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www.halldale.com The Journal for civil aviation training

Annual training Sourcebook

Civil Full Flight Simulator Census Year in Review

Changing Fortunes, Even Volcanic Growth

ISSN 0960-9024 | US $17/£8.50

MAINTENANCE TRAINING

Filling The Bill

Pilot Training

Inspiring The Next Generation In Asia

Issue 4/2010


Dedicated to Enhancing Safety Since 1951

Enhancing Safety by Delivering Superior Training and Support in the Areas That Matter Most

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Programs Tailored to Customer Needs Online Training Program Management Outstanding Customer Service Exceptional Overall Value eLearning Convenience Training to Proficiency Training for the Vast Majority of Business and Regional Aircraft Worldwide Network of 40 Learning Centers Professional Training for More Than 140 Aircraft Models

When you choose FlightSafety International, you leverage the unmatched resources of a world leader in aviation training and training equipment. More courses, more instructors, more top-level fully qualified simulators, more training locations. We’re the authorized trainer for the majority of aircraft manufacturers, a world-leading supplier of proven advanced technology training devices and a major provider of mission-critical military training programs. Business. We deliver training that meets or exceeds regulatory requirements – online, on location and at convenient Learning Centers near your aircraft manufacturer or a major service center. We tailor training to meet your specific needs and we train to proficiency for virtually every business aircraft in the air today. Commercial. FlightSafety provides professional pilot and technician training for a broad range

of commercial aircraft, as well as training for flight attendants and dispatchers. We provide excellent customer service and online training management through myFlightSafety. It all adds up to exceptional value. Military. Military aircrews that operate a wide variety of fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters benefit from FlightSafety’s comprehensive, highly cost-effective training media, courseware, sophisticated training devices and innovative distance learning. We have the resources and experience to meet your mission requirements. Simulation. FlightSafety designs, manufactures and supports the world’s most sophisticated simulators, training devices and visual systems, with the most advanced features. We pioneered simulator electric motion and control loading, and we build full flight simulators for all types of aircraft, including helicopters.

Serving 85% of Fortune 100 Companies* 1,500 Highly Qualified Instructors Serving All Branches of the U.S. Military 178 Military Fixed-Wing Aircraft and Helicopter Simulators in Service Operations at 29 U.S. Military Bases 60 Aircraft Types Simulated in the Past Five Years Alone 99.6% Simulator In-Service Availability 24/7 Worldwide Simulator Support

For information, contact Scott Fera, Vice President Marketing • 718.565.4774 sales@flightsafety.com • flightsafety.com • A Berkshire Hathaway company

FLIGHTSAFETY GENERAL ADVANTAGE - CAT MAGAZINE -

Bleed: 212 mm x 283 mm Trim: 206 mm x 277 mm

*Of those operating business aircraft.

COLOR VERIS PROOF

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Editorial

Contributors Chuck Weirauch - Editor US Affairs Chris Long - European Affairs Lori Ponoroff - US News Editor [e] lori@halldale.com Fiona Greenyer - RoW News Editor [e] fiona@halldale.com

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Advertising

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Business Manager: Jeremy Humphreys [t] +44 (0)1252 532009 [e] jeremy@halldale.com

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contents CAT 4/2010

Editor-in-Chief: Chris Lehman [e] chris@halldale.com Managing Editor: Alan Emmings [e] alan@halldale.com

Business Manager, North America: Mary Bellini Brown [t] +1 703 421 3709 [e] mary@halldale.com Marketing Manager: Lizzie Daniell [t] +44 (0)1252 532008 [e] lizzie@halldale.com Sales & Marketing Co-ordinator: Karen Kettle [t] +44 (0)1252 532002 [e] karen@halldale.com

04 YEAR IN REVIEW Changing Fortunes, Even Volcanic Growth. The airline industry won’t be looking back at 2009 with any degree of nostalgia. Editor in Chief Chris Lehman takes a look at the highlights.

12 THIRD PARTY TRAINING Third Party Trainers Optimistic About The Future. A review of the third party aviation training segment of the industry.

Design & Production David Malley [t] +44 (0)1252 532005 [e] david@halldale.com Internet www.halldale.com/cat Subscriptions & Distribution Subscriptions Hotline [t] +44 (0)1252 532000 [e] cat@halldale.com 6 issues per year at US$168 Distribution Co-ordinator: Sarah de Wet [t] +44 (0)1252 532006 [e] sarah.dewet@halldale.com Publishing House and Editorial Office Civil Aviation Training (ISSN 0960-9024) is published by: Halldale Media Ltd. Pembroke House, 8 St. Christopher’s Place, Farnborough, Hampshire, GU14 0NH, UK. [t] +44 (0)1252 532000 [f] +44 (0)1252 512714 [e] cat@halldale.com

16 Pilot Training Civil Aviation Training In Asia – Inspiring The Next Generation. The wide diversity of airline operations across Asia makes any generalisation about aviation training in the region very problematic.

20 Maintenance Training Filling The Bill. Trainers and manufacturers of training devices are finding more economic and efficient ways to train aircraft maintenance technicians.

26 CABIN CREW TRAINING Cabin Training Review. Changes in service standards, workforce reductions, regulatory change and ever present security issues are concerns for flight attendants around the world.

30 CONFERENCE PREVIEW EATS 2010 Flight Plan Now Filed For Istanbul. EATS 2010 will focus on the industry’s overall challenges and prospects heading into a new decade.

US office Halldale Media Inc. 115 Timberlachen Circle Ste 2009 Lake Mary, FL 32746 USA [t] +1 407 322 5605 [f] +1 407 322 5604 Publisher & CEO: Andrew Smith

31 NEWS Analysis and Seen & Heard. Updates from the training market, compiled and edited by Chuck Weirauch and the CAT editorial team.

41 Training Technology World Full Flight Simulator Census – Analysis And Trends. This year's Civil Full Flight Simulator Census contains more devices than ever before. Ian Strachan takes an in-depth look at this sector of the market.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise - especially translating into other languages - without prior written permission of the publisher. All rights also reserved for restitution in lectures, broadcasts, televisions, magnetic tape and methods of similar means. Each copy produced by a commercial enterprise serves a commercial purpose and is thus subject to remuneration.

47 Simulator Census Civil Full Flight Simulator Census. Comprehensive and updated global tally of operational civil full flight simulators.

CAT Magazine (ISSN 0960-9024, USPS # 022067), printed September 2010, is published 6 times per annum by Halldale Media Ltd, Pembroke House, 8 St. Christopher’s Place, Farnborough, Hampshire, GU14 ONH, UK at a U.S. subscription rate of $168 per year. CAT Magazine is distributed in the USA by SPP 75 Aberdeen Road, Emigsville PA 17318-0437. Periodicals postage paid at Emigsville PA. POSTMASTER: send address changes to: Halldale Media Inc., 301 East Pine Street, Suite 150, Orlando, FL 32801, USA.

Cover image credit: © The Boeing Company 2010 CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

03


year in review

Changing Fortunes,

Even Volcanic Growth The airline industry won’t be looking back at 2009 with any degree of nostalgia. IATA’s Giovanni Bisignani said that 2009 goes into the history books as the “worst year” that the industry has seen since 1945, with global passenger traffic down 3.5% and freight by 10.1%, resulting in total industry losses of some $9.9 billion. More losses were forecast for 2010 but in May IATA abruptly changed a forecast 2010 industry loss of $2.8 billion into a global earnings forecast of $2.5 billion. Airline industry resilience remains impressive. Editor in Chief Chris Lehman takes a look at the highlights.

04

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Air Lease Corporation ordered over 100 aircraft including 54 B737-800s. Image credit: Boeing Media.

The global accident picture in 2009 was somewhat better than 2008, with 90 total accidents (all aircraft types, Eastern and Western built), a figure 18% lower than

REGIONAL ACCIDENT RATES. WESTERN-BUILT JET HULL LOSSES PER MILLION SECTORS Source: IATA

CIS 0.00 6.43

EUR 0.45 0.42

NAM 0.41 0.58

MENA 3.32 1.89 LATAM 0.00 2.55

AFI 9.94 2.12

NASIA 0.00 0.00 ASPAC 0.86 0.58

2009 2008 2008. However, total passenger fatalities spots were Africa and the Middle East, were higher at 685 compared to 502 in with Europe about the same as the pre2008. IATA states that the global accivious year and North America somewhat FIGURE 3 FIGURE 2 for western-built aircraft was dent rate lower. Runway incidents accounted for 0.71 which is oneBACKLOGS of the lowest in the past Source: 26 percent of all accidentsNEW in 2009 and AIRCRAFT Airbus/Boeing AIRPLANES decade, and statistically represents the notably, pilot handling contributed to BY REGION DELIVERIES second safest year for air travel. But the some 30% of all accidents. See figure 1. ORDERS 1990-2009 8,130 New global differences are striking, varying The safety picture is two-pronged. Region airplanes year upon year. In 2009 the accident hot On the one hand, the first decade of the UNDELIVERED 3,521 Airbus

Safety

FIGURE 1

Asia Pacific

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUENorth 4/2010America 05

Boeing

F

ollowing the volcanic ash fiasco in April, passenger traffic rebounded strongly in May with an 11.7% increase in passenger traffic and a 34.3% jump in freight demand compared to May 2009. Passenger traffic is now (mid-2010) about 1% above prerecession levels, and freight about 6%. Europe posted the lowest rate of growth of 8.3% for May compared to the same month last year, due to continued concerns over the eurozone debt crisis. In fact, Europe remains a stark weak spot with a forecast loss of almost $3 billion through 2010 for airlines on the continent, compared to forecast earnings for North American carriers of $1.9 billion. The Middle East achieved the highest growth at 17.5%, with Asia Pacific at 13.2%. The North American carriers saw a 10.9% increase in May over the same month last year and have had particular success with matching capacity to demand, driving the load factor to over 82%, the highest amongst all regions.

9,965

ORDERS 1990-2009 UNDELIVERED

3,513

10,320

7,200

Europe

7,190

Middle East

2,340

Latin America

2,180

2


ng g ng

g g

Air traffic, RPKs (billions)

14,000 Asia Pacific

10,320

12,000 North America

7,200

10,000 Europe

7,190

8,000 Middle East

2,340

Latin6,000 America

960

Africa 2,000

710

0

1990

}

23%

}

} 72%

30,900

Other 34 % Middle East China

2,180

CIS 4,000

Total

7%

8%

Asia (excl. China) Europe

23%

45%

North 2010 to 2029 America New airplanes 30,900

58%

2009

2029

FIGURE 3 FIGURE 3

NEW NEW AIRPLANES AIRPLANES DELIVERIES DELIVERIES BY BY REGION REGION New New Region airplanes Region airplanes Asia Pacific 10,320 Asia Pacific 10,320 North America 7,200 North America 7,200 Europe 7,190 Europe 7,190 Middle East 2,340 Middle East 2,340 Latin America 2,180 Latin America 2,180 CIS 960 CIS 960 Africa 710 Africa 710 Total 30,900 Total 30,900

Source: Boeing Source: Boeing

Delivery Units Delivery Units

8% 8%

3% 2% 7% 3% 2% 7% 34 % 34 %

23% 23% 23% 23% 2010 to 2029 2010airplanes to 2029 New New airplanes 30,900 30,900

21st century saw the lowest accident rates in recorded history. On the other, the continual improvement the industry has seen each decade now shows signs of stagnating. Since 2003, the number of annual fatal accidents has essentially levelled out. The concern is that given continued industry expansion, the number of accidents will rise to unacceptably high levels unless the rate is driven down. And that means ensuring all stakeholders understand the fundamentals of how to actually achieve that goal.

Orders That industry expansion, despite the recent economic turmoil, remains intact. But 2009 orders and deliveries were substantially down, FIGURE 4 with Airbus-Boeing combined net orders at just 413, as GLOBAL compared to the 2008 total Airbus-Boeing figure of 1,445, “COMPETITIVE” LEVEL D and for 2007 a whopping 2,871. Combined Airbus-Boeing deliveries FLIGHT SIMULATOR SALES Source: CAT Magazine totalled 979 in 2009. The dramatic decline over the past two years saw Boeing lowering its annual 20 year forecast to 29,000 aircraft 2004-2009 last year, but maintaining its faith in the55 long term demand picture. 51 51 Orders bounced back in first half 2010 with combined Boeing and Airbus orders at some 396 (279 for Boeing as at July 21, and 117 for Airbus as at June 30), almost the total for the entire year 33 2009. Demand for the venerable 737 has underpinned Boeing’s 27 sales 22 success, with a remarkable 228 new orders in first half, with the 777 accounting for 11 new net orders and the 787 Dreamliner representing 36. Airbus lagged Boeing at the mid-year point, with just 43 A320 orders taken, much less than the rival Boeing 737. But a most significant additional order from Emirates during the ILA Berlin Airshow for 32 A380s impressed the pundits, as it brings 2004 06

2005

2006

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

2007

2008

2009

14,000 14,000 Other 12,000 Other 12,000 Middle East Middle East 10,000 China 10,000 China 8,000 Asia 8,000 Asia China) (excl. (excl. China) 6,000 6,000 this carrier’s planned A380 fleet to an eye-popping 90 aircraft. The Europe 4,000 Europe 4,000 A380 order book now totals 234 aircraft across 17 operators. 45% 45% North 2,000 58% North 2,000 America 72% 58% }} 72% America New Tin 0 0 1990 2009 2029 By Farnborough, the picture was looking 1990extraordinarily 2009 bright 2029 – an astounding $47 billion worth of new aircraft orders was taken as a sure sign that the recovery had arrived. The B787 Dreamliner made its maiden transatlantic appearance and by the last day of the show more than 800 passenger aircraft sales had been announced – the vast majority were mainstays such as the B737-800, A320 family, Embraer 190s, and Bombardier business aircraft. No orders were received for the Bombardier “C-Series”, although there seemed to be an understanding that these were forthcoming - subject to some engine selection issues - and that Boeing and Airbus were coming around to the realisation that there would be new competition in the single-aisle market. Leasing company orders figured most prominently at Farnborough. Highlights included Steven Udvar-Hazy’s Air Lease CorporaFIGURE 4 51 A320/321s and 15 Embraer tion’s order of some 54 B737-800s, “COMPETITIVE” 190’s. GEKAS announcedGLOBAL deals for 60 A320 family aircraft and 40 LEVEL D Source: CAT Mag 737-800s. Other contractsFLIGHT included a SIMULATOR $3 billion deal fromSALES Virgin America for 40 A320s - tripling the airline’s fleet - and an Emirates 2004-2009 order of 30 B777-300ERs worth $9.1 billion. Three B787 sales were 55 total backlog to announced for Royal Jordanian, bringing the B787 51 51 860 aircraft, across 56 countries. In addition to Air Lease Corporation’s order of 15 Embraer 190s, the Brazilian company also sold 24 E190s to Republic Airlines, and up to 140 33E175s to UK regional car2 rier Flybe – if all options are exercised the deal could be worth $5 22 Sukhoi S100 were also announced, billlion. Over 100 orders for the including 30 from Bermuda-based Pearl Aircraft Corporation and 12 from Orient Thai Airlines. ATR proved the age of the turboprop is far from over, surprising many by bagging some 72 ATR 42/72 sales. While Boeing lowered its annual 20 year forecast last year, it did the opposite this year, releasing a forecast in July that pre2007 2008 20 2004 2005 2006 dicts a demand between 2010 and 2029 for 30,900 new aircraft FIGURE 4 FIGURE worth $3.6 trillion, up from 29,0004 in the previous forecast. Much GLOBAL “COMPETITIVE” LEVEL D “COMPETITIVE” of the increase is driven GLOBAL by rising demand from the single-aisle LEVEL D Source: CAT Mag FLIGHT SIMULATOR SALES Source: CAT Mag FLIGHT SIMULATOR SALES market, and in fact this latest two-decade forecast appears just a few weeks after Boeing2004-2009 announced increases in B737 production, slated for 2012. The2004-2009 Low Cost Carrier (LCC) segment is 55 55 51 51 behind a good deal of the single aisle demand. Comments from 51 51 Boeing vice president of marketing Randy Tinseth indicate that the second decade of Boeing’s 20 year forecast weighs new market entrants significantly. And it’s not 33 just Embraer, Sukhoi and 33 2 2 Bombardier that will pose new competition. The Chinese C919 22 22 development, as is the Russian - a168-190 seat aircraft - is under Irkut MS-21, a 150-212 seat machine. The new aircraft entrants may prove to be game changers in the latter half of the decade. The forecast estimates that 17,410 or 56% of the 30,900 aircraft will address strict market growth, while 13,490 will replace currently operating aircraft.2004 The remainder, aircraft, will be 2007 2008 20 2005 5,4002006 2007 2008 20 2004 2005 2006 retained by the global fleet, with the result that the total fleet will comprise 36,300 aircraft - a 92% increase over today’s fleet of about 18,890. This view of the future sees the market consolidating around the 100-400 seat range, and for the third straight year adjusts downward both the very large and regional aircraft segments, while seeing increased twin-aisle demand in the 777 and 787 segments. Figure 2 illustrates the striking geographic growth and demand areas while figure 3 summarises the actual forecast and the change delta from last year.

Air Airtraffic, traffic,RPKs RPKs(billions) (billions

NASIA NASIA 0.00 FIGURE 3 0.00 0.00 NEW AIRPLANES 0.00 FIGURE 2 DELIVERIES BYBECOMING REGION AIR TRAVEL MORE Source: Boeing ASPAC ASPAC DIVERSE GEOGRAPHICALLY Source: Boeing 0.86 New Delivery Units 0.86 Region airplanes 0.58 0.58 3% 2%

year in review

A ng A

CIS CIS 0.00 0.00 6.43 6.43

}

}


year in review

FIGURE 4

GLOBAL “COMPETITIVE” LEVEL D FLIGHT SIMULATOR SALES Source: CAT Magazine 2004-2009

51

55

51

33

27

22

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

For the past several years CAT - and others - have been warning of a pilot shortage but it appears that the industry may be finally waking up to this reality. As orders accelerate, the cycle is beginning again. A well-publicized roadshow by Emirates was announced in July – the airline was looking to recruit up to 700 experienced crew to accommodate its fleet growth. This news came about the same time as the stunning pilot and maintenance personnel demand forecast was released by Boeing’s Training and Flight Services Division, forecasting a need for a total of 448,000 new airline pilots and over 500,000 mechanics to enter the profession over the next 20 years. IATA, the US FAA, and ICAO’s NGAP initiative are essentially voicing the same concern about the medium and long term supply. The problem is much more acute in the US than elsewhere given the fact that the major carriers have enjoyed a never ending supply of pretrained pilots from the regionals and other operators, and do not underwrite any primary training costs. The regionals in turn then hire from the flight training organisations and then a shortage of instructors looms. The whole cycle is stimulated by economic expansion and mitigated by recession but these repeated cycles do not impact the long term numbers which are directly influenced by aircraft orders and fleet growth. A major question is whether there is enough training infrastructure to address this demand as we head into yet another expansion. The reduction in investment in ab intio training as a result of the last recession has seen training capacity declining, while general interest in the profession seems to be waning. Hiring is slow coming out of the recession but given the industry’s current position on the economic cycle, it is beginning to build again. In particular, western European Low Cost Carriers and eastern European operators continue to hire, as do many carriers in Asia – clearly a willingness to go where the jobs are is key.

Simulator Demand The 2009 simulator sales equation was greatly impacted by the economic recession. In last year's Sourcebook, CAT reported some 51 FFS sales for 2008 in the so-called “competitive” market. Tallying company supplied data for 2009 points to almost a 50% decline – only 27 units were sold last year, the lowest level in five years. The high water mark was 55 in 2007. With the economic downturn, the normal forces that drive simulator sales, including aircraft deliveries, pilot hiring, F/O to captain conversion, 08

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

and conversion between aircraft types all slowed. And with the increased retirement age in the US – from 60 to 65 – pilot attrition slowed, resulting in a further dampening of simulation and training events and FFS demand. CAE reported some 21 civil FFS sales in calendar year 2009, including the initial Bombardier C Series device (CAE is part of the C Series development program), but not including the aircraft’s associated engineering development simulator. Of this number, most (13) were for single aisle B737 and A320 family aircraft, and except for two B737NGs sold to Continental and one to Kenya Airways, and an A320 each for Avianca and Sofia Flight Training, all of these single aisle machines were for Asian/Middle Eastern customers. Other major 2009 announcements included the award of two FFS for China’s new ARJ21 regional jet, an ATR 72 for Mount Cook Airlines, and a convertible A330/340 machine to Mumtalakat. On the training services side of the ledger, 2009 saw a contract with flydubai for initial and recurrent training on the 737-800 aircraft, as well as an expansion of the Global Academy’s presence in China with a pilot provisioning contract for Xiamen Airlines. CAE won both the majority of open competitions for FFS in CY 2009, as well as visual systems with its TROPOS technology. The company continues to refine the 7000 and 5000 series technologies, and is showing leadership in evidence-based training, using real world flight data analysis through its Flightscape products. Its global network of training centres and exclusive agreements with airframe manufacturers and operators also continue to pay dividends, with mid-2010 already witnessing a 10 year agreement with Mitsubishi for the MRJ, and a master agreement with ATR for simulation and training provisioning. It also announced a joint venture acquisition of China Southern West Australian Flying College (CSWAFC) in Perth, Australia, representing the 11th location for the CAE Global Academy. And as a further sign of the recovery, by July 2010 CAE had already inked some 16 year-to-date FFS orders, including an A330/340 convertible to Saudi Arabian, two 737-900 and an ATR72 for Lion Air, a 777-300 to Turkish Airlines, and A320 and A330 machines for China Eastern. In 2009 Thales announced an A330/340 Turkish Airlines contract, as well as a B777-300ER machine for PIA, both based on the company’s new RealitySeven architecture. In the spring of 2010 Thales also announced that its first RealitySeven-based A320 simulator had achieved RFT at the Airbus Training Centre in Toulouse. Together with its new 100 million pound simulator manufacturing facility in Crawley, Thales’ simulation architecture demonstrates the trend towards modular technologies, device commonalities, and increased realism and training efficiencies. The recent announcement that Boeing Training & Flight Services has been granted provisional approval for its 787 Dreamliner pilot training courses by the FAA, with advanced simulation equipment supplied by Thales, underscores these trends. Pilots can transition to the new 787 airplane in five to 20 days, and 777 pilots can qualify in as little as five days. Montreal-based Mechtronix has long been showing how innovative technical approaches can deliver direct training ROI. Mark Dransfield, Senior Director Business Development said that LCoS projectors for visual cueing, gaming industrybased IG’s, and electric motion have become “the de-facto standard in the industry for FFS.” Mechtronix has opened a few eyes with its FFT X products with 3 DOF seat motion cueing,


year in review

illustrating the potential of less than full 6 DOF motion systems to deliver recurrent and type rating training. Mechtronix has been a growing player in the narrow body FFS market, from A320 and B737-800 through to devices that support the Multi-crew Pilots License (MPL) curriculums, and see themselves as the only supplier to cover the full range up to and including Level D FFS for MPL Phase IV. “We still see a strong demand in the primary training market and especially transition-to-jet FSTD (FNTP and FTD) platforms. More and more flying schools/FTOs prefer a jet configured training device to the traditional turboprop FSTD...” said Dransfield. With its emphasis on simulation, MPL is expected to help drive simulation sales, particularly with the larger FTOs. Industry stalwart Frasca International is also heavily involved in the transition to jet device segment, particularly in the US collegiate aviation market, recently announcing a Level 6 Phenom VLJ device order from Purdue. And SimJET, based in Australia, is promising new efficiencies with its Fixed Base Training Devices (FBTD), aimed at bridging the perceived gap between procedural training devices and FFS. A somewhat larger player, Rockwell Collins, has invested heavily in entering the Level D FFS market with its “Edge” technology. Rockwell has now achieved Level D qualification for its B737NG at PAIFA in Miami, and its B737NG at CTC Aviation in the UK. Florida-based Opinicus Corporation is another member of the Level D capable “club” with over 20 years of both military and civil aviation experience.

Rules and Trends Last year we noted that in Europe the transition to EASA has not been easy - the EC did not consult with industry before adopting the Basic Regulations. The NPAs relating to FCL and Flight Operations will be based on the JARs and are expected to become law in 2012. Like the US, there is broad recognition of the need for proper stall and upset recovery training but some concern about how this will be financed by the carriers. However, the International Committee for Aviation Training in Extended Envelopes (ICATEE) was formed in 2009 with the aim of enhancing training for upset 10

Above CTC Aviation's recently installed B737NG Level D FFS. Image credit: Rockwell Collins.

and loss of control events, which are now the primary cause of fatalities. The goal is to make recommendations to the regulators and ICAO in 2011 and there is little doubt that there will be a critical role for the Level D FFS (to become ICAO Type 7 in 2012) in addressing upset recovery training. And MPL continues to move forward in Europe with many major FTOs now holding approvals to meet the requirements. There does remain an imbalance in installed simulator types between the US and Europe - many corporate aircraft simulation assets are only available on the American side of the pond. However, FlightSafety International (FSI) remains a significant supplier of training for these aircraft types - and others, including regional aircraft - and in fact is the largest operator of simulators in the world, with 260 machines at 40 Learning Centers around the globe. Most of FSI’s simulator production is for its own Learning Centers, and in May the company announced that a new state of the art simulator design, manufacturing and support facility will be built in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma.

The FFS Unplugged The big regulatory news in the US is the flurry of activity in the wake of the Colgan accident. HR 5900 was passed

by congress in July, mandating an ATPL and 1500 hours of experience before being hired as an F/O in Part 121 operations. This controversial legislation also requires the FAA to implement new duty time rules, requires new hires to disclose more employment history, mandates carriers to conduct leadership and command training as well as establish pilot mentoring programs and remedial training. Much of this enjoys broad based support, and some was already scheduled to arrive under other regulatory initiatives. But the 1500 hrs and ATPL requirement is controversial, because such a requirement does not guarantee proficiency. With the upcoming pilot demand issues, the profession risks becoming less attractive precisely when personnel shortages loom. Without the potential of securing a paying job after graduating from commercial flight training – some will have about 300 hours – aspiring aviators will be forced to stay in flight instructor or other roles longer, or simply not choose the aviation route. The impact on flight training schools will be significant, and some allowance needs to be made for graduates of structured pilot training programs. Without evidence that the new flight time rules will make a difference, there is concern about the impact to the airline industry, making hiring more difficult, and the industry less attractive. While there will be a three year period for full implementation “...it interrupts the normal flow of new pilots into the business by setting a new, dramatically higher experience level” says Kit Darby of Kitdarby.com. “It will take time for current pilots in training to develop that experience.” One of the most promising trends is the increasing attention being paid to Evidence Based Training and the use of safety data to drive training programs. Using the high value simulator asset to directly attack real-world issues such as enhanced stall training – as opposed to the almost useless prescriptive “V-1 cut” - is becoming more prevalent, and is a critical component of initiatives designed to deal with actual training issues, and therefore lowering the accident rate. It may well be that the most important training trend in the next decade is to unleash the real potential of the full flight simulator. cat

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2009

CAT_S


Realistic visual systems that don’t lose sight of the bottom line. © 2010 Rockwell Collins, Inc. All rights reserved.

From the clarity of the imagery to the breadth of the graphics. From weather to terrain to correlated sensors. Our visual systems offer pilots in training what they need to see and ultimately know. Supported by the most efficiently updated, comprehensive airport library there is. And an image generation solution that offers the flexibility to use commercial off-the-shelf projectors. All backed by a global network of service and support. The bottom line? The most reliable and affordable visual systems you’ll find. See for yourself.

www.rockwellcollins.com

CAT_Soursebook_CommSim-Ad.indd 1

8/17/10 8:33 AM


THIRD PARTY TRAINING

W

ith a surprising number of new aircraft orders announced at this year’s Farnborough Airshow, new industry forecasts predicting the need for higher numbers of airliners, pilots and mechanics and more airlines reporting increases in revenue and passenger traffic, it’s beginning to look like the aviation industry may have turned the corner to economic recovery and growth.

Upward Trends Sherry Carbary, Vice President of Boeing Training & Flight Services, equates the numbers from Boeing’s new 2010 Current Market Outlook and Pilot Forecast as a reflection of recent trends that will positively impact third party training business. This year’s documents project much higher numbers of aircraft, pilots and mechanics needed worldwide during the next 20 years than last year’s editions. “While there is some uncertainty depending on the region that you are looking at, our overall view is that the market is becoming more positive as the world is regaining its economic footing,” Carbary said. “We are seeing the passenger as well as cargo market increase and the yield improve for airlines. Overall, that means that the requirement for pilots and 12

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

mechanics is going to increase. The question is, how dramatically and how fast.” Other third party training provider executives are also becoming optimistic about the future as well, based on the recent upturn in the marketplace for airlines. “I’m pretty confident that there is the sun rising over the horizon, as one might say,” said Captain Chris Clarke, Chairman of the CTC Aviation Group. “Overall, we’re seeing a better picture than has been on the horizon over the past two years. There are significant signs for a growing need for pilot training and training services generally. “ Jan van Engelen, Regional Business Leader in Europe and Africa for CAE Simulation Products, Training and Services, reported that there are definitely signs of recovery. “We see airlines hiring pilots and taking new aircraft,” van Engelen said. “We see growth and we see an increase in training requirements. Revenue is slowly picking up in our training centers, and that revenue can come from anywhere.” According to FlightSafety International spokesperson Steve Phillips, over the past few months the company has seen a slight uptake in regional airline and business aviation training, with recurrent training business “holding its own.”

“We are very positive and in the process of preparing for a return to business,” Phillips said. “We are taking an approach of cautious optimism.” Petri Louhivuori, Head of Sales for Finnair Flight Academy, feels that pilot training is showing slight signs of improvement. “Nothing drastic has occurred, but I am positive,” Louhivuori said.” I believe that the next six months will show whether this feeling is true and to what extent the possible improved performance of airlines will reflect into training. Better airline performance, does this mean they are less in the red or are they coming above ‘water level’? That I believe remains to be seen.” Rick Brown, Manager of Pilot Training Services for Delta Air Lines, and Sales Manager Andy Frey reported that they have seen an uptake in proposals for Boeing 757-6, 737NG and Airbus A320 pilot training, especially over the last five months. “We have seen more requests for initial training,” Brown pointed out. “Airlines are actually starting to park some of their older airplanes and are either bringing on additional aircraft from the same fleet type or in some cases introducing new fleet types into the mix, a more modern fleet type than they would have had.”


Opposite Boeing predicts a global need for more than 23,000 pilots annually over the next 20 years. Image credit: Boeing Training & Flight Services.

Third Party Trainers Optimistic About The Future Chuck Weirauch reviews the third party aviation training segment of the industry, which hopes to benefit from recent “good news” developments.

Pilot Shortage? With the Boeing reports predicting that the world airline fleet will almost double over the next 20 years and a need for more than 23,000 pilots annually during that timeframe, the next logical question to ask is how the airlines and third party trainers are going to meet this challenge. Carbary feels that the industry will see a pilot shortage start to emerge over the next two years, particularly in regions that traditionally do not have a natural pipeline of pilots, such as the military, and also do not have the mature infrastructure and development. Clarke feels that a pilot shortage is

“a distinct possibility” in nine months to a year because of the continually rising costs of pilot training and the dwindling number of people who will be able to afford it. Coupled to this problem is the significant number of pilots that will be needed over the next 20 years, he pointed out. With such growth, the issue of pilot shortage will soon be back, van Engelen agreed.

Outsourcing As many airlines re-evaluate their business plans in light of the economic environment of the past two years, several have moved to outsource pilot training,

with others considering plans to do so. According to the third party training sources polled, this trend is expected to continue in the future, especially for new airline startups and low-cost carriers (LCCs). Obviously an increasing trend towards more outsourcing of pilot training by airlines will be a boon to the third party training industry. “With the startups, they typically would outsource their training, as they do not have an infrastructure to support their initial training,” van Engelen said. ‘We have worked with some to help design their training centers, for example. With airlines that are already mature,

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THIRD PARTY TRAINING

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we are having discussions about building training centers to serve third parties predominantly.” “The major pattern that you are seeing is being led by the LCCs,’’ Clarke reported. “Their business concept is to reduce risk, capital expenditures and administrative costs and concentrate on flying the airplane. Consequently, a very natural conclusion they come to is to outsource training. The trend is now for all new-start airlines to be in the LCC bracket, and as a result of that, the opportunity for third party and outsourced training are becoming greater and more popular.” Carbary also reports seeing a trend for airlines to outsource their training as they re-examine their business models and challenge their business assumptions. “Airlines are looking to see how they can become more operationally efficient, manage costs more effectively and grow,” Carbary explained. “They are now examining everything, and training is a big one. We are seeing around the world, in developing countries as well as mature economies in all spectrums of business models, where they are truly looking at how to outsource. They don’t feel the need to own all the assets and control all the training.” While airline mergers and consolidations are taking place more in the US than elsewhere, as far as the training providers polled are concerned the verdict is still out as to whether this trend will affect third party training business. According to Brown and Frey, the impact of consolidation on training depends more on each airline and the types of aircraft they fly. For example, Delta and Northwest only had one common fleet type, the Boeing 757, when the two airlines merged.

Centralized Along with more outsourcing, another trend affecting third party trainers is for

Above Third party training suppliers are benefiting from airlines outsourcing their pilot training. Image credit: CTC Aviation Group.

airlines to move towards more centralized training at or closer to their operations centers. Some European airlines are arranging pilot training in that region rather than the traditional approach of sending them to the US for training, for example, even if the training itself may be more expensive there. “We are seeing more business at our training centers outside of North America as more European operators do more training in Europe,” Phillips said. “We are seeing more opportunities in that region and less and less for them to come to the US for training. This trend is increasing steadily by 10 percent a year. Other customers are coming there from countries that we hadn’t seen before.” Clarke reported that the appeal of centralized training has grown, especially for LCCs in particular as the costs of recurrent and refresher training “have become huge.” “So where one can offer training on location, or partner with the airline to provide a small locally based training center are the ideal solutions for the airline,” Clarke said. “Usually the airlines will bear the slightly higher costs of such training because they are saving so much money by not having to send their pilots elsewhere.” CAE has partnered with a number of airlines to develop training centers at their base of operations in the past and is currently having discussions with other airlines to establish such centers, van Engelen said. “We are also in discussions with airlines that do have such a training center


about how they can make their training more efficient in terms of courseware and capabilities,” van Engelen pointed out. “They are looking at reducing their costs either by outsourcing their training centers or even for us to commercially exploit their training centers in terms of third party training.”

Single-source Training While all of the third party training providers polled feel that their responsibility is to not only improve training for their customers, they also want to help them manage costs and improve operational efficiencies as well. One way to do this is by becoming a single-source training provider for all their airline customer’s needs. “We are seeing customers actually starting to look for what we would call a single-source training solution,” Carbary said. “This means partnering with someone who can do everything that they need. I think that you will continue to see that, especially now as they are really struggling to stay afloat. This is where a provider could be a broker and advisor for training, as well as develop courseware, deliver training and everything else.” Such training organizations could even provide pilots. Through its Pilot Provisioning concept, CAE is able to provide a pool of cadets via its Global Academy. The company also maintains a database of screened and qualified senior pilots as well. “As our airline partners come back with a requirement, we allow them to very quickly help our customers satisfy their needs to have qualified pilots to fly their aircraft,” van Engelen explained.

Tailored Yet another emerging third party training trend is to provide more tailored training to better meet customer needs and expectations. “’We are focused on more tailored, data-driven training solutions,” Carbary said. “Customers don’t want and should not expect the same course being trained year after year. The world is changing, and training has to adapt to these changes as well. We are moving from more of an academic-focused training to an operationally focused curriculum. We are tailoring our courses to help our customers become more operationally efficient, such as fuel efficiency courses, for example.” cat

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Pilot Training

Civil Aviation Training In Asia – Inspiring The Next Generation The huge diversity of cultures and the wide variation on the level of maturity of airline operations across Asia make any sweeping generalisation about the state of play of aviation training in the region very problematic, writes Chris Long.

T

he start point in reviewing the training requirements is to better understand the state of the aviation industry in the region. ICAO believes that, despite the financial downturn of 2008, exacerbated by the 2009 depression, economies of emerging countries including those in the Asia Pacific region, are expected to grow over the next 20 years. In China, the economy is expected to grow by 9.5% in 2010, spending by consumers is forecast to increase rapidly, over 8% per year, while in India, consumer expenditures are expected to grow at a rate close to 7% annually. Thanks to a fast growing urbanisation rate, populations in Asia Pacific are showing an increased tendency to use air transport. While world passenger traffic is forecast to increase by 4.7% annually, the Asia Pacific region’s revenue-passenger kilometres is forecast to grow at an aver16

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age annual rate of 6.3% between 2010 and 2030. The airlines whose main place of business is located in the Asia Pacific region have the strongest growth of all regions. Governments actively support their countries’ air transport infrastructures, in an effort to encourage economic growth. In China, the domestic traffic grew by a stunning 21% in 2009. During the last 10 years, domestic traffic in Asia Pacific has more than doubled, thanks to economic growth and to the expansion of low cost carriers (LCC). LCCs already represent 14% of Asia Pacific’s total traffic and 60% of the region’s domestic traffic. The capacity of LCCs between Asia Pacific markets grew by 37% in 2008. LCC traffic among the region’s countries is forecast to increase by 10% a year over the next 20 years. Their objective is to capture the huge air travel markets represented by

Above Asia Pacific’s growing fleet – China Airlines will start to take delivery of the Airbus A350900XWB in 2015. Image credit: Airbus.

increasing middle classes. In the region, the traffic growth will be fuelled by the emergence of medium and long haul routes. Whilst there is variation on that rate of growth, the example of China is particularly interesting. According to Asian aviation expert John Bent “the percentage of the population in China with sufficient funds to fly is escalating rapidly towards the total population of the USA”. Put that statement alongside the present count of airliners in China, some 1500, when compared to the 6000 that are operating in the USA, and there is a ready indication of the potential scale of the growth. Similar figures


are true of India, and whilst these two giants lead the pack, the trend elsewhere is to continue to build the numbers. In Indonesia, for instance, the large population is geographically dispersed, and air transport is frequently the most practical form of transport and is likely to remain so.

Growing Aircraft Fleet Figures from ICAO recognise that, as a consequence of traffic growth, Asia Pacific’s fleets are expected to grow fast between 2010 and 2030. For passenger aircraft, the region’s average annual growth is expected to be 5%, the strongest rate of all regions. The freighter aircraft fleet in Asia Pacific should increase by 5.3% annually, the second highest worldwide growth rate after the Middle East region. Asia Pacific’s fleet (including all commercial air transport aircraft) is expected to increase from 7,614 aircraft today to 32,646 in 2030. The region’s fleet will grow from 12% of the total world fleet today to 22% in 2030.

needed to fly aircraft. In the view of ICAO the region will need to train over 10,000 new pilots a year to fly increasing numbers of aircraft and compensate for retirements. Between 2010 and 2030, Asia Pacific’s pilot population should increase from 50,344 (11% of the world total) to 229,676 (23% of the world total). The key issue will be for the Asia Pacific countries to recruit, train and retain sufficient pilots. The title of this piece - “Inspiring the Next Generation” is a quote from Simon Wu, Director of Flight Operations for Hong Kong Airways, and he expresses his concern that recruiting so large a number of pilots is going to be very challenging because “with the booming economies and industries in the region, manpower resources are keenly contested commodities”. In a community where success is largely measured by financial achievement alone, the new reality of pay levels in the airline business is not immediately attractive to the brightest and best.

Training Pilot Demand With more aircraft, the region will need more qualified personnel. Pilots will be

The range of experience and scale of operation of airlines in the region is huge, reflecting as it does as great

a diversity as any population on the planet. There are world-leading airlines who show the way on a global scale, and those who operate in economic and regulatory poverty. Classifying these airlines is not easy, but Cor Blokzijl of Mandala Airlines based in Indonesia suggests that there are three broad categories of airlines and their associated training systems. The first group is composed of the major airlines with training programmes based on either FAA or EurOps (JAA) and which work closely with the manufacturers training guidelines. These airlines are frequently at the leading edge and are often the first in the world to adapt to new technology and regulation. The second group have certified training programmes based on local standards, and training is conducted in TRTOs comparable with those of FAA or EurOps. Sometimes, however, these airlines lag a little in the most recent standards and consequently on occasion come under scrutiny of FAA or EU safety bodies and can become subject to airspace bans. The third group is the airlines which train locally to local standards. They frequently run under “grandfather” rights and therefore often

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Pilot Training

use equipment and training not well suited to present needs. In addition, such airlines regularly regard previous military experience as a qualification for flying and managerial competence when experience elsewhere has shown that there is little correlation between military performance and the demands of present day civil aviation. This is particularly true in the field of good CRM practice and the adoption of Safety Management Systems (SMS) culture. Symptomatic of the issues which can arise there is also a concern that in some airlines which are driven without a safety culture in mind, best practice can be sorely lacking. If, for instance, a 6-monthly simulator check for First Officers is not required by the NAA, then first of all the FO does not get that critical training, but in addition the simulator check is run with two captains on the flight deck – again not ideal from a CRM point of view.

Regulatory Issues As with other disciplines in aviation, the regulations and the regulators need to move forward to adapt to the latest advances. This is no better illustrated than by the view of the Hong Kong CAD as expressed by Simon Chean. Taking the initial spur of the ICAO Universal Safety Oversight Audit Programme which requires that regulators oversee the implementation of SMS, he is very clear that formal training is required for regulators, and that the overreaching aim at the moment is to emphasise and

Nurturing talent for the aviation industry in Hong Kong – Dragonair‘s Aviation Certificate Programme. Image credit: Dragonair.

reinforce training in SMS and its company-wide culture. The training of regulators in this critical discipline should be through adopting a formal approach, and could perhaps be best addressed through ICAO and NAAs establishing specific training courses, the completion of which would become a formal qualification for regulators. He believes that “regulatory training improvements can ensure uniform application of ICAO requirements and minimize the differences in safety oversight requirements applying in the industry”.

BERLIN.

Evolution in Training The leading training providers in the region have not been slow to react to the latest developments in regulation and technology in training. In some ways the relatively low throughput of some of the legacy training systems in terms of scale and capability has made this process easier – not so much a question of refurbishing existing systems, but rather being able to start with a greenfield solution. As Kevin Speed, Regional Leader Asia for CAE says “last fiscal year, roughly half of all new completed simulator sales worldwide were in the Asia region... the growth in pilot needs across Asia has created a situation where more low-experience pilots are training for First Officer positions.

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As the industry transitions towards more competency-based training programmes, rather than hours-based programmes, we believe that a structured training programme that blends theoretical knowledge with focused high-fidelity simulation and relevant aircraft experience can provide the skills and decisionmaking judgement necessary to fly today’s advanced commercial aircraft. An example of such a training package is in ab initio training where “we are also midway through the first CAE Multi-crew Pilot Licence (MPL) beta programme with sponsoring airline AirAsia, and anticipate further MPL programmes in the near future”.

Caution – and Optimism John Bent again “taken as a whole, the local Asia pilot training market will become quite stressed. In an industry already concerned about the relationship between training and operational safety, as well as rapidly declining experience levels on flight decks, the training supply-demand mix is unhealthy, and may spawn a further rise in accident rates. The inevitable fixes will be reactive, and quality of training process will become subsumed by rate and volume of delivery, as usual”. A strategic view by Nassima Hamza, Business Development Manager at Thales, notes some key points which give cause for optimism. The overreaching characteristic in the region is that, in marked contrast to the short term view so often forced on organisations in the west through economic constraints and concerns about future growth, in Asia a long term strategy for training is emerging, triggered by the predicted continuous expansion. Inevitably that can mean some short term financial pain, but aviation is generally seen to be so critical to continuing development and independence that there is support at national level to build and sustain robust training systems. Many of the NAAs are keen to rapidly adopt new international standards and frequently lead the world with their introduction. The scale and rapidity of the introduction of new technology and methodologies as evinced by the simulator deliveries shows that vision being turned into reality. The wish in Asia is for countries to own their training identity, and to move away from dependence on external sources. In fact the move is not only to look for self sufficiency, but also eventually to realise the long term goal of becoming training providers not only to the region but, perhaps in the long term to the global market. That is a paradigm shift, but, given the massive investment presently underway in training in the region, one that should be considered seriously. As the aviation industry picks itself up from the recent economic difficulties it is well recognised that there is still room for significant growth. Huge aircraft orders from the Gulf region over the last few years perhaps indicate that the immediate growth there is already being catered for – but the region with the greatest potential for even more expansion is Asia. Without doubt there are significant concerns as to how the training to match that growth is carried out, but by the same token there has already been huge progress in the establishment of modern, credible and robust training processes. It may be that hitherto the region has looked for guidance from historic sources of competence, but it will surely not be long before the rest of the world is looking hard at the major players in Asia in order, perhaps, to adopt approaches which originate in that part of the world. cat

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Maintenance Training

Filling the Bill Trainers and manufacturers of training devices are finding more economic and efficient ways to train aircraft maintenance technicians (AMTs). Robert W. Moorman reports.

Q

uestion: What do commercial airline pilots and AMTs have in common? Answer: There isn’t enough of either. Like its counterparts in the cockpit, the global aviation maintenance industry is facing a critical shortage of experienced AMTs to support the present and future fleet of airlines worldwide. How many AMTs are needed, and how critical is the need, remains a source of debate. To meet this challenge of providing AMTs to service new, more complex aircraft, and still remain viable in a very competitive, cost-conscience environment, trainers need to modify their training methodology to be able to train AMTs smarter, faster and cheaper.

Training Methods One solution would be to apply “learnby-doing training methodology supported by virtual technologies to provide 20

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the maximum exposure to skills required on the line,” said Michele Asmar, director of delivery services for Montreal-based CAE. That methodology would encompass ab initio and initial type instruction to specialized and refresher training. To replace AMTs retiring, and to handle the projected growth in the years to come, several related challenges will also have to be met, including finding the necessary capital to train under tighter training budgets. MROs need to make their operations more efficient through the use of LEAN and other process improvements, thereby freeing up the funding needed to train additional AMTs. They also must familiarize themselves with new time and cost reducing training technologies. The shift from the traditional 2-step approach of obtaining knowledge through a “chalk and talk” format into higher-end simulators to a virtual environment from the outset is an emerging

Above Engine maintenance personnel from Mozambique at GE’s Customer Technical Education Center. Image credit: GE Aviation.

trend. The change blends knowledge and skills throughout the curriculum, then advances to the mid-level by using easily accessible and cost-effective maintenance training devices.

Virtual Environments Another training trend that continues to evolve is the use of high-speed Internet and easy-to-use virtual training tools. Aircraft-specific portable simulations and virtual aircraft visualization tools as well as 2D and 3D aircraft component models are fast becoming commonplace in training. The use of integrated training tools, from the desktop trainer to


the Level D full flight simulator can help expedite AMT training and save training costs over the long run, according to several training experts. Generic troubleshooting and diagnostic testing tools have been enhanced and aid in AMT training and have the added benefit of tracking, evaluating and providing feedback to trainers and trainees. 2D visualization tools help identify serviceable components and run prescribed procedures, and 3D aircraft component models help train AMTs on construction and interaction of parts, run-through and safety procedures and gain familiarization with specialty tools. Instructor-led simulation-based classroom training is still an integral part of the aircraft-specific simulation training for AMTs. “Interactive software materials, good video presentations and computer-based training that can enhance the chalk-andtalk teaching is very valuable for today’s engineering [AMT] training,” said Paul Swain, technical training manager for Flybe, a large British European regional airline. Laurent Dussillois, graphics and media manager for Snecma, part of the

Safran Group said today’s training of AMTs of engines must include high resolution graphics, 2D and 3D animations, movies, texts and even story boards. Electronic Performance Support (EPS) tools with virtual environments are a technology gaining popularity among AMTs to gain access online to documents and aircraft maintenance schedules. EPS tools also reduce the reliance on aircraft for continuous training, which provides a significant dollar saving to the airlines. Distance learning is playing a larger role in AMT training, in part, because of the huge savings customers can derive, and because airlines are no longer wary of the effectiveness of the Internet as a viable training tool.

Training Model The single most significant development in AMT training in the last decade is the move toward “a competency-based training system versus an hour of theoretical-based system,” Asmar said. At present, the regulations don’t clearly outline the difference. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), the International Air Transport Association (IATA), and various regu-

lators are trying to develop a training model for competency-based training. But with cost being the driver of everything these days, pushing the higher standard is a tough sell. “If we believe a program should be four or five weeks, and the regulations are slack and say three weeks is good enough, the customers often take the three week program,” said Asmar. While some regulatory bodies have yet to fully embrace competency-based training, the methodology is becoming fairly typical among training providers. From the first to the last day of the Airbus Competency Training program (ACT) Airbus utilizes “less theory” and “more practice” using available technology, said Frank Johnson, manager of maintenance training for Airbus Americas Customer Services, Inc., in Miami. The training programs are driven in real time in “operational scenarios or on the line,” he added. The ACT package for AMT training includes the ACT Training, and Virtual Aircraft, which allow trainees Production File to perform complete maintenance tasks 09. August 2010methodolin an operationally oriented ogy. During a recent interview, Johnson kept returning to the one area of AMT

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Maintenance Training

training to which Airbus is committed — active versus passive learning. “Airbus is using input from industry sources that allows it to use the ACT trainer and a virtual aircraft in the electronic age,” he said. Airbus mobile AMT training crews can fly with the aircraft being delivered, then assist in getting the aircraft type certified. The team then helps develop the maintenance training programs on the aircraft. Airbus recently completed an AMT training project for São Paulo, Brazil-based TAM Linhas Aéreas (TAM Airlines). The program, which trained more than 70 AMTs, consisted of six consecutive line maintenance courses, each 25 days long. “You will see much more mobile training for mechanics than pilots,” Asmar said. “It is not just about providing cost effective training. It’s about providing just-in-time training, obtaining operational information as required.” competency-based training If is the new fuel, then harmonization of AMT training worldwide is the engine. Harmonization, said Johnson, is needed to give clear guidance and

Above Desktop training in LTT’s A380 classroom. Image credit: Lufthansa Technical Training.

guidelines to trainers, maintainers, manufacturers of training equipment and aircraft operators. “I get more and more calls from MROs, who have hired technicians that formerly worked for airlines and were trained here or at one of our mobile

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classes,” Johnson said. “These maintenance organizations want me to verify our course content because their airline customers are regulated by EASA, which wants to verify our level of training before they will award contracts.” Today’s aircraft systems are so integrated and interconnected by IT systems that “we don’t need a pure mechanic anymore,” said Holger Beck, chief operating officer for Lufthansa Technical Training. “We need a fully-fledged technician


that has a clear view of the mechanical up to the avionics systems.” When fly-by wire, and sophisticated IT systems became the norm, pilots were compelled to also become systems managers. AMTs are today faced with the same dilemma,” said Beck. Troubleshooting problems on today’s sophisticated aircraft is another challenge to AMTs. To be effective, AMTs now have to rely heavily on supporting IT systems to get the job done, Beck added. Another major change in AMT training, he said, is the role of the instructor. The instructor has gone from the primary source of instruction to the facilitator of the overall training program, which includes numerous software and hardware training aids. The new airliners coming to market help AMTs, but also create challenges. New aircraft, such as the Boeing 787, have highly developed internal fault systems, which notify personnel on the ground of maintenance problems. For training purposes, these internal fault systems are also built into the simulators and procedures trainers. But that begs the question: Do trainers teach AMTs about all faults found? “We’re not going to teach the mechanic about every single fault,” Asmar said. We’re going to help mechanics understand the tools that will help them figure out what and where the faults are.”

ter M601 turboprop engine. The single largest application on the engine is agriculture, followed by the Raytheon King Air 90, which has the 601E. Tim Myers, manager, CTEC, said CTEC has trained about 30 people on the engine. In other developments, GE will soon launch an engine test cell simulator at CTEC. The simulator will be used to train AMTs on the GE90-115B initially. It will allow students to come to CTEC and be trained in the operation of engine test cells. GE’s new state-of-the-art training center in Qatar will open this year, said Myers, and airlines from Asia and Africa have signed up for AMT training on the GE9 0-1B engine.

Lufthansa Technical Training has enhanced its training operations considerably over the last year. Last year, CAT wrote about the A380 desktop trainer for AMTs, now LTT has expanded the technology offering to the Airbus A330/340/320 and the Boeing 747-400. LTT is providing a fully integrated maintenance-training program for the A320, and plans are to offer the same for the A330/340 by the fourth quarter. In what might be considered retroinstruction, LTT decided not to replace all-paper training manuals for AMTs with electronic versions. “We still have a lot of AMTs that prefer the printed manual,” said Holger Beck, COO of LTT,

Developments Several developments have occurred in the last year at companies providing training equipment and solutions. Since CAT last visited, Abaris Training Resources, a leader in composite training, has added two new engineering classes, one for advanced structures analysis and one on advanced repair design. It has also added a course for managers, who wish to learn more about composite materials and processes. GE’s Customer Technical Education Center (CTEC) has begun providing service training for Cargolux AMTs on the GEnx-2B power plant for the new Boeing 747-8 Freighter. The training is a combination of line maintenance, fan/stator split, engine and installation training, plus borescope inspection instruction. Last April, CTEC began offering line maintenance training on the Wal-

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which conducts 22,000 hours of training annually from 14 different training sites worldwide. LTT has created a quick reference handbook for old-school-preferring AMTs, in addition to the electronic version. An apt example of the “blended training approach” to AMT training, said Beck. Flybe Training Academy, the training arm of the same named airline, provides B1 and B2 type maintenance training on the Bombardier Aerospace CRJ 100/200/700/900, Q400, Dash 8-100/200/300, Embraer 135/145/170/190, ATR 42/72, and the Avro 146. Flybe operates the Q400 and Embraer 190, yet maintains aircraft for numerous airlines. In addition to providing type training, Flybe provides familiarization, human factors, fuel safety and Electrical Wiring Interconnect System (EWIS) training. EWIS training was mandated by regulatory authorities following the 1996 crash of TWA Flight 800, which exploded and crashed off Long Island, and Swiss Air Flight 111, which crashed in 1998 off the coast of Nova Scotia. Faulty wiring in fuel tanks was considered a factor in both accidents. Flybe trains approximately 250 AMTs in type training annually, not including specialty training. A contract to train AMTs on a host of Pratt & Whitney Canada’s (P&WC) engines is by far “the biggest news this year” for FlightSafety International (FSI),” said Mike Lee, director of maintenance training business development. Beginning January 1, 2011, FSI will begin training AMTs at its North American maintenance training facilities in Montreal, Hawker-Beech centers in Wichita, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Toronto and West Palm Beach. FSI also will train AMTs in Paris, China, Singapore, Australia, South Africa and Brazil. Lee said the partnership would require its facilities to be significantly expanded. The Montreal center, where much of the training is expected to take place, will get a “complete renovation,” said Lee.

A major breakthrough in simulation. No matter how you look at it.

© 2010 Christie Digital Systems USA, Inc. All rights reserved.

Maintenance Training Above Flybe Training Academy provides B1 and B2 type maintenance training on a variety of aircraft types. Image credit: Flybe Training Academy.

Antycip Simulation and DiSTI have teamed up to provide virtual maintenance training packages for military and civil sectors. To enhance maintenance training, Antycip is investing in tactile tables and giant touch walls. “Commercial aircraft manufactures are starting to adopt the virtual maintenance technology that was pioneered by the US Military,” said DiSTI CEO Joe Swinski. “We’ve already seen other commercial industries including power generation and the automotive industries adopt this technology.” DiSTI has contracted directly with OEM’s on numerous successful projects. The company is actively working with rotary and fixed wing aircraft OEM’s, which see a competitive advantage in having 3D interactive training materials produced for consumption by their customers. Antycip, which represents DiSTI in Europe, would like to provide AMTs with a virtual training offering for the Airbus A400M utility aircraft, the Eurofighter and civil airliners. CAE announced at the 2010 Farnborough Airshow that it would provide a range of products and support services to operators of ATR aircraft. Both the training provider and OEM will collaborate on deploying simulation equipment and training programs at their customer training centers worldwide. With the worldwide economy improving, and orders for new aircraft increasing, the need for highly trained AMTs is expected to increase appreciably in the years to come. Boeing anticipates a market of 30,900 new commercial passenger and freighter airplanes over the next 20 years, while Embraer forecasts global demand for 6,875 jets in the 30-120-seat segment over two decades. If their prognostications prove correct, this would be welcome news to those needing AMTs and those that train them. cat

The Christie Matrix StIM™ is a scalable environment display system that provides the unique capabilities of achieving eye-limiting resolution while stimulating Night Vision Goggles for revolutionary new capabilities in NVG training. The unique lamp-less illumination system of the Christie Matrix StIM™ offers stability, reliability and years of continuous operation for a virtually maintenance-free lifetime on the display.

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CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

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Cabin Crew Training

Cabin Training Review Changes in service standards, workforce reductions, regulatory change, and ever present security issues are concerns for flight attendants around the world. Fiona Greenyer provides a summary of today’s cabin crew training technologies and techniques.

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he world of the cabin crew is a busy one. The 21st century cabin crew is a front line aviation professional who must balance the needs of the passengers with the processes and procedures required to keep them safe under all circumstances. Many cabin crew will never experience a real emergency, but that doesn’t make the training they receive any less vital.

Disruptive Passengers Disruptive passengers have long been a problem that flight attendants have had to deal with while on board the aircraft. In 2009 Transport Canada introduced new regulations aimed at reducing the incidence of interference with a crew member. The broad reaching regulations addressed statements or actions that may distract a crew member from their safety responsibilities, made by a person onboard or about to board an aircraft. 26

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Because of this broad reach, the associated required training must be delivered to all “operational personnel”, including crew members, gate/check-in staff, and their immediate supervisors. Canadian air operators set about the challenge of developing new procedures in time for the 2009 deadline, and planning the training required in 2010. These important new initiatives represented an increased pressure on the industry, particularly during a time that many are still recovering from revenue shortfalls and staff reductions, not only to research and develop the new training, but also to design the best use of resources in its delivery. As a means to alleviate these pressures, the Inflight Institute introduced a unique online training program entitled ‘In Our Customers Shoes’. The purpose of the training is two-fold. The regulatory requirements of training under the

Above

Restraining kits are designed to be effective and also simple to use. Image credit: SecuriCare.

Interference regulations are met, while the principles of understanding why this behaviour may occur are seamlessly integrated throughout. Unprecedented multi-agency cooperation and behind-the-scenes aerodrome access allow the program’s dramatic multimedia presentation to engage and interact the learner as they follow both a customer and a crew member from the start of their day through to the completion of their journey. At the close of each video clip, the online learner is offered a series of options to address the challenges presented within the scenario, and is then shown the result immediately as each decision is made


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which either increases or decreases the anxiety of the character. Lesson text on regulatory requirements and operational procedures support the program’s media, as does a recap exam at the course’s completion, the results of which are maintained with the operator’s training records. With an average running time of three hours, the efficiency of the program allows operators to save on financial and human resources (instruction personnel, travel, per diems, facilities), while allowing the learner the freedom of training in the comfort of their own home. UK-based SecuriCare has been working with the airline industry since 1996 and specialises in the management of disruptive passengers. The company has developed a complete strategy that is specifically designed to meet the challenge of preventing and managing disruptive behaviour. All courses are designed to be interactive, engaging, and encourage the crew to input and share their own experiences. Scenario-based exercises allow them to put into practice, in a controlled environment, the skills they have learnt. The training comprises of three modules progressively working through ever more disruptive scenarios and the best means for cabin crew to manage and stabilise situations. The interactive course is designed to encourage a progressive team approach to managing disruptive passenger behaviour. Crews are also taught how to respond to physical provocation which covers incident awareness and management, initial approach/response, and positive body language techniques. It also includes skills designed to help a member of staff to reduce the risk of escalation during the intial stages of physical provocation. “The last resort is to restrain the passenger” said Adrian Pannett, Director, SecuriCare. But if the situation requires restraint, SecuriCare’s restraint kits are designed to be effectively and simply used. The straps are designed like aircraft seatbelts as it is what the crews recognize and can use easily in a stressful situation. The Seat Restraint Kit secures the passenger to the seat and prevents them from posing any further threat to the safety of the aircraft, its crew, or other passengers for the remainder of the flight.

09-08-2010

13:46

Contracts Business has been brisk for many of the manufacturers of cabin crew training equipment. Superjet International Training Center is now ready to provide the first type training course for cabin crew for the Sukhoi Superjet 100 aircraft. The CEET (cabin emergency evacuation trainer) will be available at the SJI Training Center located in Tessera-Venice, Italy by the end of July. The trainer accurately reproduces a section of the Sukhoi Superjet 100 design in terms of features and size. The device will be used to train flight attendants and pilots in CRM, as a door trainer, and normal and emergency flight procedures. The system simulates several anomalies including door jam, door handle locking and slide inflation failure. Simulation of hidden fire/blaze is provided with six smoke and fire generators. The simulator is placed on a tilting platform support which supports emergency evacuation with nose landing gear or one of the main landing gear collapse. EADS RST has been developing cabin crew training devices since 2000, and more than 40 simulators have been delivered worldwide, but never to Russia. Last year, RST won their first Russian contract, with the Aviation Training Centre (ATC) in St. Petersburg. The contract was for an Airbus A320 door trainer to be equipped with part of a cabin and passenger seats to ensure the training of different evacuation scenarios in realistic surroundings. Based on good cooperation and coordination between both partners, the door trainer was installed in the St. Petersburg training centre just five months after the contract signing. In the Middle East, Oman Air has awarded a $2.6 million contract to Spatial Composite Solutions, the Dubai-based manufacturer of crew training equipment, for two new cabin crew safety trainers. Under the contract, Spatial will design and build A330-300 and B737NG emergency evacuation trainers which will be installed at Oman Air’s new Aviation Crew Training facility at Muscat International Airport. Delivery is scheduled for October 2010. “These devices are equipped with the latest cabin training technology and will provide our growing team of cabin staff with the best environment in which to hone their safety training skills. We look forward to receiving our new train-

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CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

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Cabin Crew Training

ers including the flagship A330-300 later this year,” said Peter Hill, chief executive officer, Oman Air. Founded in 2007, Spatial Composite Solutions is the only specialist manufacturer of crew training equipment in the Middle East. Virtually all components used in the construction are manufactured in the company’s Jebel Ali factory. One company at the forefront of aviation safety and cabin training is Aviation Australia. Widely known for its EASA/CASA/ HKAR approved Aircraft Maintenance Engineer training, the Brisbane-based organisation also operates the only independent fully equipped cabin crew training centre in Australasia in order to provide pre-trained cabin crew to airlines and recurrent Emergency Procedures training capability to industry. While its facility already contained a variety of evacuation trainers, Aviation Australia recently added a custom built widebody cabin simulator to ensure that service and evacuation training across the full scope of aircraft types could be offered. The new high-tech device compliments the full cabin B737 and EMB 190 trainers, numerous door trainers, escape slides, rafts and a water survival facility (with HUET capability). Completed in 2010 and with ongoing upgrades, the new B777/A330 simulator presents Aviation Australia’s cabin crew trainees and client airlines the opportunity to use a fully capable high-tech simulator that offers two class seating, fire/smoke simulation, infrared and multi-angle conventional DV cameras with dispersed microphones, DV recorders, deployable oxygen masks, fully fitted out lavatories, galleys and even a crown crew rest access. Under the watchful eye of Aviation Australia’s experienced instructors, cabin crew can explore the full range of scenarios aboard an authentically appointed wide-body aircraft

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in the most realistic environment possible, so if the time comes, they are ready and prepared for any kind of emergency.

Communication CRM encompasses a wide range of knowledge, skills and attitudes including communication, situational awareness, problem solving, decision making, and teamwork. The importance of good communications between the flight deck and cabin crews has long been recognised as a vital element to a safe environment, and it is an area of training that is regularly improved upon and studied. With what seems to be constantly changing working conditions, good communications become ever more vital. One study that has been done in this area is by Lori J. Brown of Western Michigan University, and the results were presented at the World Aviation Training Conference and Tradeshow (WATS) in Florida earlier this year. “Gaps in effective communication, can lead to loss of life, or create a communication gap that could impede the information transfer to the pilots,” she said during her presentation ‘Both Sides of the Cockpit Door: A Global Study’. Funded by Western Michigan University, the survey looks at pilot/flight attendant communication and joint training issues, and is to be published in the FAA International Journal of Applied Aviation Studies. The study identified barriers which may leave flight attendants and pilots feeling isolated and may impede effective communication. These can include inadequate briefing, no introductions, poor morale, fatigue, lack of scenario-based CRM training, or misunderstanding of the sterile cockpit rule. Out of 224 flight attendants sampled, 55% reported that they have been hesitant to report a problem and 16% indicated that they have had a situation where they did not report a problem and did not inform the flight deck, because they thought they already knew. Out of the 51 pilots sampled, 57% indicated they have noticed that flight attendants may be hesitant to report a problem due to misunderstanding of the sterile cockpit rule, or other reason. The survey results indicated that gender has the potential to impede or influence flight attendant/pilot communication. Asked to select the areas of training that they felt were lacking for pilots and flight attendants, the results showed fatigue recognition and countermeasure training as the most popular response, followed by joint CRM training, joint pilot/flight attendant security training and scenario based security training. 79% of respondents reported that they thought it would be beneficial for flight attendants and Federal Air Marshals to do their training together. The conclusion that Brown and her team found in the study was that it was doubtful that fortress door or secondary barriers will be removed from US airlines, and communication gaps surrounding these post 9/11 changes can be lessened with the application of possible remedies. “Crew Orientated Flight Training (COFT), training development and scheduling may not be realistic for all carriers in these lean economic times, but improvement of sterile cockpit training, and improved crew briefings are both viable and crucial,” concluded Brown. Coordination of the flight deck and cabin crew has never been more challenging, and as Brown noted, “let us not forget the possible effects of airline mergers on communication and crew coordination.” One issue among many that will continue to be discussed throughout the next year. cat


DILAsimAd2out.pdf

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Organised by:

The European Airline Training Symposium (EATS) is journeying to Istanbul, Turkey for the 2010 event. From November 9 to 10, we’ll be continuing our annual tradition of exploring European expertise in aviation flight training and simulation. Conference Chair Chris Lehman files an update.

T

he overall theme of EATS 2010 is “A New Era in European Aviation Training,” and along with highlighting Turkey’s unique aviation training sector, the conference will focus on the industry’s overall challenges and prospects heading into a new decade. With its accompanying exhibition, EATS provides a uniquely European perspective on civil aviation training, yet attracts conference delegates, speakers, and exhibitors from around the globe. Since inception, a hallmark of EATS is the quality of attendees – quite literally the majority of the senior personalities that drive this highly specialised sector. Personnel recruitment, selection, and F/O training issues will be centre stage at EATS 2010, including the actual experience with MPL. As usual, the conference will include an update on the role Gold Sponsor

Silver Sponsors

Bronze Sponsors

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of EASA as it continues its regulatory evolution, including Flight Crew Licensing and Flight Operations NPA activities. Training for safety and security, human factors, new navigation technologies, LOC-I, cross-cultural issues, CRM, and TEM will be covered, with viewpoints from the continent’s most informed industry players, including aircraft manufacturers, FTOs, TRTOs, and national regulators. Entirely new initiatives, including the promise of a global training best practise repository will be explored, as well as insights into positioning organisations to take advantage of the looming economic recovery.

Rounding out the conference will be a simulation technology update – from desktop devices to Full Flight Simulation, with an emphasis on the simulation technologies and techniques that are being introduced for new aircraft types such as the B787. The Aviation Industry’s Computer Based Training Committee (AICC) will conduct a special session on everything you need to know about air carrier e-learning. For the latest up-to-date conference programme as well as further show information, please visit www.halldale.com/ eats. We look forward to seeing you in Istanbul! cat

Register before 15th October 2010 and take advantage of the earlybird discounted delegate rate of 5550. www.halldale.com/eats

world news & analysis

Image credit: David Malley/Halldale Media.

Show PREVIEW

EATS 2010 Flight Plan Now Filed for Istanbul


world news & analysis

Seen&Heard Compiled and edited by the CAT editorial team. For daily breaking S&T news - go to www.halldale.com.

Simulator News First ATR simulator in Ireland for Aer Arann – Aer Arann is set to benefit from a major training facility with the arrival of the first ever ATR 72/42 full flight simulator in Ireland. The simulator is managed by Simtech Aviation at Dublin Airport. The simulator is primarily a training facility for Aer Arann, which means training new pilots as well as using it to perform proficiency checks for current Aer Arann pilots that previously took place in Toulouse, France at the ATR facility. The simulator uses a six electric axis, 36-inch stroke motion base, certified by the Irish Aviation Authority to Level C. CAE Wins C$55M in Training Contracts – CAE has won C$55 million in new training solutions contracts with Bombardier, ATR, Vietnam Airlines, and a U.S.-based legacy airline. The contracts include the sale of four full-flight simulators (FFS). Level 5 Qualification for SimCom’s TBM 850 FTD – SimCom’s TBM 850 flight training device (FTD) has received FAA Level 5 qualification status. Introduced to its simulator fleet last year, the TBM 850 FTD has demonstrated its ability to meet exacting FAA performance standards and is now approved for specific training endorsements. The type specific device may be used for satisfying flight review and instrument currency requirements as well as obtaining a high altitude endorsement. This approval provides operators the convenience of satisfying these FAA requirements while enrolled

Above SimCom’s TBM 850 FTD. Image Credit: SimCom.

in initial or recurrent training. SimCom is the exclusive factory authorized training provider for the Socata TBM in North America and Mexico. Training on the TBM series is offered at SimCom’s facility in Orlando, FL. ELITE Advanced ATD Certification – The first fully integrated, transportable desktop Advanced ATD (AATD), the ELITE PT-136 “Proficio”, has received FAA certification. The PT-136 was designed specifically for portability and ease of operation. It is the ideal solution for classrooms, learning labs, freelance instructors, space limitations and

personal training. The Proficio delivers the latest in digital technology, including integrated GNS 430 WAAS GPS and multiple aircraft modules, including the Cessna 172, 172RG, 182, Piper Archer III, Arrow IV and Beach Bonanza A36.

RFFT Fire Trainers especially designed for Airliners; contact us now www.interfireproducts.com

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world news & analysis

Rockwell Collins Edge B737NG Simulator Achieves FAA Level D Certification – Rockwell Collins has achieved Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Part 60 Level D qualification for its Edge™ Boeing 737NG full flight simulator (FFS) at Pan Am International Flight Academy’s North American training center in Miami. It is the first FAA Level D certification for Rockwell’s Edge system, which received UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) Level D qualification late last year for its simulator at CTC Aviation in Southampton, UK. Purdue University Orders Frasca Phenom FTD – Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, has contracted with Frasca International, Inc. for an Embraer Phenom flight training device (FTD) that will be designed to meet FAA Level 6 flight training device requirements and will be equipped with actual Garmin Prodigy found in the aircraft. It will also have a high fidelity digital sound system (TruSound™), TruFeel™ control loading, auto-testing, Graphical Instructor Station (GISt™) and Frasca’s visual system (TruVision™) with 220° display system. The FTD will be installed in the Holleman-Niswonger Simulator Laboratory at Purdue and will be used in the school’s professional pilot training program. Azul Orders Embraer 190 Simulator from FlightSafety – FlightSafety International has entered into an agreement with Azul Brazilian Airlines to purchase a second Embraer 190 aircraft simulator. The two companies are also to explore the joint development of a comprehensive Training Center in Brazil equipped with FlightSafety simulators and other advanced flight training devices. The new Embraer 190 simulator will be installed at Azul’s current Training Center in São Paulo, Brazil. It will be equipped with FlightSafety’s electric

Specialists in the management of Disruptive Passenger Behaviour and serious incident management Ask about SecuriCare’s unique Disruptive Passenger Restraint Kit © For all your training needs contact: trainers@securicare.com www.securicare.com 32

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motion and control loading system and advanced Vital X visual system and is expected to receive Level D qualification from the ANAC, Brazil’s National Civil Aviation Agency. Emirates Airlines Purchases Aerosim FMST for B777 and A320 – Emirates Airlines has purchased Aerosim Technologies’ Flight Management System Trainer for the B777 and A320. Emirates is using the PC-based simulation device and software to gain

Commercial Aircraft Sales June 9 2010 – August 18 2010 Aircraft type Number Operator/Buyer

A319 5 Germania A320 40 Virgin America A320 60 GECAS A320 50 LAN Airlines A320 51 ALC A320 5 South African Airways A321 5 Finnair A330-200 1 Turkish Airlines A330-300 6 Garuda Airways A330-300 7 Thai Airways A330 10 Hong Kong Airlines A330 11 Aeroflot A350 15 Hong Kong Airlines A350-900 12 ALAFCO A350-900 30 Cathay Pacific B737NG 12 Avolon B737NG 15 NAS B737NG 40 GECAS B737-800 20 Air China B737-800 15 Norwegian Air Shuttle B737-800 60 (6 opt) ALC B737-800 43 RBS Capital B737-800 35 American Airlines B737-800 2 Alaska Airlines B737-800 10 Okay Airlines B767-300ER 1 Azerbaijan Airlines B767F 2 Azerbaijan Airlines B777-200LR 2 Air Austral B 777-200LR 2 Qatar Airways B777 30 Emirates B787 3 Royal Jordanian

EMB175 140 FlyBe (65 opt/40pr) EMB190 24 Republic Airlines EMB190 25 (5 opt) Air Lease EMB190 2 TRIP EMB190 2 Qatar Airways EMB190 20 (5 opt) ALC EMB195 5 Azul L.A. Brasilieiras

CRJ900 Q400

S100 S100

8 7

Lufthansa Qantas

45 (15 opt) Pearl Aircraft Corp. 10 Gazpromavia

efficiency in development of RNAV/RNP approaches. Its flight safety and technical pilots are also using the program to check crew reports on problems with approaches.

Training Aircraft Ethiopian Airlines Purchases Diamond Training Aircraft and Simulator – Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH of Austria has signed a purchase agreement with Ethiopian Airlines for ten pilot training aircraft (DA40NG) and one simulator. The aircraft will be equipped with the new Austro Engine AE300 power plant, which operates with JetA1 (kerosene) fuel. The total cost of the aircraft and simulator are valued at 3.7 million Euros at list price. The aircraft will be delivered in eight months time from the date of the agreement and the first four aircraft are scheduled to be delivered in November 2010.

OEM Training Agreements CAE and ATR Sign Agreement – At the Farnborough Airshow, CAE announced that it has signed a master agreement with aircraft manufacturer ATR as a framework for providing a range of products and support services to operators of ATR aircraft. As part of this master agreement, ATR and CAE will collaborate on deployment of simulation equipment and training programs in ATR, CAE or customer training centres worldwide. Under the terms of the master agreement, CAE and ATR will develop and deploy the latest simulation-based training devices and programs in a training network around the world. In addition to the provision of simulation equipment, CAE will provide support services that could include simulator upgrades and maintenance as well as leasing of simulation equipment and training centre space when required by ATR CAE Signs MRJ Training Agreement with Mitsubishi – CAE has signed an agreement with Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation (MJET) to develop and deliver a training solution for the new Mitsubishi regional jet (MRJ). The agreement includes a 10-year Exclusive Training Provider program, and the establishment of two training centres,


initially in Japan and the United States. In support of the agreement, CAE is expanding its training network and developing two CAE 7000 Series MRJ full flight simulators (FFS) and CAE Simfinity™ integrated procedures trainers. CAE will also design curriculum and courseware, and provide training for pilots, maintenance technicians, cabin crew, dispatchers and ground support personnel. The two simulators will be the world’s first two MRJ FFSs and will be deployed by CAE at the two training centres established for MRJ training.

Pilot Training Centers Indra to Expand Hainan Airlines Training Centre – Indra has announced a contract with Hainan Airlines to expand its pilot training centre with two simulators supporting Airbus A320 passenger aircraft. The contract reaffirms Indra’s position in the civil simulation market in China, with six simulators previously delivered. Indra’s simulators will be some of the first in the world to incorporate air traffic control communications simulation. This feature allows the combination of training of maneuvers with communications with air traffic controllers, runway controllers etc. This feature is now much in demand and might become compulsory to obtain the Multi-crew Pilot License. Partnership to Train Japanese Pilots – CTC Aviation Group plc (CTC) and the Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology (NMIT) signed an exclusive deal with J.F. Oberlin University in Tokyo, Japan to train the University’s airline pilots. Under the agreement, 17 airline pilots will be trained at CTC’s Crew Training Centre-Hamilton the first year and 30 each year thereafter. The first students will arrive in September. CAE Acquires Part of China Southern Airlines Pilot Training School in Australia – CAE has acquired an equity interest in the China Southern West Australian Flying College (CSWAFC) near Perth, Australia, and will manage the pilot training school as part of the CAE Global Academy network. The school will operated as a joint venture owned 53 percent by China Southern Airlines and 47 percent by CAE. CSWAFC specializes in training ab initio students to become multi-engine

instrument-rated airline first officers. Graduates then earn aircraft type ratings at the Zhuhai Flight Training Centre, a joint venture between China Southern Airlines and CAE in Zhuhai, Guandong province, China.

Take Ground Training to A Whole New Flight Level

Visual Systems Boeing Visual Upgrades for All Nippon – Boeing Training & Flight Services has completed an upgrade of the visual systems on All Nippon Airways’ (ANA) three B767-300 full flight simulators in Tokyo, Japan. The upgrade enhances the realism and quality of the training and ensures conformity with the latest regulatory requirements. “ANA is pleased with our partnership with Boeing Training & Flight Services and that they have shared their expertise and knowledge to assist us with the enhancement and upgrade of our 767-300 simulators,” said Shigekazu Miyazaki, vice president of Flight Training at ANA. “We are constantly reviewing our training technologies and despite the economic downturn, ANA will continue to invest in providing the best training devices and equipment for our pilots and flight crew from other airlines who train at our facility.” Mechtronix Systems Canadian Grant to Improve Visual Displays – Mechtronix Systems Inc. is to receive $485,000 from the National Research Council of Canada’s Industrial Research Assistance Program to develop better visual displays on flight simulators used for pilot training. The company will work in conjunction with the University of Laval on this innovative research and development project to enhance the quality, accuracy and rigidity of specialized visual systems for their flight simulators.

MPL News Oxford and Flybe Launch Second MPL Course – Oxford Aviation Academy (OAA) has announced the launch of a second MPL course in partnership with major UK airline Flybe. This new course commencing in November 2010 is being launched following the success of the inaugural MPL course - the first of its kind to be delivered in UK airspace. The MPL course is designed to produce well trained First Officers qualified

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for Q400 operations upon graduation. Following a joint OAA and Flybe selection process to be held at both Oxford and Exeter, six cadets will be selected to commence training for their MPL at Oxford on the 19th November.

Flight Schools Delta Connection Academy Designated a Cirrus Training Center – Delta Connection Academy (DCA) is now a Cirrus Training Center (CTC), a designation that allows DCA to provide training to Cirrus owners only available at select Cirrus Training Center locations. DCA will use the aircraft and an FAA certified Level 6 flight training device to provide this training. In addition to traditional CTC programs pilots will now have the opportunity to take advantage of advanced training including parachute deployment, Caribbean, mountain and Alaskan flying. New Pegasus Flight Academy Planned for South China – Plans are at an advanced stage for the establishment of the Pegasus Flight Academy (PFA) at South China’s Zhuhai Airport to help ease the pressure on the country’s

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professional airline pilot training supply. This project, in development for 24 months, only awaits final investor agreements and will likely be announced at the Zhuhai International Air Show in November. Against the backdrop of a projected requirement for 61,000 new airline pilots in China over 20 years, PFA is being seen as a strong business opportunity in the China aviation sector.

Above ST Aerospace has acquired the remaining 30% equity stake in ST Aerospace Training Academy. Image Credit: ST Aerospace.

A land area of 60,000 square meters has been reserved for the academy, a fully integrated state-of-the-art


facility designed to accommodate 500 students, training aircraft and flight simulators. PFA’s 18-month training programme will take the university graduate via the most advanced airline training processes to the new ICAO Multi-crew pilot License (MPL). Graduates will be type-rated for the Airbus A320 or Boeing B737NG aircraft, in use by almost all Chinese airlines. New projections for China growth are now dwarfing those applied to the PFA business plan. ST Aerospace Acquires Remaining Stake in STATA – ST Aerospace has acquired the remaining 30% equity stake in ST Aerospace Training Academy Pte Ltd. (STATA) through its wholly owned subsidiary, ST Aerospace Engineering Pte Ltd. The equity stake was acquired from the other existing shareholder, Aviation Training Academy (Singapore) Pte Ltd., for a total cash consideration of S$4m. With this acquisition, STATA becomes a wholly owned subsidiary of ST Aerospace Engineering. Managed and operated by ST Aerospace as part of its global network, ST Aerospace’s commercial pilot training academy is the first non-airline affiliated flight training organization in Singapore to offer commercial pilot training services to network airlines, low cost carriers and aspiring individuals. STATA has been operating under a CASA (Australia’s Civil Aviation and Safety Authority) Air Operators Certificate since October 2008, it has also obtained the Civil Aviation Authority of China (CAAC) CCAR141 approval to train pilots for the Chinese airlines. Baltic Aviation Academy Starts A320 Training – Baltic Aviation Academy in Lithuania has added Airbus A320 to its type rating training list and has become the fastest growing aviation training centre in the Eastern European region. Ground school training is conducted at the Baltic Aviation Academy facility in Vilnius, and the Academy operates a network of full flight simulators in Lithuania, Spain, France, USA, Bulgaria, Germany and the United Kingdom. “This was the year of growth, the Baltic Aviation Academy expanded its capabilities by adding new type rating courses and by increasing the geography of operated full flight simulator network,” said Egle Vaikeviciute, CEO

of Baltic Aviation Academy. “We have analyzed the needs of the Eastern European aviation market and have developed training programs for the most popular aircraft types in the region. At the moment we can offer type rating training for nine types of aircraft and plan to add four more types by the end of the year.” Phoenix East Flight Training Grants – Phoenix East Aviation, Inc. (PEA) has announced two institutional grants available for US military veterans for professional flight training. Career flight training is a covered benefit under the Montgomery GI Bill, Chapter 30. The Phoenix East Aviation grants, called the Patriot Institutional Grant Alpha and the Patriot Institutional Grant Bravo, are designed to assist the veterans who wish careers as professional pilots. The new Patriot Grant Bravo can reduce training costs by up to $3,000 overall, and the Patriot Grant Alpha will contribute $1,500 toward the training tuition. Either of these grants are available to US veterans who qualify for education benefits under the Montgomery GI Bill, Chapter 30. Jet Type-Ratings at Phoenix East Aviation – Phoenix East Aviation, Inc. (PEA) in Daytona Beach, Florida is offering new jet type-rating courses for pilot certification and aircraft type ratings for Airbus A320 and Boeing B737NG aircraft. The company is partnering with AeroStar Training Services, an FAA Certified 142 training facility to conduct the programs. Classroom facilities feature interactive training environment, simulators with optimal visual and motion systems, and a virtual flight deck (VFD) training system. Keilir Aviation Academy Fully Operational – Keilir Aviation Academy at Keflavik Airport in Iceland is now fully operational with JAA FTO approval for Private to Commercial Pilots License training and training for instrument and multi engine piston ratings. The Academy offers professional flight training, headed by highly experienced staff of airline pilots and instructors, along with brand new Diamond DA20, DA40 and DA42 aircraft. New Aviation Academy in Vellore, India – The Madras Flying Club (MFC) is setting up a fully-fledged aviation academy in Vellore, India, which will be the first of its kind in Asia. Here, anyone

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with a dream of flying can get a commercial pilot’s training on easy terms. “The proposed aviation academy with a wide variety of courses will be a prestigious project of the state and also be the first of its kind in Asia,” said Capt. Sebastian, secretary of the 80-year old club. “We have already completed preliminary discussions with the state government. The MFC has demanded certain long term requirements from the government for the academy’s infrastructure. The state government has already earmarked seven acres of land for the project but the total project might require a minimum of 80-90 acres of land.”

Cabin Crew Training Embraer 190 Door Trainers for Virgin Blue – RP Aero Systems has been awarded a contract by Virgin Blue to manufacture and install an Embraer 190 door trainer and an overwing exit trainer at their Training Centre in Sydney, Australia. This brings the total number of E190 trainers ordered by Virgin Blue from RP to five. The two new devices will augment the existing VB training facilities and reflects the airlines ongoing commitment to training in an expanding environment. “The door trainer includes all the necessary functions to meet the modern day training needs with added value such as auto close, communication system and out of the window visuals as standard,” said RP Aero Systems managing director, Stephen Foster. SuperJet to Provide Type Training Course for Cabin Crew – Superjet International (SJI), the joint venture between Alenia Aeronautica and Sukhoi Holding, will have a cabin emergency evacuation trainer (CEET) available at the SJI Training Center in Tessera-Venice, Italy, by the end of July.

Above The Madras Flying Club (MFC) is setting up a fully-fledged aviation academy in Vellore, India. Image Credit: Madras Flying Club.

Currently under acceptance at the EDM facility in Manchester, UK, the trainer reproduces a section of the Sukhoi Superjet 100. At SJI, it will be used to train flight attendants and pilots in CRM (Crew Resources Management), as a door trainer, and for emergency flight procedures training. The system simulates several anomalies including, for example, a door jam, door handle locking and slide inflation failure.

Maintenance Training

2010 Annual International Flight Crew Training Conference The Global Market Place: The Challenges for Flight Crew Training Wednesday 22 – Thursday 23 September 2010 No.4 Hamilton Place, London W1J 7BQ, UK The Conference will examine potential improvements in training programmes, licensing and regulations for fixed and rotary-wing aircraft. For multinational flight crews from widely diverse backgrounds, behaviour, culture, standards and threat and error management remain important, especially when coupled with new operating techniques. Safe operations remain paramount.

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AVISA to Provide easyJet Maintenance Training – AVISA has been signed up by easyJet to deliver specialist training to the airline’s engineering and maintenance staff. AVISA training has delivered a series of courses to around 100 engineering staff, covering all aspects of European Aviation Safety Authority (EASA) regulations governing international airworthiness, without which airline operators cannot fly. The courses covered essential Continuing Airworthiness Management Organisation (CAMO) regulations and how to implement them. infoWERK Launches New Q400 Maintenance Training Seminars – infoWERK has announced that its new Q400 maintenance training has received approval from the German Luftfahrt-Bundesamt (LBA). This multimedia-based product was developed for the German Aviation Training Center AERO-Bildung and the seminars will be held at AERO-Bildung facilities in Munich. AERO-Bildung primarily offers vocational and continuing training. In 2005 the company adopted the well-known PART 147 school of Fairchild Dornier. The Q400 maintenance training can be used for initial, familiarization and recurrent/refresher training of aircraft technicians and other maintenance personnel.


ATC Training CSC Air Traffic Control Simulation Training Systems for Universities – Four more universities have chosen CSC’s NexSim™ Radar and Tower air traffic control simulation training systems to support the initial training and development of next generation Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic controllers. CSC is expanding its support for university aviation training programs by providing a total of 12 NexSim Radar and two NexSim Tower simulators to Miami Dade College, Miami, Fla.; Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, N.M.; University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Md.; and Oklahoma University, Norman, Okla. CSC’s NexSim technology simulates real operational environments found in the busiest terminal and en-route radar facilities.

Courseware FAA Provisional Approval Granted for 787 Dreamliner Pilot Training Courses – Boeing Training & Flight Services has been granted provisional approval for its 787 Dreamliner pilot training courses by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). With the 787 pilot training courses, pilots can transition to the new airplane in five to 20 days, depending on pilot experience. Boeing 777 pilots can qualify to fly the 787 in as little as five days, given the high level of commonality between the two airplane types. “Gaining FAA approval for our courses is a significant milestone as we ramp up to the start of flight training,” said Mark Albert, director of Simulator Services and 787 Training Program, Boeing Training & Flight Services. “It validates our approach to provide worldclass training solutions at great value for the 787 Dreamliner.” Local FAA offices will approve individual operator training courses and these may be based on provisional approvals. “This achievement is another important step in ensuring the readiness of our 787 support products and services,” said Mike Fleming, 787 director of Services and Support, Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

RJ Flight Academy Enhances Training with CPaT – RJ Flight Academy in Stockholm, Sweden, chose to use CPaT’s library of flight training programs for all aircraft types in its training courses, including the CPaT Learning Management System (LMS). The school wanted “to form an alliance with one provider who could cover all aircraft types” and had programs that would run on any platform, according to Captain El Sayed, Director of Training, at RJ Flight Academy. A320 Family Training Buys CPaT A320 CBT – CPaT has sold its A320 Aircraft Systems computer-based (CBT/ WBT) program to A320 Family Training TRTO, based in Le Kremlin Bicetre, France. “A320 Family is the latest in a growing number of TRTOs who have chosen CPaT to help cost-effectively solve training needs,” said Russell Peck, CPaT’s President.” Avsoft Provides Web-based Training for Air Baltic – Avsoft has delivered web based training (WBT) solutions to Air Baltic in Riga, Latvia. The airline plans to use the type rated courses to help satisfy its pilot training curriculum requirements for the B737-300/500, B737-700, B757/767, and the Dash 8-400. As part of the contract, Air Baltic will be delivering the courseware through Avsoft`s web based Learning Management System. FlyAirbus Deploys CPaT Solutions – FlyAirbus in Middlesex, UK, has purchased some CPaT A320 and A330 computer-based training (CBT) type-rated courses to help satisfy customer training curriculum requirements for its TRTO training center. CTC Launches Modular Training Options – CTC Aviation Group has launched a range of part- and full-time modular courses under the umbrella of its new CTC TAKEOFF brand. With CTC TAKEOFF, the company will add a complete selection of JAA/EASA approved modular options ranging from PPL and ATPL theory to MCC and type rating. The new courses will be available at the company’s UK and NZ-based training centres. MINT iPad-based Pilot Evaluation System – Two weeks after the iPad had been launched in the US, aviation training professionals could see its vast potential for the business when using the iPad together with MINT Media

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Interactive’s TMS’ Electronic Grade Sheets. “It’s a brilliant idea to take the iPad into the simulator session and grade Captains and First Officers right there and then,” said Andreas Weber, CEO at CST Berlin. “The best thing is that no one needs to transfer it from paper into a record keeping system anymore but it is available on-line in real-time.” With regard to the upcoming AQP requirements, the Compliance and Training Management System MINT TMS meets the needs of its airline training customers. Corresponding to the overall principle of flexibility, grade sheets can be individually constructed as can be any other qualification-related form, e.g. certificates.

Helicopter Training ANAC Certification for Era Training Center – Era Training Center LLC (ETC) has obtained Agência Nacional de Aviação Civil (ANAC) approval for its CFR 142 Training Center. ETC is the first foreign helicopter training center certified by Brazil. “ANAC approval is a fundamen-

tal step towards providing regulatory approved courses for Brazil and Latin American countries,” said Paul White, General Manager of Era Training Center. “Training services for pilots and mechanics are in high demand and this approval will play a direct role as we move into our Brazilian subsidiary - Era Training Center Brasil - due to break ground later this year.” Indra EC225 Helicopter Sim – Indra is working on the development of a new simulator supporting the EC225 passen-

Above Eurocopter EC225 Super Puma. Image Credit: Eurocopter/Patrick Penna.

ger transport helicopter. The simulator will be implemented at Eurocopter UK’s service and training centre in Aberdeen, Scotland. The system, in its final development stage, will back up the training of pilots who cover the North Sea routes and transport people and goods to over 200 offshore oil drilling platforms located

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in the North Sea. Pilots can also be trained in search and rescue missions since the EC225 helicopter is often employed in this type of mission. The avionics and navigation tools on the simulator will be the same as those of the helicopter, and the visual system will cover one million km² from Aberdeen in Scotland, to Stavanger, Norway. The capacity to reproduce the vibrations of the aircraft during flight will make this simulator unique. Helicopter Simulator Contract for Thales – Thales has been selected by Eurocopter to produce a second N3 Dauphin flight simulator for its Dauphin helicopter. The simulator will be operational from 2012 at Eurocopter’s South East Asia facility. The N3 Dauphin flight simulator has been designed to meet the training needs of Eurocopter and its civil and military customers in South East Asia, a market with promising growth potential for this sector. It will obtain FTD Level 3 and FFS Level B approval under European and American EASA/JAA/FAA criteria, so can provide training credits for initial training, as well as for initial and recurrent type rating training. The N3 Dauphin will also be used to provide training for more specific assignments, such as offshore operations, SAR (Search and Rescue) and EMS (Emergency Medical Services).

Business Aircraft Training New Learjet FFS – Bombardier Aerospace has purchased a CAE 7000 Series FFS for the new Learjet 85 business aircraft that it will use for training, and to support aircraft testing and certification before the aircraft enters service in 2013. The FFS is scheduled for delivery to the Bombardier training centre in Montreal, Canada in 2012. CAE is also simulating the aircraft’s Pro Line Fusion avionics suite for Bombardier’s Global Vision flight deck that will be ready for training at the Montreal training facility in 2011. Gulf Centre and MEBAA Partner to Improve Business Aviation Training – In keeping with the vision of the Gulf Centre for Aviation Studies (GCAS) to advance expertise and knowledge in the aviation industry, a memorandum of understanding with the Middle East Business Aviation Associa-

tion (MEBAA) has been signed. This development is a further step towards the centre’s ambition to lead the aviation industry in the region towards world class standards in operation and management. Through this memorandum of understanding, GCAS, a GCAA and ICAO recognized centre, will expand its client’ network to include the niche market managed by MEBAA, to offer it internationally accredited programs certified by JAATO and ACI. Such initiative defends the centre’s emerging position as the leading aviation training body for the Middle East and North

New Aircraft Orders Pearl Aircraft Buys 30 Sukhoi Superjet 100s – SuperJet International, a joint venture between Alenia Aeronautica, a Finmeccanica Company, and Sukhoi Holding, have signed an agreement worth more than $900 million with Pearl Aircraft Corporation for the sale of 30 Sukhoi Superjet 100 aircraft, plus fifteen options Royal Jordanian Orders Three More 787 Dreamliners – Royal Jordanian has signed an order with Boeing for three 787-8s worth approximately $500 million. This order previously was attributed to an unidentified customer on Boeing’s Orders and Deliveries website. Direct purchases and leases combined, Royal Jordanian has committed to 11 787-8s. It will place the 787 on North American routes initially, including New York, Chicago, Detroit and Toronto. Air China to Buy 20 Boeing Planes for $1.4 billion – Air China is purchasing 20 Boeing 777-800 airplanes for $1.4 billion to boost its fleet capacity by about 5 percent. The airline says the new aircraft will allow it to increase the frequency of its flights. Hong Kong Airlines Receives First Airbus Aircraft – Hong Kong Airlines became a new Airbus operator with the delivery of its first A330-200. The fouryear old airline will use the aircraft to launch services to Europe at the end of June, initially flying non-stop to Moscow. It is the first of 53 aircraft Hong Kong Airlines ordered from Airbus, including 23 A330s and 30 single aisle A320s. The airline also plans to operate two A330200F freighters under a separate lease agreement. CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

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world news & analysis

Turkish Airlines Signs for Additional A330-200 Aircraft – Turkish Airlines has placed a firm order for an A330-200 aircraft, an addition to its existing orders for 10 A330-300s, two A330200 freighters and 24 A320 family aircraft signed in 2009. The newly ordered aircraft will be powered by Rolls Royce engines and will be delivered in 2011. More A380s for Emirates – Dubaibased Emirates Airline has ordered a further 32 A380s from Airbus, taking their total firm orders to 90 aircraft. The order has a list price of US$11.5 billion. The agreement was signed in a ceremony at the Berlin Air Show witnessed by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Emirates Airline Group Chairman and CEO His Highness Sheikh Ahmed Bin Saeed Al-Maktoum, and Airbus President and CEO Tom Enders.

Arrivals and Departures New Head of Training at Cockpit4u – Carsten Heblich has been appointed Head of Training at Cockpit4u. Based in the company’s Berlin headquarters, Carsten is responsible for training standards and quality. He comes with extensive experience from Britannia Airways, Air Berlin and Cathay Pacific. Carsten holds TRE and Instructor ratings and has more than 10,000 flight hours. Dennis Pilz, CEO of Cockpit4u, also recently visited several governmentowned flying schools in India to discuss airline pilot training and future pilot demand in the region. Together with the Joint Secretary Ministry of Civil Aviation and Deputy Director DGCA he discussed different training support options for JAA training centres like Cockpit4u. New F.I.T. Aviation Director – Michael Gaffney, named the new director of F.I.T. Aviation LLC, brings to his post almost 30 years of experience in aviation management, education and executive consulting. A Master Flight Instructor and Master Ground Instructor, he has been interim director of F.I.T. Aviation since April 1 and prior to that he was director of aviation training. In his new position, Gaffney oversees flight training and operations at Florida Institute of Technology’s Emil Buehler Center for Aviation Training and Research at Melbourne International Airport. He is also an adjunct professor in the Florida Tech College of Aeronautics. cat 40

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

Index of Ads Aerosim Technologies www.aerosim.com 33, 35 & 37 Air France 9 www.airfrance-flightacad.com Ansett Aviation Training www.ansettaviationtraining.com 51 AXIS Flight Training Systems www.axis-simulations.at 63 Aviation Australia 22 www.aviationaustralia.aero CAA International www.caainternational.com 23 CAE www.cae.com Centre Spread & OBC Christie Digital www.christiedigital.com/simrevolution 25 Cockpit4u Aviation Service www.cockpit4u.com 18 CTC Aviation www.ctcaviation.com 13 Delta Air Lines www.delta.com 24 EATS 2010 Conference www.halldale.com/eats 44 European Pilot Selection & Training www.epst.com 27 FlightDeck Solutions 45 www.flightdecksolutions.com FlightSafety International www.flightsafety.com IFC Frasca International 15 www.frasca.com Gulf Aviation Academy 7 www.gulfaa.com Heinle ELT http://elt.heinle.com 28 I/ITSEC 2010 www.iitsec.org 75 Interfire Products OY www.interfireproducts.com 31 JetPubs 14 www.jetpubs.com JVC Professional Products www.pro.jvc.com/visualization 29 Low-Cost Training Conference www.andrich.com 34 Modsim www.modsimworldconference.com 71 Multi Pilot Simulations b.v. www.flymps.com 39 Opinicus www.opinicus.com 43 Oxford Aviation Academy 17 www.oaa.com Pratt & Whitney www.pw.utc.com 49 RAES Training Conference www.aerosociety.com/conference 36 Rockwell Collins www.rockwellcollins.com 11 RSI Visual Systems www.rsi-visuals.com 46 & 67 Saudi Aviation Flight Academy www.saflightacademy.com 55 SecuriCare International www.securicare.com 32 Servo Kinetics www.servokinetics.com 59 Swiss Aviation Training 21 www.swiss-aviation-training.com Teal Electronics www.teal.com 19 WATS 2011 Conference www.halldale.com/wats IBC Zero to ATPL 42 http://fpedas.uniza.sk/~av_eden/

Calendar 14-15 September 2010 APATS 2010 - Asia Pacific Airline Training Symposium Shangri-La Hotel Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia www.halldale.com/apats 9-10 November 2010 EATS 2010 - European Airline Training Symposium Istanbul, Turkey www.halldale.com/eats 19-21 April 2011 WATS 2011 - World Aviation Training Conference & Tradeshow Rosen Shingle Creek Resort Orlando, Florida, USA www.halldale.com/wats 8-10 March 2011 APATS@AA2011 - Ab initio & Evidence Based Training AsiaWorld Expo Hong Kong, SAR China www.halldale.com/apats

20-23 September 2010 FSEMC Brighton, UK www.aviation-ia.com/fsemc 22-23 September 2010 Annual International Flight Crew Training Conference London, UK www.raes.org.uk 5-7 October 2010 Helitech Estoril, Portugal www.helitechevents.com 12 October 2010 Low-Cost and Systematic Approaches To Training London, UK training@andrich.com

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Civil Simulation and Training news Issue no.23 Fall 2010

MRJ Exclusive CAE is Mitsubishi Regional Jet Exclusive Training Provider

ATR and CAE Sign Master Agreement CAE developing world’s first ATR42/72-600 full-flight simulator

CAE will develop and deliver a comprehensive training solution for the new Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) -- including a 10-year Exclusive Training Provider program and establishment of two training centres initially in the Tokyo, Japan area and the central United States -- under an agreement with Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation (MJET). In support of the agreement, CAE is expanding its training network and developing the world’s first two MRJ full-flight simulators (FFS) as well as CAE Simfinity™ integrated procedures trainers. CAE will also design curriculum and courseware, and provide CAE training for pilots, maintenance technicians, cabin crew, dispatchers and ground support personnel. “The comprehensive scope of the MRJ Exclusive Training Provider program showcases the unique breadth of CAE’s simulation and training capabilities,” said Jeff Roberts, CAE’s Group President, Civil Simulation Products, Training and Services. “The MRJ training program includes a complete courseware solution, a suite of high-fidelity flight simulation training devices, training for the full complement of aviation professionals who will operate and service the aircraft, and CAE’s demonstrated ability to collaborate successfully with OEMs and training partners.” The MRJ is a family of 70- to 90-seat next-generation jets which will offer top-class operational economy and outstanding cabin comfort. The 70-90 seat MRJ is planned to enter service in 2014 with launch customer All Nippon Airways (ANA). Hideo Egawa, President of MJET, stated, “We concluded that CAE, with its vast experience, human resources and proven capabilities, would be our best partner for training. We’re confident that working in collaboration with CAE, we will be able to provide our customers with the best training one could ask for.”

Jean-Pierre Cousserans, ATR’s Senior Vice President of Customer Services (left) and Jeff Roberts, CAE Group President, Civil Simulation Products, Training and Services

CAE and regional aircraft manufacturer ATR, the world leader in the 50- to 74-seat turboprop market, have signed a master agreement as a framework for providing a range of simulation equipment, training programs and support services to operators of ATR aircraft. CAE will now become ATR’s primary training partner moving forward. CAE will also develop the world’s first ATR42/72600 full-flight simulator (FFS) and associated training devices for the newest ATR aircraft. ATR has also partnered with CAE Flightscape to offer flight data analysis (FDA) and flight data monitoring (FDM) services to all operators of ATR aircraft.

Marc Parent, CAE President and Chief Executive Officer (left) and Hideo Egawa, 1 President of MJET


Flexible Solutions for Dynamic Airline Business Models Jeff Roberts, Group President Civil Simulation Products, Training and Services

There are many paths to becoming a professional airline pilot. The primary route for many years had been through the military, where a pilot received highly focused, immersive training and practical experience. But the number of ex-military pilots available to the commercial air transport industry continues to diminish. Another route has been to gradually accumulate licenses, type ratings and flight hours over several years – often at multiple flight schools with varying teaching techniques – then hopefully get hired at an airline. The new-hire pilot then goes through the airline’s own training program to become familiar with operating procedures. In some regions, airlines have undertaken their own dedicated ab initio and type rating pilot pipelines. At CAE, we believe structured, integrated training which applies instructional best practices will produce highly qualified professional airline pilots through an efficient end-to-end process. That’s why we have built global networks of ab initio flight schools and type rating training centres. Together with CAE’s world-leading simulation technology, our comprehensive portfolio enables our customers to tailor training programs to their unique business model … and adapt as they grow to address the dynamic air travel market. Vietnam Airlines is a prime example of how one customer is leveraging CAE’s range of capabilities. For several years, Vietnam Airlines has sent pilots to CAE training centres in Zhuhai and Singapore for initial

and recurrent type ratings. Recently, the airline undertook a rigorous process for developing their own training centre in Ho Chi Minh City. They analyzed their overall training needs in detail, determined which components made the most sense to bring in-house and which to secure through qualified partners, and then toured facilities around the world for conversations with training experts. We are very pleased that Vietnam chose CAE to build their first full-flight simulator Until their centre is ready and operational, Vietnam Airlines pilots will continue to train with CAE in Zhuhai and Singapore, and soon in Kuala Lumpur as well. And in addition, they are sending ab initio cadets to the CAE Global Academy. China Southern Airlines has been CAE’s joint venture partner at our type rating training centre in Zhuhai. In addition to supplying the airline’s needs, the centre offers third-party training to other operators of various Airbus, Boeing and Embraer aircraft. Earlier this year, the airline and CAE announced another JV – the China Southern Western Australia Flying College in Perth, the 11th member of the CAE Global Academy. Cadets who graduate from Perth will proceed to the Zhuhai training centre for type rating training, then become eligible to be hired as line pilots. Structured … focused … integrated … end-to-end. Only CAE can provide any or all of an airline’s pilot recruitment and training needs from a single, capable and credible company. Let’s have a conversation about your airline’s pilot development and training needs. Jeff

Accelerating Prototype Aircraft Development – CSeries A “virtual aircraft” developed in CAE’s Augmented Engineering Environment (AEE) will help Bombardier Aerospace to reduce its development schedule and risk for the new CSeries 100- to 149-seat class aircraft, expected to enter service in 2013. CAE is providing a comprehensive suite of products, engineering services and simulation-based technology tools to support the design, testing and certification of the CSeries platform as part of Bombardier’s Complete Integrated Aircraft Systems Test Aircraft (CIASTA) program. 2

CAE has already delivered a host networking computer system designed to run the systems simulation models. An engineering development simulator is to be delivered next spring, including a complete flightdeck environment with a visual system similar to a full-flight simulator. The engineering simulator will provide a “synthetic aircraft” interface that will help validate physical aircraft systems between the design freeze and prototype aircraft phases. “CAE’s AEE provides a complete migration path from virtual aircraft to actual aircraft. It

starts at the concept stage, facilitates the design, verifies performance, shortens the testing, and supports the operation,” said Marc St-Hilaire, CAE Vice President of Core Technologies. CAE will also design and deliver the prototype CAE 7000 Series full-flight simulator for the CSeries, as well as a full suite of CAE Simfinity™ training devices to support the aircraft entry-into-service and Bombardier flight and technical training. CAE will also provide Bombardier with engineering design and support services throughout the development phase of the aircraft program.


CAE’s civil aviation training presence in Asia and Australia Bangalore

Perth

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CAE Global Academy, JV with China Southern Airlines

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CAE Global Academy, partnership with Airports Authority of India

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CAE Training Centre, partnership with AirAsia

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CAE Global Academy, partnership with HM Aerospace

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Sydney

Zhuhai JV between CAE and China Southern Airlines

CAE Developing Training Suites for Boeing 787 As global airlines finalize their Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft delivery schedules and plan their training requirements, CAE is developing a comprehensive suite of training solutions. CAE 7000 Series full-flight simulators and other integrated training devices for the new aircraft are in production for Air New Zealand, Continental Airlines, Japan Airlines, and Qantas. To date, CAE has won every Boeing 787 full-flight simulator contract directly competed by airlines. The CAE training solutions suite for the Boeing 787 also includes a CAE Simfinity™ desktop virtual simulator / virtual maintenance trainer (VSIM / VMT) and three types of CAE Simfinity™ flight training devices (FTDs): a Level 4 FTD based on the CAE Simfinity™ integrated procedures trainer, a Level 4-plus FTD with extended product package, and a Level 5 FTD. Customers have ordered more than 30 simulation devices.

It’s True … • The first CAE 3000 Series helicopter mission simulator (an AS350 B2) has been FAA qualified for Level 7 training. It is located near Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, Arizona. • A CAE Bell 412 full-mission simulator in Bangalore, India has been certified to Level D by India’s DGCA and EASA. • Saudi Arabia Airlines has ordered a CAE 7000 Series Airbus A330/340 convertible fullflight simulator and an enhanced CAE Simfinity™ Airbus Pilot Transition trainer. • CAE has recently won orders for full-flight simulators in Asia from Korean Air, Lion Air, Malaysia Airlines, Mount Cook Airlines, Shanghai Eastern Flight Training Company (China Eastern Airlines), Skymark Airlines, and Vietnam Airlines. 3 3


Cadet-to-Captain Candidate selection … ab initio training … and type-rating training – all in a seamless, one-source, turnkey process for airline pilot provisioning As air traffic growth resumes, where will airlines get the well-qualified pilots to safely and efficiently fly expanding aircraft fleets and routes? Many airlines are turning to the extensive resources and experience of CAE to help address both near-term and future pilot requirements. CAE’s pilot provisioning program is a onecompany solution that assists airlines in recruiting and identifying the best candidates, provides entry-level flight training focused on airline operating procedures, and delivers typerating training at conveniently located centres around the globe. In addition, CAE maintains a database of thousands of qualified captains and first officers who are prepared to quickly fill current flight deck needs. Start with the ‘right stuff’ – Identifying the best candidates from hundreds or thousands of aspiring pilots is an essential first step toward successfully developing excellent airline crew members. The CAE Aircrew Selection System (CASS) uses advanced aviationspecific psychological and physical skills tests, as well as a structured interview process with trained observers, to help evaluators determine which candidates have the “thinking and doing” capabilities to perform under stressful conditions. Global-standard entry-level training – With the recent addition of the China Southern West Australian Flying College in Perth, the CAE Global Academy network of ab initio flight schools now has the capacity to train 1,800 cadets a year. The CAE Global Academy has schools in Malaysia, India, Cameroon, Portugal, Belgium, the Netherlands, Canada, and the United States. The member flight schools are able to leverage CAE’s experience in training professional pilots across the spectrum –

commercial, business and general aviation, as well as the military. This translates into standardized best practices and a consistently high-quality graduate. A truly global type rating network – CAE’s international network of 24 civil aviation training centres (and growing) enables training on more than 140 different aircraft models. In addition to the finest Level D full-flight simulators, expert instructional staff, and curricula tailored to each customer’s requirements, CAE training centres are renowned for their culture of service excellence. The end-to-end trend – The CAE Multi-crew Pilot License (MPL) program uses each of these CAE cadet-to-captain capabilities – CASS candidate screening, the CAE Global Academy for core and basic phases, and CAE training centres for intermediate and advanced phases. The 56-week beta program for sponsoring airline AirAsia recently passed its midway point, and the 12 cadets are all meeting or exceeding expectations. Graduates of the CAE Global Academy in Perth will continue on for type rating at the joint venture training centre operated by China Southern Airlines and CAE in Zhuhai, China. Vietnam Airlines recently announced they are sending cadets to the CAE Global Academy in Phoenix; the airline also trains pilots at CAE centres in Zhuhai and Singapore, and soon in Kuala Lumpur. (Plus they recently ordered a CAE Level D A320 full-flight simulator for their own new training centre.) To date, more than 2000 CAE-trained pilots have been provisioned for IndiGo, Kingfisher, Jazzera, Wizz, Xiamen and other airlines.

Chris Stellwag, Rick Adams, Heather Dane, Editors Jimmy Tigani, Graphic Design Reader feedback welcome: flightnews@cae.com

4 St-Laurent, Quebec, Canada H4T 1G6 • cae.com • Civil Simulation and Training News is a publication of CAE. © 2010 CAE All rights reserved. NC1023 CAE,


TRAINING TECHNOLOGY

World Full Flight Simulator Census – Analysis and Trends This year’s civil full flight simulator census contains more devices than ever before. Ian Strachan takes an in-depth look at this segment of the market.

T

he tables show an increase in simulator numbers of 34 compared to those for 2009. Looking further back, the increase since 2002 has been at an average of about 30 FFS per year. It should be pointed out at the outset that the exact numbers in the tables are unlikely to be the whole story, because it is inevitable that we will not have been notified of some new simulators, also of older simulators that have been retired. The civil “levels” for Full Flight Simulators (FFS) that are accepted by most National civil Aviation regulatory Authorities (NAAs) worldwide are designated A-D, the latter being the highest. Looking first at motion platforms, levels A and B must have at least three degrees of freedom (DoF), C and D must have the full 6-DoF that can be achieved by a vehicle or object that is free to move in space, or in a fluid medium such as air or water.

For the out-the-window (OTW) visual scene, levels A and B must provide a field of view (FoV) of at least 45 x 30° per pilot, C and D at least 150° horizontally and at a distant focus (“collimation”). Level D has a number of refinements. These include a model of ground-effect for accurate simulation of takeoff & landing, accurate modelling of brakes & tyres for ground handling and the landing run, realistic cockpit sounds & noises, Mach effects, a windshear model, realistic control feel (correct resistance to movement of the primary flight controls), modelling of aeroelasticity effects (fuselage and wing bending), general non-linearities, selftest & print-outs. These are formidable requirements in terms of simulating reality, and explain why the Level D is qualified by Regulators for zero flight time (ZFT) conversions of already experienced pilots to new types. Finally, in about 2012, Level D will be renamed “Type 7” as part

Above FlightSafety International has manufactured 323 of the full flight simulators in use today. Image credit: David Malley/Halldale Media.

of an ICAO rationalisation in which 27 previous categories of training device will be reduced to seven. Looking now at the census tables, they contain only 34 Level A and 49 Level B, but 292 Level C and no less than 905 Level D simulators. The approximate cost of a new Level D is over 10 million Euros or US Dollars and the large numbers need some explanation. In the initial conversion and ongoing recurrency training of Commercial Air Transport (CAT) pilots, a Level D maximises what is allowed to be done on the simulator compared to using the aircraft. Also, using a CAT aircraft for training is very costly. At a conference at the Royal Aeronautical CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

41


TRAINING TECHNOLOGY

Society in London, it was estimated that for a Boeing 747, using the aircraft for training was some 40 times more expensive than using a Level D simulator. This figure was based on the Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) of both vehicles rather than the initial purchase price, and also allowed for the consequences of using the aircraft for training. These include the fact that you cannot use many international airports for training because they are “maxed out” with revenue flights, aside from the undesirability of mixing training with passenger flights in congested airspace. Talking of revenue flights, an aircraft has to be removed from the revenue stream and deployed to a less-busy airfield that can accommodate training. It is not productive to take only one crew, and in the “old days” two or three crews would take an aircraft to another airfield so that the training exercises could take place, weather and aircraft serviceability permitting. Finally, during landing training some damage such as tyre bursts or worse can occur. So it can easily be seen how the costs of training in the aircraft can mount up. In contrast, a simulator sortie can be reliably scheduled well in advance, with minimal disturbance to

42

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

crew duty patterns. Flight simulators are often worked 16 hours out of the 24, and rarely become unserviceable to the extent that a sortie has to be cancelled. They are not weather-dependent, day sorties can be flown at night, and a takeoff at, say, Chicago O’Hare can be followed a few minutes later with an approach at Hong Kong Chep Lap Cok in entirely different weather conditions, time of day, or even the season of the year. Looking first at the distribution of flight simulators by nation (Table 1), it is

In 2012, as part of an ICAO rationalisation, Level D will be renamed “Type 7” . Image credit: Rockwell Collins.

no surprise that the USA is in the lead. What may be unexpected is the large numbers in the USA compared to any other nation, 570 compared to the next country, the UK, with 81. The numbers for the UK reflect the popularity of the London area for siting simulator training centres to which pilots travel for recurrency


Table 1: FFS by Nation & Region

Sims 570 81 69 48 42 41 35 30 28 25 18 17 16 15 15 14 14 13 12 11 10 156 1280

Country Within the USA USA 131 Texas UK 104 Florida China (PRC) 53 Georgia Germany 33 Kansas France 27 Colorado Canada 24 Minnesota Japan 24 Tennessee Australia 22 Washington Netherlands 21 Ohio UAE 20 Arizona India 17 New Jersey Spain 15 Missouri Singapore 14 N Carolina Korea S 65 Other states Russia 570 Total Brazil Sweden Belgium Malaysia Saudi Arabia Taiwan 39 Others Total

and other checks. These are owned not only by airlines such as BA but also by companies such as Boeing Training & Flight Services (ex Alteon), CAE and FlightSafety International (FSI). After the UK, other countries in order are China (including its Hong Kong region), then Germany, France, Canada and Japan, followed by 53 other nations with between one and 30 simulators. Analysing the simulators in the USA by State, Texas and Florida have more simulators than any other country except the USA itself. This is because major simulator training centres are located in Dallas/Fort Worth in Texas and Miami and Orlando in Florida, emphasising the high simulator activity level in the USA. Generally, the distribution of Regulatory Authorities reflects the location of the simulators. Unsurprisingly the US FAA is in the lead with over 650 certificated simulators, followed by the European EASA (ex-JAA) with about 280, the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) with 60, the Japanese Civil Aviation Bureau (JCAB) with 35, followed by the Australian Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) and Transport Canada (TC), then no less than 29 other NAAs. Turning to aircraft categories, there are about 940 simulators for 2-jet aircraft, 140 for twin-props, 110 for 4-jets, 70 for 3-jets, but we have been notified of only about 25 for civil rotary wing aircraft. Although the latter are expected to increase in the future, there is a much higher proportion of rotary in the 2010 MS&T census of military flight simulators (see MS&T 4/2010). Also, in the civil field there are many other rotary Flight Training Devices (FTDs) below Level A-D, typically with visuals but not the motion systems and other characteristics. Finally, a basic training helicopter is much less expensive than an airliner and so the cost balance is more in favour of using the aircraft for training rather than a Level D helicopter simulator. In terms of aircraft manufacturers, there are about 520 simu-

lators for Boeing aircraft, followed by 280 for Airbus, 120 for Bombardier, 80 for Hawker Beechcraft and 75 for Cessna. There are between 30 and 50 simulators for aircraft by Embraer, Gulfstream and Dassault, and between one and 20 for aircraft from no less than 24 other manufacturers. Turning now to simulator manufacturers, the major players are CAE of Montreal with 530 Full Flight Simulators, followed by 323 from FlightSafety and 300 from Thales. Then, a large drop in numbers to 44 from Link, 17 from the Tampa factory of CAE USA and 14 from Mechtronix in Montreal, Canada (not far from CAE’s factory in Dorval). There is then a sharp drop to six each by Opinicus, Rockwell Collins and SimCom of the USA, five by Sim-Industries of the Netherlands and then four from ERA/Penza (Russia) and Frasca (USA), then Transas of Russia with three. In terms of Initial Service Date (ISD), about 30% are from 2005 or later, 55% from 2000 and 70% from 1995. Only about 15% have ISDs before 1990, and many of these have been updated. So, although older simulators are still in use, most Full Flight Simulators are less than 10 years old, more recent than many of the airframes for which they are being used for training.

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Table 2: Full Flight Simulators by Manufacturer

530 CAE (Canada) 323 FSI (USA) 300 Thales (France & UK) 44 Link (USA) 17 CAE USA (USA) 14 Mechtronix (Canada) 6 Opinicus (USA) 6 Rockwell Collins (USA) 5 Sim-Industries (Netherlands) 4 ERA/Penza (Russia) 4 Frasca (USA) 4 SimCom (USA) 3 Transas (Russia) 18 12 Others 1 280 Total The characteristics of the simulators are not governed entirely by their Regulatory Levels. A Level D simulator must have a minimum of three Image Generator channels to achieve the field of view (FoV) required, but can have five channels or more. The three-channel layout with a cross-cockpit display is the most popular, some 73% of all Level C and D simulators having it. While on the subject of cross-cockpit displays, these are almost invariably fitted now in preference to an array of collimated monitors (“WAC Windows“). The focal distance of collimated simulator displays is set by the amount of vertical curvature on the mirror through which the pilots view the outside-world scene. Frequently a focal distance of between 100 and 200 metres is used rather than infinity. In the census tables, such displays are coded “3ch/3wCC” for the commonest layout, a three-channel three-window cross-cockpit mirror-based display. Channels and windows relate to field of view, particularly in the horizontal. Level A and B simulators generally have 90 degrees horizontal view or less. In Levels C and D, 448 simulators (35% of the total) have 150 degrees horizontal view, 598 (47%) have 180 degrees, and 168 (13%) between 200 and 225 degrees. For helicopters, two extra display units are sometimes added below the main display system as “chin windows” to give downward view when hovering or flying at “nap of the earth” heights. Looking at motion platforms, the Gough/Stewart six-jack design is used because the simulator cockpit can be placed on top of the platform, allowing

movements in all six degrees of freedom (6-DoF) without the need for swinging arms or suspension of the cockpit from above (as in some systems of the 1960s and 70s). Electric jacks are now replacing hydraulic and, as well as simplifying the overall platform design, allow faster response times, that is, smaller transport delays (“latency”). Criticism of the performance of some early motion platforms has led to considerable activity to improve the way that Acceleration Onset Cueing is implemented. Built-in Test Equipment (BITE) now ensures that motion and visual cueing is always correctly synchronised, and motion cueing algorithms have been developed further. For instance, a system called “Lateral Manoeuvring Motion” (LM2) has been developed by the SABENA Academy. Improved motion platform designs and cueing algorithms have been described in papers by experts in the field such as Dr Sunjoo Advani, and others. Developments have also come from the Motion Group of the International Working Group (IWG) of the Royal Aeronautical Society Flight Simulation Group (RAeS FSG), chaired by James Takats of the Opinicus Corporation. A recent development, is a motion-seat designed for Level D simulators produced by one of the existing motion seat providers for military simulators. This is to improve training for airliner “upset” and loss-ofcontrol events. These have now replaced Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT) as the primary cause of fatalities in the Commercial Air Transport sector. As a result, the International Committee for Aviation Training in Extended Envelopes (ICATEE) was formed in 2009, with membership from Regulatory Authorities, airframe and simulator manufacturers and others in the field,with a view to making recommendations to Regulatory Authorities and ICAO in 2011 after a final meeting and open conference at the RAeS in London. The census tables show how the airlines of the world have exploited modern simulation technology. In the civil field, it has long been recognised that simulation saves money in the long term because it is less costly than using the aircraft in a training mode. When Level D becomes the ICAO Type 7 in about 2012, further improvements in aspects such as motion cueing and the air traffic environment can be expected. cat CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

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Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Edited by Ian Strachan.

The 2010 CAT Civil Full Flight Simulator Census is a complete update from last year’s release. It provides comprehensive data on 1,280 civil full flight simulators in use around the globe, sorted by training centre/user, followed by aircraft type and engine configuration. Technical data, including motion axes, image generator, display system, and approval level is also included. The Census is also available as a fully searchable database, including more detail than ever before. Visit www.halldale.com for further information. Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations Visual Display ch image generator channels, w separate display windows or projectors, CC cross-cockpit collimated system (WIDE & similar), C collimated unit (WAC window). Motion E electric, H hydraulic, 3/4/6 degrees of freedom, V vibration device. General Abbreviations ASE Aeronautical Systems Engineering (USA) AST Aviation Simulation Technology Inc (USA) Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

BASC Beijing Aviation Science and Technology Co. Boeing TFS Boeing Training and Flight Services CA Civil Aviation CAE USA (R) formerly Reflectone and BAES F&S CDG Charles de Gaulle airport DGAC Direction Générale de l’Aviation Civile, French CAA FSI FlightSafety International LGW London Gatwick airport LHR London Heathrow airport Link also includes Singer-Link Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

MSP Minneapolis/St Paul airport NCAA National CAA PAIFA Pan Am International Flight Academy RColl Rockwell Collins TBA To Be Advised Thales R formerly Rediffusion Thales S formerly Singer-Link Miles Thales T formerly Thomson CSF u/d Updated WAC Wide-Angle Collimated Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

ABX Air Inc. - USA, OH, Wilmington Tel: +1 937 382 5591 Email: jack.greenwood@abxair.com B767-200 1 GE 80A Thales u/d Opinicus 6H SP3 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2005 u/d DC8-62 1 JT3D-3 Thales R 3H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 1980 DC9-30 1 JT8D-9 Thales 3H Vital 4 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 1985 DC9-30 1 JT8D-9 Opinicus 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 2003 Aer Arann - Ireland, Dublin Tel: +353 1 8448073 Email: info@simtech.ie ATR 72-500 1 PW127 Mechtronix 6E RSI 3chCC 180 x40 EASA C 2010 Aer Lingus - Ireland, Dublin Tel: +353 1 8862820 Email: derek.mulvey@aerlingus.com A320 1 CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1999 Aeroflot - Russia, Moscow Tel: +7 095 578 7942 Email: vshishkin@aeroflot.ru A320 1 CFM56/IAE2527 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2004 IL-76 1 D30KP-2 ERA/Penza 3H CKT 2ch/2w 80 x40 NCAA A 1985 IL-86 1 HK86-4 ERA/Penza 3H CKT 2ch/2w 80 x40 NCAA A 1978 IL-96-300 1 PC90A ERA/Penza 6H CKT 5ch/6w 200 x40 NCAA C 1994 TU-154M 1 D30KU-154 ERA/Penza 3H CKT 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA B 1978 Aerolineas Argentinas - Argentina, Buenos Aires Tel: +54 1317 5694 Email: informes@aerolineas.com.ar B737-200 1 JT8D-9 Thales R 3H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA B 1971 Aerolineas/Boeing Training & Flight Services - Argentina, Buenos Aires Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B737-300/500 1 CFM56-3B CAE 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 1986 AeroMexico - Mexico, Mexico City Tel: +52 55 5063 8067 Email: cjuarezv@aeromexico.com.mx B737-700/800 1 CFM56-7B Thales 6H ESIG 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 EMB 145 1 AE3007A1 CAE 6H MaxView+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA/FAA D 2001 MD82 1 JT8D-217 CAE 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1985 Aeroservice Aviation Center - Brazil, Rio de Janeiro Tel: +1 305 871 5557 Email: steven@aeroservice.com B727-200 1 JT8D-15 Thales R 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA-ANAC C 1982 Aeroservice Aviation Center - USA, FL, Miami Tel: +1 305 871 5557 Email: steven@aeroservice.com B727-200 1 JT8D-15 Link 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1977 B727-233 1 JT8D-15 CAE 6H SP1-T 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1980 B737-200 1 JT8D-15 CAE 6H Raster NX1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1982 CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

4:16 PM

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Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

B737-300 1 CFM56 CAE 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1988 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B Sim-Industries 6E EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2009 B747-300 1 CF6-50E2 Thales S 6H RasterFlite 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1972 B767-200 1 CF6-80A/JT9D-7R4D Thales R 6H RasterFlite 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1982 DC10-10 1 CF6 CAE 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1977 DC8-71 1 CFM56 Conductron 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1969 MD80 1 JT8D-217/219 CAE 6H RasterFlite 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1983 MD88 1 JT8D-217/219 Thales S 6H RasterFlite 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1988 Aims Community College - USA, CO, Denver Tel: +1 970 330 8008 Email: ggaiser@aims.edu BE 1900-D 1 PT6167D TDI 6H SP-X 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2001 Air Algerie - Algeria, Algiers Tel: +213 21 28 35 95 Email: contacts@airalgerie.dz B727-200 1 JT8D-15 Thales R 6H SP2 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA B 1979 B737-200 1 JT8D-15 Thales R 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA C 1983 Air Canada - Canada, Toronto Airport Tel: +1 905 676 4798 Email: Husam.Wafaei@aircanada.ca A320-200 3 CFM56 CAE 6H Maxvue+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA-TC D 1990/91/02 B767-233 1 JT9D-7 CAE 6H Maxvue+ 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA-TC C 1982 B767-300ER 1 CF6 CAE 6H Maxvue+ 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA-TC D 2002 B777-300ER 1 GE90-115B CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA-TC D 2007 EMB 170 1 CF34-8E5 CAE 6H Maxvue+ 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA-TC D 2006 EMB 190 1 CF34-10E5A1 CAE 6H Maxvue+ 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA-TC D 2006 Air Canada - Canada, Vancouver Airport Tel: +1 905 676 4798 Email: Husam.Wafaei@aircanada.ca A320-200 1 CFM56 Thales R 6H MaxVue A+ 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA-TC C 1989 A330/A340 1 RR Trent CAE 6H Maxvue+ 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA-TC D 2002 B737-200 1 JT8D-9 CAE 6H Vital 4 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA-TC B 1976 B767-300ER 1 CF6 Thales R 6H MaxVue A+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA-TC C 1991 Air China - China, Beijing Tel: +86 10 6459 9068 Email: master@mail.airchina.com.cn B737-800 1 CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue 2000 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1995 B747-400 1 PW4056 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1995 B777-200 1 RR Trent CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1998 Air Europa - Spain, Mallorca Tel: +34 91 540 16 82 Email: comunicacion@globalia-corp.com B737-700/800 1 CFM56-7B FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA/FAA D 2000 Air France - France, Paris CDG Airport Tel: +33 1 64 47 77 84 Email: jeta@airfrance.fr A320-200 1 CFM56/IAE V2527 CAE 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2003 A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4 CAE 6H Tropos 6000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2007 A330-200/A340-300 1 CF6-80E/Trent 772/CFM56 CAE 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1993/02 A340-300 1 CFM56-5C2 Thales T 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1993 A380 1 EA GP7270 CAE 6H Tropos 6000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2009 B747-400 1 CF6-80C2 Thales R 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1990 B777-200/300 1 GE90-90&94B/PW4090 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2003/07 B777-200/300 1 GE90-94B&115B Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1999/07 B777-300ER 2 GE90-115B Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2006/10 Air France - France, Paris Orly Airport Tel: +33 1 64 47 77 84 Email: jeta@airfrance.fr A320-200 1 CFM56-5A1 Thales T 6H SP-X 500HT 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA D 1988 A320-200 1 CFM56-5A1 Thales T 6H EP100 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA D 1989 A320-200 1 CFM56-5A1 Thales T 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1991 A320-200 1 CFM56-5A1 Thales T 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2000 Air India - India, Hyderabad Tel: +91 40 27752354/27750419 Email: dtctehyd@gmail.com A320 1 IAE-2500 A1 CAE 6H Vital 7 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1990 A320 1 IAE-2500 A1 CAE 6H Vital 7 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1992 B737-200 1 JT8D-17A Thales R 6H SP3-T 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1987 Air India - India, Mumbai Tel: +91 22 2626 3337 Email: A.Deepak@airindia.in A310-300 1 CF6 CAE 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1988 48

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

B737-700/800 1 CFM56-7B FSI 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2001 B747-400 1 PW4056 CAE 6H MaxVue 2000 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1993 B777-300ER 1 GE90-115 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2007 B787 1 RR Trent 1000 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2010 Air New Zealand - New Zealand, Auckland Tel: +64 9 255 5701 Email: john.ogilvie@airnz.co.nz A320 1 V2500 CAE 6H Tropos 1 3chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2003 ATR72 1 PW127 CAE 6E Tropos 6 4chCC 210 x40 NCAA D 2010 B737-300/400/500 1 CFM56 CAE 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2001 B747-400 1 CF6-80C2/RB211-524 Thales R 6H SP3-T 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1989 B767-200 1 CF6 Thales R 6H SP2 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA C 1986 B777-200ER 1 Trent 895/892/PW400/GE90 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2005 B777-300ER 1 GE90 CAE 6E Tropos 6 4chCC 210 x40 NCAA D 2010 Dash 8 Q100/300 1 PW123 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2005 Airbus China - China, Beijing Tel: +86 (10) 80486340 Email: klaus.walendy@airbus.com A320 1 CFM56 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2008 A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 1997 A330-200/A340-300 1 GW/PW/RR/CFM56 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 1998 Airbus North America Customer Services - USA, FL, Miami Tel: +1 305 871 3655 Email: todd.metts@airbus.com A320 2 CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5 CAE USA 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 A320 2 CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5 Thales 6H ThalesView 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2010 A340/A330 1 CFM56/GE/PW/RR Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA/DGAC C 1992 Airbus Training Centre - France, Toulouse Tel: +33 (0)5 61 93 33 33 Email: thierry.marty@airbus.com A310/A300-600 1 GE CF6/PW4152/PW4158 Thales 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1984 A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2003 A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1999/00 A330-200/A340-300 1 GW/PW/RR/CFM56 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1992 A330-200/A340-300/A340-600 1 CFM56/RR Trent CAE 6H EP-1000 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2006 A380-800 1 RR Trent 972 CAE 6H Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2007 Alaska Airlines - USA, WA, Seattle Tel: +1 206 392 6351 Email: Bill.Johnson@AlaskaAir.com B737-400 1 CFM56 Thales R 6H SPX-200 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1992 B737-700 1 CFM56 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 B737-800 1 CFM56 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 CRJ 700 1 CF34 CAE 6H Maxvue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 MD83 1 JT8D-217 Thales R 6H SPX-200 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1989

IT’S IN OUR POWER™. At Pratt & Whitney, we keep you flying. Our Customer Training team is dedicated to advancing jet engine knowledge and maintenance techniques. From standard courses to customized solutions, whether instructor-led or on the web, we provide an innovative learning experience to support your maintenance, engine performance and fleet management needs. Backed by a global network that supports you anytime, anywhere. Pratt & Whitney. Learn more at www.pwcustomertraining.com.

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CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010 49 3/24/10 1:40:00 PM

PWC_eagle_CustomerTraining178x85mm.indd 1

Client: Pratt & Whitney One Company Ad Title: Customer Training Ad Publication: Civil Aviation Training


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

Alitalia Flight Training Centre - Italy, Rome Tel: +39 (06) 6563 8884 Email: moro.claudio@alitalia.it A320-200 1 Multichoice CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2002 A321-111 1 CFM56 Thales 6H Space 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1995 B777-200 1 GE90-94B CAE 6H Maxvue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2002 MD11 1 CF6-80D1F Thales 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1991 MD82 1 JT8D-217 Thales 6H SP3-T 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1986 MD82 1 JT8D-217 Thales 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1992 Allied Wings - Canada, Winnipeg, Southport Tel: +1 204 428 2503 Email: Klein.AB@alliedwings.ca Bell 412CF 1 PT6T-3D FSI 6H Vital 9 5chCC 220 x60 NCAA-TC D 2007 King-Air C90B 1 PT6A-21 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA-TC D 2006 Alpha Aviation Academy Europe - UK, LGW Crawley Tel: +44 (0)845 260 1032 Email: info@eu.alphagroup.com B737-800 1 CFM56 Sim-Industries 6E EP1000 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2005 American Airlines - USA, TX, DFW Tel: +1 817 967 5232 Email: Philip.Fuhrer@AA.com B727-200 1 JT8D-15 Link 6H SP3-T 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 1983 B737-800 1 CFM56 CAE 6E EP1000 3chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2009 B737-800 4 CFM56 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1998/00/01 B757-200ER 1 RR RB211 CAE 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1990 B757-200ER 1 RR RB211 CAE 6H SP-X 200HT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1992 B757-200ER 1 RR RB211 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 B767-200 1 CF6 Link 6H SP2 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1983 B767-200 1 CF6 Link 6H ESIG 3350GT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 1987 B767-300ER 1 CF6 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1998 B777-200 3 RR Trent CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1998/99 F 100 1 RR Tay CAE 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1991 F 100 1 RR Tay CAE 6H SP-X 200HT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1992 MD80 1 JT8D-217 Link 6H ESIG 3350GT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1986 MD80 4 JT8D-217 Link 6H ESIG 3350GT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 1985/88 MD80 1 JT8D-217 CAE 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1991 American Eagle Airlines - USA, TX, DFW Tel: +1 817 967 5232 Email: Philip.Fuhrer@AA.com ATR 42-300 1 PW120 CAE 6H SP-X 200HT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1991 ERJ 145 2 AE3007 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999/00 Saab 340B 1 CT7 CAE 6H SP-X 200HT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1991 ANA - Japan, Tokyo Tel: +81 3 3745 8001 Email: otomo@ana.co.jp A320-200 1 CFM56 Thales 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 JCAB D 1990 A320-200/A321-100 1 CFM56/V2500 CAE 6H Vital 8+ 5chCC 225 x40 JCAB D 1999 B737-500 1 CFM56 CAE 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 JCAB D 1995 B737-700 2 CFM56 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 2005/06 B747-400 1 CF6 CAE 6H SP-X 550AT 5chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 1993 B767-300 1 CF6 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 1993 B767-300 2 CF6 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 JCAB D 1989/91 B777-200/200ER 2 PW4074/4090 Thales 6H Vital 8+ 5chCC 225 x40 JCAB D 1995 Dash 8 Q400 1 PW150A CAE 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 2006 ANA/Boeing TFS - Japan, Tokyo Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B787 1 GE Genx/RR Trent 1000 Thales 6E EP-1000CT 3chCC 200 x40 JCAB C 2010 Ansett Aviation Training - Australia, Melbourne Tel: +61 3 9373 8000 Email: rdimaio@ansettaviationtraining.com A320 2 IAE V2527 CAE 6E EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2007/08 B737-300 1 CFM56 Thales R 6H SP1-T 5ch/6w 200 x40 CASA D 1987 B737-800NG 1 CFM56-7B26 CAE 6E EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2008 BAE 146-300A 1 ALF 502 CAE USA(R) 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 CASA D 1992 Dash 8 Q100/200/300 1 PW120A/123D/123E FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2005 EMB 120 1 PW118 FSI 6H Vital 7 3ch/4w 80 x40 CASA B 2008 F 100 1 MK-620-15 CAE 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2008 u/d King Air 200 1 PW PT6A-42 FSI 6H Vital 8 3ch/4w 80 x40 CASA B 2008 Metro III 1 ALF 502 FSI 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 CASA B 1988 Saab 340A/B 1 CT7 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 1997 50

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

MIS095


MIS0958 MSC_Ansett Aviation Ad FP_FA.indd 1

12/08/10 5:10 PM


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

Asian ATR Training Centre - Thailand, Bangkok Tel: +66 2 690 0380 Email: aatc_bkk@samart.co.th ATR 42/72 2 PW120/124/127 Thales 6H ThalesView 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1997/04 Asiana Airlines - South Korea, Seoul Tel: +82 2 2669 5553 Email: simservice@flyasiana.com A320 1 CFM56/IA CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 B737-300/400/500 1 CFM56 Thales R 6H SP-X 500HT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 1991 B747-400 1 CF6 CAE 6H MaxVue 2000 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 1994 B767-300ER 1 CF6 CAE 6H MaxVue 2000 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 1995 Atlas Air - USA, FL, Miami Tel: +1 786 265 5993 Email: Randy.Schwellinger@AtlasAir.com B747-200F 1 CF6-50E2 Link-AST 6H SP1-T 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1981 B747-200F 1 CF6-50E2 Link-AST 6H Raster XT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2002 B747-400F 1 CF6-80C2B5F CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 2001 B747-400F 1 CF6-80C2B5F CAE 6H Tropos 5chCC 210 x40 FAA D 2009 ATR Training Centre - France, Toulouse-Blagnac Tel: +33 (0)5 62 21 67 51 Email: franck.gillis@atr.fr ATR 42/72 1 PW120/124 FSI 6H Tropos 6000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1990 ATR 42/72 2 PW120/124/127 Thales 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1996/97 Aviation Training Centre Tunisia - Tunisia, Tunis/Gammarth Tel: +216 71 911 811 Email: ajebali@atct.com.tn A320 2 CFM/IAE Thales 6H EP1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2005/09 Aviation Academy Austria - Austria, Vienna Tel: +43 5 9010 3600 Email: office@aviationacademy.at Fokker 100 1 Tay 650 Axis FTS 6H Equipe G10 5chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2008 Boeing Training & Flight Services - Australia, Brisbane Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4/V2527 Thales 6H ESIG 3800 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2004 B717-200 1 BR715 FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2001 B737-700/800 1 CFM56-7B FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2001 B737-700/800 1 CFM56-7B Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2003 Boeing Training & Flight Services - China, Shanghai Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B757-200/B767-300 1 PW2037&4056/CF6-80C2/RB211 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 1998 B787 1 CFM56-7B26 Thales 6E EP-1000CT 3chCC 200 x40 CAAC C 2010 Boeing Training & Flight Services - Europe, being relocated Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com A320-200 1 CFM56-5B/V2547 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA C 1995 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B CAE 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 1997 Boeing Training & Flight Services - Mexico, Mexico City Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B737-700/800 1 CFM56-7B Thales 6H ESIG 3800 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 2002 MD82 1 JT8D CAE 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1984 Boeing Training & Flight Services - Singapore Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com A320 1 CFM-56-5A1/V2527 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2006 B737-300/400/500 1 CFM56 3C1 Thales 6H SPX 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2006 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2007 B777-200ER/300ER 1 GE90-94/RR Trent 895 CAE 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 CAAC-HK D 2006 B787 2 GE Genx/RR Trent 1000 Thales 6E EP-1000CT 3chCC 200 x40 NCAA C 2010 Boeing Training & Flight Services - South Africa, Johannesburg Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B737-700/800 1 CFM56-7B FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA SA/UK D 2000 Boeing Training & Flight Services - South Korea, Gimpo Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B777 1 PW4090 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 1999 Boeing Training & Flight Services - South Korea, Incheon Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B737-700/800 1 CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 1999 Boeing Training & Flight Services - UK, LGW Crawley Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com A320-200 1 CFM56-5B/V2547 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2001 52

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

B737-300

1

CFM56-3B

CAE

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA C

1990

B737-700/800

1

CFM56-7B

FSI

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA D

1999

B737-700/800

1

CFM56-7B

Thales

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA D

2001

B757-200

1

PW2037/RB211-535E4

FSI

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA D

2001

B757-200/B767-300ER

1

RB211-535/CF6-80C2/PW4060 CAE

6H

EP-1000CT

3chCC 150 x40

NCAA C

2001

B777-300ER/-200

1

GE90-115

Thales

6H

EP-1000CT

3chCC 200 x40

EASA D

2010

B787

1

GE Genx/RR Trent 1000

Thales

6E

EP-1000CT

3chCC 200 x40

EASA C

2010

Boeing Training & Flight Services - USA, FL, Miami Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com A320-200

1

IAE/CFM56

Thales

6H

SP3-T

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1988

B737-200

1

JT8D

CAE

6H

SP1

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1984

B737-300

1

CFM56-3B

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA C

1997

B737-700/800

1

CFM56-7B

CAE

6H

ESIG 3350GT

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2001

B737-700/800

1

CFM56-7B

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2001

B737-800

1

CFM56-7B

CAE

6E

EP-1000CT

3chCC 200 x40

FAA D

2009

B757/B767

1

CF6/PW/RR

CAE

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2001

B757-200

1

PW2037/RB211

Thales

6H

ESIG 3800

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002

B757-200

1

PW2037/RB211-535

FSI

6H

EP-1000CT

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1991

B767-300ER

1

PW4056

FSI

6H

EP-1000CT

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1991

B777-200/300ER

1

GE90-115/-94B

FSI

6H

EP-1000CT

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

1999

F 100

1

Tay 650-15

FSI

6H

Vital 4

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1992

MD11

1

CF6-80C2/PW4460

CAE

6H

Vital 7

3chCC 150 x40

EASA/FAA D

1990

Boeing Training & Flight Services - USA, GA, Atlanta Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B717-200

1

BR715-A1/C1

CAE

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2001

B717-200

1

BR715-A1/C1

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 150 x40

FAA D

1999

B717-200

1

BR715-A1/C1

FSI

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA/DGAC D

2001

B737-700/800

1

CFM56-7B

FSI

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2001

Boeing Training & Flight Services - USA, WA, Seattle Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B717-200

1

BR715

FSI

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

1999

B737-700/800

2

CFM56-7B

CAE

6H

MaxVue A+

3chCC 150 x40

FAA D

1997/98

B747-400/-8

1

CF6-80C2/PW4056

CAE

6E

EP-1000CT

3chCC 200 x40

FAA D

2009

B767-300ER

1

CF6-80C2/PW4060

Thales

6H

SP-X 500

3chCC 150 x40

FAA C

1987

B767-400ER

1

CF6-80C2

CAE

6H

MaxVue A+

3chCC 150 x40

FAA C

2000

B777-200/300ER

1

GE90-115

CAE

6H

EP-1000CT

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2006

B787

2

GE Gnx or RR Trent

Thales

6E

EP-1000CT

3chCC 200 x40

EASA/FAA C

2010

Boeing Training & Flight Services/CasaAero - Morocco, Casablanca Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B737-300/400/500

1

CFM56-3

CAE

6H

Vital 7

3chCC 150 x40

EASA D

2005

B737-700/800

1

CFM56-7B

FSI

6H

EP-1000CT

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA D

2005

Boeing Training & Flight Services/S7 Training Centre - Russia, Moscow Tel: +1 206 662 8236 Email: mike.saladin@boeing.com B737-300/400/500

1

CFM56-3B

Thales

6H

SPX-500

3chCC 150 x40

NCAA C

2005

B737-700/800

1

CFM56-7B

Thales

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA D

2003

Bombardier Aerospace - USA, TX, DFW Tel: +1 469 791 6429 Email: dan.linn@aero.bombardier.com Challenger 300

1

AS907

RColl

6H

ESIG 3350GT

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2003

Challenger 604

1

CF34-3B

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002

Challenger 605

1

GE CF34-3A

CAE

6E

Tropos 6000

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2010

Learjet 31A

1

TFE-731

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2000

Learjet 45

2

TFE-731

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2000

Learjet 60

1

PW305A

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2003

Learjet 60/60XR

1

PW305A

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2000

Bombardier Aerospace - Canada, Montreal Tel: +1 514 344 6627 Email: franco.pietracupa@aero.bombardier.com

Challenger 604

1

CF34-3B

CAE

6H

MaxVue

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

1996

Challenger 605

1

CF34-3B

CAE

6H

MaxVue

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2006

CRJ 100/200

1

CF34-3A1/-3B1

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

1994

CRJ 700/900

1

CF34-8C1/CF34-8C5

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2000

Global Express

1

RR BR700-710A2-20

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

5chCC 210 x40

FAA D

2002

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

53


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

Bristow Academy - UK, Aberdeen Tel: +44 1224 723151 EC-225 1 TM Makila Frasca 6H TruVision 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA B 2009 S-92 1 GE CT7-8A Frasca 6H TruVision 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA B 2009 British Airways - UK, London Heathrow Tel: +44 (0)208 562 8787 Email: flight.training@ba.com A319/A320/A321 1 CFM45-V27/A5 CAE 6E Raster XT 3chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2001 A319/A320/A321 2 CFM56/V2500 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1999/00 B737-300/400/500 2 CFM56 Thales R 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1991/97 B747-400 1 RR RB211 Thales R 6H Raster XT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA C 1997 B747-400 2 RR RB211 Thales R 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1988 B747-400 1 RR RB211/GE CF6 Thales R 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1994 B757-200 1 RR RB211 CAE 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 1982 B757-200 1 RR RB211 CAE 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1989 B767-200/300ER 1 RR RB211 CAE 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1991 B777-200/IGW/ER 3 RR 895/GE90/PW4096 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1995/98/00 CAE - Europe TBA Challenger 300 1 Honeywell HTF7000 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2010 CAE Brussels - Belgium, Brussels Airport Tel: +32 (2) 752 57 11 Email: brussels-centre@cae.com A320 1 CFM56 Thales 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1999 A320 1 CFM56/V2500 CAE 6E Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2009 A330/A340 1 CFM56 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1999 B737-300/400/500 1 CFM56 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 5ch/6w 200 x40 EASA C 1989 B737-800/700 1 CFM56 Sim-Industries 6E EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2007 RJ85 1 ALF-507 CAE USA 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1996 CAE Centre - Mexico, Mexico City Bell 412 1 PT6T-3D CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2010 CAE SimuFlite - USA, TX, DFW Tel: +1 972 456 8000 Email: SimuFliteInfo@cae.com B737NG/BBJ 1 CFM56-7B27 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 Beechjet 400A 1 PW JT15D-5 CAE 6E Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2005 Beechjet 400A 1 PW JT15D-5 RColl 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 Challenger 601 1 GE CF34-3A/3R CAE 6H MaxVue 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1995 Citation Excel 1 PW 545A CAE 6H MaxVue 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 Citation I/SII 1 PW JT15D-4 Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1985 Citation III/VI/VII 1 TFE 731-4R-2S Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 2001 Citation Ultra/Bravo 1 PW JT15D-5D CAE 6H MaxVue 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2000 Citation V 1 PW JT15D-5A SimuFlite 6H Vital IV 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1993 Citation X 1 RR CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2004 Falcon 10 1 TFE 731-2-1C Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1985 Falcon 20 1 GE CF700-2D-2 Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1985 Falcon 2000 1 GE CFE 738-1-1B Thales/RColl 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2003 Falcon 50 1 TFE 731-3-1C Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1985 Falcon 900/900EX 1 TFE 731-60 Thales/RColl 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2003 G II 1 RR Spey MK 511-8 Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1985 G III 1 RR Spey MK 511-8 Thales S 6H Image IIIT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1984 G IV 1 RR Tay MK 611-8 CAE 6H MaxVue 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1995 GV 1 RR RB 710-48 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 Global Express 1 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2009 Hawker 700 1 TFE 731-3R-1H Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1985 Hawker 800/800XP 1 TFE 731-5BR-1H CAE 6H Maxvue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 King Air 200 1 PW PT6A-42 TP Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1985 King Air 350 1 PW PT6A-60A TP RColl 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 Learjet 24/25/C21 1 TFE 731-2-2B Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1985 Learjet 35/36 1 TFE 731-2-2B Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1984 Learjet 55 1 TFE 731-3A-2B Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1984 Phenom 100/300 1 PWC PW617F-E CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 Westwind I/II 1 TFE 731-3-1G Thales S 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1984 CAE SimuFlite North East Training Center - USA, NJ, Morristown Tel: +1 973 581 7400 Email: SimuFliteInfo@cae.com Challenger 300 1 HTF 7000 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 54

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

Citation CJ3 1 Williams FJ44-3A CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2009 Citation CJ3 1 Williams FJ44-3A RColl 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 Falcon 50 EX 1 Honeywell TFE731-40 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2010 Falcon 7X 1 PW 307A CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2006 Falcon 900EX EASy/2000EX EASy 1 CAE 6H Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2006 G 200 1 RR Spey 511 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2009 G 450/550 1 RR Spey 611 CAE 6H Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2008 G IV 1 RR Tay MK 311-8 CAE 6H MaxVue 3chCC 160 x40 FAA D 2000 Hawker 800/1000 1 PW304 CAE USA 6H SPX250 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1994 Hawker 800XPi 1 PW304 CAE 6H Tropos 6000 5chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2008 S-76C+ 1 Turbomeca Arriel 2S1 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 CAE - Belgium, Brussels Tel: +32 2 752 9444 Email: brussels-centre@cae.com A300 B2/B4 1 GE CF6-50C2 CAE 6H Vital IV 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 2000 ATR 42/72 1 PW120/PW127F CAE 6H MaxVue 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C&D 2003 B737-300 EFIS 1 CFM56-3B2 FSI 6H Vital IV 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 1990 B737NG 1 CFM56-7B27 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 B757/B767 1 PW4060/GE CF60 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2001 C-130/L-100 1 Allison T501D22A CAE USA 6H Vital IV 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA B 1990 Do328TP 1 PW119B Thales 6H SP3050 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1998 CAE - Brazil, Sao Paulo Tel: +55 11 2462 3300 Email: saopaulo-centre@cae.com A320 1 IAE V2527-A5 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 A320 1 V2500 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA-ANAC D 2001 A320-200 1 CFM56-5A CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 A330/A340 1 Trent CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA-ANAC D 2001 B737-700 1 CFM56-7B22 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA-ANAC D 2001 B737NG 1 CFM56-7B27 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2007 CAE - Canada, Montreal Tel: +1 514 341 6780 Email: montreal-centre@cae.com A310-200 1 JT9D CAE 6H Hitachi HiVis IIA 5ch/6w 200 x40 EASA C 1994/09

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

55


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type A330/A340

Sims Engines On Line 1

GE/PW/RR

Simulator Manufacturer CAE

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA-TC D

2001

CAE - Canada, Toronto Tel: +1 905 672 8650 Email: toronto-centre@cae.com CRJ 200

1

GE CF34-3A1

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

1998

CRJ 200/900

1

GE CF34-3B1

CAE

6H

MaxVue A+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2003

Dash 8-100/300

1

PW121

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA-TC D

2002

Do328TP

1

PW 119B

Thales

6H

SP3050

3chCC 150 x40

FAA D

2002

CAE - India, Bangalore Tel: +91 80 428 54005 Email: aviationtraining@cae.com A320

1

CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5

CAE

6E

Tropos II

5chCC 200 x40

FAA D

2008

B737NG

1

CFM56B-27

CAE

6E

Tropos II

5chCC 200 x40

FAA D

2008

CAE - Netherlands, Amsterdam Tel: +31 23 567 1721 Email: amsterdam-centre@cae.com B737NG

2

CFM56-7B24/CFM56-7B26

CAE

6H

Tropos

5chCC 200 x40

FAA D

2006/07

B737NG

1

CFM56-7B26

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2000

B737NG

1

CFM56-7B26/CFM56-7B27

CAE

6H

Tropos

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2000

Fokker 100

1

RR Tay 620/650

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2001

Fokker 50

1

PW125B

CAE

6H

Vital IV

3ch/4w 150 x40

EASA C

1988

Fokker 50

1

PW125B

CAE

6H

Vital VII

3chCC 150 x40

EASA C

1991

Fokker 70/100

1

RR Tay 620/650

CAE

6H

Vital IV

5ch/6w 200 x40

EASA C

1993

Fokker 70/100

1

RR Tay 620/650

CAE

6H

MaxVue

5chCC 150 x40

EASA D

1995

CAE - Spain, Madrid Tel: +34 91 748 1160 Email: madrid-centre@cae.com A320

2

CFM56/V2500

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2001/02

A320

1

CFM56-5B

Thales

6H

Vital VII

3chCC 150 x40

EASA C

1990

A320

1

CFM56-5B4

Thales

6H

ESIG

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2000

A330/A340

1

CFM56-5C

Thales

6H

ESIG 3350

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

1999

A330/A340

1

GW/PW/RR

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA-TC D

2001

A340-300

1

CFM56-5C4

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2002

B747-200

1

PW JT9D

Thales

6H

SP1

3ch/4w 150 x40

EASA C

1981

CRJ-200/700/900

1

CF34-3A/CF34-3B

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2001

CRJ-900

1

CF34-8C5/CF34-8C5A2

CAE

6E

Tropos 6000

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

1995

Dash 8-300

1

PW123

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2002

MD87/88

1

JT8D-217C

CAE

6H

Vital VII

3chCC 150 x40

EASA C

1990

CAE - USA, AZ, Phoenix Tel: +1 480 727 1318 Email: phoenix-centre@cae.com CRJ 200/700/900

2

CF34-3A1

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2003

ERJ 145

1

RR AE 3007A

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2003

CAE - USA, CO, Denver Tel: +1 303 373 3210 Email: denver-centre@cae.com A320

1

CFM56/V2500

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002

CAE - USA, FL, Miami Tel: +1 303 373 3210 Email: denver-centre@cae.com CRJ-200

1

CF34-3A1

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002

CAE - UK, Burgess Hill Tel: +44 (0)1444 247535 Email: burgesshill-centre@cae.com A320

2

CFM56-5B4

CAE

6H

Tropos

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2007

A320

2

CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5

CAE

6H

Tropos

5chCC 200 x40

FAA D

2004

A340-600

1

RR Trent 556-61

CAE USA

6H

MaxVue

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2007

Citation Excel/XLS

1

PWC 545C

CAE

6E

Tropos

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2008

Falcon 7X

1

PW307A

CAE

6H

Tropos

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2006

Falcon 900EX EASy/2000EX EASy 1

TFE 731-60

CAE

6H

Tropos

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2006

Global Express

1

RR BR700-710A2-20

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002

Learjet 40/45

1

Honeywell TFE731-20

CAE

6E

Tropos

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

Phenom 100/300

1

PWC PW617F-E

CAE

6E

Tropos 6000

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

CAE/Aeroflot - Russia, Moscow Tel: +7 495 5787942 Email: vshishkin@aeroflot.ru A320-200

1

CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5

CAE

6H

Tropos

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA D

2004

CAE/Air Canada - Canada, Vancouver Tel: +1 905 972 8650 Email: vancouver-centre@cae.com Dash 8-100/300 56

1

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

PW 121

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA-TC D

2003


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

CAE/AirAsia Training Centre - Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur Tel: +60 3 8777 8060/47 Email: aviationtraining@cae.com A320

1

IAE 2527/CFM56

CAE

6H

ESIG 3350

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

1999

A320

1

PW 4168A

CAE

6E

Tropos 6000

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2008

A330

1

PW 4168A

CAE

6E

Tropos 6000

5chCC 200 x40

FAA D

2008

B737-400

1

CFM56-3

Thales

6H

Image IV-500

3chCC 150 x40

EASA C

1995

CAE/Airbus - USA, FL, Miami Tel: +1 303 373 3210 Email: miami-centre@cae.com A320-200

1

CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5

CAE

6H

ESIG 3350

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

1999

A320-200

1

CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5

CAE

6H

ESIG 3350

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2001

CAE/Alitalia Training Centre - Italy, Rome Tel: +39 06 6563 8061 Email: aviationtraining@cae.com A320

1

CFM56-5B4

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2002

B767-300ER

1

CF680C2-B6F

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2002

B777-200

1

GE90-94B

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2002

CAE/Emirates - India, Bangalore Tel: +91 80 428 54005 Email: aviationtraining@cae.com A320

1

CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5

CAE

6E

Tropos 6000

5chCC 200 x40

FAA D

2010

CAE/Emirates - UAE, Dubai Tel: +971 4 286 9119 Email: dubai-centre@cae.com A318/320/321

1

CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2002

A320

1

CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527

CAE

6H

Tropos

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2006

A330/A340

1

RR/PW/GE & CFM

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2003

B737 NG/BBJ

1

CFM56-7B26

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2002

B737 NG/BBJ

1

CFM56-7B27

CAE

6H

Tropos

3chCC 200 x40

EASA/FAA D

2005

B777

1

GE90-94B/RR 892

CAE

6H

Tropos

3chCC 200 x40

EASA D

2006

Bell 412/212

1

PW PT6T-3D

CAE

6H

Tropos

5chCC 220 x60

EASA/FAA D

2005

Global Express

1

BR710

CAE

6H

Tropos 6000

4chCC 210 x40

EASA/FAA D

2010

Gulfstream 4/300/400

1

RR TAY 611-8

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 200 x40

EASA/FAA D

2003

Gulfstream 5/550

1

BMW/RR BR710-A1-10

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 200 x40

EASA/FAA D

2003

Hawker 800A/800XP

1

TFE731-5R-1H

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2003

Hawker 800XPi

1

TFE731-5BR-1H

CAE

6E

Tropos 6000

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2009

CAE/Horizon Air - USA, WA, Seattle Email: seattle-centre@cae.com CRJ 700

1

CF34-8C1

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2001

CAE/Lan - Chile, Santiago Tel: +56 2 601 1500 Email: santiago-centre@cae.com A320

1

CFM56

CAE

6H

Tropos 6000

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA D

2007

A320-200

1

V2500

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA D

1999

B737-200

1

JT8D

Thales

6H

SPX 550HT

3chCC 150 x40

NCAA C

1981

B767-300

1

Multichoice

CAE

6H

Maxvue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2002

B767-300ER

1

CF680C2-B6F

Thales

6H

SPX 550HT

3chCC 180 x40

NCAA D

1992

CAE/US Airways - USA, AZ, Phoenix Tel: +1 303 373 3210 Email: charlotte-centre@cae.com CRJ-200/700

1

GE CF34-3A1

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002

CAE/US Airways - USA, NC, Charlotte Tel: +1 303 373 3210 Email: charlotte-centre@cae.com CRJ-200

2

GE CF34-3B1

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2000/02

Capital Training Center - USA, FL, Sanford Tel: +1 407 585 4336 Email: ganselmi@capitalcargo.com B727-200

2

JT8D-15

CAE

6H

MaxVue

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2004

Cargolux - Luxembourg, Luxembourg Airport Tel: +352 4211 3754 Email: francis.ruppert@cargolux.com B747-400F

1

RR RB211/GE CF6

CAE

6H

Tropos 6400

4chCC 200 x40

EASA D

2000/10

B747-8F

1

GEnx-2B67

CAE

6E

Tropos 6400

4chCC 200 x40

EASA D

2010

CityLine AVRO Simulator & Training GmbH, Germany, Berlin Tel: +49 30 8875 5767 Email: rick.retzer@cstberlin.de RJ100

2

LF-507

CAE USA

6H

Tropos 6200

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

1996

Cathay Pacific - China, Hong Kong Tel: +852 2747 8540 Email: william_lam@cathaypacific.com

A330/A340

CAE

1

RR Trent/CFM56

6H

SP-X 550HT

3chCC 150 x40

CAAC-HK D

1994

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

57


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

A330/A340 1 RR Trent/CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue A+ 3chCC 150 x40 CAAC-HK D 1997 B747-200 1 RR RB211 Link/CAE 6H SP-X 200HT 3ch/4w 150 x40 CAAC-HK C 1981 B747-400 1 RR RB211 CAE 6H SP-X 550HT 3chCC 150 x40 CAAC-HK D 1994 B747-400 2 RR RB211 Thales R 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 CAAC-HK D 1989/91 B777-200/300 1 RR Trent CAE 6H Tropos IIe 3chCC 200 x40 CAAC-HK D 1995 B777-300ER 1 GE90 CAE 6E Tropos IIe 3chCC 200 x40 CAAC-HK D 2007 China Airlines - Taiwan, Taipei Tel: +886 2 251 46075 Email: tedwu@china-airlines.com A300-600R 1 PW4158 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1997 A330/A340 1 A340-CFM56-5C4/ CAE 6H MaxVue+ 5chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2001 A330-RR Trent 772 A330-200 1 CF6-80E1A4 CAE 6H Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2005 B737-800NG 1 CFM56-7B CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2000 B747-400F 1 CF6-80C2-B1F CAE 6H MaxVue+ 5chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2002 B747-400P 1 PW4056 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1989 China Commercial Aircraft Co Ltd (COMAC) - China, Shanghai Tel: +(86-21) 61210000-6236 Email: wanghai2@comac.cc ARJ21 Xiangfeng 2 GE CF34-10A CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2010 Civil Aviation Flight University Of China - China, Guanghan A320 1 CFM/IAE Mechtronix 6E RSI 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2009 B737NG 1 CFM56 Mechtronix 6H RSI 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2005 Citation CJ1 2 Williams FJ44-1A Mechtronix 6E RSI 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2007 Clark Aviation - Philippines, Clark Airport Tel: +63 (45) 599 7435 Email: info@alphagroupclark.aero A320 1 CFM56/IAE V2527 CAE 6E Maxvue+ 3chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2007 Comair - South Africa, Johannesburg Tel: +2711 9210418 Email: simulator@comair.co.za B737-236 1 PW JT8D-15 Thales R 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1981 B737-300/400/500 1 CFM56 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2004 Continental Airlines - USA, TX, Houston Tel: +1 281 553 8746 Email: Patrick.Cleary@coair.com B737-500 1 CFM56 Thales 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1994 B737-800 2 CFM56 CAE 6E EP-1000 3chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2009 B737-800 2 CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1998/08 B757-200 1 RR RB211 Thales 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1995 B777-200 1 PW4082 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1998 ERJ 145 3 AE3007 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2000/01/03 Copa Airlines - Panama B737-NG 1 CFM56-7B Mechtronix 6E RSI 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2006 CTC Aviation Services - UK, Southampton Tel: +44 (0)2380 737567 Email: darren.lee@ctcaviation.com A320-200 1 CFM56 Thales R 6H Raster XT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA B 1988 A320-200 1 CFM56/V2500 Thales 6H SP3-T 5ch/6w 150 x40 EASA C 1989 Czech Airlines - Czech Republic, Prague Tel: +420 220 111 167 Email: milos.kvapil@csa.cz A320 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2007 B737-400/500 1 CFM56-3C1 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA C 2000 Delta Air Lines - USA, GA, Atlanta Tel: +1 404 715 0834 Email: dal.contracttrng@delta.com B737-200 1 JT8D-15 CAE 6H SPX-550 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 B737-800 3 CFM56 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999/00 B757-200 2 PW2037 Link/CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1984/89 B757-200 1 PW2037 Thales R 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1992 B767-200 1 CF6 Link/CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1983 B767-300ER 2 CF6/PW4000 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999/01 B767-300ER 1 CF6/PW4000 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1991 B767-400 1 CF6/PW4000 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2000 B777-200 1 PW4074 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 B777-200LR 1 GE90-110B1L2 CAE 6E EP1000 5chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2008 MD11 1 PW4000 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1991 MD11 1 PW4000/CF6 Thales R 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1992 MD88 2 JT8D-219 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1992 58

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

MD88 1 JT8D-219 Link 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1990 MD88 1 JT8D-219 Link/BSC 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1988 MD90-30 1 V2500 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1995 TriStar L1011-250 1 RR RB211 Link/ARI 6H SP-X 250 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1973 Delta-NWA - USA, MN, MSP Email: randy.haar@nwa.com A320-211 1 CFM56-5-A1 CAE 6H ESIG 3350gt 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1998 A320-211 2 CFM56-5-A1 Link 6H SP-X 250t 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1991/97 A320-211 1 CFM56-5-A1 Thales T 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1990 A330/A340 1 CF6-80E/PW4168/ CAE 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 Trent 772/CFM56-5 A330-223 1 PW4168A Thales 6H ESIG 3350gt 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2003 B747-251 1 JT9D-7Q/F Link 6H SP1-T 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1983 B747-251 1 JT9D-7R/G Link 6H SP-X 250t 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1990 B747-451 1 PW4056 CAE 6H SP-X 500ht 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1989 B747-451 1 PW4056 Link 6H SP-X 250t 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1990 B757 1 GE 80A Link u/d Opinicus 6H ESIG 3350 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 2002 u/d B757-251 1 PW2037 Thales S 6H SP-X 500 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 1985 B757-251 1 PW2037 Link 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1990 B787-8 1 RR Trent 1000A Thales 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2010 DC9-30 2 JT8D-7,9,15 Link u/d Opinicus 6H ESIG 3350 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 1999 u/d 09 DC9-30 2 JT8D-7/9A CAE u/d Opinicus 6H ESIG 3350 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2000 u/d DC9-30 1 JT8D-9A Link 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1990 Dragonair - China, Hong Kong Tel: +852 3193 3200 Email: william_lam@cathaypacific.com A320 1 V2500/CFM CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC-HK D 2000 A330/A340 1 RR/GE CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC-HK D 2002 EgyptAir - Egypt, Cairo Tel: +202 2696 3842 Email: trainingcenter@egyptair.com A320 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2001 A330/A340 1 PW4060/GE90 Thales 6H ESIG 3800 3chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2005 B737-800 1 CFM24k/26k/27k FSI 6E Vital 10 3chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2009 B777 1 PW4090/GE90 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2003 Elbit Systems - Israel, Netanya King Air B200 1 PT6A-42 Mechtronix 6E RSI 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2009 Embraer - Brazil, San Jose Tel: +55 12 3927 7541 Email: pimentel@embraer.com.br EMB 120 1 PW118 Thales R 6H Vital 4 2ch/2w 60 x40 NCAA-ANAC B 1990 Emirates - UAE, Dubai Email: forterry@emirates.com A300/A310-300/600 1 CF6 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA C 1995

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

59


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

A330/A340 1 RR Trent CAE 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2000 A330-202 1 RR Trent CAE 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2000 A380 2 EA GP7000 CAE 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2008 B777-200 1 RR Trent CAE 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 1995 B777-300 1 RR Trent CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2003 B777-300ER 2 GE115 CAE 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2007/08 EPA Civil Aviation Training Centre - Brazil, Curitiba Tel: +55 41 3356 3636 Email: ctreinamento@epa-pr.com.br EMB 120 1 PW118 Thales R 6H Vital 4 2ch/2w 60 x40 NCAA-ANAC B 1990 Ethiopian Airlines - Ethiopia, Addis Ababa Tel: +251 161 22 22 Email: Instructor-Res@ethiopianairlines.com B707/B720 1 JT3D-3 Link 3H NVS 2ch/2w 60 x40 EASA A 1967 B757/B767 1 CF6 Thales R 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1993 Etihad Airways - UAE, Abu Dhabi Tel: +971 (0) 50 825 7230 Email: jdemontrichard@etihad.ae A320-200 1 IAE V2527-A5 CAE 6E Tropos 3chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2008 A330-200/ A340-300 2 RR Trent 556&772/ CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2007 PW4168A/CFM 56-5C4 B777 1 GE90-115BL2 CAE 6E Tropos 3chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2009 European Skybus Flight Training Centre - UK, Bournemouth Airport Tel: +44 (0)1202 581111 Email: steve.costello@european-simulators.com B727-200 1 JT8D-15 Thales R 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA D 1979 B737-200 1 JT8D-15A Thales R 6H SP3-T 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 1988 B747-200 Combi 1 RR RB211 CAE 6H SP-X 500 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 1989 BAC 1-11 1 RR Spey Thales R 3H NVS 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 1974 u/d Sikorsky S61N 1 CT-58 Thales R 6H EP-1000 2ch/2w 60 x40 EASA B 1978 EVA Airways - Taiwan, Taoyuan Tel: +886 3 3516551 Email: sts@evaair.com A330-200 1 CF6 80E1A4 CAE 6H Tropos R300 3chCC 200 x40 NCAA-Ph/Tw D 2003 B747-400 1 CF6 80C2-B1F Thales 6H Tropos R300 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC/CAAP/TCAA D 1993 B777-300ER 1 GE-90-115B CAE 6H Tropos R300 3chCC 200 x40 NCAA/Ph/Tw D 2006 MD11 1 CF6 80C2-D1F/PW4460 Thales 6H Tropos R300 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC/TCAA D 1994 FAA Academy - USA, OK, Oklahoma City Tel: +1 405 954 4562 B737-800 2 CFM56 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2004 FedEx - USA, AK, Anchorage Tel: +1 901 397 9758 Email: mdjackson5@fedex.com MD11 1 CF6 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1997 FedEx - USA, TN, Memphis Tel: +1 901 397 9758 Email: mdjackson5@fedex.com A300-600F 1 CF6 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1993 A300-600F 1 CF6 Thales 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1999 A310-200 1 CF6 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1994 A310-300 1 PW4000 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 2006 B727-200 1 JT8D CAE 6H EP-1000 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2006 B727-2S2F 1 JT8D-17 Thales R 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1987 B757-200 2 RB211 CAE 6H EP-1000 5chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2008 B777F 2 GE90 CAE 6H EP-1000 5chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2008/09 DC10-10F 1 CF6 Thales S 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA B 1983 MD10 2 CF6 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 2000 MD11 4 CF6 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1991/99/02/06 Finnair Flight Training Centre - Finland, Helsinki Tel: +358 9 8184611 Email: flight.training@finnair.com A320-200 1 CFM56/IAE 2527 CAE 6H Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 1999 ATR 42/72 1 PW120/PW124 Thales R 6H EP-1000CT 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 1986 B757-200 1 RR RB211/PW2040 Thales R 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1991 DC9-50 1 JT8D-17 Link 3H NVS 2ch/2w 60 x40 EASA A 1972 EMB 170 1 CF34-8E5 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2006 MD11 1 CF6/PW4362 CAE 6H Vital 7 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 1990 Finnish Aviation Academy - Finland, Pori Tel: +358 2 6301 700 Email: Esa.Lohikivi@finaa.fi King Air 300 1 PT6A FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 1991 60

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

Flex Aviation Center (ex Varig) - Brazil, Rio de Janeiro Tel: +55 21 3717 0366 / 0354 Email: comercial.fac@flexaviationcenter.com B707-321B 1 JT3D-3 Thales R 3H Novoview 2500 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1977 B727-200F 1 JT8D-15/15A Thales R 6H SP-1 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA-ANAC C 1976 B737-200 1 JT8D-17 Thales R 3H SP1-T 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1976 B737-300 1 CFM56 Thales R 6H SP3-T 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1988 B767-200 1 CF6 Thales R 6H SP3-T 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1987 Flight Simulation Company - Netherlands, Schiphol Tel: +31 20 304 3200 Email: Robin@fsctraining.com A320 3 CFM56/IAE V2527 CAE 6E Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2007 B737-300 1 CFM56 CAE 6H Image II 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1993 B737-800 1 CFM56 Sim-Industries 6E EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2007 B737-800 1 CFM56 CAE 6E Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2007 B737-800 2 CFM56 CAE 6E Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2006 &07 B767-300ER 1 CF6/PW CAE 6E MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1993 Do328Jet 1 PW306 CAE 6E Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2007 Flight Simulation Company - USA, TX, DFW Tel: +1 817 445 7100 Email: jerry@fsctraining.com A320 1 CFM56/IAE V2527 CAE 6E Tropos 3chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2009 B737-200 1 JT8D-15 CAE 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2006 B737-300 1 CFM56-3 CAE 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2008 B737-800 1 CFM56 CAE 6E Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2009 flyLAL Training - Lithuania, Vilnius Tel: +370 5 2525515 Email: e.kuzminas@flylaltraining.com B737-300/400/500 1 CFM56 Thales 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1989 FlyRight Inc. - USA, NC, Concord Tel: +1 704 720 9623 Beech 1900D 1 PT6A Opinicus 6H RasterFlite 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2008 King Air 200 1 PT6A Opinicus 6H RasterFlite 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2008 FlightSafety International Atlanta Learning Center - USA, GA, Atlanta Tel: +1 678 365 2700 / 800 889 7916 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Citation 1/2 1 PW JT15D-5 FSI 6H Vital X 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1987 CRJ 4 GE CF-34-3B1 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2000/01 CRJ 700 1 GE CF-34-8C1 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2003 Dash 8 1 PW 120 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 2001 EMB120 1 PW118 FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1991 Jetstar 1 PW JT12-8 FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA A 1983 King Air 200 1 PT6-A42 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 King Air 350 1 PW PT6A-60A FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1993 King Air 350 1 PW PT6A-60A FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 Learjet 31A 1 Garrett TFE731-2-3B FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 Learjet 35 1 Garrett TFE731 FSI 4H Vital 8 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 1986 Learjet 45 1 Garrett TFE731-20 FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2000 Learjet 60 1 PW305A FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 FlightSafety International Cincinnati Learning Center - USA, KY, Erlanger Tel: +1 859 283 2345 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com CRJ 3 GE CF-34-3B1 FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2000/01/02 CRJ 1 GE CF-34-3B1 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1998 CRJ 700 1 GE CF-34-8C1 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2003 FlightSafety International Columbus Learning Center - USA, OH, Columbus Tel: +1 614 559 3700 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Citation Excel 1 PW545A FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 Citation Sovereign 1 PW306C FSI 6E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2006 Citation Ultra 1 PW JT15D-5D FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 Citation X 1 Allison AE3007C FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 Citation XLS 1 PW 545B FSI 6E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2007 Falcon 2000 1 Garrett CFE738-1-1B FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2003 Gulfstream 200 1 PW 306A FSI 6E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2007 FlightSafety International Daleville Learning Center - USA, AL, Daleville Tel: +1 334 598 4485 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com King Air 200/C12/UC12B 1 PT6A FSI 6H Vital 4 5ch/6w 150 x40 FAA C 1986 King Air C-12 1 PT6A FSI 6H Vital 4 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1985 CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

61


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

King Air C-12

2

PT6A

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA C

1992/94

King Air C-12D

1

PT6A

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA B

2004

King Air C-12D

1

PT6A

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 150 x40

FAA C

2000

Sikorsky S-70

1

GE T700-GE-701C

FSI

6H

Vital 9

5chCC 200 x60

FAA D

2003

FlightSafety International DFW Learning Center - USA, TX, DFW Tel: +1 972 534 3200 / 866 486 8733 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com ATR 42/72

1

PW120

FSI

6H

Vital 4

3ch/4w 185 x40

FAA C

1998

CRJ 200/700

1

GE CF34

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2003

ERJ 145

1

Allison AE3007A1P

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2004

Falcon 10

1

Garrett TFE731-2

FSI

6H

Vital 4

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1983

Falcon 20

1

Garrett TFE731-5BR

FSI

6H

Vital 7

3chCC 150 x40

FAA D

1994

Falcon 2000

1

PW 308C

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 165 x40

FAA D

2000

Falcon 2000EX/900EX EASy

1

Garrett TFE731-60

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2007

Falcon 50

1

Garrett TFE731-3-1C

FSI

6H

Vital 7

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1994

Falcon 900EX

1

Garrett TFE731-60

FSI

6H

Vita 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2000

G100

1

Garrett TFE731-40R

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2005

G150

2

Garrett TFE731-40R

FSI

6E

Vital 9&X

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2007/09

G200

2

PW 306A

FSI

6H

Vital 8&9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2007/08

GII

1

RR Spey 522-8

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 160 x40

FAA C

1989

GIII

1

RR Spey 511-8

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 160 x40

FAA D

1996

GIV

1

RR Tay

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 150 x40

FAA D

2009

FlightSafety International Farnborough Learning Center - UK, Farnborough Tel: +44 (0)1252 554500 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com 1900D

1

PW PT6A-67D

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2005

Citation Bravo

1

PW 530A Turbofan

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA C

2001

Citation CJ2

1

Williams FJ-44-2C

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2002

Citation Excel

1

PW 545A

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2006

Citation Mustang

1

PW 615F

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2008

Citation Sovereign

1

PW 306C

FSI

6E

Vital X

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2009

Dash 8 400

2

PW 150A

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2006/07

G550/G450

1

RR Tay MK 611-8C

FSI

6H

Vital X

3chCC 150 x40

EASA/FAA D

2009

Hawker 400XP

1

PW JT15D-5

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2006

Hawker 750

1

Garrett TFE731-5BR

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2009

Hawker 800XP

1

Garrett TFE731-5BR

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2006

Hawker 850XP

1

Garrett TFE731-5BR

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2007

King Air 200

1

PWC PT6A-42

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2006

S-92

1

GE CT7-8A

FSI

6E

Vital 9

5chCC 200 x40

EASA/FAA D

2007

Saab 340

1

GE CT7-9

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

EASA/FAA D

2005

FlightSafety International Ft Worth Bell Learning Center - USA, TX, Hurst Tel: +1 817 785 0800 / 800 379 7413 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Bell 412/212

1

PW PT6T-3B

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

Bell 412/212

1

PW PT6T-3B

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA C

1993

Bell 430

1

Allison 250-C47B

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA C

2009

FlightSafety International Houston Learning Center - USA, TX, Houston Tel: +1 713 393 8100 / 800 927 1521 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com ATR 42

1

PW120

FSI

6H

Vital 4

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1998

ATR 42/72

1

PW124

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 150 x40

FAA C

1991

ATR 42/72-500

1

PW127E

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

Challenger 601/3A

1

GE CF-34-3A

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 160 x40

FAA D

1997

Commander 690 & 1000

2

Garrett TPE331-1050

FSI

4H

Vital 8

2ch/2w 60 x40

FAA A

2001

ERJ 145

1

AE3007A1P

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

1998

ERJ 145

2

AE3007A1P

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

Hawker 800XP

1

Garrett TPE731-5BR

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

Hawker 900XP

1

Garrett TFE731-50R

FSI

6E

Vital X

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

King Air 200

1

PW PT6A-42

FSI

6E

Vital X

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

King Air C-90

1

PW PT6A-21

FSI

6H

Vital 8

2ch/2w 60 x40

FAA A

2000

Saab 340

1

GE CT7-9

FSI

6H

Vital 7

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA D

1995

FlightSafety International Japan - Japan, Tokyo Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Dash 8 100/200/300

1

PW 120A/ PW 123

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

JCAB D

2009

RJ

1

GE CF-34-8C5

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

JCAB D

2008

62

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

FlightSafety International Lafayette Learning Center - USA, LA, Lafayette Tel: +1 337 408 2900 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Bell 206 1 Allison 250-C20J FSI 6EV Vital X 5chCC 220 x45 FAA D 2008 S 76 C+/C++ 1 Turbomeca Arriel 2S2 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2004 S 92 1 GE CT7-8A FSI 6E Vital X 5chCC 200 x40 FAA D 2008 FlightSafety International LaGuardia Learning Center - USA, NY, Flushing Tel: +1 718 565 4170 / 800 749 8818 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Beech 1900 1 PW PT6A-65B FSI 6H Vital 4 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1989 Beech 1900D 1 PW PT6A-67D FSI 6H Vital 7 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1996 King Air 200 1 PW PT6A-42 FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1989 Shorts 360 1 PW PT6A-67AR FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1989 FlightSafety International Lakeland Learning Center - USA, FL, Lakeland Tel: +1 863 646 5037 / 800 726 5037 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Cheyenne I/II 2 PT6 FSI 4H Vital 4 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 2005 Cheyenne III 1 PT6A-41 FSI 4H Vital 4 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 2005 King Air 200 1 PW PT6A-42 FSI 4H Vital 4 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 2004 King Air C-90B 1 PW PT6A-21 FSI 4H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA B 2005 FlightSafety International Le Bourget Learning Center - France, Le Bourget Tel: +33 1 49 92 1919 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Citation V/II 1 JT15D-4 FSI 6H Vital 7 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA/FAA C 1998 Dash 8 1 PW120 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 165 x40 FAA D 2008 EMB120 1 PW118 FSI 6H Vital 8 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA/FAA C 1991 EMB170/190 1 GE CF-34-8E5 FSI 6E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 EASA/FAA D 2006 ERJ 145 2 Allison AE3007A1P FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 EASA/FAA D 1990/00 ERJ 145 2 Allison AE3007A1P FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 EASA/FAA D 2001/03 Falcon 10 1 Garrett TFE731-2 FSI 3H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 EASA/FAA A 1979 Falcon 20 1 GE CF700-2D-2 FSI 6H Vital 8 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA/FAA C 1999 Falcon 2000 1 Garrett CFE738-1-1B FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 EASA/FAA D 1998 Falcon 2000EX/900EX EASy 1 PW 308C FSI 6E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 EASA/FAA D 2006 Falcon 50 1 Garrett TFE731-3-1C FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 EASA/FAA C 1992

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

63


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

Falcon 900 1 Garrett TFE731-5AR FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 EASA/FAA C 1999 Fokker 100 1 Tay MK 650-15 FSI 6H Vital 7 3chCC 150 x40 EASA/FAA C 1995 King Air 200 1 PW PT6A-41 FSI 4H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA/TC B 1979 FlightSafety International Long Beach Learning Center - USA, CA, Long Beach Tel: +1 562 938 0100 / 800 487 7670 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Citation II/I 1 PW JT15D-1A FSI 6H Vital 8 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2002 Citation V 1 PW JT15D-5A FSI 6H Vital 9 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1990 EMB120 1 PW118 FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1990 Gulfstream G550/G450 1 RR 611-8C FSI 6E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 Gulfstream II 1 RR Spey 511-8 FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1985 Gulfstream III 1 RR Spey 511-8 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1986 Gulfstream IV 1 RR 611-8 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1989 King Air 200 1 PW PT6A FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1998 King Air 300 1 PW PT6A-60A FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1989 FlightSafety International Memphis Learning Center - USA, TN, Memphis Tel: +1 901 368 1234 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com CRJ 1 GE CF-34-3B1 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 CRJ 2 GE CF-34-3B1 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1997/00 FlightSafety International Montreal Learning Center - Canada, Montreal Tel: +1 514 631 2084 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Challenger 600/601 1 GE CF-34-1A FSI 6H Vital 7 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1987 Challenger 601 1 GE CF-34-1A FSI 6E Vital 7 3chCC 160 x40 FAA/TC D 2009 FlightSafety International Orlando Learning Center - USA, FL, Orlando Tel: +1 321 281 3200 / 800 205 7494 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Beech 1900D 1 PW PT6A-67D FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1997 Citation Bravo 1 PW 530A FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2003 Citation CJ2&3 2 Williams FJ-44 FSI 6H Vital 9&X 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002/07 Citation Encore UC-35B 1 PW 535A FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2002 Citation Excel 1 PW 545A FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2003 Citation Mustang 1 PW 615F FSI 6E Vital X 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2009 Citation Sovereign 2 PW 300 & 306 FSI 6E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2006/07 Citation X 1 Allison AE3007C FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1996 Citation XLS 1 PW 545B FSI 6E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 ERJ 145 1 Allison AE3007A1P FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2004 FlightSafety International San Antonio Learning Center - USA, TX, San Antonio Tel: +1 210 248 0100 / 800 889 7917 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Citation Bravo 1 PW 540A FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1998 Citation CJ1 1 Williams FJ-44 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 2001 Citation Excel 1 PW545A FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 Citation II 1 PW JT15D FSI 4H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1982 Citation III 1 TFE731-3B FSI 6H Vital 8 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1984 Citation Jet 1 Williams FJ-44-1A FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 2008 Citation SII 1 PW JT15D-4B FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1986 Citation Ultra 1 PW JT15D-5D FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1997 Metro C-26 1 TPE331-12UAR-701G FSI 6H Vital 7 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1995 FlightSafety International Savannah Learning Center - USA, GA, Savannah Tel: +1 912 644 1000 / 800 625 9369 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Gulfstream G450 2 RR Tay 611-8C FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2005/07 Gulfstream G550 2 RR BR 710-C4-11 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2003/06 Gulfstream G550/G450 1 RR Tay 611-8C FSI 6E Vital X 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2009 Gulfstream I 1 RR Dart 5298X FSI 4H Vital 8 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1993 Gulfstream IV 1 RR Tay 611-8 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1990 Gulfstream IV 1 RR Tay 611-8 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 Gulfstream IV 1 RR Tay 611-8 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2009 Gulfstream V 2 RR BR710 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1997/99 FlightSafety International Seattle Learning Center - USA, WA, Seattle Tel: +1 206 493 1800 / 888 782 5261 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Beech 1900D 1 PW PT6A-67D FSI 6H Vital 7 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 1996 Dash 8 2 PW 123E FSI 6H Vital 8 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1992/94 Dash 8 400 2 PW 150A FSI 6H Vital 8&9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2000 Jetstream 31 1 Garrett TPE331-12 FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1991 Metro III 1 Garrett TPE331-11U FSI 4H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 1981 64

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

FlightSafety International Salt Lake City Learning Center - USA, UT, Salt Lake City Tel: +1 801 355 3901 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com CRJ 2 GE CF-34-3B1 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 CRJ 1 GE CF-34-3B1 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 160 x40 FAA D 2001 CRJ 200/700 1 GE CF-34-3B1 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 FlightSafety International St. Louis Learning Center - USA, MO, St. Louis Tel: +1 314 442 3300 / 800 258 4351 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com CRJ 200 1 CF34-3A1 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2007 CRJ 700/900 1 GE CF-34-8C5 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2000 Dash 8 400 1 PW 150A FSI 6E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 EMB 170 3 GE CF-34-8E5 FSI 6E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2006/08 ERJ 145 3 Allison AE3007A FSI 6H Vital 8/9/X 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2000 Jetstream 31/32 1 TPE331-511/513 FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1989 Metro III 1 Garrett TPE331-11U FSI 4H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 1986 Saab 340 A/B 1 GE CT7-5A2 FSI 6H Vital 7 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1994 FlightSafety International St. Louis Sabre Learning Center - USA, MO, St. Louis Tel: +1 314 442 3300 / 800 258 4351 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Sabre 60 1 PW JT12A-8 Thales S 3H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1978 Sabre 65 1 Garrett TFE731-3R-1D FSI 4H Vital 8 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1982 Sabre 80 1 GE CF-700-2D-2 Thales S 4H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1978 FlightSafety International Teterboro Learning Center - USA, NJ, Moonachie Tel: +1 201 528 0100 / 800 827 8058 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Falcon 2000 1 CFE738-1-1B FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1996 Falcon 2000EX EASy 1 PW308C FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2005 Falcon 50EX 1 TFE731-40 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 Falcon 900EX 1 TFE731-60 FSI 6H Vital X 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 Falcon 900EX EASy 1 TFE731-60 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2003 FlightSafety International Toledo Learning Center - USA, OH, Toledo Tel: +1 419 930 6300 / 800 497 4023 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Citation Excel 1 PW 545A FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 Citation II/SII 1 PW JT15D-4B FSI 6H Vital 4 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1987 Citation III 1 Garrett TFE731-3B100 FSI 6H Vital 8 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1987 Citation Ultra 1 PW JT15D-5D FSI 6H Vital 8 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1995 Citation V/II 1 PW JT15D-4B FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1993 Citation X 1 Allison AE3007C FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 Hawker 400 XP 1 PW JT15D-5 FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2007 FlightSafety International Toronto Learning Center - Canada, Toronto Tel: +1 416 638 9313 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Beech 1900D 1 PW PT6A-67D FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA/TC D 2000 Dash 7 1 PW PT6A-50 FSI 4H Vital 8 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA/TC B 1991 Dash 8 1 PW123E FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 150 x40 FAA/TC C 2002 Dash 8 100/300 1 PW120 FSI 6H Vital 7 3ch/4w 180 x40 FAA/TC D 1989 Dash 8 400 1 PW150A FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA/TC D 1998 Dash 8 400 1 PW150A FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 FAA/TC D 2009 Twin Otter 1 PPW PT6A-27 FSI 4H Vital 8 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA/TC B 1993 FlightSafety International Tucson Learning Center - USA, AZ, Tucson Tel: +1 520 918 7100 / 800 203 5627 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Challenger 601 1 GE CF-34-3R FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 Challenger 604 1 GE CF-34-3B FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 Learjet 25D 1 GE CJ610-6 FSI 4H Vital 4 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1978 Learjet 31A 1 Garrett TFE731-2-3B FSI 6H Vital 9 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 2008 Learjet 35 1 Garrett TFE731-2-2B FSI 4H Vital 8 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 1986 Learjet 35 1 Garrett TFE731-2-2B FSI 6H Vital 8 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1989 Learjet 45 1 Garrett TFE731-20BR FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1997 Learjet 55 1 Garrett TFE731-3AR FSI 4H Vital 4 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 1982 Learjet 60 1 PW305 FSI 6H Vital 7 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA D 1995 Learjet 60 1 PW305 FSI 6H Vital 8+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 FlightSafety International Vero Beach Learning Center - USA, FL, Vero Beach Tel: +1 772 564 7650 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com ERJ 145 1 Allison AE3007A1P FSI 4H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 Saab 2000 1 Allison AE2100 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1996 Seminole PA44 3 Lycoming TIO-540 FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2001 CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

65


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

FlightSafety International West Palm Beach Learning Center - USA, FL, West Palm Beach Tel: +1 561 515 2900 / 800 769 6763 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Piaggio Avanti

2

PW PT6A-66B

FSI

6H

Vital 9&X

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2006/09

S 70

1

GE T700-GE-701C

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002

S 76

1

Allison C30

FSI

6H

SP1

4ch/5w 150 x40

FAA B

1981

S 76 A/B

1

PW PT6B-36A

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 150 x40

FAA C

1988

S 76 B/C/C+

1

Turbomeca Arriel 2S2

FSI

6H

Vital 9

5chCC 180 x60

FAA D

1999

S 76 C+/C++

1

Turbomeca Arriel 2S2

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 220 x40

FAA D

2007

S 92

1

GE CT7-8D

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2004

FlightSafety International Wichita Cessna Learning Center - USA, KS, Wichita Tel: +1 316 220 3100 / 800 488 3214 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Caravan

1

PW PT6A-114A

FSI

4H

Vital 4

2ch/2w 60 x40

FAA B

1990

Caravan

1

PW PT6A-114A

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

2002

Caravan

1

PW PT6A-114A

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2008

Citation CJ2+

1

Williams FJ-44

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2001

Citation CJ3

1

PW 306C

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2004

Citation CJ4

1

Williams FJ-44

FSI

6H

Vital X

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

Citation Encore

1

PW 535A

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2001

Citation Encore +

1

PW 535A

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2007

Citation III/VII

1

Garrett TFE731-4R

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1993

Citation Mustang

2

PW 615F

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2007

Citation Sovereign

1

PW 306C

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2003

Citation X

1

Allison AE3007C

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002

Citation XLS

1

PW 545B

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 160 x40

FAA D

2004

Citation XLS+

2

PW 545C

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA d

2008

FlightSafety International Wichita Hawker Beechcraft Learning Center - USA, KS, Wichita Tel: +1 316 612 5300 / 800 488 3747 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Beech 390 Premier

1

Williams FJ-44-2A

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2000

Beechjet 400A

1

PW JT15D-5

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 150 x40

FAA D

1998

Beechjet 400A

1

PW JT15D-5A

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2000

Hawker 4000

1

PW 308A

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2005

Hawker 750

1

Garrett TFE731-5BR

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2008

Hawker 800XP

1

Garrett TFE731-5BR

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

1999

Hawker 800XP

1

Garrett TFE-731-5BR

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002

Hawker 900XP

1

Garrett TFE731-50R

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

King Air 200 GT

1

PT PT6A-42

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2004

King Air 350

2

PW PT6A-60A

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002/04

King Air C-90B

1

PW PT6A-21

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

1999

King Air C-90GT

1

PW PT6A-135A

FSI

6E

Vital X

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2008

FlightSafety International Wichita Learjet Learning Center - USA, KS, Wichita Tel: +1 316 943 3394 / 800 491 9807 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Learjet 24/25

1

GE CJ610-8A

FSI

4H

Vital 4

2ch/2w 60 x40

FAA A

1978

Learjet 35

1

TFE-731-2-2B

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1986

Learjet 45

1

TFE731-20BR

FSI

6H

Vital X

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

Learjet 55

1

TFE731-3AR-2B

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1986

FlightSafety International Wilmington Learning Center - USA, DE, New Castle Tel: +1 302 221 5100 / 800 733 7548 Email: John.Slish@flightsafety.com Beech 360 Premier

1

Williams FJ-44-2A

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2007

Challenger 300

1

Honeywell HTF-7000

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2006

Challenger 604

1

GE CF-34-3B

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2001

Falcon 50

1

Garrett TFE731-3-1C

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA C

1999

Falcon 900

1

Garrett TFE731-5BR

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 160 x40

FAA C

1987

Global Express

1

RR BR 700-710-A2

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2004

Gulfstream 200

1

PW 306A

FSI

6E

Vital X

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2009

Gulfstream G550

1

RR BR 710-C4-11

FSI

6E

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2006

Gulfstream IV

1

RR Tay MK 611-8

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2000

Gulfstream V

1

RR BR 710-48

FSI

6H

Vital 9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2002

Hawker 800XP

2

Garrett TFE731-5BR

FSI

6H

Vital 8&9

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2001/05

Hawker HS125-700

1

Garrett TFE731-3-1H

FSI

6H

Vital 8+

3chCC 180 x40

FAA C

1986

Westwind Astra SP

1

Garrett TFE731-3

FSI

6H

Vital 4

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1991

Westwind II

1

Garrett TFE731-1100G

FSI

6H

Vital 7

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1994

66

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

Garuda Indonesia - Indonesia, Jakarta Tel: +62 21 5406279 Email: t.otman@garuda-indonesia.com B737-228

1

PW JT8-51A

Thales R

6H

SP-X 500HT

3chCC 150 x40

NCAA D

1989

B737-300/400

1

GE CFM56

CAE

6H

MaxVue8+

3chCC 150 x40

NCAA-TC D

1996

B747-200

1

JT9D-7A/7Q

Thales R

6H

SP-1

3ch/4w 150 x40

NCAA B

1984

F28

1

RR Spey-555

Thales R

6H

SP-1

3ch/4w 150 x40

NCAA B

1984

MD11

1

PW 4060/4460

CAE

6H

MaxVue8+

3chCC 150 x40

NCAA-TC D

1996

Gazpromavia - Russia, Moscow Tel: +7 495 719 1832 Email: gazpromavia@gazprom.ru Mi-171

1

BK-2500-03

Transas

6HV

Aurora

5chCC+2chin 220 x75 EASA D

2009

Mi-8MTV

1

TV3-117VM

Transas

6HV

Aurora

5chCC+2chin 220 x75 EASA D

2009

Mi-8T

1

TV2-117A

Transas

6HV

Aurora

5chCC+2chin 220 x75 EASA D

2009

Global Training Aviation - Spain, Madrid Tel: +34 91 329 5317 Email: sim@globaltrainingaviation.com ATR 72-500

1

PW127

Indra

6H

Invis

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2009

Guangzhou Civil Aviation College - China, Baiyun Airport Tel: +86 20 86120574 Email: office@caac.net B737-300

2

CFM56

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 150 x40

FAA C

1985

Cheyenne III

3

PT6A

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 150 x40

FAA C

1994

MD82

1

JT8D-15

CAE

6H

Vital 4

5ch/6w 200 x40

FAA D

1989

Xian Y7

1

PWC 127J

BASC

6H

VDS-2000

3ch/4w 150 x40

FAA C

1992

Gulf Aviation Academy - Bahrain, Bahrain Airport Tel: +973 1735777 Email: info@gulfaa.com A320

2

CFM56

CAE

6E

Tropos 6000

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2010

EMB 170/190

1

GE CF-34-8E5

CAE

6E

Tropos 6000

3chCC 180 x40

FAA D

2010

Gulf Air - Bahrain, Bahrain Airport Tel: +973 17327840 Email: john.wheldon@gulfair.com A320-200

1

CFM56

Thales R

6H

Raster XT

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

1992

A340-300/A330-200

1

CFM56/RR Trent

Thales

6H

Raster XT

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

1995

B767-300ER

1

CF6-80C2B4

Thales R

6H

SP-X 500HT

3chCC 150 x40

EASA D

1993

Higher Power Aviation - USA, TX, DFW Tel: +1 817 445 7000 Email: info@jetcrew.com B737-200

1

JT8D-15

CAE

6H

Vital 4

3chCC 150 x40

FAA C

2006

B737-3A4

1

CFM-56

CAE

6H

Vital 4

3chCC 150 x40

FAA C

2008

Icare Flight Training Centre - France, Morlaix Tel: +33 2 98 88 10 10 Email: ma.borina@icare.fr ATR 42-300/42500/72-200

1

PW120/PW127E/PW124

FSI

6H

Vital 8

3chCC 150 x40

EASA C

1991

CRJ 100/200/700

1

CF34-3A1/3B1/8C1

CAE

6H

MaxVue+

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2001

CRJ 700/1000

1

CF34-8C1/8C5A1

FSI

6E

Vital X

3chCC 180 x40

EASA D

2009

ADVANCING YOUR VISUAL ENVIRONMENT

RSI -VISUAL S .CO M

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8/12/10 10:22 AM CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010 67


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

IFTC Istanbul - Turkey, Istanbul Tel: +90 212 463 09 00 Email: saliha.yuksel@iftc.aero A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4 Mechtronix 6E RSI Raster Flite 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA C 2009 A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE 2527-A5 Mechtronix 6E RSI Raster Flite 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2008 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B Mechtronix 6E RSI Raster Flite 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2008 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B Mechtronix 6E RSI Raster Flite 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA C 2008 IranAir - Iran, Tehran Tel: +98 (021) 46627894 Email: a.kouchaki@iranair.com B727-200 1 JT8D-9 Link 6H NVS 2ch/2w 60 x40 NCAA A 1978 Japan Airlines - Japan, Tokyo Tel: +81 3 5756 3650 Email: ko.mitani@jal.com A300-600R 1 PW4158 CAE 6H SP-X 500HT 5chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 1991 B737-400 1 CFM56-3C-1 CAE 6H Vital 7 5chCC 225 x40 JCAB D 1995 B737-800 3 GE CFM56-7B24 CAE 6E Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 2007/08 B747-300 1 JT9D-7R4G2 CAE 6H Vital 7 5chCC 225 x40 JCAB D 1994 B747-400 1 CF6-80C2B1F Thales R 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 JCAB D 1991 B747-400 3 CF6-80C2B1F Thales R 6H SP-X 550HT 5chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 1992/04 B767-200 1 JT9D-7R4D Thales R 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 JCAB D 1986 B767-300 1 JT9D-7R4D Thales R 6H SP3350 5chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 1998 B767-300ER 1 CF6-80C2B7F CAE 6H ESIG 3800 5chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 2003 B777-200 1 PW4074 CAE 6H MaxVue 2000 5chCC 210 x40 JCAB D 1998 B777-200 1 PW4077 CAE 6H Tropos 5chCC 210 x40 JCAB D 1998 B777-200ER 1 GE90-94B CAE 6H ESIG 3800 3chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 2003 B777-200ER 1 GE90-94B CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 2006 MD81 1 JT8D-217C CAE 6H SP-X 500HT 5chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 1992 MD90-30 1 V2525-D5 Thales 6H SP-3250 5chCC 200 x40 JCAB D 1996 Jat Airways Training Centre - Serbia, Belgrade Email: training@jat.com DC9-30 1 JT8D-9 CAE 3H Vital 4 2ch/2w 090 x40 NCAA A 1972 JetBlue Airways - USA, FL, Orlando Tel: +1 407 812 2435 Email: Sarah.Streff@jetblue.com A320 4 V2527-A5 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2005 EMB 170/190 1 CF34-10E CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2005 EMB 190 2 CF34-10E CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2005 Jordan Airline Training & Simulation - Jordan, Amman Tel: +962 6 445 1516 Email: info@jats.com.jo A310-300 1 CF6 Thales T 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1990 A320-200 1 CFM56 Thales T 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1990 A320-200 1 V2527 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2007 B727-200 1 JT8D-17 A&M 4H Novoview 6000 2ch/2w 090 x40 JCAB B 1977 Jupiter Aviation - India, Bangalore Tel: +91 80 2559 4911 A320 1 CFM56 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2009 B737NG 1 CFM56-7B26 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2009 Kalitta Air - USA, MI, Ypsilanti Tel: +1 800 521 1590 Email: jphelps@kalittaair.com B747-200/300 1 GE CF6-50E2/ CAE 6H SPX-550 HT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1985 PWJT9D-7R4G2 Kelowna Flightcraft - Canada, Kelowna, BC Tel: +1 250 807 5358 Email: rob_crawford@flightcraft.ca B727 1 JT8D-9/JT8D-17 CAE 6H Vital 4 4ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA-TC A 1995 Kenya Airways - Kenya, Nairobi Tel: +254 20 64 220 00 Email: contact@kenya-airways.com B737NG 1 CFM56 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2010 Kingfisher Airlines - India, Mumbai Tel: +91 22 2626 2200 Email: info@flykingfisher.com A320 2 CFM56 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2010 ATR 72 1 PW127 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2010 KLM - Netherlands, Schiphol Tel: +31 20 649 1894 Email: robert-van.saarloos@klm.com A330-200E 1 GE CF6 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2005 B737-400 1 CFM56 CAE 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1990 68

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

B737-800 1 CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1998 B737-800 1 CFM56 CAE 6E Tropos 6400 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2008 B747-400 1 GE CF6 CAE 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1991 B747-400 1 GE CF6 CAE 6H SP-X 500 4ch/6w 150 x40 EASA D 1988 B777-200ER 1 GE90-94 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2003 B777-300ER 1 GE90-115B Thales 6H EP-1000CT 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2008 MD11 1 GE CF6/PW 4060 CAE 6H MaxVue 2000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1993 Korean Air - South Korea, Cheju Tel: +82 32 886 8476 Email: kimsmo@koreanair.com Cheyenne 400 1 PT6A FSI 6H Vital 7 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1992 Citation II 1 JT15D FSI 4H SimView2004 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA A 1994 Korean Air - South Korea, Incheon Tel: +82 32 886 8476 Email: kimsmo@koreanair.com A300-600R 1 PW4158 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA D 1988 A330-200 1 PW4168 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1999 B737-900 1 CFM56-7B24 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2003 B747-400 1 PW4056 CAE 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1990 B747-400 1 PW4056 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1998 B777-200 1 PW4090 CAE 6H MaxVue Enh A+ 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1997 Citation CJ1 1 FJ44 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2010 Kuwait Airways - Kuwait, Kuwait City Tel: +965 2 434 5555 Email: kwittku@kuwaitairways.com A300/A310-300/600 1 CF6 CAE 6H SP-X 500 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1990 B747-200 1 JT9D-7 Link 6H NVS 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1980 Let’s Fly - Czech Republic, Ostrave Tel: +420 597 471 474 Email: letsfly@letsfly.cz L410 1 PT6 Letov Simulatory 6H PCIG 2ch/2w 075 x40 EASA A 1987 Libyan Airlines - Libya, Tripoli Tel: +218 21 602090 Email: a.elkedairi@ln.aero B727-200 1 JT8D-9 Thales R 6H SP2 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1980 Lion Air - Indonesia, Jakarta Email: gmltc@lionair.co.id MD82 1 PW JT8D-217A/219 Thales R 6H SP3-T 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA C 1990 Lufthansa Flight Training - Austria, Vienna Tel: +49 69 696 72444 Email: sales@lufthansa-flight-training.com A320-200 1 CFM56-5A1 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1991 A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2007 Dash8-Q400 1 PW150A CAE 6E Tropos 6400 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2008 Lufthansa Flight Training - Germany, Berlin Tel: +49 69 696 72444 Email: alexander.ziegler@lft.dlh.de A310-300 2 CF6-80C2 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1991 A320-200 2 CFM56-5A3/V2527-A5 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2002 A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2006 A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4/V2527-B4 CAE 6E Tropos 6400 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2008 B737-300 1 CFM56-3C1 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2001 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B Thales 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2005 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B Thales 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1997 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B26 Mechtronix 6E EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2007 B777-200LR 1 GE90-110B1L CAE 6E Tropos 6400 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2009 Lufthansa Flight Training - Germany, Bremen Tel: +49 69 696 72444 Email: alexander.ziegler@lft.dlh.de B737-300 1 CFM56-3B1/B2 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1990 Lufthansa Flight Training - Germany, Frankfurt Tel: +49 69 696 72444 Email: alexander.ziegler@lft.dlh.de A310-300/A300-600R 1 CF6-80C2A2/3/5 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1991 A319-100 1 CFM56-5A5 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2001 A320-200 1 CFM56-5A1/V2527-A5 Thales 6H EP-1000 3chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2004 A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4/V2527-A5 CAE 6E Tropos 6400 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2008 A321-100 1 V2530-A5 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1997 A330-300(Enhanced) 1 RR RB211 Trent 772B CAE 6H EP-1000 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2004 A340-300 1 CFM56-5C2 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1992 A340-300 1 CFM56-5C4 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2000 CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

69


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

A340-600 1 RB211 Trent 556-61 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2002 A380-800 1 RB211 Trent 970-84 Thales 6H EP-1000 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2010 B737-300 1 CFM56-3B1/B2 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1988 B737-300/400/500 1 CFM56-3B1/B2/C1 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1990 B747-200 1 CF6-50E2 Thales 6H SP2 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 1979 B747-400 1 CF6-80C2 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1988 B747-400 1 CF6-80C2 CAE 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1989 B747-400 1 CF6-80C2 Thales 6H EP-1000 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2004 B747-8 1 GE Genx-2B67 CAE 6E EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2010 B757-200/B767-300ER 1 PW2040/PW4060 Thales 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1990 B767-300ER 1 PW4060 Thales 6H EP-1000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2001 MD11/11F 1 CF6-80C2/PW4460/62 CAE 6H EP-1000 5chCC 210 x40 EASA D 2001 Lufthansa Flight Training - Germany, Munich Tel: +49 69 696 72444 Email: alexander.ziegler@lft.dlh.de A320-200 1 CFM56-5A1 CAE 6H EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1989 A330E 1 RB211-Trent 772B CAE 6E EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2009 A340-600 1 RB211-Trent 556-61 CAE 6E EP-1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2009 Lufthansa Flight Training - Switzerland, Zurich Tel: +49 69 696 72444 Email: sales@lufthansa-flight-training.com MD11 1 CF6-80C2/PW4460 CAE 6H Maxview A+ 5chCC 210 x40 EASA D 1990 Lufthansa Flight Training CST Berlin GmbH - Germany, Berlin Tel: +49 30 8875 5767 Email: rick.retzer@cstberlin.de CRJ 100/200 2 CF34-3A CAE 6H Tropos 6200 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1992 CRJ 200/900 2 CF34-3A/8C CAE 6H Tropos 6200 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1996 u/d 09 CRJ 700/900 2 CF34-8C CAE 6H Tropos 6200 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2000 u/d 06 Lufttransport - Norway, Oslo Tel: +46 7 760 8300 Email: post@lufttransport.no King Air 200 1 PT6A-42 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2010 Malaysia Airlines - Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur Tel: +603 78402663 Email: tanwf@mas.com.my B737NG 1 CFM56 CAE 6E EP-1000CT 3chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2010 Malaysia Airlines - Malaysia, Subang Tel: +603 78402663 Email: tanwf@mas.com.my A330-300 1 PW4168 Thales 6H Image IV 600 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1994 A380 1 RR Trent 900 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2008 B737-400 2 CFM56-3C1 Thales S 6H Image IV 600 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA C 1993/94 B747-400 1 PW 4056 RCC Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2005 B777-200 1 RR Trent FSI 6H Vital 8 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2000 F 50 1 PW125 ASDL 6H Image IV 600 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA C 1990 Malev Airlines - Hungary, Budapest Tel: +36 1 235 3646 Email: corporate-communications@malev.hu B737-NG 1 CFM56 Mechtronix 6E RSI Raster Flite 3chCC 180 x40 EASA C 2006 Merpati Airlines - Indonesia, Juanda Airport Tel: +62 31 8686510 Email: contact.mtc@merpati.co.id CN 235-10 1 CT7/CT9A ASDL 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1994 F27-500 1 RR Dart Thales R 4H SP1-T 2ch/2w 090 x40 NCAA B 1985 Mexicana Airlines - Mexico, Mexico City Tel: +52 5784 8453 Email: ruben.liverant@mexicana.com.mx A320 1 IAE V2527-A5/V2500-A1 Thales 6H ESIG 3000 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1999 B727-200 1 JT8D-17 Link 3H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA B 1971 B727-200 1 JT8D-17R CAE 6H Vital 4 5ch/6w 200 x40 FAA C 1981 Miami-Dade College - USA, FL, Miami Tel: +1 305 237 5044 Email: jpita@mdcc.edu B727-235 1 JT8D-7 Link 3H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 1967 NASA AMES Sim Labs - USA, CA, Silicon Valley B747-400 1 PW4000 CAE 6H Vital X 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1993 Olympic Aviation Flight Academy - Greece, Athens Hellinikon Tel: +30 2310 475823 Email: tcsecretariat@olav.gr B737-200 1 JT8D-9A CAE 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1982 Olympic Aviation Flight Academy - Greece, Crete, Chania Tel:+30 2310 475823 Email: tcsecretariat@olav.gr B737-400 1 CFM56-3C-1 Thales 6H Image 250 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1994 70

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


MODSIM World is a unique multi-disciplinary international conference for the exchange of modeling and simulation knowledge, research and technology across industry, government and academia.

October 13–15, 2010

Hampton Roads Convention Center This year, the conference focus is 21st Century Decision-Making: The Art of Modeling & Simulation. Speakers, educational tracks, presentations, and product demonstrations will center on using modeling and simulation tools and practices in decision-making in today’s challenging operating environments. Attendees will learn about new applications and practices

Serious Games & Virtual Worlds

K-20 STEM Education

The Human Dimension

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Health & Medicine

Engineering & Science

Defense

and have an opportunity to network with other industry professionals.

Register now at

www.M O D S I M W O R L D C O N F E R E N C E.com Stay connected.


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

Olympic Aviation Flight Academy - Greece, Thessaloniki Tel: +30 2310 475823 Email: tcsecretariat@olav.gr ATR 42/72 1 P120/P124B FSI 6H Vital 7 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1993 Oxford Aviation Academy - China, Hong Kong Tel: +46 8 797 4242 Email: anna.bengtsson@oaa.com A320 1 CFM/IAE Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2001 A320 1 CFM/IAE ThalesR u/d Opinicus 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC-HK D 1998 A330/A340 1 CFM/GE/RR Thales 6H EISG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC-HK D 2001 B737-700/800 1 CFM56 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC-HK D 2001 Oxford Aviation Academy - Denmark, Copenhagen Tel: +46 8 797 4242 Email: anna.bengtsson@oaa.com B737-700 1 CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1999 CRJ -200/900 1 GE CF34-3A1/3B1/8C5 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2010 MD80 1 PW JT8D-217C/219 Thales S 6H Image 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA D 1989 Oxford Aviation Academy - Latvia, Riga Tel: +46 8 797 4242 Email: anna.bengtsson@oaa.com B737-300 1 CFM56 CAE 6H Raster XT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1990 Oxford Aviation Academy - Norway, Oslo Tel: +46 8 797 4242 Email: anna.bengtsson@oaa.com B737-400/500 1 CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2002 B737-700/800 1 CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2000 Dash 8-100/300 1 PW121/123 CAE 6H MaxVue Enh B 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D&C 1996 Oxford Aviation Academy - Sweden, Stockholm Tel: +46 8 797 4242 Email: anna.bengtsson@oaa.com A320 1 CFM/IAE AAI u/d CAE 6H MaxVue+ 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2002 A330/A340 1 RR/GE/PW/CFM CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2001 B737-300/500 1 CFM56 Thales R 6H Raster XT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1992 B737-700 1 CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue Enh B 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1997 B767 1 PW4060 CAE 6H Image 4 5chCC 210 x40 EASA D 1989 Bell 212/412 2 PT6/PT6T CAE 6H MaxVue Enh B 5chCC+2chin 210 x60 EASA D 1998 Dash 8-Q400 1 PW150A CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2001 F 50 1 PW125B CAE 6H Image 4 3ch/6w 150 x40 EASA C 1990 F28 1 RR Spey-555-15P Thales S 3H SP1-T 4ch/6w 150 x40 EASA C 1978 Jetstream 31/32 1 TPE331-012UAR-701H CAE USA(R) 6H SPX 200HT 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA B 1990 MD80 1 PW JT8D-217C/219 ThalesS u/d CAE 6H Image 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA D 1989 Saab 2000 1 Allison GMA 2100A FSI 6H Raster XT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1995 Saab 340 1 340/CT7-9B GML/CAE 6H SP1-T 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 1984 Oxford Aviation Academy - UK, LGW Crawley Tel: +46 8 797 4242 Email: anna.bengtsson@oaa.com A320 1 CFM/IAE Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2001 A320 2 CFM/IAE Thales 6H Raster XT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1995/98 B737-300 1 CFM56 Thales R 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1987 B737-700/800 1 CFM56 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1999 B757/B767 1 GE/RR Thales R 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA C 1994 DC10-10/30 1 CF6 Thales R 6H SP-X 200HT 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 1981 EMB 170/190 1 CF34-8E CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2003 Oxford Aviation Academy - UK, LHR Tel: +46 8 797 4242 Email: anna.bengtsson@oaa.com A320 1 CFM/IAE Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1988 A330/A340 1 CFM/GE/RR Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2002 B737-300 1 CFM56 Thales R 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1991 Oxford Aviation Academy - UK, Manchester Tel: +44 (0)161 955 4058 Email: anna.bengtsson@oaa.com ATP 1 PW126/126A CAE USA(R) 6H SPX 200 3chCC 150 x40 EASA B 1991 B737-300 1 CFM56 Thales 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1992 B757/B767 1 GE/RR Thales R 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1996 BAE 146-200A/300A 1 ALF 502R-5 CAE USA(R) 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA B 1992 Oxford Aviation Academy - UK, Oxford Tel: +44 (0)1862 841 234 Email: anna.bengtsson@oaa.com B737-400 1 CFM56 Frasca 6E FVS200TX 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA B 2001 u/d 06 Pakistan International Airlines - Pakistan, Karachi Tel: +92 21 9044590 Email: m.khalid@piac.aero A310-300 1 CF6-C2A8 Thales R 6H SP1-T 4ch/5w 200 x40 NCAA C 1980 72

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

B747-200 1 RB211 Link 6H SP1-T 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1980 Pan Am International Flight Academy - USA, FL, Miami Tel: +1 877 394 2118 / +1 303 394 2118 Email: GDarrow@PanAmAcademy.com B707-321B 1 JT3D-3 Link 3H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1966 B727-200 1 JT8D-15 CAE 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1981 B737-200 1 JT8D-15 Thales R 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1980 B737-200 ADV 1 JT8D-15 Thales R 6H SP2 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1981 B737-300 1 CFM56-3B1 CAE USA 6H Raster NX1 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA/FAA C 1995 B737-400 1 CFM56-3B1 Thales R 6H Raster Flite 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 2008 B737-800W 1 CFM56-7B RColl 6E EP 1000CT 3ch/4w 200 x40 EASA/FAA D 2010 B747-200 1 CF6-50E2 Thales S u/d Opinicus 6H RASTER XT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1989 B747-200 1 CF6-50E2 Thales-S 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1980 B747-400 1 CF6-80C2 CAE 6H Tropos 6000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA/FAA C 1990 B747-400 1 CF6-80C2 CAE 6H Tropos 6000 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2009 B767-200 1 JT9D-7 CAE 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA/FAA C 1991 B767-200 1 JT9D-7/CF6-80A Thales R 6H SP-X 250 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1994 DC10-10 1 CF6-6 CAE 6H SP1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1982 DC9-30 1 JT8D-9 Link 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1983 MD82 1 JT8D-217 Thales R 6H SP-X 200 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1990 Pan Am International Flight Academy - USA, MN, MSP Tel: +1 877 394 2118 / +1 303 394 2118 Email: GDarrow@PanAmAcademy.com CRJ 200 1 CF34-3A1 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 CRJ 900 1 CF34-8C5 FSI 6E Vital 10 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 ERJ 175 1 CF34-8 FSI 6E Vital 10 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2009 Saab 340 A/B 1 CT7-9 FSI 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 EASA/FAA D 1990 Saab 340 B 1 CT7-9 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 Pan Am International Flight Academy - USA, NV, Las Vegas Tel: +1 877 394 2118 / +1 303 394 2118 Email: GDarrow@PanAmAcademy.com B737-200 1 JT8D-9 CAE 6H SP1T 5ch/6w 200 x40 FAA C 1985 MD82 1 JT8D-217 Thales S 6H SP-X 250 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1988 MD87/88 1 JT8D-217C/219 CAE 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1988 Pan Am International Flight Academy - USA, OH, Cincinnati Tel: +1 877 394 2118 / +1 303 394 2118 Email: GDarrow@PanAmAcademy.com A300-B4 1 CF6-50C2 Thales T 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1985 B727-200 1 JT8D-15 Link 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1993 DC8-71 1 CFM56-2 Link 3H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA B 1984 Pan Am International Flight Academy - USA, TN, Memphis Tel: +1 877 394 2118 / +1 303 394 2118 Email: GDarrow@PanAmAcademy.com B727-200 1 JT8D-15 Link 6H SP3-T 5ch/6w 200 x40 FAA D 1993 Caravan 1 PT6A-114 RColl 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 DC10-30 1 CF6-50 CAE 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2000 DC10-30 1 CF6-50 LMu/dOpinicus 6H ESIG3350 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1976 Pan Am International Flight Academy - USA, TBA Tel: +1 877 394 2118 / +1 303 394 2118 Email: GDarrow@PanAmAcademy.com B737-800W 1 CFM56-7B Sim-Industries 6E EP 1000CT 3ch/4w 200 x40 FAA D 2010 Philippine Airlines - Philippines, Pasay City Tel: +632 8540280/81 Email: edmon_quizon@pal.com.ph B737-300/400 1 CFM56-3B1 Thales 6H Image 4 500 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1993 Qantas - Australia, Melbourne Tel: +61 2 9691 7900 Email: flighttrainingsales@qantas.com.au A330-200 1 GE CF6-80E CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 210 x40 CASA D 2008 B737-300 1 CFM56-3B-2 CAE 6H SP3-T 3ch/4w 150 x40 CASA D 1986 B737-400 1 CFM56-3C-1 CAE 6H Vital 7 3ch/4w 150 x40 CASA D 1989 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2008 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 200 x40 CASA D 2002 Qantas - Australia, Sydney Tel: +61 2 9691 7900 Email: flighttrainingsales@qantas.com.au A330-200 1 GE CF6-80C Thales 6H EP1000 3chCC 200 x40 CASA D 2008 A380-800 1 RR Trent 972 CAE 6H EP1000 3chCC 200 x40 CASA D 2007 B747-400 1 RR RB211 CAE 6H EP1000 3chCC 200 x40 CASA D 1991 B747-400 2 RR RB211 Thales 6H EP1000 3chCC 200 x40 CASA D 1989 B767-300ER 1 GE CF6 Thales 6H EP1000 3chCC 200 x40 CASA D 2003 B767-300ER 1 GE CF6 Thales 6H Image 4-600 5ch/6w 200 x40 CASA D 1990 CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

73


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

B787 1 GEnX CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 200 x40 CASA D 2010 Dash 8 Q300/100 1 PW 123E/PW 120A FSI 6E EP1000 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2009 Dash 8 Q400 1 PW 150A FSI 6E EP1000 3chCC 180 x40 CASA D 2008 Qatar Airways - Qatar, Doha Tel: +974 449 6000 Email: infodesk@qatarairways.com A320 1 CFM56/V2500 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 A330/A340 1 CFM56-5C Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 B777 1 GE 90 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 Royal Air Maroc - Morocco, Casablanca Tel: +212 22 912820 Email: abelhouari@royalairmaroc.com B727-200 1 JT8D-9 CAE 6H Vital 3 2ch/2w 60 x40 EASA B 1980 B727NG 1 CFM26/24 FSI 6H EP1000 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 2005 B737-400/500 1 CFM56 CAE 6H Vital 7 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1993 Royal Brunei Airlines - Brunei, Seri Begawan Tel: +673 2 339236 Email: efjeffra@rba.com.bn B757-200ER/B767-300ER 1 RB211-535E4/PW4056 Thales 6H EP1000 CT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA C 1997 Rudradev Aviation - India, Chennai A320 1 CFM56 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 B737NG 1 CFM56-7B26 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 RWL German Flight Academy - Germany, Monchengladbach Tel: +49 2161 689054 Email: w.plesch@rwl-flight.de B737-300/400 1 CFM56 CAE 6H Vital 7 3chCC 150 x40 EASA C 1990 B737-800 1 CFM56 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1998 Ryanair - UK, East Midlands Airport Tel: +44 (0)1332 815 964 Email: keilt@ryanair.com B737-800 1 CFM56-7B27 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2001 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B27 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2004 B737-800W 1 CFM56-7B26/27 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 5chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2007 Ryanair - UK, Stansted Airport Tel: +44 (0)1332 815 964 Email: keilt@ryanair.com B737-800W 1 CFM56-7B26 CAE 6E Tropos 6200 3chCC 180 x40 EASA B 2008 S7 Aviation Training Centre - Russia, Moscow Tel: +7 495 651 0665 Email: training@s7.ru A320-200 1 CFM56-5B4 Thales 6E EP-1000CP 5chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2009 Sabenavita Training Centre - Lithuania, Vilnius Tel: +370 687 49935 Email: d.gintautas@sabenavita.lt B737-500 1 CFM56-3C1 Thales R 6H SPX-500 T 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 1991 B737-800W YK131 1 CFM 56-7B26 Sim-Industries 6E EP 1000 CT 3chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2010 Saudi Arabian Airlines - Saudi Arabia, Jeddah Tel: +966 26864163 Email: mdeeb@saudiairlines.com A300-600R 1 JT9D Thales S 6H SP3T 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA A 1985 A320-200 2 CFM 56-5B4 CAE 6E EP-1000CT 5chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2009 B737-200 1 JT8D-17A Thales R 4H Novoview 6000 2ch/2w 80 x40 NCAA A 1977 B747-100 1 RR RB211 Thales S 6H SP1 3ch/4w 090 x40 NCAA A 1983 B747-300 1 RB211 524-D4-4DX Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA C 1983 B747-400 1 GE CF6-80C2 B5F Thales 6H ESIG 3800 5chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2005 B777-200 1 GE 90 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 5chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2000 EMB 170 1 CF34-8E CAE 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2006 MD90-30 2 V2500 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 5chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2000/01 Senasa - Spain, Madrid Tel: +34 91 329 1032 Email: planning@senasa.es A340-300 1 CFM56-5C4 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1999 B757-200 1 RR RB211-535E4 FSI 6H Vital 7 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA D 1993 Citation III/VII 1 TFE-731 FSI 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 EASA C 1993 Shanghai Airlines - China, Shanghai Tel: +86 21 6255 8888 Email: chenggw@shanghai-air.com B737-800 2 CFM56-7B26 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2006 Shanghai Eastern Flight Training Centre - China, Shanghai Tel: +86 21 50 480 099 Email: shiyonghong@ceaftc.com A300-600R 1 CF6-80/PW4185 Thales 6H Tropos R300 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 1998 A320 2 CFM56-5B4/IAE 2527-A5 CAE 6H Tropos R200 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2003 A320 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE 2527-A5 CAE 6H Tropos R300 5chCC 200 x40 CAAC D 2006 74

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


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Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

A320 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE 2527-A5 CAE 6H Tropos R6400 5chCC 200 x40 CAAC D 2007 A320 Family 1 CFM/IAE CAE 6E Tropos 6000 5chCC 225 x40 CAAC D 2010 A330 1 CFM/IAE CAE 6E Tropos 6000 5chCC 225 x40 CAAC D 2010 A330-200/A340-600 1 RR Trent 556&773B/PW 4168A CAE 6H Tropos R300 5chCC 200 x40 CAAC D 2006 B737 1 CFM56-7B24/7B26/7B27 CAE 6H Tropos R200 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2004 Shenzhen Airlines - China, Shenzhen Email: wm@shenzhenair.com A320 2 CFM56-5B4/IAE 2527-A5 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2008 B737NG 4 CFM56 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2006/08 Sichuan Airlines - China, Chengdu Tel: +86 28 88 888 888 A320 2 CFM56-5B4/IAE 2527-A5 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2008 Sim AeroTraining - South Africa, Kempton Park Tel: +33 299 827 237 Email: info@sim-aerotraining.com Beech 1900D 1 PW PT6A-67D FSI 6H Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2004 1 FSI 6H Dash 8 100/300 PW 123E Vital 9 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 2004 SimCom Training Centre - UK, Grimsby Tel: +1 407 275 1050 / 800 272 0211 Email: rcsuy@simulator.com 1 Jetstream 41 TPE331-146 CAE USA 6H SP-X 200 3chCC 180 x40 EASA B 1995 SimCom Training Centre - USA, AZ, Phoenix Tel: +1 407 275 1050 / 800 272 0211 Email: rcsuy@simulator.com Citation II 1 PW JT15D-4 SimCom/PAIFA 6E Rasterflite 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2001 1 FSI 6H King Air 90 PW PT6A-21 RasterXT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1991 SimCom Training Centre - USA, FL, Orlando Tel: +1 407 275 1050 / 800 272 0211 Email: rcsuy@simulator.com 1 SimCom Beech 400A PW JT15D-5 6H Rasterflite 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2007 1 CAE/RColl Citation II PW JT15D-4 6H Vital IV 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2000 1 SimCom PW JT15D-5D 6E Rasterflite 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 2008 Citation Ultra 1 SimCom CitationJet 525 Williams FJ44-1A 6H Raster NX1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2007 Do328Jet 1 PW306B CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001 EA500 2 PW610F Opinicus 6E EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 1 Falcon 20 GE CF700-2D-2/TFE 731-5BR-2C Link 6H CATi X-100 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1985 HS125-800 1 Garrett TFE 731-5BR-1H SimCom/ASE/PAIFA 6H Raster NX1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 2002 Jetstream 41 1 TPE331-146GR/HR CAE USA 6H SP-X 500HT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1995 Learjet 35 1 Garrett TFE 731-2 ASE/PAIFA 6H Raster NX1 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1999 Westwind I/II 1 TFE 731-3-1G Link 6H CATi X-100 3chCC 180 x40 FAA C 1984 Simtec Simulation - Germany, Braunschweig Tel: +49 531 215 390 Email: i.fellmann@simtec.de Do228-200 1 Garrett TPE331 Simtec 6H Raster NX2 2ch/2w 60 x40 EASA A 1992 Singapore Airlines/CAE - Singapore Tel: +65 6546 8320 Email: a320cae@singnet.com.sg 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 A320 1 CFM56 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 Singapore Airlines - Singapore Tel: +65 65403614 Email: huikwan_low@singaporeair.com.sg A330-200 1 Trent 772 CAE 6H Tropos 6000 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA C 1998 u/d 08 CAE 6H A340-600 1 Trent 556 Tropos 6000 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1996/08 A380 1 RR Trent 970 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2007 B747 1 PW4056 Thales 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA C 1993 B747 1 PW4056/CF-80C2 CAE 6H MD Vital 7 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA C 1992 B777 1 RR892 Thales 6H EP1000CT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2003 B777 1 Trent 892 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 2001 B777200ER 1 Trent 892 CAE 6H Tropos 6000 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA C 1997/09 B777300ER 1 GE90-115BL CAE 6H Tropos 6000 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA C 1997/08 Skymark Airlines - Japan, Tokyo Tel: +81 3 50-3116-7370 B737NG 1 CFM56 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 JCAB D 2010 Sofia Flight Training - Bulgaria, Sofia Tel: +359 2 945 90 56 Email: office@sofiaflighttraining.com CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2010 A320 1 CFM 56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5 MD82/83 1 JT8D-217/219 Link 6H Image 2T 5ch/6w 200 x40 EASA C 1988 South African Airways - South Africa, Johannesburg Tel: +27 11 978 3308/9 Email: KimViljoen@flysaa.com A320-200 1 IAE V2500/CFM56 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA SA/UK D 2004 76

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

A340-600 1 RR Trent 556 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA SA/UK D 2002 B737-200 1 JT8D-17A Thales 6H SP2 3ch/4w 150 x40 NCAA C 1982 B737-700/800 1 CFM56-7 FSI 6H ChromaView 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA SA/UK C 2000 Southwest Airlines - USA TX, Dallas Tel: +1 214 792 1404 Email: Joe.Marott@wnco.com B737-300 1 CFM56-3 CAE USA 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1994 B737-300 2 CFM56-3 Thales R 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1996/97 B737-700 1 CFM56-7 CAE 6H RCEP 1000 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2009 B737-700 1 CFM56-7 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2009 B737-700 3 CFM56-7 CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2009 Sukhoi - Russia, Moscow Email: info@scac.ru Superjet 3 SaM146 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2008 SwissAviation Training - Germany, Munich Tel: +41 79 820 1162 Email: christian.walgenbach@swiss-aviation-training.com EMB 190 1 GE CF34 10E CAE 6H Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2009 SwissAviation Training - Switzerland, Zurich Tel: +41 79 820 11 62 Email: ron.teichmann@swiss-aviation-training.com A321-100 2 CFM56 Thales 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1994 A330/A340 2 PW/GE/RR/CFM CAE 6H MaxVue B 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1998/00 EMB 170 1 GE CF34 8E CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2003 ERJ 145 1 RR AE 3007 A1 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2005 MD11 1 PW/GE CAE 6H MaxVue B 5chCC 210 x40 EASA D 1990 MD83 1 PW JT8D-219 CAE 6H Hitachi HiVis IV 5chCC 210 x40 EASA C 1991 Taca Airlines - El Salvador, Las Flores Email: aeportillo@taca.com A320-200 1 IAE V2527-A5 Mechtronix 6E RasterXT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA/AAC D 2010 TAP Portugal - Portugal, Lisbon Tel: +351 21 841 5886 Email: scruz@tap.pt A320 1 CFM56/V2500 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1998 Thai Airways - Thailand, Bangkok Tel: +66 2 545 3624 Email: public.info@thaiairways.com A300-600R 1 PW4158 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 1987 A330-300 1 PW4168 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 1998 A340-600 1 RR Trent 556-61 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 200 x40 NCAA D 2006 B737-400 1 GE CFM56-3C Thales 6H SP-X 550HT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1992 B747-400 1 GE CF6-80C-B1F Thales 6H SP-X 550HT 3chCC 150 x40 NCAA D 1992 B777-200/300 1 RR Trent 875/892 Thales 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 NCAA D 1998 Transport Canada - Canada, Ottawa Tel: +1 613 998 3527 Email: michael.sharon@tc.gc.ca Citation II (550) 1 JT15D CAE 6H Tropos 3ch/3w 180 x40 NCAA-TC D 1993 King-Air C90A 1 PT6-21 Opinicus 6H Redifun 3ch/3w 180 x40 NCAA-TC C 2010 Turkish Airlines - Turkey, Istanbul Tel: +90 212 426 45 49 / +90 212 426 61 67 Email: turkish.ftc@thy.com A320 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE V2527-A5 Thales 6H EP-1000CT 3chCC 200 x40 EASA D 2007 B737-400 1 CFM56-3C-1 Thales 6H Image 4 600PT 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1995 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B CAE 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 2000 RJ-100 1 LF507-1F CAE USA 6H ESIG 3350GT 3chCC 180 x40 EASA D 1997 United Airlines - USA, CO, Denver Tel: +1 303 780 3600 Email: flight.training@unitedsvcs.com A320-232 1 V2527-A5 Thales T 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1994 A320-232 1 V2527-A5 Thales T 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1997 A320-232 2 V2527-A5/CFM56 Thales T 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1998/99 A320-232 1 V2527 Thales 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2002 B737-222 1 JT8D-7B Conductron 6H CGI 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1968 B737-291 1 JT8D-17 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1987 B737-322 2 GE CFM56-3B1 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1989/90 B737-322 2 GE CFM56-3B2 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1987/88 B747-238 1 JT9D-7J Thales R 6H SP-X 250 3chCC 150 x40 FAA C 1992 B747-422 2 PW 4056 CAE 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1989/93 B747-422 2 PW4056/CF6-80/RB211-524 CAE 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1998 B757-222 2 PW2037 CAE 6H SP-X 500 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1991/92 B757-222 1 PW2037/RB211-535E4 CAE 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1997 CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010

77


Civil Full Flight Simulator Census

Aircraft Type

Sims Engines On Line

Simulator Manufacturer

Motion Axes

Image Generator

Display System

Approval Level

Initial Service Date

B767-222 1 JT9D-7R-4D CAE 6H SP-1T 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1982 B767-300ER 1 PW4060 CAE 6H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1981 B767-322ER 1 PW4060 CAE 6H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1981 B777 A/IGW 2 PW4077/PW4090/GE90-76B/ Thales T 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1994/97 GE90-90B/RR Trent 889 B777-200 IGW 1 PW4077/PW4090/GE90-76B/ Thales T 6H ESIG 3350 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1997 GE90-90B/RR Trent 889 University of Alaska - USA, AK, Anchorage Tel: +1 907 786 7200 Email: ansmh@uaa.alaska.edu Caravan 208B 1 PT6 Frasca 6E Saturn 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA B 2002 UPS (United Parcel Service) - USA, AK, Anchorage Tel: +1 502 359 1010 Email: bvenice@ups.com B747-400F 1 CF6-80C2 CAE 6H EP1000GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2007 MD11F 1 PW4460 CAE 6H EP1000GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2008 UPS (United Parcel Service) - USA, KY, Louisville Tel: +1 502 359 1010 Email: bvenice@ups.com A300-600F 1 PWa4158 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2000 B757-200 1 PW2040 Thales R 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1990 B757-200 1 RR RB211 Thales R 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 1995 B767-300ER 1 CF6-80C2 Thales 6H EP1000GT 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2009 MD11F 1 PW4460 CAE 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2002 US Airways - West Flight Training Center - USA, AZ, Phoenix Tel: +1 704 359 2770 Email: cassandra_ramos@usairways.com A320 2 V2500 Thales 6H ESIG 3800GT 3chCC 150 x40 FAA D 2002 B757-200 1 RR RB211 CAE 6H SPX-200 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1990 US Airways - USA, AZ, Phoenix Tel: +1 704 359 2770 Email: cassandra_ramos@usairways.com A320-214/232 1 CFM56/IAEV2527 CAE 6H Tropos 6000 4chCC 210 x40 FAA D 2008 US Airways - USA, NC, Charlotte Tel: +1 704 359 2770 Email: cassandra_ramos@usairways.com A320-200 2 CFM56 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 1999 A320-214/232 1 CFM56/IAEV2527 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 4chCC 210 x40 FAA D 2008 A330-243 1 RR Trent 772B-60 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 4chCC 210 x40 FAA D 1999 u/d 09 B737-300 2 CFM56 CAE 6H Image IIT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1988 B757-200 1 RB211 CAE 6H Vital 4 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1992 CRJ 200 1 CF34 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2004 Dash 8-100 1 PW120 CAE 6H Image IIT 3ch/4w 150 x40 FAA C 1992 ERJ 190 1 CF34 CAE 6H Tropos R200 4ch/5w 150 x40 FAA C 2004 USA Jet Airlines - USA, MI, Belleville Tel: +1 800 577 5484 Email: paxcharters@usajet.aero DC9-30 1 JT8D-7 Thales R 3H SP1 2ch/2w 60 x40 FAA A 1969 WestJet Airlines - Canada, Calgary Tel: +1 403 444 6244 Email: pkiely@westjet.com B737-700NG 1 CFM56 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 200 x40 NCAA-TC D 2006 B737-700NG 2 CFM56 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 FAA D 2001/03 Zentrum fur Flugsimulation Berlin - Germany, Berlin Tel: +49 30 315 9040 Email: info@zfb-berlin.de A330/A340 1 CFM56/C46 CAE 6H SP-X 550 3chCC 150 x40 EASA D 1993 Zhuhai Xiang Yi Aviation Technology Co. Ltd. - China, Zhuhai Tel: +86 756 3213580 Email: market@zhftc.com A320 2 CFM56-5B4/IAE 2527-A5 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2005/07 A320 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE 500-A1 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 1999 A320 1 IAE V2527-A5 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2004 A320 1 CFM56-5B4/IAE 2527-A5 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2009 A320 1 IAE 2527-A5 CAE 6E Tropos 6000 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2009 A330 1 RR Trent 772B/PW4168A CAE 6H Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 CAAC D 2007 B737-300 1 CFM56-3B2 CAE 6H Image 4 3chCC 150 x40 CAAC C 1991 B737-300 1 CFM56-3B2 CAE 6H MaxVue 2000 3chCC 150 x40 CAAC C 1994 B737-800 2 CFM56-7B24/26/27 CAE 6H Tropos 5chCC 200 x40 CAAC D 2006/07 B737-800 1 CFM56-7B26 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 180 x40 CAAC D 2002 B757-200 1 RB211-535E4 CAE 6H MaxVue+ 3chCC 150 x40 CAAC C 1991 B777-200 1 GE90-76B&90B/PW4070 CAE 6H MaxVue A+ 3chCC 150 x40 CAAC C 1995 EMB 145 1 AE3007A1 CAE 6H Tropos 3chCC 150 x40 CAAC D 2005 78

CAT MAGAZINE • ISSUE 4/2010


The World’s BIGGesT NeTWorKING oPPorTUNITY For AvIATIoN TrAINING ProFessIoNAls

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19-21 APrIl 2011 orlANdo, FlorIdA

The World AvIATIoN TrAINING CoNFereNCe & TrAdeshoW 19-21 APrIl 2011 • roseN shINGle CreeK resorT • orlANdo, FlorIdA

wats@halldale.com w. www.halldale.com/wats t. [Us] 407 322 5605 t. [roW] +44 (0)1252 532000 e.


Innovative: CAE simulation for the 787 It’s true … CAE customers Air New Zealand, Continental Airlines, Japan Airlines, and Qantas have ordered more than 30 simulation devices for their Boeing 787 Dreamliner training programs. To date, every airline that has conducted a Boeing 787 simulator competition has chosen CAE. Our suite of training solutions includes the CAE Series 7000 full-flight simulator, Level 4 and 5 CAE SimfinityTM flight training devices, and CAE SimfinityTM desktop virtual simulators / virtual maintenance trainers. Whatever aircraft you fly, CAE offers the most comprehensive and innovative portfolio of simulation equipment and training services available from one trusted source – with the flexibility to tailor solutions to your unique training needs. Have a conversation with CAE at APATS Kuala Lumpur, September 14-15

AC132

conversation@cae.com

cae.com/simulationproducts

one step ahead


CAT Magazine - Issue 4/2010