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A G A Z I N

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RACHEL SPAAN – ‘OCEAN’ CHRIS GRUNDY CHARLEY GREENFIELD MADHAV GOYAL – THE PORTFOLIO ROCCA LUIS CESAR ANNA KOVESI – ‘COLLECTING ISSUES’ VIKS BIKES

M E


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MADHAV G OYAL THE PORTFOL I O PAGE 56


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V IKS PAG E 9 8 ISSUE FOUR 'THE ELEGANT ISSUE' © HANKER MAGAZINE


E DI TO R S L ET T ER ISSUE # 4 – T HE ‘ELEGA NT ’ IS S UE NEW YEAR, NEW LAYOUT! Welcome to the fourth issue, the 'elegant' issue. A lot of time preparing this issue was spent trying to figure out what exactly elegant is and trying to convey that throughout this issue. I have come to discover though, that the meaning comes down to an individuals perception, so this issue may not be what you consider to be elegant. Issue Four features an array of awesome creatives including; Rachel Spaan, photographers Chris Grundy and Charley Greenfield, Maddy Goyal, Anna Kovesi, Rocca Luis César and also Viks bikes. On other news, we now have a website where you can keep up to date on Hanker Magazine between issues. We also plan to have content added to the site that may not be published, so check it out from time to time. Just like the last issue Hanker Magazine is available in print and digital download. Go to www.hankermagazine.com for details. As always thank you to everyone that contributed to the creation of this issue and thank you to everybody reading and viewing this magazine. I hope you enjoy the contents within this issue and I encourage you to go and check out the featured.

Dillon McIntosh Founding Editor www.hankermagazine.com Cover Image: Chris Grundy 13


Rachel Spaan

OCEAN The ocean is the most understated and simple beauty that we hold on this earth. In times when we need answers, in times we feel overwhelmed, it's simplistic beauty has the soothing ability to renew and empower us. It is gentle and soothing, yet powerful and authoritative. We can never control its forces, we can be swept away into its depts, never to return at its liking. We fear at its most hostile times, yet we have endless curiosity for what lies below. It beauty holds the power to overwhelm and transform you. When immersed in its power we are at our most vulnerable state, we are open to its every command. In the waves crashing, in the water being drawn back into its hands, there is a voice, a voice of reason that has the ability to ease thoughts and answer questions. Even when life takes you away from home, the songs of the sea will still be the same and they will take your thoughts home. Homesick, lost or struggling, there will always be part of home with you by the sea. It never leaves, it will always be there, as it ages it beauty only grows. If your struggles consume you, immerse yourself in it and let it sooth your pain and answer your questions. The ocean is one of the only simple beauties we have left in this world, immerse yourself in it.

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DILLON MCINTOSH


Chris

GRUNDY


Chris Grundy is a 21 years old, freelance photographer based in Sydney, Australia. He was born in London, lived there for two years and then moved to Australia and has been living in here ever since. When did you first start photography? Well, my dad gave me his old film camera, a Nikon f801s a couple of years ago. I shot a few rolls of film, got them developed and was hooked ever since then I guess. Not long after that I got myself a pretty basic dslr, and soon fell in love with it. Then around a year later I saved up some money and having been adding and changing the setup ever since. Still have the same film camera to this day. It really has become a form of an addiction; I absolutely love it and enjoy every moment of it, especially when you get a keeper! Who or what inspires you the most? So many people have an influence on the work I produce. I’m constantly viewing the work of others and draw inspiration from them. Trent Mitchell and Morgan Maassen I feel have had a major influence on my work. They both have very creative minds, and I love when their work pops up! I recently purchased Trent’s books and they leave me pretty speechless every time I open them. What is it about the ocean that you love the most? The ocean is a form that is constantly changing, where no moment is ever the same. By depicting raw elements and isolating them, my work explores the notions of change, motion and form. The oceans personality can never be identified, but it’s a concept that can be explored and documented. Different emotions can be conveyed, by exposing these elements which others may not be able to see or envision. There are different levels, in which you can meet at, but this will vary on your knowledge as an individual and yet the idea may still not be clear. The ocean is a body, which displays a diverse range of faces at any given time. I intend on documenting these elements and show others my interpretation on this vision. My interest in photography grew almost instantly and is a transformation of things that dwells inside me, and when they find their exit out, it is through this very medium. What is a usual outing with the camera? Depends really, but generally I’ll get up in the early hours of the morning, drive to a location usually on the Northern Beaches, and make sure I arrive well before first light. I’ll typically do some long exposure work

up until around sunrise. Then I usually grab a coffee and head somewhere else and shoot the surf for a few hours. Drive back home, make breakfast and edit away, then I’ll share the keepers on Facebook/Instagram. Tell us about your trip to India... When did you go and how long for? I left on the 23rd of November and had a month all up over there, exploring both India and Nepal. We based the majority of our travel around the major cities, but if I were to do it again, I would go to more isolated locations and probably venture down South. Was this your first overseas adventure? No, it wasn’t. There’s still a lot more countries I would like to tick off, hopefully I’ll be heading to the States for 6 months at the start of next year. What was the highlight? Well, in terms of culture both Varanasi and The Thar Desert were the two big standouts in my opinion. For me Varanasi was unreal, never have I ever been to a place that hit me so hard. The camel trek into The Thar Desert was also an experience that I’ll never forget. Sleeping under star lit dunes, and having three meals prepared by an Indian family of 10 that could barely speak a word of English was such an epic experience. Goa, on the West coast of India was also pretty rad! Did you learn anything about yourself or even any new photography tips? Having long blonde hair over there is one way to constantly stared at, for an entire month. In terms of photography, I don’t have many tips. I shot a lot of portraits over there which is totally different to what I usually shoot, so if you’re looking for a cheap interesting adventure and you want explore portraiture or get into it, India is a pretty good way to start. Plus there’s plenty of material over there. Also things like a laptop, hard drives, spare memory cards etc. All come in handy. If you could photograph anywhere in the world, where would it be and why? If I had to choose one country it would have to be Iceland, purely cause of its epic landscapes, variety and isolation. I hope to make this happen within the next two years, fingers crossed. @chrisgrundyphoto www.facebook.com/chrisgrundyphoto 25


Charley

GREENFIELD


Arnhem Dress Ela Hawke Vintage Dress + Top Eau Paix Vie Swim Bottoms Native Riot Accessories


Ela Hawke Vintage Top Native Riot Accessories


Ela Hawke Vintage Crochet Top Gold Ordon Ankle Cuffs


Ela Hawke Vintage Top Eau Paix Vie Swim Bottoms Native Riot Accessories


Native Riot Accessories Eau Paix Vie Swim Bottoms


FACE THE TURNING TIDE Byron Bay has a magical feeling. It is and will always be my favourite place to escape during Melbourne’s cold and bitter winter. Growing up on the road traveling along each coast of Australia I have never had much luck staying in the one place for a long period of time as an adult. Chasing an endless Summer always leads me to Byron Bay. So to be given the opportunity to shoot three beautiful goddesses there in a secluded cove among other incredible locations was an absolute honour. These images are very close to my heart as they personify everything that I love – strong & dreamy women, clear blue waters, healing crystals & those moments of solitude where you can “just be". I believe that a photographer is only as good as their team & I am so grateful for the effort that everyone went to for this shoot.

Words: CharleySDG Art Direction & Photography: CharleySDG Assistant: Mel Savic Fashion Styling: Kirsten Morrison Hair & Make-Up: Elle Howard Set Styling: Sourced by Sam Talent: Taylor @ Tamblyn Angie @ Division B rittany @ Vivien’ www.charleysdg.com

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Native Riot Headpiece Ela Hawke Vintage Dress


Eau Paix Vie Swim Top & Bottoms Ela Hawke Vintage Shawl Gold Ordon Shell Necklace Native Riot Accessories


Arnhem Dress Ela Hawke Vintage Dress + Top Eau Paix Vie Swim Bottoms Native Riot Accessories


Native Riot Headpieces


Haut Boheme Neckpiece Ela Hawke Vintage bottoms


Haut Boheme Neckpiece Ela Hawke Vintage bottoms


Native Riot Accessories


Native Riot Accessories


Madhav Goyal is from India and is the Founder of a community of talented photographers known as The Portfolio. Are you a photographer or just a lover of great photography? I am kind of both, but I am not an active photographer anymore. I used to photograph in high school, but when I couldn't do it regularly, I started supporting other people who did. When did you start The Portfolio; what made you want to start up The Portfolio? In November 2011, when I was active as a photographer, it was very hard for me to create audience for my work and also to improve at the same time. As nobody really wanted to give me tips on how I could be better. So, in order to fix that – I created this page called "The Portfolio", started featuring artists, but nobody thought it was going to work. For two years, till October 2013, the page had only 2500 likes. Then I started giving it a lot of time, I contacted a lot of artists, approached them on every social platform.. and it picked up! How many likes does The Portfolio Facebook page have at this exact moment? 20,369 people like The Portfolio, as of February 22, 2014. Are you surprised by how quickly Portfolio has grown? I wouldn't say it has grown quickly, as the page has been there for more than two years. What surprises me is that so many young artists are coming together to support and inspire each other.

You have a Tumblr page full of conversations with photographers from all over the world, how do you manage to maintain a constant stream of inspiration? I don't plan my conversations, I just start talking to the artists, engaging them in conversational interviews. With less rehearsal there is something much more honest about how they tell their stories and creative process. When I talk about inspiration, I talk about something that stays within you to encourage you to do better and better. If you had to choose one or two photographers that are consistently producing amazing work, who would it be and why? It has to be, Rachel Baran and Melania Brescia. Both of them are doing an excellent job, they are reaching another level of storytelling with each photo they produce. I don't think I need to say much, Go through their stream..their work speaks for itself. What's next for The Portfolio? Any plans for expansion or are you happy to continue with what's happening now? I have a few things in mind, but I don't think I'd be working on it anytime soon. What's happening right now is just the beginning of how Art can be promoted. Let's hope more people join us and take the pledge to inspire.

www.facebook.com/ThePortfolioGroup www.tpgconversations.tumblr.com @portbox

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www.flickr.com/groups/hankermag_communitysubmissions


AARON SEHMAR

AGUSTIN FARIAS

ALESSANDRA AGATE


ANA STEFANOVIC

ANA STEFANOVIC

ANA STEFANOVIC


CELIA BOLTANSKY

AVI FLOYD COHEN

CHARMAINE DE HEIJ


ARTURO OBIZZO

AUSTEN SORENSEN


CHRISTOPHER PREECE

CHRISTOPHER PREECE

DANIEL FARÒ


DANIEL FARÒ


DANIELLE HULLS

DANIELLE HULLS

EDUINA JAUPI


EUGÉNIE ARCHAMBAULT

EUGÉNIE ARCHAMBAULT

EDUINA JAUPI


FEDERICA RINALDI

FEDERICA SANTOLAMAZZA

FEDERICA RINALDI


FEDERICA SANTOLAMAZZA

FEDERICA SANTOLAMAZZA

FEDERICA SANTOLAMAZZA


HARALD WAWRZYNIAK

HARALD WAWRZYNIAK

HARALD WAWRZYNIAK


JULIE STUTZMAN

KENO MEINERS

KENO MEINERS


MICHAEL DIETRICH

MICHAEL DIETRICH


OLIVER LIRIA

OLIVER LIRIA


PIOTR BIENIASZ


TIZIANA CAMBARAU

TIZIANA CAMBARAU

VALERIA SCHETTINO


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Designer and avid magazine collector Anna Kovesi explores the fine line between collecting and hoarding, and why print still has such a powerful and emotional affect over us. My Dad recently asked me what I wanted to do with the retail space under my queen-sized bed currently filled with my ordered piles of old Vogue magazines. I’ve been collecting them since my first year of high school, so there are many. But I don’t live at home anymore, or actually in the same state, so you see my parents don’t want to have my collection for me. A sense of anxiety came over me. They were like old friends, memories, inspiration I got out of their glossy pages from when I was younger. It’s probably why I chose to study Fashion Design. It was the magical era where model Gemma Ward first emerged, Grace Coddington’s finest creative direction took place, I fell in love with the work of photographers Tim Walker and Nick Knight, and Alexander McQueen and Viktor and Rolf turned fashion into modern day architecture. My rationalisation was that I wanted them as ‘references’ or at the very least ‘maybe they’ll be worth something one day’, but I’m not sure I’d convinced myself. Which begged the question, why do we collect? Having spoken to several friends about collecting, and realising that they too had a magazine collection of some kind, I realised it was actually quite common. In my current apartment, I have piles of magazines, separated into Vogues and Harpers Bazaar next to my wardrobe, interior magazines stacked next to my bed, and Frankie and Russh magazines stacked on top of my dresser propping up my jewellery and fragrances. I recently decided to stop collecting Vogue magazine (not at all related to my Dad’s questioning). It was something I was definitely still buying out of habit, having started collecting them 15 years ago. But I’d

formed such a collection, sorry, connection with the issues, it was like breaking up with my best friend. Impossible. The anxiety was immeasurable. I was twitchy and pacing outside news agencies wondering if I should just keep buying the magazine out of this sense of duty. My style had changed over the years, I’d changed careers from fashion to graphic design and Vogue was no longer relevant to my ‘resource/reference’ excuse for buying magazines. I was now buying other magazines that I was convincing myself were helping my career. Vogue wasn’t one of them. So I made that tough choice, but the sadness I felt for already missing three issues, three objects that had essentially ended my collection, was almost insane. Where is the line between hoarding and collecting? Many psychologists agree that collecting is the art of meticulously organizing objects of a perceived value. You almost make a shrine to celebrate and pray to. You make sure each issue is in order. Even the way magazine spines are designed sing to a collector. You buy the piece for the smell, the touch, and the content that inspires you. I find it hard to narrow down the exact reason for my anxiety over missing an issue that I’m avidly collecting. Yes, of course, there’s the fact I’ve missed the actual issue - the content, inspiration and what’s new in the world. But it’s more than that. It’s like doing a 5000 piece puzzle and realising at the end there’s one friggin’ piece in the centre that’s missing. Psychologist Mark McKinley says,“(there are) those that collect for pure enjoyment; those who collect for investment; those who collect to preserve the past, those who collect to expand their social circles; those who enjoy the quest (knowing that their collection will never be complete in their lifetime); those who collect for prestige or fame; those who are fulfilling a void in

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their self identity; and those who enjoy experimenting with arranging and re-arranging a microcosm of objects obtained from the larger world”. But at the root of it all, collecting allows the collector to keep the past in the present. But then hoarding (which sounds like such an ugly word) is a very short step away. Hoarding is defined as the point where the objects in question take over your normal day-to-day life, where instead of the object being heralded, they are shunned away, kept out of sight and become shameful secrets. It often amounts to a room (or even a household) full of objects with no real significance (except to the hoarder) that aren’t categorised artfully but shoved together in a frenzied state. In trying the get to the root of my own issue (pun intended), I revisited my process and the emotional experience. I usually go to Magnation if I can, or a large local news agency once a month to survey the magazine world. Usually I will pick the two magazines I collect religiously but I look around at other magazines in case there’s something amazing I should be buying as well as my usual suspects. For me, if I had a heart-rate monitor on, this would be the climax. The smells, the physical turning of the page, the colours, layouts and tactile elements. My heart races. Internal dialogues about how many magazines I can afford versus what I “need” come into play. The triumph of deciding on the one(s) you actually want to buy is probably the height of excitement. Oh yeah, and I always inspect the spine of the magazine before I buy it, it needs to be perfect.

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I have to have time to set aside to digest my magazines. My attention has to be focused solely on the magazine. I usually like to flick reasonably quickly through the whole magazine, like a movie trailer, to whet my appetite. I then start again and go through slowly, page by page. You feel the pages if there’s texture or embellishments and smell the paper. Wow, that almost sounds perverse. I used to rip up magazines for my folio inspiration pages but now I can’t. I like them whole and pristine, as if it was a first edition book. The time the magazine stays out on the couch or next to my bed depends. Usually a week later I feel like I’ve adequately read the magazine and it can now be welcomed into its permanent home. New issues go on top, so the organisational process is pretty short. I did, however, come to a point recently where my interior magazine pile had outgrown its assigned space. Much fretting and re-organising was had to correct this travesty. The feeling when order has been restored is immense; a sense of inner peace takes hold. Is it the issue you want to collect or “... have they shed their original function and become totems, fetishes? Collecting by its very nature is animist and transcendental,” writes Philipp Blom, author of 'To Have and To Hold: An Intimate History of Collectors and Collecting'. Which brings me back to the unresolved problem of my piles and piles of old Vogue magazines waiting for me at my childhood home…


Rocca

LUIS CÉSAR


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Tell us a bit about yourself.. Who are you and where are you from? I'm a graphic designer from Guadalajara, Mexico. Currently my work, and what makes me most happy, is creative and art direction. I'm always looking for ways to take graphics from 2d to 3d, and my dream is to do many public space interventions around the world. How would you describe your artistic style? Nostalgic, corny... I always try to tell short stories with my work. When did you first notice you had a creative side? Since childhood. I loved drawing, doing models, painting, and my talent at school was to always come up with the most creative and original presentations. Who or what inspires you and your work? Feelings, from love to sadness, to loneliness. I get really inspired by journeys and great landscapes. In terms of celebrities, I get inspired by Wes Anderson's aesthetics and colour palette, and Natalia Lafourcade's music projects direction. Many illustrators also inspire me. If I have to mention one, it would be Hsiao Ron Chang. I also got really inspired by Spike Jonze's "Her". I would say mainly loneliness as a feeling, and everything that it entails. What's your favourite medium for creating works? Mixedmedia, from handwork to digital. What do you like the most about collage art? To reinterpret artwork and be able to give several visions to one same piece. What do you see yourself doing in five years? Art direction, creative direction, collaborating with other artists and designers, and doing public space interventions. www.cursiestudio.com

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Viks

BIKES


First off, tell us about the brand, Viks... When did it all begin and who is involved? In fact Viks is a specific bike model of Estonian based bike company Velonia Bicycles. You could call it brand or sub-brand as well. It all started back in 2008 when Indrek Narusk, engineer, passionate cyclist and amateur road racer (for over 10 years) thought that it’s time for Estonian bike riders to have their own bike brand. So he founded Velonia Bicycles. At first it was all about designing carbon bike frames and components. Whole production took place in China. As we have Viks now that we produce in Estonia, we like to call ourselves as revivers of Estonian bike industry that has been destroied by World War II. Besides Indrek, who’s still the main man in this company, there is me, Kristo Riimaa. I’ve been with Velonia as co-owner and marketing/sales person for less than a year. But our history with Indrek goes back to 2009. We first met when I was asking him to let me write my thesis of masters degree about Velonia. To sum it up: Indrek is an artist But every artist needs his manager or administrator. We have skilled welder and painter involved as well but I’m very suspicious, that Indrek likes to paint frames by himself. He’s a big fan of welding, so probably he’s going to try his skills sooner or later on Viks frameset too.


It's quite a catchy name, 'Viks', where did the name come from?

know what kind of bike he’s riding. Perfect example of buzz marketing, isn’t it?

It’s simple. In Estonian „viks“ means classy, gentlemanlike, polite, with good manners, something like that. At the same time it sounds "fixed", like fixed gear... That is what Viks was all about in the beginning – fixed gear urban commuter. Today it is lot more than that, for example electronic shifting and belt drive among other features.

If you could change anything on the bike, what would it be and why?

The shape of the bike is something different... What makes them so special Thats true. The design is highly exclusive for Viks as there is no seat tube. Two identically shaped tube frames run alongside the entire frame. Joined at the head tube, seat tube and bottom bracket. The fork and handle bar is all in one piece as well, making the Viks look extremely sleek and flowy from every point of view. And it is surprisingly comfortable, at least for a regular cyclist, who is more used to the low front end. Besides that the ride doesn't feel any different from a "normal" bicycle. The frame doesn't flex from missing the seat tube at all and the 30mm bars feel quite good without the grips. It turns heads everywhere you go or even when it's locked outside a cafe. This makes it even better to ride. Was there anything that was a major influence on the shape of the frame? Indrek appreciates beautiful design and beautiful yet simple things. He doesn't ride motorbikes himself but does fancy the classic design of old school motorcycles and classic cars. So the major influence were caferacers. It’s been even said that Viks is the pedal powered version of it (caferacer).

VIKS as a product is still in developing phase - we are fine tuning the production methods to make it easier and faster to manufacture with increased quality. Small details that have changed (geometry, dropouts, some materials etc.) and development of production will make every bike a bit advanced than the previous. But in general Viks frameset stays the same. What's next for Viks? Last week we finished something completely new. It’s a prototype. It’s not Viks, it’s Kiks - Viks-inspired electric kickbike equipped with Estonian own Prismattery app and was introduced in Barcelona Mobile World Congress last Monday. A fact that Indrek is engineer and a designer, gives our company the excellent privilege to seek for new solutions that will satisfy customers needs. And we are doing it on a daily basis. We have always something new on our table. Currently we are working on a race specific prototype that will not let you to forget to take all your race day equipment with you on your race day. By the way. We moved our production of carbon racing frames to Italy. They will be 100% custom made based on a riders measures, riding style and needs. So our expectations are high on different aspects. ww.viks.cc

What has been the hardest part of the journey so far? For Viks it’s been easy to get attention. No question about that. We happen to have very good coverage in media. But the hardest part has been so far to understand where to put Viks on a bike market in general. So we are still looking for our place. One thing is obvious, we do not want Viks to be a one hit wonder and disappear at the same pace we came onto the market. We’d like to see Viks bicycle to become as well known and liked as the Schwinn beach cruiser has been for many years. At the same time it’s not far enough of having good media coverage. Viks is not a cheap product so simply a fact that Viks is in media, will not put our bikes on the streets. What we are trying to do now, is build up decent network of distributors and get more Viks bikes onto the streets. Couple of days ago I heard funny story about Viks owner in London who’s constantly chased by other riders who want to

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Hanker Magazine #4  

Issue Four features an array of awesome creatives including; Rachel Spaan, photographers Chris Grundy and Charley Greenfield, Maddy Goyal, A...

Hanker Magazine #4  

Issue Four features an array of awesome creatives including; Rachel Spaan, photographers Chris Grundy and Charley Greenfield, Maddy Goyal, A...

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