadaver kidney, it takes an average of three to seven years for a transplant. Polk hopes for a live donor kidney, which can be transplanted immediately after the donor receives a clean bill of health. Anyone considering donating a kidney should be 18 or older and in good health, with blood type B or O. Potential donors, for Polk or any patient, can call 1-800645-1228. Visit www.ChrissKidneyConnection .org –Christine Fanning August 2013


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John Mackarey*, LUTCF Agent, New York Life Insurance 220 Penn Ave. Suite 100 Scranton, PA 18503 570-969-3111 www.JohnMackarey.com

*Registered Representative, offering securities through NYLIFE Securities LLC, member FINRA/SIPC.


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Children’s Advocacy Center Celebrates 15 Years of Shining in the Community

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his year, The Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) of Northeastern Pennsylvania marks 15 years of developing strong, competent and compassionate intervention for child abuse. This private, non-profit, charitable organization provides medical assessments and child forensic interviews for victims of abuse and neglect and coordinates a multidisciplinary team response to child abuse and neglect in Lackawanna, Luzerne, Wayne, Bradford, Pike, Monroe, Carbon, Susquehanna, Schuylkill and Wyoming Counties.That doesn’t tell the whole story. Since CAC opened its pink door on Mulberry Street in 1998, it has strived to find healing and justice for over 8,000 child and adolescent victims of physical and sexual abuse as well as neglect. CAC also provided prevention and education to more than 75,000 community members in 680 targeted adult populations. According to Executive 68

Director Mary Ann La Porta, these types of programs turn adults into advocates and activists for children.The best measure of this is the annual increase in abuse reportage. Education doesn’t stop with adults. The CAC presented the Body Safety Program to 1,537 children in grades K-5. According to statistics, one out of every four girls and one out of every six boys will be sexually abused before they reach 18. What is most chilling is that 90 percent of these children know their abuser. CAC will open a satellite Teen Advocacy Center that will give abused teens a safe haven for healing and justice in an environment that will cater to their specific needs. The CAC is a beacon of hope for children in the community, but LaPorta can’t stress the importance of the community response.“This community has been extremely generous, responsive and supportive of the needs of

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children.”The Crystal Anniversary Celebration is an opportunity to both look back the last 15 years and to look at the progress and change that has been instilled in NEPA.“The celebration is a reflection that we’re all working within the same mission-driven philosophy, to protect children, to preserve their innocence and to make our community safer,” she notes. On September 6, CAC will celebrate its partnership with the community at the Crystal Anniversary Celebration. This elegant affair with honorary co-chairs Maryla and Bill Scranton will kick off at 6 p.m. with a cocktail reception featuring live music, hors d’oeuvres and open bar in the grand lobby of the Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel in Scranton. Dinner is at 7 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom. It will be punctuated with an awards ceremony, documentary, dancing, raffles, a “Time for Action” silent auction of highend timepieces. Visit www.cacnepa.org√ –Kieran O’Brien Kern

August 2013


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St. Mary’s Villa Residence Your new beginning and place to call home

Enjoy life with us!

Call today for your personal tour Nursing Home 570.842.7621 Personal Care 570.842.5274

St. Mary’s Villa Golf Tournament Monday, Sept. 16, 2013 Glen Oak Country Club Help Support Our 7th Annual Golf Tournament Fundraiser GOLF & NUMEROUS SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE

call 842-5274 for more info Just minutes from Scranton at One Pioneer Place, Elmhurst Township, PA

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August 2013

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NEPAVoices Ryan Adcroft, Partner, Tribal Media

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f you’re struggling with integrating your social media presence into your current marketing, you’re not alone. According to research conducted by Constant Contact, over 50 percent of small businesses need help with social media. For three years, my company, Tribal Media, has helped companies develop fully integrated social media marketing campaigns. Here are three things we’d like to share to help your company develop a more integrated marketing approach.

1. Link your Facebook and Twitter accounts. This will allow you to save time when posting on these accounts and also establish consistency for all the content that’s being pushed out. To integrate these accounts, go to www.facebook.com/twitter. 2. Do an online branding assessment. Don’t make this harder than it needs to be. Start by visiting your website and social media profiles, and make sure the branding and graphics are consistent across all 70

platforms. Ask yourself,“Do all my platforms look similar at first glance? Am I consistent with color themes, images, fonts and logos?” If not, then you’re most likely confusing your audience and losing business because of it. The objective is to be visually consistent across all platforms. Next, since active social media profiles get high organic search rankings, make sure all the sections where you can plug info about your business are all properly filled out. Don’t forget to include links to your other profiles and website. If a customer lands on your Facebook page, you don’t want to lose them in the click-through process. Make it easy for them to navigate from one of your sites to the next. This may also include embedding your website on one of the tabs below the cover photo on the Facebook page. This will allow someone to view your entire website without leaving the Facebook platform. HappeningsMagazinePA.com

3. Do an offline branding assessment.

Are you properly displaying how to be found online on all your printed materials? Are social media icons with proper URLs listed on all these materials? Do you have signage properly displayed directing people to your social media profiles and website in your brick-andmortar locations? Is your offline branding consistent with your online branding in terms of design? From your billboards and TV spots to your radio commercials and print, consider incorporating a social and digital twist into your marketing. A properly integrated social media presence should work wonders for your business down the line. Not only will your businesses marketing become more efficient, but it will also save you time and money. Your marketing should be working for you, not the other way around! -Ryan Adcroft, Partner, Tribal Media; Local Sales Manager, Entercom Communications

August 2013


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OWEELLLL L AW AW, O U UR R RO OO OT T SS R U UN N D EEEEP P A TT P OW

A law firm stands tall when its roots run deep. At Powell Law, the reason we're so good at representing people and businesses in Northeast PA is that we've grown strong through generations of service to our neighbors. Our founder, James J. Powell Sr., began serving Scranton's legal needs back in 1906. His sons, James Jr. and Christopher - both lawyers - proudly served their country in wartime. James Jr. landed on Omaha Beach as a private, rose to the rank of captain and came back a decorated war hero. In their absence, a sister, Rose, ran the family law office. Today, we honor that tradition of service by giving our clients the finest legal representation. When you need legal help, we're here for you -- as we've been for three generations. POWELL LAW. Deep roots in Northeast PA

N E PA’ S O L D E S T P E R S O N A L I N J U R Y F I R M SCRANTON 570-961-0777

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MADE IN PA Willow Tree Shop Artisans’ Marketplace

1107 Oram Street,Scranton 969-2120 14001 Church Hill Road, Clarks Summit 585-2120 Tues-Sat 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Thurs 10 a.m.-8 p.m. (Scr) Sun 12-4 p.m.

•Log Beds •Custom Furniture •Waterbeds •Lamps •Wildlife Mounts •Futons Corner of Route 715 & 611, Tannersville, PA next to the Crossings Outlet / Open Mon-Sat. 9:30-5:00

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Award-Winning Store-Made Kielbasi 10 First Place Awards!

Variety of Store-Made Sausage Including Links, Loose, Patties & Rope

Black Angus Choice Beef Full Variety of Deli Meats & Store Made Salads

524 Burke By-Pass, Olyphant • 570 383-5260 www.BosaksChoiceMeats.com

August 2013

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What to Do Now to Get Ready for College Advice for High School Students in Every Grade When is the best time for

high school students to plan for college? Right now. Start planning early. Keep grades up. Become involved in community service and extracurricular activities. Be organized and careful about meeting deadlines. Find out whom you can go to for advice on decisions. Parents, family and school/private college counselors are best. 9th Grade Take challenging courses; find extracurricular activities; read; get good grades; take a foreign language; get tutoring if needed, and engage in community service. 10th Grade Continue challenging courses; put more effort into finding and staying with activities; take the PSAT; explore college options; research and visit campuses; take SAT II/AP tests as appropriate. 11th Grade Take the PSAT and high-level courses; consider taking a college course through a dual enrollment/college scholars program; keep grades up. In spring, take SAT and/or ACT; go to college 74

fairs and visitations; draft a tentative college list; take SAT II/AP tests as appropriate; volunteer, and work. 12th Grade Take SAT/ACT in early autumn; take SAT subject tests if necessary; complete college applications; request recommendation letters; work on college essays; submit FAFSA; see if college requires CSS profile, and seek scholarship opportunities. Building a College Resume Students need to show that they are well-rounded, mature and able to handle the responsibility of college. Volunteer in the community; participate in activities and work. Many colleges evaluate applications holistically—not only grades and scores, but the student as a person. Colleges want to see that the student has shown commitment. Hold a leadership role; make a difference. Explore Different Careers Find opportunities to complete shadowing experiences and internships with individuals who are willing to talk to students about and allow them to observe their career. HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Attend special programs such as career fairs offered at colleges and in the community that present career information. Attend college visits, and speak to professors, students and high school alumni in various majors and fields. NEPA Career and College Counseling Associates offers to arrange career shadowing and internship experiences for interested students.

Preparing for Success The skills most pivotal to college success are organization, flexibility, maturity and hard work. Stay positive; work hard; explore opportunities and try new experiences. Work closely with adults who will support and advise throughout high school and college. For more, call 570-702-5700, follow @NEPACareerAndCo or visit www.Facebook.com/NEPACar eerAndCollegeCounseling –Jennifer L. SeveriniKresock, MS, Private Career and College Counselor and Owner of NEPA Career and College Counseling Associates

August 2013


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#634 #554

#695 #750

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Back on Track

Ensuring Backpack Safety for Children

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lass is in session! As the work load begins to pile up in schools, it’s important to notice the backpacks children are carrying. Overloading a backpack or wearing it improperly will dramatically increase the risk of back injuries. Seek a backpack that comes with a padded back to reduce pressure on the body. Hip and chest belts and multiple compartments will evenly distribute weight from the back and shoulders to the hips and torso. Store the heaviest items in the compartment closest to the body. Place lighter items in the outside compartments. Keep an eye out for a bag that offers compression straps which are useful for stabilizing the con-

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tents of the backpack and reducing pressure on the body. Finally, make sure that it includes reflective material to increase night-time visibility. It is important that children use both shoulder straps. Wearing both straps will even out the amount of weight resting on each side of the body, promoting a more symmetrical, well-aligned posture.“A backpack should be snug to the back directly between the child’s shoulder blades,” advised Janine Kan, a physical therapist at Allied Services. “Lower back injuries could be caused by wearing a backpack too low, while wearing one too

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high could cause neck pain.” In essence, a backpack should match the size of the child. The rule of thumb is that the weight of a backpack should not exceed 15 percent of a child’s body weight. There are warning signs that a child’s backpack is too heavy. Notice if the child has a change in his or her posture when wearing the backpack or struggles to put it on and take it off. Other common signs are pain when wearing the bag, tingling or numbness and red marks. Allied Services’ physical therapists can address a variety of backpack-induced postural pain. Call 570-348-1332. –Katie Manley

August 2013

im


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Weis Markets proudly provides the necessary tools to teach kids the importance of a healthy lifestyle. Look for Kid’s Bites tips, activities, recipes and more in the latest volume of Healthy Bites Magazine™. www.weismarkets.com/healthyliving Connect with Weis Markets for healthy living articles, recipes, videos and more.


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CATCH SOME Sleep Supports Study in School Studies show that healthy sleeping habits help children in school. Dr. Catherine Wubbel, MD FCCP, Pediatric Pulmonologist at Geisinger’s Janet Weis Children’s Hospital, provides more tips on developing good habits.

old have obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep accounts for 40 percent of a child’s average day. That means in a 24-hour day, 9.6 hours are to be spent sleeping.

s z z Z

Benefits of Sleep Sleep is essential for survival. It regulates mood, learning and memory. It helps to regulate weight and energy levels and is critical for brain development. Poor sleep has a bigger negative impact for children than for adults. Inadequate sleep may be the strongest predictor of a child’s performance in school.

At the Sleep Meeting in San Antonio in 2010, researchers discussed a study linking better language, reading and math skills in preschool children to adequate sleep. They showed children who had a regular bedtime to be the most consistent factor for positive developmental outcomes at 4 years of age. Children whose parents set rules about bedtime performed better in both receptive and expressive language, phonology awareness, literacy and early math skills.

Statistics 25 percent of children experience some type of sleep problem during some period of childhood. Up to 10 percent of children 6 to 8 years

Tips for developing healthy sleep habits: 1. Develop and stick to a regular sleep schedule. 2. Create a bedtime routine. 3. Create a room conducive

to sleeping– preferably cool, dark and quiet with comfortable bedding. 4. If naps are needed, limit to 10 to 30 minutes in the midafternoon. Long daytime naps interfere with nighttime sleep. 5. Daily routine should include physical activity. 6. Manage stress. How many hours of sleep should each age group get? Babies/Toddlers: 14 to 18 Grade school: 10 to 14 Teens: at least 9 College/Young Adults: 7 to 8 Additional Advice: Sleep is equivalent to good nutrition, good mental health, exercise and all other good things we provide for our children. Parents can be a good role model for their children by understanding and implementing the value of sleep. Speak with your doctor about any concerns regarding a child’s sleep. –Casey Phillips


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531 South State St. (near Talbot’s) Clarks Summit • (570) 587-5580 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m-7 p.m. Sat 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.

August 2013

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QUALITY • SERVICE • VALUE

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To Write Love on Her Arms Organization’s Founder Speaks at University of Scranton and you’re part of a bigger story. You need to know your life matters.” Through various outlets, TWLOHA has been able to spread their message of hope all over the world, including in Scranton. Tworkowski appeared on the campus of the University of Scranton to present a lecture to students, faculty and staff on the evening of April 23. Noah Gundersen provided live music.

J

amie Tworkowski met Renee when she was 19. She was broken, hurting and anything but okay. Cocaine, pot, alcohol and razor blades were her normal methods of coping. Desperate to help, Tworkowski and his friends did the only thing they could think of - sell t-shirts. Renee needed treatment and rehab; she could not afford treatment, and the local rehab center would not accept her. It was not long after that first night that Tworkowski and his friends took Renee into their own lives to help her detox. Renee is now a girl with a slightly brighter future and a hope that had never before existed. Jamie had successfully

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As much as they want to spread hope to the hurting, TWLOHA also “You were created to love and be loved. wishes You were meant to live life in relationship to spread with other people and be known. You awareneed to know your story is important, ness.

helped a friend. What and you’re part of a bigger story. You he did need to know your life matters.” not plan on Tworkowski has been able to were the fans that followed. speak in churches, on college T-shirts made for Renee sold campuses and at conferfaster than they could be ences. He believes that comprinted, and the community begged for Tworkowski to tell munity plays a vital role in the act of changing lives.“We their story. Amidst all the just want to move people commotion, Tworkowski saw and see light bulbs go off to an opportunity, and To Write get someone to believe that Love on Her Arms was born. they can change,” says TWLOHA has a vision.“The Tworkowski. TWLOHA is vision is that we actually working hard to be that light, believe these things,” says to get people to see the Tworkowski.“You were creattruth- hope is real. Visit ed to love and be loved. You were meant to live life in rela- www.TWLOHA.com –April Dakoske tionship with other people and be known. You need to know your story is important, HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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First Five to the Future: Connecting Preschool Years to Adult Success Does a child’s preschool development influence his or her adult successes… or failures? If you’re not certain of the answer, consider this fact: by age five, 90 percent of a child’s brain is developed. “A child’s brain develops so rapidly in their first years, it’s almost impossible for us to imagine,” describes Sara Peperno, vice president of marketing and community impact for the United Way of Wyoming Valley.“Children’s brains are much more open to learning influences than when we are adults. Every moment becomes an opportunity for a child to learn, to set a child on the path of success in school and life.”

children from birth to age 5 for success. “Early childhood programs reach children at a critical point in brain development, and the impact is sustained long term. Young children’s brains develop 700 synapses– neural connections that transmit information and support learning – every second,” says Danchak.“The human brain is primed from birth to react to and learn from the environment and interactions with caregivers. Parents are the first and most important teachers in a child’s life.” He says high-quality, pre-kindergarten programs have been shown to significantly improve children’s early literacy, language and math skills; decrease the rate of special education placements by nearly 50 percent through second grade; reduce grade repetition by as much as 33 percent through eighth grade and lower the incidence of juvenile arrests by 32 percent.

“Every $1 spent on high-quality early education saves $7 in reduced future expenditures...” Investing in the Future Peter Danchak, president of PNC Bank Northeast PA, is personally invested in early childhood education through PNC Grow Up Great, a national $350 million initiative to help prepare 82

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Regional Problem Solving The 2012 Reach and Risk Report by the Office of Child Development and Early Learning found that 63 percent of the 11,559 children under age 5 in Lackawanna County are living in economically at risk families. 28.6 percent of children in Luzerne County are in poverty. Lisa Berardelli, director of Success By 6 for the United Way of Lackawanna and Wayne Counties, says this may affect how well young children learn.“Research has shown that children affected by risk factors such as living in economically stressed families, abuse, neglect and having parents with low educational levels are likely to enter school behind their peers, struggle in school or drop out altogether.” Berardelli is convinced the time to reach these students is well before they step into a kindergarten classroom.“The circuits for key functions such as vision/hearing, language and high level cognitive thinking develop most in the first five years of life. The creation of these circuits is affected by a child’s early learning environment. Bad experiences actually chew away at brain connections, while good quality experiences spur healthy development. After age 5, the number of new connections slows, making it more difficult to build the necessary cognitive and social skills,” Continued on page 84 August 2013


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Excellence. Experienced. Established.

ballet, tap, jazz, modern, hip-hop, mommy & me, tiny ballerina, and adult classes Call 347-0208 or www.balletheatre.com and register now! Joanne D. Arduino • Artistic Director

August 2013

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est. 1958

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Continued from page 82

“By age 5, 90 percent of a child’s brain is developed.” says Berardelli.“Essentially, our children’s early experiences will affect their brain development and learning for life.” To reach kids in this influential time frame, Success By 6 has distributed a “New Parent Resource Kit” to over 3,000 new parents this year to educate them on the importance of quality early learning and where to find resources. They have provided school readiness materials to over 2,000 incoming pre-k families this year. United Way of Wyoming Valley drew attention to the topic during the Week of the Young Child in April. Fortunately, Berardelli continues,“Research has also shown that at-risk children who receive quality early education can catch up to their peers in language, math and social skills before they reach kindergarten.” The Art of Learning While early childhood education may sound academic, one regional organization is broadening the effort to reach young children with the arts.“We believe that quality arts experiences belong in very early childhood. The theory of multiple intelligence learning by Howard Gardner identifies that the arts serve not only verbal and logical learning children but also children who are visual, interpersonal, kinesthetic learners,” explains Brooks Eldredge-Martin,

director emeritus for the Bradford County Regional Arts Council. He founded a new initiative of the BCRAC to fill the void of early childhood arts education. The Learning Early Network now unites parents and professionals. The network encompasses schools, libraries, daycare centers, family resource centers and hospital and government programs in the Northern Tier of PA and Southern New York. It has received international honors for training artists and teachers to work together in early classrooms. At an annual conference, nationally recognized presenters train early childhood professionals. “The arts build teamwork, physical development, visual learning and musical learning,” continues EldredgeMartin.“The arts have the unique position of being able to inspire self-confidence, reach across curricular areas, expose kids to a range of cultures and points of view, reach hardto-reach students, nurture communication skills and bring joy.”

“Our kids are the future workforce of America. Early childhood investments create more opportunities for children to succeed in school and become the highly skilled workers the region needs to compete while also generating substantial savings in education, criminal justice and other public services.” Peperno elaborates, “Every $1 spent on high-quality early education saves $7 in reduced future expenditures for special education, delinquency, crime control, welfare and lost taxes, based on research developed by the Office of Child Development and Early Learning.” Berardelli concludes,“Children that enter school prepared and ready to learn are more likely to graduate high school and attend college or career training. These children are more likely to have higher earnings as adults, and this creates a strong and stable workforce. We all win when

“Early experiences will affect brain development and learning for life.” children succeed!” –Erika A. Bruckner

Community Benefit As great as the individual benefits are, the collaborative benefit to the community and economy are even greater. Danchak explains,

Connect to resources at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com.


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Dr. Andrew Taylor, DDS Dr. Aldan Lori, DDS VISIT OUR NEW LOCATION!

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August 2013

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Cool School Essentials

Lifestyle and stationery products from PAPAYA feature original artwork using a special range of paintings, drawings and mixed media to achieve a signature aesthetic. Personalized Adventure Tote features an adjustable strap, Retail: Clipboard$8.98;Tote bag: $59.98 drawstring mesh bag on top and soft-side, insulated cooler Get it: Everything Natural, Clarks Summit on the bottom (for lunches) with bold round monogram in matching colors.Available in fuschia, lime (as shown) or orange. Retail $29 Get it: Bella Faccias, Scranton

Hand-sewn iPad covers for all size tablets and e-readers; custom included! Retail: $18 Get it: Willow Tree Shop, Clarks Summit & Scranton

Custom handcrafted desk and chair set made of PA Native Bluestone and white birch by local artist James Lynch.Retail: $1,695

Get it: Van Gorder’s Furniture, Hawley

New Balance sneakers available in medium and wide widths for boys and girls. Available at: New Balance, Scranton, Wilkes-Barre & Saucon Valley It's everyone's favorite– Leo's Peanut Butter Cups. Chocolate for you and your friends.Retail: $2.50 to $3.50. Get it: Chocolates by Leopold, Montrose


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Be Inspired Back to School with Visionary Graphics from PAPAYA!

Click or call for more info Clarks Summit 586.9684 • www.everythingnaturalpa.com

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EYE SPY O

ften, children’s eye health is overlooked or not discussed. Children should have their first eye exam at six months of age and another at age 3. Dr. Alexandra D. Wasmanski of Bucci Vision says there is more to an eye exam than just vision.“We assess eye muscle alignment, depth perception, color vision and the general health of the ocular structures.” School-age children should have their eyes checked every two years, and yearly exams should be established once a child hits adolescence. Regular exams provide the best way to detect any vision issues.“It is important to monitor your child for frequent headaches, squinting, eye irritation and difficulty with reading,” says Dr. Wasmanski. These are indicators in the potential need for eyeglasses.

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Emphasizing Children’s Eye Health Month

This prospect may worry some parents. Children and delicate objects don’t always mix. But with more technological advances, there are ways to avoid disaster and frequent replacements. Dr. Wasmanski recommends polycarbonate lenses because they are impact resistant and less likely to break. Flexible frames are also available, which can endure more wear and tear than frames made from traditional materials. If a child does need glasses, it’s important to be sure he or she wears them and only in the situation for which they are meant. Contact lenses can also be considered for children’s vision correction. This decision should be based more upon a child’s maturity level rather than age. If a child can be responsible enough to care for lenses- keeping them clean, disposing of them when prescribed and maintaining an appropriate schedule for wearing them- conHappeningsMagazinePA.com

tact lenses may be a good option. There are also some possibilities of a child growing out of the need for glasses. While most children tend to be more nearsighted and less farsighted with age, those who start out farsighted may have improved vision with time.“If your child started out needing glasses for farsightedness, it is actually possible that they may not need them in the future,” Dr. Wasmanski explains. It’s essential that parents be aware of issues and follow an exam schedule to detect any problems before they escalate into a bigger problem. Good vision is at the forefront of children’s eye health, and a child’s eyes are a key element in their learning. –Nicole Krempasky

August 2013


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12

NEPA Revitalization

Technology at Work

iffany Cross Luciani is managing director of TecBridge, created by the merger of Great Valley Technology Alliance (GVTA) and the Northeastern Pennsylvania Technology Institute (NPTI). TecBridge works with young professionals to foster talents in industries that strengthen the future of the community. Happenings recently interviewed Luciani for her insight on the industry.

T

How has TecBridge collaborated with existing resources? TecBridge works with the region’s 14 institutions of higher education and the biolife science initiatives. We understand the resources of these campuses and how some of the equipment and talent are not utilized to capacity. To close the gap and showcase assets, our organization worked with local companies to create the Intellectual Asset Inventory (IAI), by way of a state grant. This tool houses assets including research, publications, faculty expertise, facilities, equipment, services and intellectual property. (Access the site through www.HappeningsMagazine

PA.com). The AIA is utilized by faculty and economic development partners to recruit industry into the region. What is your role with the Regional Bioscience Initiative? We are a partner. TecBridge owns the IAI database. We facilitated several roundtables, which included higher education institutions and private industry to assess needs and how to bridge gaps. TecBridge pulls all biolife partners together for a bi-monthly status meeting. What is the status of major research-driven education in the region? Our region is stronger than many realize when it comes to major research. Along with the region’s colleges and universities formally working together, The Commonwealth Medical College has tightened the efforts for faculty research. A Faculty Colloquium was held with over 75 faculty researchers from seven different NEPA schools coming together to showcase their research in progress and meet like-minded faculty. An initiative is taking place to discuss opportunities that focus on clinical research in areas such as colon cancer and aging.

Many don’t realize that NEPA is almost seven times higher than the national average for clinical trials. How has the Business Plan Competition already helped improve the region? The competition has seen 26 companies incorporate in PA, which employ over 100 people. It provides students with insight and hands-on experience in building a viable business. The process of writing the plan, interacting with professionals and learning to pitch their companies adds value to their education. The competition brings together the region’s senior executives, academia and economic development partners to help support students and entrepreneurs. The competition has certainly helped strengthened the technology cluster that is alive in the region. Why is it crucial to motivate young people with entrepreneurship and technology tools? Empowering students at all levels is very important to the success of the individual and for the entire workforce. Our region is traditional in industries, historically speaking, and educating students about starting a business is a different mindset. Faculty at


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local schools are opening students’ eyes by encouraging them to participate in programs like the Entrepreneurship Institute and the Business Plan Competition, put on by our organization. Once students participate, they are excited and certainly motivated. Students are beginning to understand that an interest in a technology career can include not only working in the industry, but also starting a company of their own.

What steps do organizations need to take to create jobs and keep bright technological minds in this region? We all need to realize what we have here today. In NEPA, we have over 80 companies involved in the tech industry. continued on page 92

Photo Guy Cali Associates

What advice do you have for young professionals? Take a chance, and try something outside your comfort zone. Apply for an internship, or work with a professional to get real-life experience. The earlier you become open to new experiences, the better and easier it gets. Go to a networking event. Introduce yourself to someone at a luncheon. Little efforts like this can make a difference in your career path and lead to opportunities you would not imagine.


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NEPA Revitalization

Technology at Work continued from page 91

This number is amazing and news too many, I’m sure. TecBridge is able to connect bright students with companies. We also have an expansive network of tech professionals in the region who are made aware of employment opportunities. Do major technology businesses in the region need to go outside the region to attract employees? It seems we are strong in the area of entry-level technology positions, with 18,000 students graduating from our local institutions of higher education. We understand entrepreneurs are finding seasoned employees more difficult to source locally. I know some companies have recruited employees to NEPA for great technology positions. TecBridge is working with various networks to market these seasoned positions to individuals who have ties to the region. A tech ecosystem is here, and new tech opportunities are happening each day. How have you helped close the gap in funding regional entrepreneurs? The Great Valley Pennsylvania Angel Network brings together accredited investors who meet periodically to review

business plans and network with firms looking for investments. Prequalified companies that have a revenue-generating track record can present to the group. The network is connected with 19 other groups around PA but focuses its private investing efforts in the Scranton/WilkesBarre/Hazleton region. What surprises you most about the technology industry? It amazes me how quickly technology is changing. There are new jobs today that didn’t exist 10 years ago, like app developers and social media managers. Cell and smart phones are “old” within five years, as encoding technologies and infrastructure develop each year. Cloud computing, where one can access files from any computer any time, makes business faster and more efficient. What are the major goals of TecBridge for the future? TecBridge wants to strengthen and support the technology community, which includes biolife activities. We have developed processes for recruiting talent. We are focused

12 Meet Tiffany Cross Luciani Career: Managing Director, TecBridge Education: Marywood University Years Experience: 18 years Family: Sons, Christopher and Spencer Favorite Quote: “When all is said and done, more is said than done” - Lou Holtz. (It reminds me to act and not just talk.) Currently reading:The Brain that Changes Itself by Norman Doidge

on showcasing the tech and biolife science clusters and educating others that NEPA is a place to start and build a technology business. We will facilitate additional networking opportunities for professionals who wish to meet and learn about all the great happenings in the region. We are working to enlighten all that NEPA continues to change, strengthen and grow our technology ecosystem –Melissa Sanko


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WHERE TO DINE Apple Valley Restaurant- Casual and affordable dining since 1996. Serving burgers, grilled sandwiches, fajitas, specialty pasta, BBQ, ribs and more. Full service pub with daily food and drink specials. Seven gift shops, koi ponds, 1800s schoolhouse, tourist information booth... all on eight acres. Exit 46, 1-84, 104 Rte. 6, Milford. 570-296-6831. www.applevalleyrestaurant.com

Arcaro & Genell- On Main Street, Old Forge since

Coney Island Lunch- A Scranton tradition since 1923. Taste the Texas Wieners and Texas Hamburgers that made us famous. Serving homemade soups, oldfashioned rice pudding and chili-con-carne. Enjoy our legendary chili sauce, created from a closely-guarded family recipe, eat in or take it out. Open Mon.-Sat. 10:30 a.m.- 6 p.m., Sun. noon-6:30 p.m. 515 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. 570-961-9004. www.texas-wiener.com

1962. Carrying on the family tradition of homemade Italian specialty entrees, seafood, steak, chicken, veal & much more. Old Forge Red & White Pizza. Open Monday -Saturday, lunch at 11 a.m., dinner at 3 p.m.; takeout available. Private parties Sun. Catering services available on and off premise. www.arcarongenell. 570-457-5555.

Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Restaurant-

Baileys Rib & Steakhouse- see ad page 59

Fern Hall Inn-see ad page 39

Barley Creek Brewing Company- see ad

The French Manor- see ad page 41

page 103

Overlooking beautiful Lake Wallenpaupack, Ehrhardt’s cozy atmosphere and delicious food will have you returning time and time again. We offer a variety of steaks, seafood, salads, burgers, sandwiches and more! Open 7 days a week 11:30 a.m. Pub open later. Route 507, Hawley. 570-226-2124. www.ehrhardts.com

Gresham’s Chop House- Dine in our beautiful dining room, cozy bar or under the awning on our deck, and enjoy dazzling views of Lake Wallenpaupack while choosing from delicious steaks, seafood, Italian specialties and more. Visit us at www.greshamschophouse.com Rte. 6, Hawley. Open 7 days at 4 p.m. 570-226-1500. Kelly’s Pub & Eatery- Established in 1990 by the Cosgrove sisters. Family, friendly atmosphere. Serving soups, appetizers, sandwiches, burgers, pizza, fries, cold beer and Award-Winning Hot Wings. Take out orders available and gift certificates. Credit cards accepted. Handicap accessible. 1802 Cedar Avenue, Scranton. 570-346-9758. www.kpehotwings.com

Carl Von Luger Steak & Seafood- A family

La Tonalteca- see ad page 99

tradition since 1887. Casual fine dining in downtown Scranton. USDA prime steaks & fresh seafood. Lunches from $5.95; dinners starting at $10.95. Entertainment. Friday Night Jazz Lounge 7-11 p.m. Sunday brunch 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Dinner dress code. Outdoor dining available. Open daily. 301 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. 570-955-5290 www.carlvonluger.com

Ledge’s- see ad page 93

Carmen’s Restaurant & Wine Bar- see ad page 148

Coccetti's A Restaurant & Bakery- Enjoy charming décor & unique breakfast/lunch creations including funky chicken salad, eggs benedict & Christmas wrap. Daily homemade baked goods including our popular white coconut cake & chocolate fudge iced brownies. Daily breakfast/lunch specials.Tues.Friday 7a.m.- 2p.m. Sat.7a.m.-noon. Follow us on Facebook.1124 Main St., Peckville. 570-489-4000.

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Leggio’s Italian Ristorante- Affordable dining in a Mediterranean decor. Breakfast. Wed.-Fri. 8-11 a.m. Sat. & Sun. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Lunch & Dinner Sun.-Thurs.11a.m.-10 p.m. Friday & Sat. 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Full Bar. Happy Hour. Food to order. Appetizers. Seafood, chicken, veal, pasta. Pizza, sandwiches/wraps. Catering. Memorial Luncheons. 64 East Center Hill Rd. Dallas. 570-675-4511

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WHERE TO DINE Lil’s Bar & Grill- Nestled on Lake Winola just a short ride from Clarks Summit and Tunkhannock. Modern yet casual, cozy bar and family dining, available for any occasion. Serving your favorite bar food and Chef's daily specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner.1085 State Route 307, Lake Winola. 570-378-3324 Louie’s Prime Steak House-

see ad page 102

Manhattan Manor- Family-owned restaurant, bar, and lounge in downtown Carbondale. A unique dining experience featuring steaks, pastas, flatbreads and a variety of delicious unique chef inspired dishes. Large contemporary wine and martini menu. Live music, outdoor patio, on and off site catering available. Hours 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. 8 Salem Ave. 570-282-2044 Reservations accepted. www.manhattanmanor.net

Smith’s Restaurant- We're your stop for all on- or off-site catering. Offering a wide variety of menu options and seating for up to 100. Stop by for our $6 meal deals and homemade specialties. Open daily 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Extended hours available for special events. Located at 1402 Cedar Ave. Scranton. 570-344-4403.

Smugglers Cove- see ad page 101 State Street Grill- Cozy & casual street side dining. Award-winning patio. Voted Best Chef 2008. Best Ambiance 2011, Friendliest Bar 2012. Popular for cocktails and small plates. Wide ranging American Cuisine. Lunch Mon.-Sat.11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Dinner Mon.-Sat. 410 p.m. Sunday Brunch 10 a.m.114 S. State St. Clarks Summit. 570-585-5590. www.thestatestreetgrill.com

Mayuri Indian Cuisine- Authentic South/North Indian cuisine with a balanced menu between vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes. Enjoy excellent food and outstanding service. Some of our dishes include Dosa, Paneer, Tandoori, Biryani, Naan, Gulab Jamun and many more. 917 Wyoming Ave., Scranton www.pennmayuri.com Fax: 570-227-0017. Phone: 570-341-3410

Stirna’s Restaurant & Bar- More than 100 years in service. Catering on & off premises seven days a week, for all your needs- large or small. Exclusive caterer for LaBuona Vita, formerly the Parish Center, Dunmore. Visit our smoke-free bar & restaurant. Hours: Tues.-Sat. 4 p.m. Until closing. 120 W. Market St., N. Scranton, 570-961-9681 570-343-5742.

Perkins Restaurant & Bakery- see ad page 146

Stone Bridge Inn & Restaurant- Quaint European village nestled on a hilltop, surrounded by rolling countryside – discover Northeast PA’s best-kept secret! Excellent cuisine in a casual atmosphere, multilevel tavern & patio with entertainment. Monthly Wine Tasting Dinners. Serving dinner Wed.-Sun. I-81, Exit 206, Rt. 374 East two miles past Elk Mountain, Union Dale. 570-679-9500. www.stone-bridge-inn.com

POSH- see ad page 14

Sycamore Grille- In the heart of Delaware Water

Nick’s Lake House- see ad page 102 Patsel's- see ad page 97

Quaker Steak & Lube-

see ad page 146

Ruth Chris Steakhouse-see ad page 37 Settlers Inn-- see ad page 93 Shenanigans- see ad page 102 Six East Restaurant- see ad page 101

Gap. Fresh seafood, steaks & pasta. Pub favorites like wings, burgers & more! Bar voted "Best Happy Hour" in the Poconos. Nightly Specials, live music, seasonal lunch. Come down to the Gap…we can't wait to see you! Exit 310 Rt. 80 570-426-1200 www.sycamoregrille.com facebook.com/sycamoregrille

Twigs- see ad page 101 Woodloch- see ad page 45

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THE PERFECT BLUEBERRY PIE Compliments of It’s a Keeper www.itisakeeper.com

“One of my favorite things about summer is the abundance of fresh fruits. Especially blueberries. There is nothing like the taste of a fresh blueberry plucked right from the bush that is still warm from the sun. It just bursts in your mouth! Over the years, I’ve tried many recipes in search of the perfect blueberry pie… when the juice doesn’t run all over your plate, and the pie slice holds its shape beautifully. That’s the perfect blueberry pie. This recipe makes the perfect blueberry pie.”

About Christina: Christina Hitchcock is a food blogger from the Moscow area. Her blog,“It’s a Keeper,” features hundreds of recipes, cooking videos and ideas on how to cook more despite a busy lifestyle. Christina is a field editor for Taste of Home magazine, kitchen expert for GoodCook.com and guest contributor on WNEP’s “Home and Backyard.” lling Blueberry Fi ueberries bl h 4 cups fres t tapioca 1/4 cup instan 1 cup sugar juice 1 Tbsp. lemon on 1/4 tsp. cinnam 1 Tbsp. butter

es Pie Pastry one-inch piec butter, cut in ld co eic . sp 12 Tb 3 cups flour 1 tsp. salt r 1 Tbsp. suga ing table shorten ge 1/2 cup ve , ater bine berries 1/3 cup ice w e bowl com rg la a d In juice an cin wl of a ar to the bo sugar, lemon , g ca su io d p 15 an ta r lt fo d r, sa well. Let stan Add the flou e steel blade. namon. Mix fitted with th re into r to u tu b ss ix e ce m th ro ry d p d er food s. Pour b te es to mix. A u m in ti on m e re u th . Dot b tter ten times Pulse two to ed pie crust ar lse eight to p crust Pu re . ie p g p in d n en rt Place seco . f peas. With ter and sho es o ri ze er si b f e o th top ges. Make ly butter is ries. Crimp ed e water slow or until the er b th f d o ad p , g to n in o g one egg or runn mp the process h by whiskin rm a ball. Du as fo w to g s eg in an eg ugh b of milk or roll until the do tablespoon surface, and e d n o re the u h it flo w a nto frigerg wash over dough out o wrap, and re Brush the eg . ic st m ill la ea w p cr is in p Th ra e crust. dough in into a ball. W d sides of th tes. Cut the u u an Yo in p . m to st u 30 a cr t half into wn, shiny ate for at leas yse a nice bro ace, roll each cr rf ak ar m su g d su re u g rn e sandin e edge, tu kl n half. On a flo th ri to sp r so te n k al in can h. I th it om the ce f the egg was oesn’t stick. circle. Roll fr o d p it to re n su o e ls ta d e pie. Bake y to mak sparkle to th ing regularl rolling pin, an e d ic n n u a o s. ar es iv le g gh circ to fit to 50 minute Roll the dou ll the dough egrees for 45 ro d n 0 U . 40 te la at p pie transfer to a top crust. eat with the ep R . an the p 96

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An Incredible Wedding Experience!

Save the Date Sunday, August 4 – 5:00 p.m.

Hats off to the Everhart Benefit for Everhart Museum

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Routes 6 & 11, Clarks Summit, PA August 2013

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Healthy Entrees

Make Wise Choices When Dining Out Without Sacrificing Flavor

Grilled Swordfish Salad with Chipotle Appleslaw

Served: Baby spinach, mixed field greens, grilled swordfish, julienne apples, portabella mushrooms, cucumbers, tossed with chipotle lime yogurt dressing. Health Factors: Amino acids, omega-3 fatty acids, Vitamins A, K, and C, water soluble fiber. Get it: Shenanigans, Lake Harmony 570-722-1100 www.ShenanigansLH.com

–Photo by Andrea Rosar

Cranberry Spinach Salad

Served: Baby leaf spinach, feta cheese, dried cranberries, walnuts, Roma tomatoes, grilled chicken breast drizzled with raspberry vinaigrette. Health Factors: Beta-carotene, flavonoids, antioxidants, calcium, Vitamin B12. Get it: Barley Creek Brewing Company, Tannersville 570-629-9399 www.BarleyCreek.com –Michael Straub Photography

Veggie Pizza

–Michael Straub Photography

Served: Portabella mushrooms, roasted red peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, red onion. Health Factors: Fiber, Vitamins A, C and K, foliate, potassium. Get it: Barley Creek Brewing Company, Tannersville, 570-6299399 www.BarleyCreek.com


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–Photo by Andrea Rosar

Jumbo Lump Crabcakes with Lemon Caper Aioli

Served: Super lump, jumbo lump and claw crabmeat, white onion, red bell peppers, mayonnaise, lemon juice, plain and panko bread crumbs. Health Factors: Protein, selenium, chromium, omega-3 fatty acids, flavonoids. Get it: Nick’s Lake House, Lake Harmony 570-722-2500 www.NicksLakeHouse.com

–Photo by Chris Cosgrove

Grilled Herb Salmon

Served: Grilled salmon rubbed with fresh dill, tarragon and parsley, brunoises vegetable brown rice pilaf, marinated cucumber salad, side of steamed broccoli. Health Factors: B complex vitamins, antioxidants, potassium, Omega-3 fatty acids, whole grains. Get it: State Street Grill, Clarks Summit, 570-585 -5590 www.TheStateStreetGrill.com

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Alfresco Dining Guide 84 Country Store, Greentown

Castel Grisch Winery, Watkins Glen, NY

In addition to shopping for homemade fudge, lake region gifts and foods, join an outdoor BBQ daily from noon to 8 p.m. through Labor Day! 570-222-4223

Eat on the outdoor deck overlooking vineyards that lead to Seneca Lake with panoramic views of the hillside. 607-535-9614

Apple Valley Restaurant, Milford Outdoor seating is among eight acres of land featuring a duck pond, old schoolhouse, waterfalls, meadows and fruit trees. 570-296-6831

Baileys Rib and Steak House, Mount Pocono The outdoor patio is surrounded by a park-like setting with 13 acres, gazebo and backyard where kids can play while adults relax on the deck for dinner or drinks around two outdoor fire pits. 570-839-9678 Barley Creek Brewing Co., Tannersville The giant garage-door-style windows on the enclosed Onyx Bar Room deck are rolled opened to give diners an “outdoor” dining experience. For true outdoor fun, a backyard pavilion and bar is open on weekends. 570-629-9399 Carl Von Luger Steak & Seafood, Scranton Umbrella tables line Linden Street serving up steaks and seafood outdoors in the heart of downtown. 570-955-5290

Cooper’s Seafood House, Scranton Those on The Dock tiered deck enjoy a separate outdoor bar and an outdoor chef cooking up seafood favorites in the fresh air. 570-654-6883

Cooper’s On the Waterfront, Pittston Cooper’s Cabana outdoor deck and bar brings a tropical beach feeling to diners overlooking the Susquehanna River. 570-346-6883

La Tonalteca

Choose from the full authentic Mexican menu while dining on the covered patio in Dickson City or under umbrella tables at the newest location in Clarks Summit where there’s usually live entertainment weekly. 570-9690966 (Dickson City) 570586-1223 (Clarks Summit) Glass Wine. Bar. Kitchen. at Ledges Hotel, Hawley Dine on small plates for sharing while overlooking the river gorge falls on the decks. 570-226-1337 Leggio’s Italian Ristorante, Plains Mangia on the outdoor deck with a large gazebo. 570-822-0861

Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Restaurant, Hawley

Lil’s Bar & Grill, Lake Winola

Umbrella tables shade lakeside diners on the outdoor deck overlooking Lake Wallenpaupack. 800-678-5907

A new deck is scheduled to be completed early this summer for dining with a view of the lake. 570-378-3324

Fern Hall Inn, Clifford

Manhattan Manor, Carbondale

Relax under an umbrella on tables set on stone patios with views of Elk Mountain and lush, rolling estate grounds. 570-222-3676

Gresham’s Chop House, Hawley Sink your teeth into Italian steakhouse fare on the awning-covered deck overlooking Lake Wallenpaupack. 570-226-1500

The covered patio next to the Lackawanna River hosts live entertainment. 570-282-2044

Montage Italian Grill at the Glen Motor Inn, Watkins Glen, NY On the covered deck overlooking Seneca Lake, enjoy a Finger Lakes menu with subtle Mediterranean flavors. 607-535-2706 Continued on page 102

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a Summer Destination Street Party

Banquet Facilities Available Scranton-Carbondale Hwy. • Dickson City, PA Phone: 489-8974 • Fax: 489-6414

Hours: Tues.-Sat. 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. Sunday 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. • Monday - Closed

sixeastdiner.com ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

August 2013

Dine with us under the Sun, Moon & Stars! Kick Back & Relax Indoors or OUT!

Rte. 6, Historic Downtown Tunkhannock 570.836.0433 • twigscafe.com

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Alfresco Dining Guide:

Eventually Everyone Shows Up At

Continued from page 100 Nick’s Lake House, Lake Harmony Bask on the multi-level, waterside decks with an outdoor bar nearby. 570-722-2500

Steaks • Seafood • Chicken Pizza • Salads • Pasta Great Appetizers & Sandwiches

Patsel’s, Clarks Summit Dine on the patio overlooking the landscaped flower and herb gardens, and stroll the grounds on the brick walkways. 570-563-2000

Karaoke Every Weekend POCONO’S #1 DANCE CLUB

Boomers Dance Club Spinning Today’s Hottest Hits

Open 4 p.m. Mon-Fri • Open noon Sat & Sun

98 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony, PA 18624

570.722.1100 Reservations and Directions

Waterfront Dining at its Best

Outdoor Dining Patio Bar Live Entertainment Friday • Saturday • Sunday At the Water’s Edge 110 South Lake Drive, Lake Harmony, PA 18624

570.722.2500

taste Reservations and Directions

great

THURSDAY TASTE OF ITALY

Traditional New York Steak House featuring Prime Aged Steaks, Terrific Seafood and Outstanding Service

570.722.3990 for reservations Open Sunday thru Thursday 4p.m.-9:30pm Friday & Saturday 4pm-10:30pm Closed Monday 134 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony, PA 18624

www.dinelakeharmonypa.com FIND US ON FACEBOOK 102

Quaker Steak & Lube, Dickson City Park yourself outside within the guardrailenclosed patio seating under an awning. 570-489-5823 Trax Platform Lounge at the Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, Scranton Pull up a chair to a front-row view of the cityscape outside the historic building with the recently re-decorated Trax patio. 570-342-8300

Settlers Inn, Hawley Covered backyard terrace overlooks the herb gardens on the banks of the Lackawaxen River. 570-226-2993

Shoppes at Montage, Moosic Have a bite to eat in the fresh air, whether it’s sushi, salads, burritos, sandwiches, coffee, pizza or yogurt. Doc Magrogan’s Fish Market & Oyster House patio hosts live entertainment and special events. 570-341-3271

Bel’lago Ristorante at Split Rock Resort, Lake Harmony Italian favorites are served on the patio overlooking the lake. 570-722-9111

State Street Grill, Clarks Summit Outdoor patio has tented and lounge areas and live entertainment. 570-585-5590

Stone Bridge Inn & Restaurant, Union Dale Dine on the outside terrace near Elk Mountain or the patio, which features live entertainment all summer during Party on the Patio from 7 to 11 p.m. on Thursdays. 570-679-9500

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The French Manor, South Sterling The Stone Veranda offers a 20-mile view of the Northern Pocono Mountains. Diners can order from either the Dining Room or Hanna’s Café menu. 1-877-720-6090

Twigs Café, Tunkhannock Enjoy café-style dining on the sidewalk of the town’s historic district. 570-836-0433

The Grille Room at The Country Club at Woodloch Springs, Hawley Dine on the flower-surrounded, covered patio overlooking the ninth green. 570-685-8113

Waterlillies Café at Magnus Ridge Winery, Rock Stream, NY Take in the view of terraced ponds with waterfalls in a French Country landscape while dining on café fare. 607-243-3611

Link to all restaurants mentioned at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com!

The Pocono’s Finest Outdoor Dining Great Menu, Beautiful Views Wiffle Ball Field, Bocce Ball Courts and Horseshoe Pits

Open at 4:00 Friday, Saturday and Sunday - Midweek can be reserved

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 BEGINNING AT 6:00 PM

A CELEBRATION OF NEPA GROWN & PRODUCED FOOD, BEER & WINE PREPARED BY

EPICUREAN DELIGHT ALL PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT

EVERHART MUSEUM Sullivan Trail and Camelback Road Tannersville, PA • 570.629.9399 www.barleycreek.com August 2013

www.everhart-museum.org

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• Easy on-line rental • Instrument Rental Plan with Purchase Option (new & reconditioned instruments)

• Maintenance repair and

theft protection included in monthly contract.

• Educator

recommended brands

is ool Sch rting. Sta t Your t Ge umen r InstNOW!

Musical Instrument Rentals, Repairs & Sales

• We carry a full line of books & accessories for all instruments

• Professionally-staffed inhouse repair department for fast, efficient service

570.383.3772 • 800.422.6163 • 717 Center Street • Throop, PA Rent your instruments online at www.cliffgirardmusic.com

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Discover Wyoming County Destination Tunkhannock

S

ettled in 1775, Tunkhannock has continued to grow without losing its roots. A vital Main Street is home to a number of restaurants, antique stores, gift and specialty shops. Traveling on foot is the best way to see all this historic area has to offer. Pick up a brochure at the Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau and take a self-guided walking tour of the historic district. The town boasts an impressive collection of Victorian era architecture– both residential and commercial.

II, vintage toys, tools and household items. Of special interest, the museum also features Walter Tewksbury’s 1900 Olympic Bronze medal. The track and field star, turned physician, hailed from Tunkhannock. Riverside Park is a cool, quiet place to take a break. The idyllic setting on the banks of the Susquehanna River offers a playground, picnic area, walking trail and boat access.

August Events in Wyoming County ▼

HIstoric District Walking Tour

A 1930s era movie house was restored and re-opened as the Dietrich Theatre showing the latest movie releases. It’s also home to a number of cultural events and classes. The Wyoming County Historical Society displays a fascinating array of artifacts and memorabilia. The collection is housed in a former school building and features Native American artifacts, items from the Civil War through World War

Riverside Park

Christy Mathewson Days • Aug. 9-10 Keystone College & downtown Factoryville.570-954-6755 Think Outside the Shoe • Aug. 16-18 The Oldest House, Laaceyville. 570-869-1679 Gathering of Singers & Songwriters • Aug. 21 Dietrich Theatre,Tunkhannock. 570-996-1500 Tunkhannock 4th Friday • Aug. 24 Downtown Tunkhannock. 570-687-1585 Kiwanis Wyoming County Fair • Aug. 28-Sept. 2 Fairgrounds, Meshoppen. 570-836-5502 Cornstock Acoustic Music Fest • Aug. 30-Sept. 1 Lazy Brook Park,Tunkhannock. 570-250-7972

Sponsored by Twigs Cafe • Rte. 6, Historic Downtown Tunkhannock • 570-835-0433


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COME VISIT THE ENDLESS MOUNTAINS O F N O R T H E A S T E R N PA !

J.R’s HALLMARK Towne Plaza • Tunkhannock • 570-836-6458 Mon-Sat. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. • Sun. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

34th Annual Blueberry Festival August 3-4 • Village Green, Montrose

An Afternoon of Delights August 11 • Old Mill Village, New Milford 156th Harford Fair August 19-24 • Fairgrounds, Harford Annual Salt Springs Celebration August 31 • Salt Springs Park, Franklin Forks

Funded in part by the Wyoming County Room Tax Fund and the Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau.

www.visitpamountains.com • 1-800-769-8999 Funded in part by the Susquehanna County Room Tax Fund and the Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau

www.endlessmountains.org • 800-769-8999


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Hair Services • Color Services Special Occasion Services • Nail Services Massage & Body Treatments • Skin Care Clinical Skin Care Treatments Waxing Services 1 Kim Ave, Tunkhannock •

570-996-5004 • www.headtotoesalonandspa.com

4003 Fiddle Lake Rd. Thompson, PA 570-756-2089

www.fiddlelakefarm.com

www.endlessmountains.org • 800-769-8999


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Fastball to Fun

Christy Mathewson Days

Keystone College and

Factoryville Borough will hold the 18th annual Christy Mathewson Days August 9 and 10. Christopher (Christy) Mathewson was born on August 12,1880 in Factoryville. He pitched for the New York Giants from 1900 to 1916 and for one year for the Cincinnati Reds. He is one of the first players elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY. He died October 7, 1925. Keystone’s President Emeritus Edward Boehm saw the oneman play,“Matty: An Evening with Christy Mathewson,” off Broadway in 1995. He knew the connection of Christy Mathewson to Factoryville and wanted to bring the play to Keystone. Boehm worked with the Factoryville Men’s Civic Club; the Factoryville Woman’s Civic League became involved in 1998.

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The Christy Mathewson collection will open Friday, August 9 from noon to 10 p.m. at the Gambal Gymnasium lobby.“This is the only time of year the collection is displayed,” said Liz Ratchford, director of grants Keystone College. “Matty: An Evening with Christy Mathewson,” a oneman play, which stars Eddie Frierson, will be held Friday, August 9 at 7:30 p.m. at the Theater in Brooks. An ice cream social will follow the play at the Gambal Gymnasium Lobby. Saturday, August 10 will feature a one-mile fun run and a “The Big Six Run/Walk, starting and ending at the college. Race participants can pre-register and receive a shirt or register the day of the event. Medals and trophies will be awarded. Breakfast will follow at the college.

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

The parade will begin at 5 p.m. at Keystone College on Saturday and ends at the Lackawanna Trail Elementary Center.“We will have as many student-athletes as we can from our 17 varsity teams to hand out candy in the event,” according to Kacy Manning, assistant director of athletics, senior woman administrator and head field hockey coach. Beginning at 6 p.m. at the Christy Mathewson Park behind the Lackawanna Trail Elementary Center there will be presentation of parade awards, music, games for adults and children and food. “Ross Park in Binghamton will be bringing animals to pet. It is great and the kids love them,” says O Malley. Tickets for the play can be purchased for $3 for adults and $2 for children under 12 by calling 570-945-8169. Visit www.Keystone.edu. –Linda Scott

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A SMASHING GOOD TIME 30th Annual Pittston Tomato Festival

T

he Pittston Tomato Festival returns for another summer bringing games, food and fun. The festival began with Val Delia’s idea to celebrate local gardens, and it has expanded from its humble beginnings in a downtown Pittston parking lot. The event boasts a parade including the Pittston and Wyoming Area marching bands and the Knights of Columbus as well as a 5K run to raise money for the Miles for Michael charity. Children can compete for the titles of Little Mr. and Miss Tomato, and a scholarship pageant will be held to name the next Miss Tomato Festival Queen. Festival goers can cast their vote for their favorite sauce as local restaurants compete for the title of Best Marinara Sauce in the Sauce Wars. The Annual Tomato Contest will award ribbons to tomatoes in the categories of largest, smallest, ugliest and most perfect. The popular tomato fights will be held in the parking lot of Cooper’s on the Waterfront Restaurant, giving participants the opportunity to hurl rotten tomatoes at friends. The festival stays true to its roots with local produce and baked goods featured at The Pittston Farmers’ Market. Other food vendors feature everything from homemade

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ravioli to tiramisu and gelato. The festival that began with the celebration of quality local tomatoes continues to highlight the local community even as the event rises to national recognition. Festival Chairperson Lori Nocito describes the event as,“A venue for people from all over the area and out of town to come to Pittston City, see the revitalization efforts, enjoy good food, live entertainment and a variety of events.” The festival kicks off August 15 at 5 p.m. and continues through August 18. Visit www.PittstonTomatoFestival.com. –Melissa Durante

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Luzerne County Fair 51st Annual

21st Annual Our Lady of the Snows

Country Bazaar August 1,2 & 3

Sept. 4-8

on the grounds of the Church of St. Benedict on Newton Ransom Boulevard, Clarks Summit, PA

Live Bands nightly, hayrides, games, baskets, great food, ice-cream, antiques, plants & much more

This years bands will be: Thursday – The Wanabees Friday – Picture Perfect Saturday – The Poets Thursday and Friday 6–11 p.m. Saturday 5–11 p.m.

Admission ONLY

$8.00!

51 YEARS

Featur

of

Fun, Food & Entertainment!

Shawn ing K & Kentulush Headhu cky nters

Route 118, Dallas/Lehman • www.luzernecountyfair.com

Montour-DeLong Community Fair Montour-DeLong

75th Annual

AAuugg1133tthh--7755cceennttnniigghhtt Hot HotDogs-$.75 Dogs-$.75Hamburgers-$1.75 Hamburgers-$1.75 Dinner DinnerMeal-$7.50 Meal-$7.50

Aug Aug 14th 14th -- American American Idol Idol finalist finalist Aaron Aaron Kelly Kelly performs performs Sponsored Sponsoredby byJersey JerseyShore ShoreState StateBank Bank

Aug Aug 16th 16th -- Fireworks Fireworks Show Show Sponsored Sponsoredby byPPL PPL&&its itsAffiliates Affiliates

75th Anniversary August 12-17, 2013 August 2013

FREE Admission • FREE Entertainment • Parking $3 2628 Broadway Road, Danville, PA www.montourdelongfair.com • 570-437-2178

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Fairs Fairs

TO R E M E M B E R

Pocono State Craft Festival The festival attracts thousands each year to Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm in Stroudsburg. It runs August 24, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and August 25, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and boasts food, music and a variety of craft vendors. There will be live music performances by the bluegrass band The Lost Ramblers and everything from jewelry to silk-screens will be available. Both new and returning vendors will be at the festival including Jesamie Handwovens by Pam Bartl, Studio in the Sky and Groundhog Blues. The entry fee is $6. Call 476-4460. Montour-DeLong Community Fair The fair heads into its 75th summer at the MontourDeLong Fairgrounds (August 12-17) in Danville. The fair boasts tractor pulls, livestock judging, contests including best baked goods and cow milking as well as a chicken barbeque. True to tradition, all of the old-fashioned games such as throwing hay bales and blindfolding the wives in a wheelbarrow will be played, and there will be a fireworks display Friday night. Live music acts perform 6 to 8 p.m. each evening at the pavilion and include The Jesse Alexander Band, Legends, Midlife Cowboys, Gospel Bond, The Joe Murray Band and American Idol sensation Aaron Kelly. Admission is $3. Parking is free. Visit www.montourdelongfair.com or call 437-2178. Wayne County Fair With 151 years of experience and around 175 vendors returning this year, the Wayne County Fair has a little bit of something for everyone. Visitors can expect all the classic fair food in addition to arts and crafts, jewelry, tractors and farm equipment. Parking is free. An $8 admission covers rides, games, small stage acts and many of the grandstand shows including harness racing, tractor and truck pulls, stunt drivers and the

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woodmen’s competition. Tickets are available for Monster Truck/BMX Racing, the Monster Truck Freestyle and the much-anticipated performance by country music star Justin Moore. There will be livestock and showmanship competitions as well as baking contests, pig races and a demolition derby. The fair runs August 210 at the Wayne County Fairgrounds, Honesdale. Call 253-5486 or visit www.waynecountyfair.com. Luzerne County Fair Celebrated September 4-8 at the fairgrounds in Dallas. Food vendors including Grotto Pizza, J & G Kettle Corn and Penalty Box BBQ. There will be a Tractor Obstacle Rodeo, Dialed Action Sport Team show, horse show, line dancing and fireworks as well as live music acts each evening including The Tommy Guns Band and The Poets. A Miss Fair Queen will be named and the Fair Princess Contest will be held for girls age 4 to 6. Other attractions for children include the Barnyard Olympics and a new area called– Kiddie Land. Competitions will be held judging everything from artwork and florals to baked goods and livestock. Admission is $8 and parking is free. Call 675-FAIR or visit www.luzernecountyfair.com. Wyoming County Fair August 28-September 2 in Meshoppen. Overfield’s Apple Dumplings and Endless Mountain Catering are among the food vendors.The fair boasts a variety of entertainment including an ATV drag, demolition derby, horse show, tractor and truck pulls and livestock exhibitions. There will be small stage performances throughout the week as well as grandstand concerts including the acclaimed Florida Georgia Line. A new Fair Queen and Junior Fair Queen will be named. Admission is $8 and includes parking. Call 833-4866 or visit wyomingcountyfair.com. –Melissa Durante

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Featuring: • 10 Pipe Bands • Scottish Equestrian Drill Team • Celtic Music, Dance & Genealogy • Highland Games

August 2013

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SUMMER FUN CHAMBERLAIN CANOES –

Canoe, raft and kayak rentals on the scenic Delaware River. We offer trips ranging from 2 hours to 3 days through Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Open Daily from midMay through mid-October. Group rates available. Located off 1-80 at exit 310. www.chamberlaincanoes.com 1-800-422-6631 COSTA’S FAMILY FUN PARK–

Featuring go-karts, water slides, bumper boats, miniature golf, driving range & stadium batting cages– fun for the whole family. Stay for lunch or dinner but be sure to leave room for Hershey's hand-dipped ice cream. Open daily during the summer; Weekends spring & fall. Rte. 6, Hawley. 570-226-8585. LAHEY FAMILY FUN PARK–

36 holes of the finest miniature golf. Courses are built into the mountainside. Five waterfalls, seven streams & caves create a beautiful & relaxing outdoor setting. Other attractions: go carts, batting cages, bumper boats, arcade, children's soft play & snack bar. Open daily at 10 a.m. 500 Morgan Hwy. Clarks Summit. 570-586-5699. SUSQUEHANNA CANOE & KAYAK–

Inside, Out Fun! There’s no shortage of fun and entertainment in the Sullivan County Catskills. See legends on stage. Raft the white waters. Reel in the big one, or cast about for antiques. Savor our farm fresh produce, and our own Sullivan County wine, beer and spirits too. We know how to make you feel welcome.

Enjoy a relaxing day on the Susquehanna– paddling, exploring and sightseeing. Centrally located along the river in Falls, a close drive from Luzerne and Lackawanna Counties.You'll float along the most beautiful section of the Endless Mountains. Daily/Weekly rentals to other local waterways in Northeastern PA also available. Call 570-388-6107 www.kayaktheriver.com WALLENPAUPACK SCENIC BOAT TOUR & BOAT RENTALS-

Enjoy a breathtaking 50-minute cruise on beautiful Lake Wallenpaupack.Tour guides describe the charming area and its history. Boat rentals available. Rent your own pontoon boat, kayak and/or stand up paddle board. Open daily. Located at the Lake Wallenpaupack Observation Dike, 2487 Route 6, Hawley PA call 570-226-3293 or visit www.wallenpaupackboattour.com. WOODLANDS STABLE & TACK– ONLY 90 MINUTES NEW YORK CITY AND EVEN LESS FROM NORTH JERSEY

1-800-882-CATS scva.net ® I LOVE NEW YORK logo is a registered trademark/service mark of the NYS Dept. of Economic Development, used with permission.

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Year-round trail rides (appointment only- no group too small), lessons, birthdays and pony rides on & off premises. Summer Day Camp. Week-long overnight camp. Scouting programs.Tack Shop on premises. 20 minutes from Scranton. Call for appointment or information. 570-842-3742 www.woodlandsstable.com

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“The “The Family Family is is one one of of Nature’s Nature’s Masterpieces.” Masterpieces.” -George Santayana

Take time to enjoy yours! Charming housekeeping cottages in a peaceful lakefront setting. Guest Review “Rate A” Camping and Cottage Resort

www.keenlake.com 570-488-5522 or 1-800-443-0412

August 2013

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WHERE TO CAMP COOL LEA CAMPGROUND –

Located on Kayutah (Little) Lake. Celebrating our 25th Summer. Seasonal & overnight camping– electric and sewer. Wooded tent area, Cabins and a cottage. Fishing, swimming, boat launch, hiking trails, Pavilion, game room, Camp Store, short drive to Wine Trails, shopping, museums, restaurants. Nine miles to Watkins Glen, NY. 607-594-3500 www.coolleacamp.com DON LAINE CAMPGROUND–

PIONEER CAMPGROUND–

Award-winning campground! Spacious wooded campsites for tents and camper trailers. Rustic cabins, furnished cottages, heated pool, game room, planned weekend activities, pet friendly, free WiFi, open pavilion, social hall. Near historic Eagles Mere, Worlds End and Ricketts Glen State Parks. 307 Pioneer Trail, Muncy Valley, PA www.pioneercampground.com pioneercg@epix.net 570-946-9971

Pool, playground, store, snackbar, game room, laundry, horseshoes, wagon rides, country & oldies bands & DJs, nature trails. Planned activities (weekends). Full hook-ups– wooded & open sites, dump station. Near Beltzville Lake– 18 miles to Pocono International Raceway. Northeast extension of PA Turnpike, exit 74. Rte 209 N. approx. nine miles. Follow signs. Reservations. 800-635-0152, 610-381-3381 www.donlaine.com

SANDY VALLEY CAMPGROUND–

Enjoy camping at our beautiful riverside location. Canoeing, kayaking, rafting, fishing, swimming pool, planned activities and free WiFi. Open midMay to mid-September. Located four miles south of Portland, PA to Columbia, NJ bridge on River Road. Call 570-897-6859 or visit www.driftstone.com for a free brochure, information and directions.

SHORE FOREST CAMPGROUND–

DRIFTSTONE ON DELAWARE–

HONESDALE POCONO KOA–

A KOA in the Poconos.The true Poconos is in Wayne County. We're near the best fishing, hiking, horseback riding in NEPA. Looking for peace & quiet? That's what our campers tell us they find here. We have full RV hook-ups, monthly sites, seasonal sites & full service cabins. 570-253-0424 www.honesdalepoconokoa.com MOUNT POCONO CAMPGROUND–

We are a family-oriented campground with sites for campers and tenting. Our amenities: Big Rig Friendly (50 amp), free Wifi, heated pools, planned activities and pet friendly with dog run. Nearby attractions. Camelbeach, Mt. Airy Casino & Pocono International Raceway. Come join us! 30 Edgewood Rd. Mt. Pocono 570-839-8950 www.mtpoconocampground.com

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Family campground in the western Poconos. Wooded site with water & electric. Primitive sites by the lake. Pool, playground, fishing lake, game room, store, LP Gas, weekend activities, seasonal & yearly sites. I- 80 exit 273. For GPS enter, 199 Sandy Valley Camp Road, White Haven. 570-636-0770/570-636-0206 for reservations. email: sandyvalleycampground@hotmail.com www.sandvalley.com Forget hotels! Camping offers lifetime memories. Nestled in the beautiful Endless Mountains on a five-acre lake. Heated pool/spa, camp store, snack bar, game room, crafts, hayrides, weekend activities and so much more! Family fun! Cabins, Cable TV/WiFi available. Camping at its best! Shoreforestcampground.com Half mile from Rte 11. Hop Bottom 570-289-4666 SLUMBER VALLEY CAMPGROUND–

Located along Meshoppen Creek, this family campground has been in the business of “cooking with sticks” since 1966. Separate tenting area overlooking a 20-foot waterfall. Electric, sewer and creek sites, cabin, two pavilions, pool, playground, sand volleyball, mini-golf, nature trail, fishing ponds.Two miles to Susquehanna River Boat Launch. www.slumbervalleycampground.com 570-833-5208.

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Win

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Four Tickets to The Museum at Bethel Woods in Bethel, NY!

Explore the Story of the ‘60s and Woodstock! The museum, on the grounds of the original Woodstock Festival in Bethel, NY, tells the story of an influential decade through exhibits in the Main Gallery, Special Exhibit Gallery, Corridor Gallery and outdoor sculpture garden. Guests can take a walk around the historic Woodstock festival site, visit the Museum Shop and dine at the Muse Café. Experience the festival through interactive multimedia presentations and authentic artifacts. For more, call 866-781-2922, or go to www.BethelWoodsCenter.org/Museum.aspx 118

ons tulati a of a r g n Co mm ie Su e won to Jul n, PA! Sh venture s Ad ranto of Sc o Skytop’ t r! ts Cente ticke

Enter to Win

At www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com, or mail your name, phone number, mailing address and email address to “August Explore More Contest” Happenings Magazine P.O. Box 61 Clarks Summit, PA 18411 Contest ends August 31, 2013

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Big Brown Fish & Pay Lakes

Where the fish are always biting! Rte. 115 North Effort, PA

(570) 629-0427

$25

NO LICENSE REQUIRED

UNT Y AY DISCORU FFRRID IDA HRU

Y TTH s. AY ils. DA ND tail UN eta De SSU forr D ll fo all CCa

www.bigbrownfish.com email: bigbrownfish@verizon.net

GET YOUR FISHING IN

Before You Go Back to School!

Paradise Fishing Preserve Quality Since 1902

Rte. 191 North NO LICENSE Paradise Valley, PA REQUIRED

Call or click today for dates, rates and rafting reservations

(570) 629-0422

www.paradisetrout.com email: pbtc1@verizon.net

WWW.WHITEWATERCHALLENGERS.COM

In the Poconos • White Haven, PA

between exits 180 and 182B from I-81

August 2013

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Up IN THE AIR! Balloon Fest and Air Show

The Balloon Fest/Air Show is back again with exciting shows and fun events for all ages. The show, set to take place on September 14 at the Lycoming County Fairgrounds, will feature a dozen commercially piloted air balloons, which will launch at 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Team Aerodynamix, the world’s largest air show team, will perform, along with the all-female skydiving team, the Misty Blues, and solo stunt pilot Jeff Maurer. ATV drag races, the BMX

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team Dialed Action Sports, the PA Army National Guard, puppets, shows, vendors and exhibits will also delight guests. There will also be model airplane exhibits, magicians, music and many other attractions. The Rotary Clubs of Hughesville, Montoursville, Muncy and Williamsport host the event. Sandy Spencer, event chair, says,“Working with this team of hard-working and dedicated people is inspiring. The Rotary motto is ‘Service Above Self,’ and this

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team truly exhibits that motto. When everything comes together and we see so many happy people in attendance, we feel we have shared the Rotary message in a small way.” Air shows start at 11 a.m., 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Advance tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children age 6 and up. Tickets are sold at the gate for $8 per adult and $5 for children age 6 and up. Visit www.LCRotary.com or call 570-279-6192. –Casey Phillips

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GOLF GUIDE BUCK HILL GOLF CLUB–

Legendary. Loyalty to the soul of the game is a centuries old tradition.The timeless design of legendary architects Donald Ross and Robert White has grown into a 27-hole treasured masterpiece offering all the amenities of a country club.The Fairway Grille & Bar is open daily. 570-595-7730. Golf Drive, Buck Hill Falls, PA www.buckhillgolfclub.com COUNTRY CLUB AT WOODLOCH SPRINGS–

Woodloch’s spectacular 18-hole championship golf course winds its challenging way over 6,579 yards of fern-carpeted forests, lush wetlands and broad upland meadows. Four sets of tees on every hole so all levels can be accommodated. 4.5 STARS- Golf Digest’s Best Places to Play. Outside tee-times can be made up to four days in advance. 570-685-8102. FERNWOOD RESORT–

18-hole, par-71 resort course presents challenging holes tucked into the rolling hills of the Poconos. Golf shop, club rentals, practice hole and lakeside dining at Wintergreens Patio Grill. 10 Play Any Day Book on sale for $350 including cart. Special golf/villa stay packages available for groups and individuals. www.FernwoodGolfCourse.com 888-337-6966 HUNTSVILLE GOLF CLUB–

18-hole Rees Jones designed course located in Dallas features the risk/reward challenge that golfers of all skill levels can appreciate. Huntsville is ranked the 5th Best Course in Pennsylvania by Golf Digest. Golf, Social and Non-Resident memberships are available without initiation fees. 570-674-6545 www.golf-huntsville.com THE INN AT POCONO MANOR–

Celebrating over 100 years of golf! Two challenging mountain-top courses. George Fazio-designed West Course favors long ball hitters. East Course, designed by Donald Ross, offers challenging water hazards & breathtaking view. Pro shop, practice greens, driving range, Golf Lessons, Restaurant & Bar. Golf Getaway Packages available. Route 314 Pocono Manor, PA 800-233-8150 Ext. 7433 www.PoconoManor.com 122

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GOLF GUIDE LAKELAND GOLF CLUB–

Well groomed, small, nine-hole course with lovely country setting. Light lunches served in the beautiful clubhouse. Course is challenging enough for the advanced golfer, yet perfect for beginners... just 20 minutes from Scranton and only five minutes from Lackawanna State Park. Located on Rte. 107 between Fleetville corners & Lake Sheridan, Fleetville, PA. 570-945-9983. MAHONING VALLEY COUNTRY CLUB-

Nestled in the picturesque Mahoning Valley. Established in 1926. Open to the public. Boasting a challenging 18-hole golf course with bent grass tees, rolling fairways and undulating greens. Practice areas, cart, bag services, a fully stocked pro shop. Open seven days a week. 323 Country Club Rd., Lehighton. 570-386-2588. www.mahoningvalleycc.com MOUNTAIN LAUREL GOLF CLUB–

The premier golf destination in the Poconos. Fully stocked golf shop, 18 beautiful holes featuring bent grass greens, wonderful elevation changes and a user-friendly design.The restaurant facilities are second to none.The Club is available for general play, outings, banquets and dining. Call for tee times. 570-443-7424. White Haven www.mountainlaurelgolfclub.com SCOTT GREENS GOLF CLUB–

Nicely maintained and challenging nine-hole golf & teaching facility in Scott Township. Home of "A Swing for Life" Golf Academy featuring Teaching Professionals Scotty McAlarney a "Top 100" Instructor, W.G.T.F., and Corey McAlarney, a Jim McLean certified instructor and master club fitter. Minutes from Clarks Summit, Rt. 81 and Scranton area. Great membership level rates. 570-254-6979 www.Scottgreensgolfclub.com SCOTTISH GLEN GOLF COURSE

Play on our scenic nine-hole, award-winning course. Located on Crystal Lake in the middle of an old-growth forest– it's absolutely beautiful. Mention this ad when reserving your Tee Time, and receive a voucher for 50% off a 2nd Entree on a Dining reservation. Rte. 247, Clifford. 570-222-3676. www.fernhallinn.com continued on page 124 August 2013

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GOLF GUIDE SHADOWBROOK INN & RESORT–

Local 18-hole, 6,000-yard golf course that is located in the heart of the Endless Mountains. Part of the beautiful Shadowbrook Inn and Resort.The perfect place for all your events. Fundraising, wedding, banquet, meetings, etc. Check us out on Facebook today! Play the Brook. 201 Resort Lane,Tunkhannock, PA 18657 570-836-5417 www.shadowbrookresort.com SHAWNEE INN & GOLF RESORT–

27-hole championship course located on an island in the Delaware River. Breathtaking views accompany each swing. Driving range, practice facility, golf academy and the best 19th hole around, the Gem and Keystone Brewpub.Three minutes from Route 80. www.shawneeinn.com, 100 Shawnee Inn Drive, Shawnee on Delaware, PA. For tee times call 570-424-4000 SKYTOP LODGE–

Rated 4.5 stars by Golf Digest for places to stay and play. A mountain-style course that plays over rolling terrain, with wide, tree-lined fairways and small challenging greens above average in speed. Back tees measure 6,656 yards with a slope rating of 133 and forward tees 5,789, with a 122 slope rating. www.Skytop.com 570-595-8910 SLEEPY HOLLOW GOLF COURSE–

Picturesque public "19" hole course with rolling hills & lush greens. 5,189-yard course features a challenging back 10 holes. New additions annually. Non-golfers & people of all ages may enjoy afternoon tea & food bar in dining area. Golf card accepted. Follow us on Facebook. Sandy Banks Rd. Greenfield Twp. 570-254-4653. SPLIT ROCK GOLF CLUB–

Open to the public. Beautiful 27-hole tree-lined course with picturesque views in Lake Harmony. Fully stocked Golf Shop, practice facility, restaurant/bar, Locker facilities. 18 holes: $40 midweek, $55 weekend pre-season & $55 midweek, $65 weekend in-season including cart.Yearly memberships & weekly specials. Great Tournament and Outing Course- Tee times/directions 570-722-9901 www.golfsplitrock.com 124

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GOLF GUIDE

STONE HEDGE GOLF CLUB–

18-hole championship golf course masterfully carved out of lush rolling hills and meadows of Northeast Pennsylvania's beautiful Endless Mountains. A relaxing natural habitat to play the game at its best. Golf our mature links. Stay and enjoy dinner on our covered deck overlooking the 18th green. 570-836-5108 www.stonehedge-golf.com TREASURE LAKE GOLF–

We are offering Stay & Play Packages- two beautiful USGA rated courses – Unlimited Play, Cart, Lodging, Meals. $299 per person, based on four person occupancy for Friday, Saturday & Sunday. Two nights lodging in spacious condos, two breakfast buffets, two dinners. Gold Course 814-913-1482, Silver Course 814-913-1480 www.treasurelakepoa.com.

Luzerne County You’ll Find it all Right Here!! Aug. 15-18

Pittston Tomato Festival, Delicious food, a variety of live entertainment, a parade, 5K run, games, rides, arts and crafts, bingo and of course home-grown Pittston tomatoes keep bringing an enthusiastic crowd to the festival year after year. 570655-1424 or www.pittstontomatofestival.com

Aug. 18

The Wilkes-Barre Triathlon, starting at Harvey’s Lake, World Class Athletic Competition - 1K Swim, 40K Bike, 11K Run from Harvey’s Lake to Penn State Campus & Sports Expo. 570-270-4793 or www.wilkesbarretriathlon.com

Aug. 17-18

Living History & Civil War Weekend at Eckley Miners Village, Weatherly, Civil War encampment, firing and drilling demonstrations, camp life, artillery, infantry, and cavalry units, period music and dancing, and more! 570-636-2070 Kielbasa Festival, Plymouth, Live entertainment, food and lots more, for more information go to www.plymouthalive.org Railfest at Steamtown National Historical Site, Scranton, Our annual event, where modern railroad equipment visits historic steam locomotives, at Railfest 2013. While in town, you can also visit La Festa Italiana on Lackawanna County Courthouse Square! 570-340-5204 or www.nps.gov/stea/planyourvisit/railfest-2013.htm

Aug. 23-24 Aug. 31-Sept. 1

Wilkes-Barre Hazleton

1.888.905.2872 • www.tournepa.com August 2013

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Getaway to Bucks County, PA f the name Bucks County conjures images of covered bridges, canals and quaint towns, then you have a good vision of what the scenic area has to offer. Places like New Hope, Doylestown and Lahaska are synonymous with diverse culture and rich history. Best of all, the region is an easy two- to three- hour drive from NEPA making it an ideal day trip or weekend getaway.

I

Center. Exhibits here include Buck’s Nobel and Pulitzer Prize. Guides offer information on the historical evolution of the 68acre grounds, origins of the sculptures, the family gravesite and the floral and water gardens. East meets west inside the 19th century home where a large collection of Pennsylvania country furniture sits alongside Asian furnishings and decorative objects collected by Buck on her travels. The large library is a highlight of every tour. Here visitors may see the desk and typewriter Buck used to write “The Good Earth” while in China. Other notable artifacts include gifts from the Dali Lama and correspondence from Eleanor Roosevelt and President Richard Nixon. Tours are offered Tuesday through Saturday at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. and Sunday at 1 and 2 p.m. www.pearlsbuck.org

Fonthill Castle

Pearl S. Buck House The rural setting of Bucks County lured Pulitzer Prize wining author Pearl S. Buck to make her home in Perkasie. Her 1825 stone farmhouse recently re-opened for tours following a six-month closure. The grand re-opening was the culmination of an eightyear, $2 million endeavor to fully restore and preserve the home’s interior and exterior. Guided tours of the National Historic Landmark allow expanded access to collections and never-before-seen artifacts including select wardrobe items worn by Buck, a 1927 office Edison-Dictaphone, crystal stemware and china table settings. Begin with an orientation in the Welcome 126

Visit the home and observe the legacy of another native son of Bucks County. Henry Mercer was a definite Renaissance man. Born in Doylestown in 1856, he graduated from Harvard and earned a law degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He dabbled in archaeology, antiques, art and writing. He was also a leader in the American Arts and Crafts movement of the early 20th Century. Mercer gained notoriety as a tile maker and even established the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works adjacent to his home. Mercer built his 44-room home to resemble a Medieval castle (above right), and it’s an appropriate showcase for his collection of antiques and oddities. Fonthill features narrow passage ways,

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winding staircases, 18 fireplaces and 200 windows. The columns, walls and ceilings are adorned with thousands of mosaic tiles of Mercer’s own design as well as those he purchased in Persia, China, Spain and Holland. Following his death in 1930, the mansion opened as a museum of decorative tiles and prints in accordance with Mercer’s wishes. Guided tours are offered Monday through Saturday 10 .a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday noon to 5 p.m. continued on page 128

Spend a day exploring the Mercer Museum & Fonthill Castle, two treasures in Doylestown. Open daily. You won’t know if you don’t go! Walking distance of shops & restaurants

mercermuseum.org • 215-348-9461 August 2013

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Mercer Museum At the height of the Industrial Revolution, when demand for new machine made products was high, Mercer had the foresight to preserve relics of early American life. He amassed a collection of 30,000 items ranging from hand tools to horsedrawn vehicles. In 1916, he constructed a six-story concrete castle (above) to house and display his collection.The towering central atrium was used to hang large objects such as a whale boat, stage coach and Conestoga wagon. On each level surrounding the court, smaller exhibits were installed in niches and rooms according to Mercer's classifications– healing arts, tinsmithing, dairying and illumination. The collection, which has grown to include 40,000 objects, is viewed by more than 65,000 visitors annually. The museum is open Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday noon to 5 p.m. www.merermuseum.org

turned it into a theatre. In its 70 year history, the stage has welcomed Grace Kelly, Angela Lansbury, Bea Arthur, Walter Matthau, Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn, Liza Minnelli, Helen Hayes and Robert Redford. In 2012, Playhouse Productions was formed to return professional theatre to the venue. Local and nationally known talent once again perform in New Hope. This month, visitors may see “Summer of ‘42” through August 11 or “The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife” slated for August 15 through September 1. www.bcptheater.org

Bucks County Playhouse An unassuming building along Main Street in New Hope has hosted some of the biggest names in the entertainment industry. The Bucks County Playhouse is situated in a former grist mill on the banks of the Delaware River. A community campaign in the 1930s, led by Broadway playwright and Bucks County resident Moss Hart, saved the 1790s-era structure from demolition. The small band of artists and art enthusiasts 128

Robert Redford (seated, center) in a 1959 production of “Tiger at the Gates” at the Bucks County Playhouse.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2013 Lycoming County Fairgrounds in Hughesville, PA Hot Air Balloons, Air Show Attractions, ATV Drag Races, BMX,Vendors, Entertainment and more. A family-friendly event! Visit our website for a complete list of attractions,schedule,tickets and more.

www.LCRotary.com (570) 279-6192 Balloon Rides: (570) 220-3117


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E x p l o r e the Lake Wallenpaupack Region 84 COUNTRY STORE Featuring jams, jellies, meats & cheeses from Lancaster & local farms. A place the whole family can enjoy: 2,000 sq. ft playroom for the kids. Slow cooked BBQ and homemade fudge made fresh daily. Enjoy our retro soda & candies. Located off I-84, take Route 507 South to 101 Creamery Road, Greentown, PA. 570-252-4223. Second location: 150 Water Street, Milford PA 570-409-4646. www.84countrystore.com

AUREL’S TV & APPLIANCES Featuring a comprehensive inventory of all major brands of appliances. Beautiful showroom, 334 appliances on display. Knowledgeable staff. Parts department. Competitive pricing. Located at 1671 Mount Cobb Road between Hamlin and Mount Cobb, easy access from Routes 191, 590 and I-84. 570-689-9757. Major credit cards accepted. www.aurelsappliance.com

COMFORT INN-POCONO LAKES REGION While visiting Lake Wallenpaupack, let the Comfort Inn– Pocono Lakes Region be your home away from home. Our friendly staff, tastefully decorated spacious rooms, game room and hot breakfast all add to value you will appreciate. Twin Rocks Diner is adjacent and open until 10 p.m. nightly. I–84 exit 17. 570-689-4148. www.comfortinn.com/hotel/pa092

SCULPTED ICE WORKS FACTORY TOUR & NATURAL ICE HARVEST MUSEUM Open year round. The history of natural ice harvesting and modern ice production and carving is educational, informative and entertaining! Step back in time to learn how ice was "made" before refrigeration. Watch how clear ice is manufactured today, and learn how ice sculptures are made. Rte 590, Lakeville. 570-226-6246. www.sculptediceworks.com

SHELLY’S FAMILY RESTAURANT Open 7 days a week. Breakfast. Lunch. Dinner. Enjoy our weekend breakfast buffet. Full menu, daily specials. Ice cream stand open all Summer. Soup and Salad Bar$6.99. Check us out on Facebook. Join our Family Club for discounts and $5 OFF for your birthday. Located in Hamlin on Route 590. Down the hill from CVS. 570-689-0424. 130HappeningsMagazinePA.com July 2013


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209 Mount Cobb Highway Hamlin, PA www.btmflooring.com

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570 689-4500

Relax this Summer!

327 Main Ave. Hawley, PA 18428 570.226.3112 • fax 570.226.3371 teeters@ptd.net • www.teetersfurniture.com

HAPPY TRAILS RIDING STABLE

Mon-Thurs 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. Fri 8:30 a.m.- 8 p.m. • Sat 8:30 a.m- 5 p.m. Sun noon-4 p.m.

W W W. H A P P Y T R A I L S R I D I N G . CO M

August 2013 July 2013

648 HONESDALE RD. WAYMART, PA

1625 HAMLIN HWY. LAKE ARIEL, PA

570-488-6996

570-698-6996

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August’s

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Can’t-Miss Events

Shawnee Mountain Mud Run

August 17, 9:30 a.m. Shawnee Mountain Ski Area, Shawnee On Delaware The 3rd Annual Mud Run challenges individuals or teams of two or four with a 5K that includes obstacles such as “Marsh Madness” and the final “Mountain Mud Crawl.” For children 6-12, a onemile Kids Mini Mud Run will be held. The races are followed by a barbeque with music provided by an outdoor DJ. All contestants will be entered into a prize raffle, in addition to prizes for best team costume and funniest team name. www.shawneemt.com.

WPSADA Antique Show & Sale August 3 & 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wallenpaupack Area High School, Hawley Wayne & Pike County, PA, Sullivan County, NY Antique Dealers Association’s annual Antique Show & Sale will feature a variety of antique dealers offering everything from antique glassware and postcard books to vintage clothing and jewelry. Proceeds benefit area libraries and museums in what organizer Cookie Astringer describes as an effort to,“encourage young people to come and learn about antiques and history.” Admission is $4.50. 2963539 www.WPSADA.com. 132

WOOFstock 2013 August 10, noon-7 p.m. Salt Springs State Park, Montrose The event features a variety of food vendors and live music acts including Leland Smith and George Wesley Band. A raffle will be held, and local vendors will be selling handcrafted goods. A special VIP “Dog Bar” will be available for furry friends as well. All proceeds benefit the True Friends, the only no-kill shelter in Susquehanna and Wyoming Counties. 570-278-1228 www.TrueFriendsAWC.com.

Foodstock August 17, 6:30 p.m. Patsels, Clarks Summit Celebrate the 44th anniversary of Woodstock with Foodstock. In the spirit of the iconic festival, Chef Michael Bodner’s ‘60s buffet includes “Santana’s Stuffed Sole Sacrifice” and “Purple Haze Blueberry Barbeque Sauce” and themed drinks such as “Grapeful Dead Sangria” and “Sweetwater Melong Margarita.” Live music on the lawn will be provided by the local band Paul Moran and Friends, and guests are asked to dress “hippie chic” for the occasion Patsel’s is calling,“an evening of peace and music.”The event is $45 per person plus tax and gratuity, and reservations are required. 563-2000 HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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HAP-13

At Lighthouse Harbor

Boat Rentals Jet Ski Rentals Parasailing Wakeboards Kneeboards Tubes

At Lighthouse Harbor Marina On Lake Wallenpaupack

570-857-0779 www.PoconoActionSports.com August 2013

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Fun in the Finger Lakes! More Reasons for a Road Trip Aug. 6, 13, 20 & 27, Free Concerts in the Park, 7 p.m., Lafayette Park, Watkins Glen, NY

10 Cottages • 17 Motel Rooms • Free Wi-Fi Exercise Area • Pool Table • Basketball Court Golf Driving Range • And More!

Aug. 8-11, Cheeze-It TM 355, Watkins Glen International, Watkins Glen, NY. 866-461-RACE. Aug. 10, Jack Ass Day, noon-6 p.m., Swedish Hill Winery, Romulus, NY. 800-549-WINE. Celebrate the 26th birthday of Doobie, the winery’s famous miniature donkey! The winery’s biggest event of the year boasts live music, wine slushies, bbq fare, annual cornhole tournament and vendors. Admission is free.

Glen Motor Inn

Motel and Restaurant Breathtaking View From Every Room Exceptional Service and Outstanding Food Casual Comfort • Centrally Located Franzese Family Owned and Operated since 1937

k

1 mile north of Watkins Glen on State Route 14

607-535-2706 www.glenmotorinn.com “The only thing we overlook is Seneca Lake!”

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Aug. 17, Limited Release Wine Tasting, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Swedish Hill Winery, Romulus, NY. 800-549-WINE. Each year, the winery introduces two new wines at this limited tasting. The winemakers have been experimenting with new varietals, blends and styles, and two will be served at the event.

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August 2013


Wine Tasting Room and Boutique Shop: Daily 10 am - 5 pm Lunch: Daily 11 am - 4 pm Dinner: Thursday - Saturday 5 pm - 9 pm Sunday 2 pm - 7 pm Dinner featuring the German Buffet on Friday & Saturday Evenings

3380 County Road 28 • Watkins Glen, NY

www.castelgrisch.com

607-535-9614

August 2013

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SCENIC, FUN & TASTEFUL WINE TOURS!

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COUNTRY INNS / B&BS 1811 ADDISON HOUSE BED & BREAKFAST

A warm welcome awaits you at this fully restored historic home. Enjoy a full gourmet breakfast in our sumptuous dining room. Spend your day cross-country skiing, hiking, antiquing, or travel the wine trail. Relax in our library. Excellent nearby restaurants. Located in Susquehanna County– Choconut PA, Route 267 South. 570-553-2682. www.1811addison.com COLONIAL BRICK INN & SUITES–

Come and enjoy Pennsylvania hospitality at its finest. Call to reserve your special occasion package. Winter ski or summer golf packages, we will cater to guests all seasons of the year. New meeting room and free Internet in rooms. 25161 Route 11, Hallstead. 570-879-2162 or 1-800-290-3922. www.ColonialBrickInn.com CRESCENT LODGE–

Reserve our cabin in the woods in the heart of the Poconos. Stone fireplace, wood paneling, canopy bed with TV, Jacuzzi for two, covered deck and balcony. Nearby find a spa, casino, antiquing & outlet shopping. Enjoy our pub and restaurant. Super Pasta Night every Wednesday! Paradise Valley. Cresco, PA 800-392-9400. www.CrescentLodge.com DRIFTWOOD INN B&B & FAMILY COTTAGES– Located in the heart of the Finger Lakes Region on the shore of beautiful Cayuga Lake. We offer six rooms in the B&B, and our cottages can accommodate just about any size family. Bring this ad and receive a free bottle of wine with your stay! 7401 Wyers Point Rd., Ovid, NY 888-532-4324. www.driftwoodny.com THE FRENCH MANOR– Romantic country inn modeled after a French chateau. Gourmet French cuisine, excellent wines. AAA 4-Diamond Award Winner for lodging & dining. Luxurious suites with fireplace, Jacuzzis & balcony. New GREEN spa, Le Spa Foret. Includes indoor pool, hot tub, fitness room, couples’ massage suite, fireplace, pedicures & more. South Sterling, PA. 1-877-720-6090. www.TheFrenchManor.com. www.JamesManningHouse.com

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COUNTRY INNS / B&BS THE JAMES MANNING HOUSE– Enjoy a peaceful stay at this historic 1819 Federal-style house two miles north of Honesdale, PA.Three guest rooms, each with private baths, central AC,TV and WI-FI, feature handmade quilts and antiques. Hearty breakfasts include home-baked goodies served with genuine PA Dutch hospitality. Bethany, PA. 570-253-5573.

POCONO PINES MOTOR INN & COTTAGES– Tall pines shade this year-round family resort next to “The Big Lake” & winter ski slopes. Cottages, kitchenettes, motel rooms & a three-bedroom lodge with fireplace are available. Cable TV, DVD,VCR, outdoor pool, BBQ’s & private boat docks. Boating, fishing, shops & restaurants close by. 345 Rte. 507, Tafton. 570-226-2772. www.PoconoPinesMotorInn.com SILVER STRAND BED & BREAKFAST– Directly on Cayuga Lake in Sheldrake, and in the heart of the Cayuga Wine Trail. Offering a private beach, complimentary use of boats and bicycles. All guest rooms have private bath and private balcony, two with double Jacuzzi and gas fireplace. 7398 Wyers Point Road, Ovid, NY. 800-283-5253. www.silverstrand.net STONE BRIDGE INN & RESTAURANT– European-style inn, restaurant & tavern in a spectacular country setting. 13 charming rooms, with private baths,TV, A/C, several with fireplaces, free WI-FI. Continental breakfast, indoor pool/hot tub, horseback riding. Excellent dinner cuisine. Exit 206, Rt. 374 East two miles past Elk Mountain, Union Dale. 570-679-9200. www.Stone-Bridge-Inn.com.

Great Prices! SAVINGS UP TO 70%

POLISH POTTERY as seen on QVC

Cranberry Glass • Birdbaths Large Selection of Fiestaware and so much more!

Holley Ross Pottery Products from over 135 Manufacturers Route 191,La Anna • Midway between Cresco & Newfoundland • 35 minutes from Scranton Open May 1-Mid Dec. • www.holleyross.com • 570-676-3248

August 2013

Join Kelly & her family at Lake Road Cafe at Lake Winola for a delicious, homemade meal. Open 7 days a week 7 a.m.-3 p.m.

914 Lake Road, Lake Winola

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

(570) 378-2284

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AUGUST HAPPENINGS Special Events Aug. 1-4, 25th Annual AFBA Bluegrass Festival, Thu 3-11 p.m., Fri-Sat. 11a.m.-midnight, Sun. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Mountain View Park,Wind Gap. 610-253-2800 Aug. 1-31, Ghost Walk, 7 p.m., downtown Scranton. 383-9297. Aug. 1-31, Historic Farm Tours, Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m., Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm, Stroudsburg. 992-6161. Aug. 2-4, 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament, downtown Scranton. Aug. 2-3, Blueberry Festival, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.,Village Green Montrose. 278-1881. Aug. 2-10,Wayne County Fair, Wayne County Fairgrounds, Honesdale. www.waynecountyfair.com

Aug. 3, Old Stone AUGUST Jail Tour, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Old Stone Jail, SUN MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT Honesdale. 2531 2 3 3240. www.wayne4 5 6 7 8 9 10 historypa.org.

11 Aug. 4,11,18 & 25, Historic House 18 House Tour, 1-3 25 p.m., Forty Fort Meeting House, Forty Fort. 287-5214.

12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31

Aug. 4, Hats Off to the Everhart, Patsel’s, Clarks Summit. 563-2000. Aug. 4,11,18 & 25, Historic House Tours, 1-4 p.m., Nathan Denison House, Forty Fort. 288-1044.

Village Green, Eagles Mere. 525-3370.

Aug. 10, French Azilum Heritage Day, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., French Azilum Historical Site,Towanda. 746-9140. Aug. 10,WOOFstock 2013, noon7 p.m., Salt Springs Park, Franklin Forks. 278-1228.

Aug. 4,11 & 18,Trolley Excursion to PNC Field, 12:15 p.m., downtown Scranton. 963-6590.

Aug. 11, An Afternoon of Delights, 4 p.m., Old Mill Village Midtown Park, New Milford. 934-2297.

Aug. 7-11, Carbon County Fair, Carbon County Fairgrounds, Palmerton. 610-826-1862.

Aug. 11, Car Show, Moffat Estate, Moscow.

Aug. 3-4, 9th Annual Festival of Wood, Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Grey Towers National Historic Site, Milford. www.greytowers.org.

Aug. 7, Hot Summer Night, Pen Can Speedway, Susquehanna. www.penncan.com.

Aug. 12-17, 75th Annual Montour-Delong Community Fair, Montour Delong Fairgrounds, Danville. 437-2178.

Aug. 3-4, Antique Show & Sale, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,Wallenpaupack Area High School, Hawley. 296-3539. www.WPSADA.com.

Aug. 9, 5th Annual Raising the Rooftop Party, 5-8 p.m., Intermodal Center,Wilkes-Barre. 823-0156.

Aug. 14-17, Carbondale Pioneer Nights Ethnic Heritage Festival, downtown Carbondale. 282-4633.

Aug. 3, Artfest, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Center Street, downtown Bloomsburg. 784-2522.

Aug. 9-10, Christy Mathewson Days, Fri. Noon-10 p.m., Sun. 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Keystone College, Factoryville. 954-6755.

Aug. 3, Blue Mountain Beer & Wine Festival, noon-4 p.m., Blue Mountain Ski Area, Palmerton. 826-7700. Aug. 3-4, Blueberry Fields Festival, Berry Fields Farm Guest House, near Forksville. 924-3019. Aug. 3, Forest City Summer Fest & Light Parade, 9 a.m., downtown Forest City. Aug. 3-4, Jazz Festival, downtown Scranton. 138

Aug. 10, Bloomsburg Nationals, 2-4:30 p.m., Bloomsburg Fairgrounds, Bloomsburg. 717-243-7855. Aug. 10, Jack Ass Day, noon-5 p.m., Swedish Hill Winery, Romulus, NY. www.swedishhill.com Aug. 10 -11, Eagles Mere Arts & Crafts Festival, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,

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Aug. 15-18, Pittston Tomato Festival, downtown Pittston. 655-1424. Aug. 17, 21st Annual Pioneer Day, Pioneer Tunnel Coal Mine & Steam Train, Ashland. 875-3850. Aug. 17, Carbondale’s Ethnic Heritage Festival Explorer Train, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Steamtown National Historic Site, Scranton. 348-3003. Aug. 17, Foodstock ’13, 6:30 p.m., Patsel’s, Clarks Summit. 563-2000. www.patsels.com

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AUGUST HAPPENINGS Aug. 17-18, Living History & Civil War Weekend, Eckley Miners Village,Weatherly. 636-2070. Aug. 17, Shawnee Mountain Mud Run, 9:30 a.m., Shawnee Mountain, Stroudsburg. 421-7231. Aug. 18, Car Show, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Pittston Commons, Pittston. Aug. 18, Hoover One Room School House Tour, 1-4 p.m., Route 2014,West Clifford. 679-2723. Aug. 18, Museum of Local History Tour, 1-4 p.m., Clifford Community Center, Clifford. 679-2723. Aug. 19-24, Harford Fair, 8 a.m.10 p.m., Harford Agricultural Society Fairgrounds, Harford. 434-4300. Aug. 23,Tunkhannock 4th Friday, 6-9 p.m., downtown Tunkhannock. 687-1584. Aug. 23-25,Wally Fest, Lake Wallenpaupack, Hawley. www.wallylakefest.com. Aug. 24 25, 27th Annual Pocono State Craft Festival, Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm, Stroudsburg. www.poconocrafts.com Aug. 25-Sept. 1,West End Fair, West End Fairgrounds, Gilbert. 610-681-4293. Aug. 28-Sept. 2, Kiwanis Wyoming County Fair, Wyoming County Fairgrounds,West Meshoppen. 836-5502. Aug. 28-Sept. 2, Sullivan County Fair, Forksville Fairgrounds, Forksville. 924-3205. Aug. 31, Salt Springs Celebration, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Salt Springs Park, Franklin Forks. 967-7275.

August 2013

Aug. 31-Sept. 1, Civil War Reenactment, No. 9 Mine Museum, Lansford. 645-7074. Aug. 31-Sept. 2, La Festa Italiana, Courthouse Square, Scranton.

Aug. 9, Scavenger Hunt, 5 p.m., downtown Danville. 284-4502. Aug. 10, Concern4Kids Charity Golf Tournament, Edgewood Pines, Drums. www.concern4kids.org.

Aug. 31-Sept. 2, Railfest, Aug. 11, 5th Annual Pauly Steamtown National Historic Site, Friedman 5K Family Walk/Run, Scranton. 340-5204. 9:30 a.m., Misericordia University, Dallas. 823-5144.

Community Events

Aug. 11, St. Rose of Lima Family Picnic, McDonnell’s Grove, Carbondale. 282-2991.

Aug. 1-3, 21st Annual Our Lady of the Snows Country Bazaar, Thurs-Fri. 6-11 p.m., Sat. 5-11 p.m., Aug. 15, Battle of the Books, 5:30 p.m.,The Mall at Steamtown, Church of St. Benedict grounds, Scranton. 587-3440. Clarks Summit. Aug. 16-18, 8th Annual Blessed Aug. 2-4, Catholic Charismatic Sacrament Parish Family Renewal of the Diocese of Scranton, University of Scranton, Festival, Parish Grounds Hall, Throop. 489-1963/489-0752. Scranton. 344-2214. Aug. 17,Tricky Tray, 5 p.m., Aug. 2, Coal Cracker Cruisers Car Club, 6-9 p.m., Advance Auto Blooming Grove Volunteer Fire Department, Lords Valley. Parts, Carbondale. 876-4034. 775-7355. Aug. 2-3 & 9-10, Corn Roast & Aug. 18, Pancake Breakfast, 7:30Peach Fest, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., 11:30 a.m., Pine Mill Community Rohrbach’s Farm Market & Gift Hall, Equinunk. 224-8500. Shop, Catawissa. 356-7654. Aug. 18,The Hellbender 5K Aug. 3, Flea Market, 8 a.m.-2 Marathon, 8:30 a.m., Weiser State p.m., United Methodist Church, Gouldsboro. 842-8738/842-6106. Forest, Roaring Creek Tract, Bear Gap. 799-0167 Aug. 3, Obon Lantern Ceremony, 5:30-10 p.m., Endless Aug. 18,The Wilkes-Barre Triathlon, Harvey’s Lake. 270-4793. Mountain Zendo, Stillwater. 925-5077. Aug. 22, 2nd Annual Marcellus Open, 11 a.m., Stone Hedge Aug. 3, Groundbreaking Root Vegetable Cook-Off, 2-3:30 p.m., Country Club, Factoryville. 836-5108. Abington Community Library. 587-3440. Aug. 23-24, Kielbasa Festival, Aug. 6 & 20, New and Full Moon Main St., Plymouth. Celebrations, 7 p.m., Columcille www.plymouthalive.org Megalith Park and Celtic Cultural Aug. 23, St. Stanislaus’ 5th Center, Bangor. 610-588-1174. Annual Block Party, 5-10 p.m., Aug. 8, 56th Ice Cream Social & corner of East Elm St. & Pittston Ave., Scranton. 343-6017/961-9231. Cake Festival, 5 p.m., Bloomsburg Town Park, Aug. 24, Chicken on the Run Take Bloomsburg. 717-329-8039. Out Chicken Barbeque, 2-6 p.m., United Methodist Church, Dalton. 563-1248/945-5586. ☛ HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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AUGUST HAPPENINGS Aug. 24, Music on the Lawn Craft Fair & Yard Sale, 1 p.m., Lake Winola United Methodist Church, Mill City. 351-7365. Aug. 24, Leon Striefsky Memorial Tournament, Sleepy Hollow Golf Course, Greenfield Twp. 282-7999. Aug. 24,“Pig Pickin/Corn Roastin Good Time,” 10:30 a.m.4 p.m., Catawissa Boat Club, Catawissa. 784-9272. Aug. 25, Camp Victory’s 19th Annual Dr. O’s Victory Ride, 8 a.m., Camp Victory, Millville. 458-6530. Aug. 25, Lackawanna Audubon Society Annual Dinner, 5 p.m., Inn of the Abingtons. 586-5156/346-8225. Aug. 31, Chicken Barbeque, noon-6 p.m., Gouldsboro United Methodist Church, Gouldsboro. 842-6106/842-8738.

Concerts Aug. 1, 8,15, 22 & 29, Berwick Summer Concert Series, 7-9 p.m., Jackson Mansion Lawn, Berwick. 752-2723. Aug. 1-10, Buck Hill Skytop Music Festival, Skytop Lodge, Skytop. 855-345-7759. www.skytop.com.

Aug. 2, First Friday Open Mic Night, 7-9 p.m., Cocoon Coffee House, Hawley. 226-6130.

Aug. 4 & 18, Milford’s Music in the Park Summer Concert Series, Ann Street Park, Milford.

Aug. 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29, Jazz Jam, The Deer Head Inn, Delaware Water Gap. 424-2000.

Aug. 4, Music in The Park, 10:30 a.m. worship service, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., live music, Clifford Fireman’s Fairgrounds, Clifford. 679-2766.

Aug. 1, Joe Stanky and the Cadets, 7:30 p.m., Honesdale’s Central Park, Honesdale. Aug. 1, 8,15, 22 & 29, Live Music with John Curtain, 7-10 p.m., Glass, Hawley. 226-1337.

Aug. 4, 11, 18 & 25, Summer Gazebo Concert Series, 6 p.m., The Presbyterian Church of the Mountain, Delaware Water Gap. 476-0345.

Aug. 2, 9,16, 23 & 30, Live Music Friday, 8-11 p.m., Glass, Hawley. 226-1337.

Aug. 4,The Marty Wilson Trio, The Deer Head Inn, Delaware Water Gap. 424-2000.

Aug. 2,The Dave Liebman Master Class Performance, The Deer Head Inn, Delaware Water Gap. 424-2000.

Aug. 7,14, 21 & 28, Jazz on the Deck, 6-9 p.m.,The Settlers Inn, Hawley. 226-2993.

Aug. 3, A Night of Classical Music, 8 p.m., Dewire Center, Eagles Mere. 525-3672. Aug. 3, Eileen Ivers & Immigrant Soul, 6 p.m., Dorflinger-Suydam Wildlife Sanctuary,White Mills. 253-5500. Aug. 4, A Tribute to ABBA, 8 p.m., Dewire Center, Eagles Mere. 525-3672. www.emfoa.net. Aug. 4,11,18 & 25, Blues, Brew & BBQ, 6-9 p.m., Glass, Hawley. 226-1337.

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30th PITTSTON TOMATO FESTIVAL Thursday-Sunday August 15-18 Delicious Homemade Food Live Entertainment • Parade 5K Run • Pittston Tomatoes & Produce • Tomato Sauce Competition • Tomato Contest Queen Scholarship Pageant

Aug. 7, Senator John Blake & Friends, 6 p.m.-dusk, Hillside Park,Winola Road. Aug. 9, Amina Figarova, The Deer Head Inn, Delaware Water Gap. 424-2000. Aug. 10, Lew Tabackin, The Deer Head Inn, Delaware Water Gap. 424-2000. Aug. 10,Tizer, 6 p.m., DorflingerSuydam Wildlife Sanctuary,White Mills. 253-5500. Aug. 11, Celebrate Harmony, 7 p.m., Irem Temple Country Club pavilion. 287-2476.

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AUGUST HAPPENINGS Aug. 11,The Farm Hands Bluegrass Quartet, 7 p.m., Dimock Camp meeting Grounds, Dimock. 457-0379. Aug. 11, Kansas, The Sherman Theater, Stroudsburg. 420-2808.

Aug. 18, Music in the Mountains, 4 p.m., Eagles Mere. 525-3248. Aug. 19, Black Onion, 7:30 p.m., Central Park, Honesdale.

Aug. 12, Doug Rogers and the Hoi Polloy, 7:30 p.m., Honesdale’s Central Park, Honesdale.

Aug. 21, Gathering of Singers & Songwriters 11, 7:30 p.m., Dietrich Theater,Tunkhannock. 996-1500.

Aug. 14,The Wannabees Duo, 6 p.m.-dusk, Hillside Park,Winola Road.

Aug. 21,Two Minute Warning, 6p.m.-dusk, Hillside Park,Winola Road.

Aug. 14,We The Kings, The Sherman Theater, Stroudsburg. 420-2808.

Aug. 22, Fiddlin’ Around, 7:30 p.m., Central Park, Honesdale.

Aug. 15,The Crackers, 7:30 p.m., Central Park, Honesdale. Aug. 15, Cheech & Chong with WAR & Tower of Power, 7:30 p.m., Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY. Aug. 17, A Cole Porter Evening, 8 p.m., Dewire Center, Eagles Mere. 525-3672. www.emfoa.org.

Aug. 23, 4th Fridays Acoustic Music, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Abington Community Library. 587-3440. Aug. 23, New Orleans Jazz BBQ, 5-10 p.m.,The Settlers Inn, Hawley. 226-2993. Aug. 24, Roseanne Cash, 8 p.m., Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY.

Aug. 17, Newman/Oltman Guitar Duo, 7:30 p.m., Milford Theatre, Milford. 409-1269.

Aug. 25, An Evening with Precious Seed, 7 p.m., Dimock Camp meeting Grounds, Dimock. 457-0379.

Aug. 17, Susan Winter, 6 p.m., Dorflinger-Suydam Wildlife Sanctuary,White Mills. 253-5500.

Aug. 26, COTA All Stars, The Deer Head Inn, Delaware Water Gap. 424-2000.

Aug. 17, Pickin’ at Forest Lake, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Forest Lake Vol. Fire Co., Montrose. 396-5906.

Aug. 28,The Fab Three, 6 p.m.Dusk, Hillside Park,Winola Road.

Aug. 31, Maureen McGovern “The Long & Winding Road,” 8 p.m., Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY.

Theatre Aug. 1-4, Les Miserables, The Music Box Dinner Playhouse, Swoyersville. 283-2195. Aug. 3, New York City Ballet Dancers’“See the Music,” 7:30 p.m.,The Notre Dame High School, East Stroudsburg. 616-0317. Aug. 22,“A Few of Our Favorite Things Cabaret,” The Shawnee Playhouse, Shawnee on Delaware. 421-5093.

Art Exhibits Aug. 3,“The Enchanted Earth,” Monroe Co. Conservation District’s Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Aug. 9, Chamber Gallery Show, 6-9 p.m., Greater Carbondale Chamber of Commerce, Carbondale. Aug. 10-23,“Current Hues of the Hudson, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY. www.BethelWoodsCenter.org.

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AUGUST HAPPENINGS Aug. 16-Sept. 1, Ken Metcalf Exhibit, The Antoine Dutot Museum & Gallery, Delaware Water Gap. 476-4240. Aug. 22-Sept. 29,“The Sights and Sounds of Color,” 6-8 p.m., Artspace Gallery, Bloomsburg. 784-9272. Aug. 24,Twin Covered Bridge Fine Arts Festival, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Twin Covered Bridge Park, Orangeville. 1-800-847-4810.

Seminars & Lectures Aug. 1, Memory Test, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Hawley Senior Center, Hawley. 253-4262. Aug. 5, Gathering Basket Workshop, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Home Textile Tool Museum, Orwell. 744-2653. Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24 & 31,Tastings Demos, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Mill Market, Hawley Silk Mill, Hawley. 390-4440. Aug. 6, Monthly World Peace Meditation & Reiki Circle, 5-7 p.m., Self Discovery Wellness Arts Center, Montrose. 278-9256. Aug. 5,12 &17, O,The Drama : A Theater Club for Beginner & Intermediates, 6-8 p.m., Abington Community Library. 587-3440. Aug. 6,13 &17, Scripts for the Stage: A Class in Intermediate Playwriting, 6-8 p.m., Abington Community Library. 587-3440. Aug. 9-11 & 11-16, Pocono Quilt Camp, Pocono Environmental Education Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. Aug. 10, Introduction to Home Canning: Jam, 10 a.m.-noon, Pocono Environmental Education Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. 142

Aug. 10 & 24, Moonlit Drumming, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Pocono Environmental Education Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. Aug. 10, Pro Series: Ferns Lycophytes, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Pocono Environmental Education Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. Aug. 12, Autism and the Arts Workshop, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Keystone Theatre,Towanda. www.bcrac.org. Aug. 12, Hat & Scarf Felting Workshop, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Home Textile Tool Museum, Orwell. 744-2653. Aug. 13, Adult Admissions Office Open House, 4-7 p.m., Misericordia University, Dallas. 674-6791. Aug. 16, Advanced Cheese Making Workshop, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Home Textile Tool Museum, Orwell. 744-2653. Aug. 16,“Ice Harvesting in Wayne County,” 5-6 p.m.,Wayne County Historical Society Honesdale. 253-3240. Aug. 16-18,Think OutsideThe Shoe Crafting Event, Fri. 1-4 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 1-5 p.m.,The Oldest House, Laceyville. 869-1679. Aug. 17, Guest Lectures on Textiles, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Home Textile Tool Museum, Orwell. 278-1886. Aug. 17, Up On the Ridge, 10 a.m., Monroe Co. Conservation District Environmental EdCenter, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Aug. 22,Wayne County Genealogy Group, Wayne County Historical Society, Honesdale. 253-5468. HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Aug. 23,“The Pennsylvania Coal Company Gravity Railroad,” 5-6 p.m.,Wayne County Historical Society, Honesdale. 253-3240. Aug. 24, Guest Lecture on Weaving, 11 a.m., Home Textile Tool Museum, Orwell. 278-1886. Aug. 30,“A Feel for Dorflinger Glass,” 5-6 p.m.,Wayne County Historical Society Multi-Purpose Room, Honesdale. 253-3240.

Nature Aug. 2-4, Dog Days of Summer Family Nature Getaway Weekend, Pocono Environmental Education Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. Aug. 3,“Retain the Rain” Scavenger Hunt, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Education Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Aug. 3, 17 & 31,Traversing Tremendous Trails, Salt Springs Park, Franklin Forks. 967-7275. Aug. 4, Public Bog Walk, 1 p.m., Bog parking lot, Cherry Lane Road,Tannersville. 629-3061. Aug. 5, Stillwater Cliffs & Special Places Hike, 9 a.m., D&H Rail Trail, Forest City. www.nepa-rail-trails.org. Aug. 7,14, 21& 28,Tannersville Bog Walk, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Tannersville Bog Parking Area, Cherry Lane Road,Tannersville. 629-3061. Aug. 10, Insect Bingo, 10 a.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Aug. 11, Sunday for Singles Nature Hike, 1-3 p.m., Pocono Environmental Education Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319.

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AUGUST HAPPENINGS Aug. 13-14,Two-Day Canoe Trip, Monroe County Environmental Education Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Aug. 14 & 28, Family Fishing Program, 2-4:30 p.m., Promised Land State Park Falls Pavilion, Greentown. 676-0567. Aug. 17, Dragonfly Walk, 1-3 p.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. Aug. 17, Frog Frenzy, 1-3 p.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. Aug. 17-18, Girls Weekend – Women in the Woods, Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. Aug. 17-18, Gravity Easter Series Downhill Mountain Bike Race, Blue Mountain Ski Area, Palmerton. 610-826-7700. Aug. 22, Bog Walk – Center of the Bog, 10 a.m.,Tannersville Bog Parking Area, Cherry Lane Road, Tannersville. 629-3061. Aug. 22, Fern Walk, 2 p.m., Western Wayne Middle School parking lot, Lake Ariel. 676-0567. Aug. 23, Moonlight Paddle on

Lake Lacawac, 7-10 p.m., Delaware Highlands Conservancy Sanctuary, Lake Ariel. Aug. 24, Butterfly Walk, 1-3 p.m., Pocono Environmental EdCenter, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. Aug. 24, Public Bog Walk, 2 p.m., Tannersville Bog Parking Area, Cherry Lane Road,Tannersville. 629-3061. Aug. 24, Summer Tree ID, 10 a.m., Monroe Co Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Aug. 24,Towanda RiverFest Kayak Paddle Trip, 9:30 a.m., Towanda River Fest,Towanda. 746-9140. Aug. 25, Go Green Bike Tour, Lackawanna State Park, North Abington. countrysideconservancy.org Aug. 31, Lewisburg Appetizer, 1-4:30 p.m., Milton State Park, Sunbury. 524-7692.

Kids Corner Aug. 1-16, PEEC Summer Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Pocono Environmental EdCenter, Dingmans Ferry. 828-2319. www.peec.org.

Aug. 5-9, Earth Connections Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Lackawanna College Environmental Institute, Covington Township. 842-1506. Aug. 5-9, Kingdom Rock Vacation Bible School, Elm Park United Methodist Church, Scranton. 342-8263. Aug. 7, Nature Arts & Crafts in the Park, 10 a.m.-noon, Promised Land State Park Falls Pavilion, Greentown. 676-0567. Aug. 7, Summer Fun Day, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Children’s Museum, Bloomsburg. 389-9206. Aug. 9 & 16, Free Friday Art Show, Children’s Museum, Bloomsburg. 389-9206. Aug. 15,Tech Smart 4 Kids Safety, 7 p.m., Abington Community Library. 587-3440. Aug. 9, Gardening Fun, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Abington Community Library. 587-3440. Aug. 10, Steampunk Jewelry Making, 2-4 p.m., Abington Community Library. 587-3440. Aug. 17, Carbondale Kiwanis Club Kiddies Day, 9 a.m.-noon, Russell Park, Carbondale. 282-2662ext 8154.

Find more August events at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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Kittatinny Canoes La Tonalteca Lackawanna College Lackawanna County Lake Road Café Lake Wallenpaupack Region Lakeside Resort Lanard Ledges Hotel Louie’s Prime Steak House Luzerne County Luzerne County Fair Made in PA Manning Farm Dairy Mariotti Marshall Parker & Weber, LLC MCR Mercer Museum & Fonthill Castle Minooka Subaru Montour Delong Fair Mountain View Vineyard, Winery & Distillery New Balance New York Life Nichols Village Hotel & Spa Nick’s Lake House No. 9 Mine & Museum Nye Jewelers Olde Barn Centre Orthodontic Specialists Our Lady of the Snows Country Bazaar PA Cyber Pandora Paradise Fishing Preserve Patsel’s Pearl S. Buck House Penn Furniture Pennstar Perkins Restaurant & Bakery Pittston Tomato Festival Pocono Action Sports Pocono State Craft Festival POSH Powell Law Preppy Pet Quaker Steak & Lube Quality Wine Tours Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel Rave Patio Red Dragon Karate USA Regal Room Ruth’s Chris Steak House Settlers Inn Shawnee Inn Shenanigans Shoppes at Montage Six East Restaurant Smuggler’s Cove St. Mary’s Villa Residence Sullivan County Catskills, NY Summer Fun Guide Taylor Family Dental Teeters’ Furniture Treasure Hunting Truly Scrumptious Twigs Restaurant & Catering UTA Karate Van Gorders’ Furniture Viewmont Mall Wally Lake Fest Weis Markets Where to Dine Whitewater Challengers Wilbur Chocolate Willow Tree Shop Wisnosky Jewelers Woodloch Resort WVIA Studios Wyoming County/Tunkhannock Zacharellis Gardens

Magazine

114 99 75 109 137 130 134 25 93 102 125 111 72 & 73 89 61 69 29 127 119 111 72 75 67 40 102 115 41 53 35 111 83 19 119 97 127 65 59 136 140 133 113 14 71 56 136 135 138 52 83 19 37 93 73 102 137 101 101 69 114 114 85 131 52 19 101 141 63 85 113 77 94 & 95 119 72 72 11 45 144 105 35

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DICKSON CITY Exit 191a off of I-81 4005 Commerce Boulevard 570.489.LUBE (5823) There's ALWAYS something happening at The Lube! From Tuesday's All-You-Can-Eat Wing Night, Everyday Happy Hour from 8-10 p.m. and Half Price Appetizers from 8 p.m.-close... and so much more! QUICK LUBE ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT LUNCH BUFFET Monday-Friday 11 a.m.-2 p.m. featuring our famous Wings, Hot Entrées, Full Salad Bar, Soup & More! $10.99 MONDAY - KIDS NITE 5-8 p.m., $1.99 kids meals (with adult purchase), free face painting, play Wii on the big screen, Crafts with Coop our mascot on select nites! EVERY NITE IS MOVIE NITE at THE LUBE! Stop by the Lube to Win FREE IMAX Movie Gift Cards daily on our prize wheel! $15 Movie Meal Deal - Lube Burger, Side & Fountain Beverage plus Movie Ticket.* Present your ticket stub for daily discounts and specials! *Regular Movie ticket not valid on IMAX or 3D REV UP YOUR WEDNESDAY WITH QUAKER STEAK & LUBE BIKE NITE from 6 ’til close all summer long! Great Food & Drinks, Entertainment & Happy Hour from 8-10 p.m.! See you at The Lube®! Also Located in BLOOMSBURG Exit 232 off of I-80 211 Columbia Mall Drive 570.389.WING (9464)

570.387.0490 570.387.6702 Get 10% OFF Accommodations!

www.quakersteakandlube.com Order Online @ www.lubewingstofly.com

E. STROUDSBURG BLOOMSBURG DICKSON CITY MOUNT POCONO STROUDSBURG WILKES-BARRE 563 Milford Road 570-223-0600

MATAMORAS

Exit 232 off of I-80 Exit 191a off of I-81 570-963-1115 570-784-1140

DANVILLE

HAZLETON

103 Westfall Town Dr. Exit 224 off of I-80 Exit 145 off of I-81 570-275-1529 570-491-4341 570-455-0313

Exit 3 off of I-380 570-839-0300

Exit 305 off of I-80 570-421-6263

PITTSTON

TUNKHANNOCK

I-81 & Rte 315 570-883-5682

615 SR 6 East, Suite 1 570-996-0157

Exit 165 off of I-81 570-823-7264


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Profile for Happenings Magazine

August 2013 Happenings Magazine  

Summer wedding guide, ways to buy local, fairs and festivals and events across the NEPA region!

August 2013 Happenings Magazine  

Summer wedding guide, ways to buy local, fairs and festivals and events across the NEPA region!