Page 1

The Kerusso – January | 2019 Kerusso (Greek): “To publish, proclaim openly: something which has been done.”

The EMC is now officially in South Africa Almost four years ago a group of former Methodist leaders in South Africa reached out to the EMC, seeking denominational headship. They had pulled away from the Methodist Church of South Africa and had formed an association which they named, the “Combined Methodist Church.” Two key leaders traveled to the United States in October of 2017; Bishop Lungisa Nyangani and Lay Leader Jobe Tukwayo. They met with Dr. Williamson and many other EMC leaders, including several General Board members as we together explored the possibilities of a formalized connection. Lay Leader Tukwayo was our guest at General Conference in April of 2018 in Indianapolis. After those meetings, and with the consent of General Council in September, it was decided that these churches and leaders could be affiliated with the EMC through our Canada-based Conference, “Christ for All Nations,” with churches in Canada, Europe, and the DRC in Africa. International General Superintendent Max Edwards and his wife Judy were invited to attend the second triennial conference of the Combined Methodist Church, to be held at the Lumec Conference Center in Lusikisiki, South Africa, in November of 2018. Max represented both the CFAN Conference, and the Global EMC Church, and on Sunday, November 25th, the assembly of believers from across southern South Africa witnessed and celebrated the formal affiliation of the church there as the South Africa District of the CFAN Conference. They were overjoyed, and praised God for connecting us together. One of the very special things about the defined structure of the EMC is that it understands the need for flexibility in structure in areas of the world that are quite distinct from the United States of America. Our global conferences each embrace somewhat divergent structures. We are unified by our theology, and by our commitment to Biblical holiness, but within that unity, we embrace the possibility of a need for diversity in non-essentials. Our Myanmar conference, for instance, utilizes an appointment system for their pastors, which we do not follow in the USA. The newly affiliated South Africa District has a structure that is, in many ways, closer to what Wesley established in England in the 1700’s than we are accustomed to in the USA. The new EMC in South Africa has several “Circuits,” each of which has individual “Societies.” Not every society has a pastor, but certainly every circuit does. Depending on the number of societies in the circuit, there will be a greater number of pastors to travel to, and minister to, those outlying societies. One of the things I had not previously been exposed to anywhere is the widespread use of church uniforms. As you can see from these pictures, different groups or guilds have their own distinctive garb, which they wear with the intent to avoid favoritism, and pride. These precious brothers and sisters are so excited to be a part of the EMC, and we are extremely overjoyed to have a new set of kinsfolk in the faith … different in some ways, but the same in the most important of ways - - both they and we who have claimed Christ as Savior are children of the Most High God.



The Kerusso – January | 2019

Page 2

Kerusso (Greek): “To publish, proclaim openly: something which has been done.”

End of Year Reports “Reports.” What an ugly word, right? I mean, don’t we have many, many more important things to do than to prepare and give reports to someone else? Don’t we have important people to visit? Don’t we have important sermons to write? Don’t our churches and communities have significant needs for us to be busy meeting? YES, many of these things are true. But a careful reading of God’s Word indicates that details and reports are also important. In the last pages of John’s gospel, we read that the morning Jesus was preparing breakfast by the seashore, the disciples who were fishing caught 153 fish that day. (John 21:11) Somebody took the time to count them, and the Holy Spirit deemed it important to include the detail of the exact number in the retelling of the story. It wasn’t reported as “a lot” or “many.” It wasn’t reported as “over 100” nor “about 150.” No, the exact number was reported. Turning forward just a few pages into the narrative in the Acts of the Apostles we come to the vibrant account regarding the travels of Paul and Barnabas. And while there were many important things to do, they budgeted the time to record, and share reports with fellow Christians: “From Attalia they sailed back to Antioch, where they had been committed to the grace of God  for the work they had now completed. On arriving there, they gathered the church together and reported all that God had done through them and how he had opened a door of faith to the Gentiles. And they stayed there a long time with the disciples.” Acts 14:26-28 With those examples in mind, we would like to commend you in advance for taking the time to complete the yearend reports that are required of all credential holders in the EMC. The deadline for reporting your 2018 statistics, financials, and activities is January 31, 2019. And please don’t wait until January 30th. Schedule a couple of hours in the first couple of weeks of 2019 to knock these things out so you don’t have to play catch up right at, or even after the deadline. Thank you, thank you, thank you. (And here’s a tip … Pastors, you don’t need to write a whole different year-end report for the denomination. You may simply duplicate your report to your local church ACC. Just copy and paste that information directly into the M1000 form.) You can find the links to the forms on our website at: EMC Year-end Report Forms

Here are the direct links themselves: Pastors of EMC Churches have three reports to complete: Local Church Report for EMC Churches - M1946 Pastor's Report for EMC Pastors - M1000 Church Leadership Contact Information Report - M1005

Non-pastoring Elders, Admission on Trial persons, and Local Preachers have one report: Credential Holder's Report - M1001

Deacons and Deaconesses have one report: Deacon / Deaconess Report - M1002


The Kerusso – January | 2019

Kerusso (Greek): “To publish, proclaim openly: something which has been done.”

Page 3


The Kerusso – January | 2019

Page 4

Kerusso (Greek): “To publish, proclaim openly: something which has been done.”

Long-term Pastors Two articles in Christianity Today penned just last month by Karl Vaters discuss the issues of long-term pastorates. In the first of the two, the author writes, “Longevity builds trust, which gives people a better perspective on what does and doesn’t really matter.”1 Vaters goes on to note in a second article on avoiding the dangers of a long-term pastorate that the trend is toward longevity, which he believes “… is mostly good news for pastors, their families, and the churches they serve.”2 This issue of long-term pastors is of great interest to one of our own pastors. Rev. Dr. Joshua Strunk is pastor of the Community Church of Pine Run, an EMC congregation located in Apollo, Pennsylvania. Pastor Strunk’s doctoral work took him into these very issues, and he strongly believes that long-term pastorates provide enhanced opportunities for trust-building, and deeply beneficial relational stability. He helped author a scholarly article on the relationship between efficacy and longevity which was published in “Pastoral Psychology” in August of 2017 titled, “The Convergence of Ministry, Tenure, and Efficacy: Beyond Speculation Toward a New Theory of Pastoral Efficacy.”3 We asked Dr. Strunk to quickly share some of the insights he gained in studying these things. Here are his thoughts: “Here in the West, we are rapidly shifting into a Post-Christian culture, which is changing how some people view pastoral ministry; and yet I believe it has not fundamentally changed the purpose or practice of the pastorate. Several years ago, I conducted a qualitative study to explore the nature of effective pastoral ministry in this changing landscape. Research had already shown that pastors who minister to a single congregation for an extensive period more often see greater results than their shorter-tenured counterparts. I wanted to know why. What I discovered was both embarrassingly simple and exhilaratingly practical. First, I found that longer-term pastors seemed to share a stronger fidelity to the pastor’s calling, which allowed them to better endure disappointment, adversity, disillusionment, and even self-doubt. It produced determination and compassion in them, and enabled them to navigate both organizational and personal conflicts. Second, I found that while each pastor had different approaches to the organizational work of ministry, they all understood it primarily in terms of cultivating vibrant and authentic relationships. Deeper relationships clearly seemed to be the key. Taking a long view in getting to know people, as well as allowing themselves to be known, was primary. Long-term pastors seem to clearly make more intentional choices to become rooted down in their communities. These things create trust and admiration, which in turn cultivates a cycle of greater and greater ministry opportunity, and an ever-expanding circle of influence. Of course, this makes sense when we consider that the scripture calls us repeatedly back to this central tenant of our Faith. Love is the first and greatest commandment (Matt. 22:37-38), it is at the heart of the second (Matt. 22:39) and it is what compels us forward (2 Corinth. 5:14). Love identifies us with Jesus (John 13:35) and acts as the ultimate apologetic for a skeptical world (John 17:23). Love is what we were made for (Eph. 1:4-6) and when everything else fades away, it will remain (1 Corinth. 13). So while it is true that culture is changing and we must remain agile and flexible in it … longevity still matters! Some things don’t change.” 1 Christianity Today, Karl Vaters. 12/3/18 - "8 Benefits of Investing a Lifetime of Ministry in One Congregation"

2 Christianity Today, Karl Vaters. 12/8/18 - "The 5 Biggest Dangers of a Long-Term Pastorate and How to Avoid Them"

3 Strunk, J., Milacci, F. & Zabloski, J. (2017) The Convergence of Ministry, Tenure, and Efficacy: Beyond Speculation Toward a New Theory of Pastoral Efficacy.

Pastoral Psychology, 66 (4), 537 -550. Link to the article


The Kerusso – January | 2019

Page 5

Kerusso (Greek): “To publish, proclaim openly: something which has been done.”

From time to time in future issues of the Kerusso, we will highlight a “Legacy Pastor” - someone who has served a single EMC congregation for over 20 years. Look for this logo, and celebrate these amazing servants with us!

Pastor Tony Wiley

Hamblen Chapel ~ Avondale, Arizona Anton (Tony) Wiley and his wife Elizabeth have served Hamblen Chapel Evangelical Methodist Church for nearly 52 years.

Hamblen Chapel is situated in the Cashion neighborhood of Avondale, Arizona just west of Phoenix. The people of Hamblen Chapel are a reflection of their long-time pastor … they are warm, friendly, welcoming, and love the Lord with heart, soul, and mind. They also earnestly desire to impact their community for Christ, and love to reach out to families, children, and adults of all ages. Thank you, Pastor Tony, for loving people, and for leading this church family for over five decades and counting. May the Lord grant you the desires of your heart, and may your example and legacy inspire those of us coming behind you! “And let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds,  not giving up meeting together,  as some are in the habit of doing, but encouraging one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching.” (Hebrews 10:24-25)

Profile for Evangelical Methodist Church

The Kerusso - 2019 January  

EMC Monthly Newsletter 1/2019

The Kerusso - 2019 January  

EMC Monthly Newsletter 1/2019