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On the prowl A look into the real GJPD p. 10

Grand Junction High School

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1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, Colo. 81501

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Volume 91 • Issue 6

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March 2009


INDEX The Orange & Black is... Spotlight 9 Dejan Jestrovich Now 9 Jenna Hansen • Stephani Soto Connection 9 Jessa Dearth • Chelsea Tomasi

FEATURES See how students at GJHS spent their spring breaks in Tiger Tracks • p. 32

InSight 9 Nic Murdock • Lesley Wharton Scene 9 Kayden Horwitz • Kirstin Maska Open to Interpretation 9 Bekah Gallegos • Dylan Proietti In Motion 9 Emily Dohm • Brionne Griffin Photography Editor 9 Shreya Pokharel Graphics Editor 9 Nick Powell Advertising Manager 9 Jenny Jessup

Scene takes you step-by-step in preparing your own perfect steak • p. 19

Advertising Assistants 9 Jessica Gillis • Samantha Weinberg

Web Assistants 9 Zachary Bryner Jon White

Video 9 Kevin Reed • Austin Ross Adviser 9 Rick Jussel

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ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

april fool’s day

22 ACT

Graphic Artists 9 Garrett Brown • Greg Coleman Kyle Rogers

Photographers 9 Kristin Balbier • Alyssa Behrens Cody Blankenship • Hannah Cook Noelle De Puey • Richard Gonzales Amy Nelms • Natalie Pipe

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16 parent/teacher conferences

Webmaster 9 Tom Nelson

Reporters 9 Jillian Arja • McKenzie Binder Moriah Black • Sarah Bolton Kaitlin Cain • Cody Holman Zack Kelley • Katie Langford Eric List • McKenna Moe Grayson O’Roark • Emilie Pearson Kurt Peterson • Margeaux Prinster Baylee Ragar

april

In Motion explores new sports for the spring • p. 30

Police take action against drinking and driving-related fatalities in Now • p. 7 Policy The Orange and Black, a legally recognized public forum for student expression, is published six to nine times a year by the Newspaper Class for students of Grand Junction High School. Expression made by students in the exercise of the freedom of speech or freedom of press is not an expression of District 51 school board policy. The views expressed in The Orange and Black do not necessarily represent the views of the entire staff, adviser, GJHS administration or the School District 51 administration. Board policy regarding student publications (JICE, JICE-R) is available in the journalism room (Rooms 130-131) or in the principal’s office.

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They will be edited for space and legal considerations, but not for inaccuracies, grammar or spelling. Letters must contain information pertinent to the students of GJHS. The staff retains the right to not publish any letter not meeting these requirements. Unsigned letters will not be published. Please submit typed letters in person to Room 130 or via mail or email. Contact The Orange and Black, Grand Junction High School, 1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, CO 81501. Phone: 970-254-6929. FAX: 970-254-6973. Web site: GJHSNEWS.com. Adviser e-mail: rjussel@mesa.k12.co.us.

Letters to the Editor The Orange and Black welcomes and encourages letters to Cost the editors. This is a chance to express your viewpoint on Single copies free. Where available, additional copies of important issues. Letters should be limited to 250 words. this paper are available for purchase for 50 cents each.

Contact The Orange and Black for more information. Taking more than one copy of this paper with the intent to prevent other individuals from reading this edition of the paper is prohibited (C.R.S. 18-4-419). Violators, subject to prosecution and penalty under C.R.S. 13-21-123, will be prosecuted. Some material courtesy of American Society of Newspaper Editors/MCT Campus High School Newspaper Service. © 2009 The Orange and Black Grand Junction High School. All rights reserved. Cover photo by Chelsea Tomasi


Maladroit

SPOTLIGHT

Guantanamo Bay Closed Cody Holman After much deliberation, newly elected president Barack Obama has shut down the Guantanamo Bay prison camp. Many people are viewing this action with pessimistic eyes, wondering what will become of the current inhabitants of the prison camp, and how will they feel about their change in life style. For example, Adel Hakimjan was disappointed when news reached him of the closing of his home for the four years. “Life’s not so bad here if you know how to please the guards,” Hakimjan said. Hakimjan fears that upon his release from Guantanamo Bay he will be shipped back to China where he may actually be prosecuted for his accused crime of plotting against his homeland. The current proposal is to initiate a raffle to decide the outcome of the 200 plus prisoners currently at Guantanamo Bay. In the early stages of the bill it has been estimated that every country would receive at least one prisoner and will be required to keep and care for this prisoner for one year, when the raffle will be re-initiated. Many are left wondering what will become of the old facilities at Guantanamo Bay. The answer is the newest form of luxury vacationing. Guest to the Bay of Pigs Resort, Spa and Casino will be treated to the finest conditions in the newly remodeled prisoner camp. Activities such as day trips into the hostile Cuban environment, water skiing in the Bay of Pigs and a 24-hour casino only add to the already alarmingly exotic atmosphere that surrounds Guantanamo Bay. The spacious cells, breathtaking views and top of the line service will create a vacationing atmosphere one cannot escape.

-I embarrassed him like a bulldog on a porkchop

-If I had twins I would name them Cheeto, Frito, and Dorito.

-Come here and let me put you in my pleather.

-Yeah, because pollen is flammable.

-That’s not porn that’s punishment.

-Did you just break up with my dog?

-It tastes like flaming raisins and it burns like raisins on fire. -Is that a wizard? It’s the pope, you moron! -You don’t have to hold on I’m just moving my pants bye. -Armpits are the best! -It’s pretty hard to sleep when you are getting attacked by a fan in a gerbil cage. -Yes I did! Just look in your pants. -I’m only down to one gypst clicker! FEBRUARY 2009

-Wherefor art thou, Romeo? Taste my .9!

Watch Your Mouth

-I can’t show you my new car, it would probably blow your mind. It just might put you in a coma. -You guys, I have the best idea. I’ll be British. -Smarties are vegetable food. -That was awful. I don’t like squeezing baby ducks. -If that was in my house I would turn into the devil too. ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

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NEWS

News by the numbers

Six important international, national and local news stories

The number of foot soldiers working for two of Mexico’s deadliest drug cartels that have been wreaking havoc across the country and threatening U.S. border states.

100,000 g

Pardoned Bishop denies Holocaust

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The number of dead as a result of a power struggle in Madagascar in which President Mark Ravalomana is opposed by civilian Andry Rajoelina, who now has the support of the military and many of the poor.

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On Jan. 21, Bishop Richard Williamson denied the occurrence of death by gassing during the Holocaust. Pope Benedict XVI lifted his excommunication the same day. “I think that 200,000 to 300,000 Jews perished in Nazi concentration camps, but none of them by gas chamber,” Williamson said. Williamson, in an interview in January, claimed that the Holocaust was reported as worse than it actually was. He based his stance on evidence such as the Leuchter report, a report against the likelihood of mass gassing as genocide during World War II. “I believe the historical evidence … is strongly—is hugely—against 6 million Jews having been deliberately gassed in gas chambers as a deliberate policy of Adolf Hitler,” he said. “I believe there were no gas chambers.” Williamson was excommunicated for 20 years after Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre unlawfully consecrated him as a bishop. The Catholic Church has laws stating that bishops cannot be consecrated without permission from the papacy. The Pope claimed he had no knowledge of Williamson’s views when he lifted the excommunication. The excommunication was raised because the bishop had readily agreed to the Catholic Church’s doctrines and authority of the Pope. The Vatican has been criticized for allowing Williamson back into the Church and has demanded he recant his views about the Holocaust, calling them “absolutely unacceptable.” The Pope said that Williamson was allowed back into the Church to heal a rift with traditionalists, not to endorse his views about the Holocaust. However, Williamson has not rescinded his opinions. He also claimed that the U.S. planned the 9/11 attacks. His remarks have stirred up huge protests and controversy worldwide, especially among the Jewish community. Jewish leaders have demonstrated their outrage, claiming the decision would “cast a shadow on relations with Jews” and the Catholic Church. While the world voices its outrage against Williamson, he stands by his views. “There was not one Jew killed by the gas chambers. It was all lies, lies, lies,” he said.

Sources: news.bbc.co.uk, wikipedia.org

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Leila Fadel/MCT

Eric List

The percentage of Iraqis who said their life is very good in a poll taken in February, an increase of 8 percent from 2004. Of the 2,228 Iraqis interviewed, 16 percent said that life is very bad.

$49,000 g

The average cost of medical care for a premature or low birthweight baby for its first year of life, according to a new report from the March of Dimes Foundation.

g

The number of motors in HRP-4C, a female humanoid robot unveiled by Japanese scientists in Tokyo that can walk, move its arms and make different expressions. The robot costs $400,000.

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The percentage drop in preorders of Girl Scout cookies because of nationwide economic struggles. Sources: Marchofdimes.com, bbc.com, nbc.com, FOXNews.com

The Low Down: Pennies for Patients Pennies for Patients is led by The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s School and Youth Program in schools grades K-12 to raise money for blood cancer. Leukemia is the leading cause of death for children with cancer, and every year 52,320 individuals will die from it. Grand Junction High School is participating, and students can contribute their change (or dollars) by finding any teacher with a box. ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

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NOW

State forces school Emilie Pearson

B

ecause of statewide budget cuts and economic struggles, Mesa County School District 51 must cut more than $5 million from its budget and is considering changing bus routes, moving to four-day weeks, and cutting the number of teacher workdays. The economy has played a significant role in the cuts, which increased from $2.3 million in February to $5 million in March. “The state situation continues to get worse,” Melissa Callahan de Vita, executive director of district support services, said to The Daily Sentinel. “As the state goes, so do we.” Jeff Kirtland, the district’s director of communications, said that District 51 is financially stable and will not feel the cuts as severely as other districts in the state.

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District officials have said that they have not discussed the possibility of layoffs, but the budget cut has triggered mixed reactions from faculty members. “It is unfortunate that the community does not support schools as much as I wish they would,” Kari Allerton, faculty member, said. “Cuts like these can have both positive and negative effects.” “The budget cuts give the public the oppor“Our district tunity to work together and support each other has been pro- through this economic struggle,” she said. Even with the negative aspects of the budget active with cuts, students and teachers agree that there are saving mon- positive factors as well. ey, (and) we “I like the idea of a four-day week, but that are doing bet- also may increase the class sizes, and that could ter than other devastate the education process,” said Jerry Unverferth, social studies teacher. schools.” Students said they would not mind the changes either. “Three-day weekends would be the best part,” junior Elijah Pittsinger said. District 51 is expecting $7 million from the federal stimulus package, but that money is restricted to special education and Title 1 schools, which have high percentages of students from lower socionomic statuses. The district has had enough time to talk to the community and ask where they feel the schools can cut money with minimal controversy, while other Colorado school districts had to make the cuts immedi-

ately. Currently, District 51 functions with less money than most other districts in the state and has learned to save as much as possible. The district is using alternative energy, has a reserve of money in savings, and has saved money originally budgeted for gas because of the recent drop in prices. “Our district has been proactive with saving money,” Leah Gonyeau, assistant principle said. “We are doing better than other schools.” The size and location of a school greatly impacts the amount that will be cut from its budget. While smaller districts won’t be facing many cuts, Jefferson County, with 85,000 students and more than 4,000 teachers, had to slash $7 million from its budget. Other metro-area schools are facing similar proposed cuts. District 51 will not decide on final budget cuts until May, and by June, it must have its 2009-10 budgets ready for adoption.

Where’s the dollar worth more?

Ethiopia

Bahamas

Jillian Arja

The United States’ economy is spiraling downward, causing Americans to look for ways to save money. Take a look at how the U.S. dollar compares to currency around the world—some economies are struggling and others are not doing so bad.

=1.02 Bahamian dollars = == = = 11.34 Ethopian birr = == =

Austrailia

Brazil

2.44 Brazilian real

= = = = =1.57 Australian dollars = == = =Graphics by Kyle Rogers

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The Bahamas’ economy is driven by tourism and financial services. With few domestic resources and little industry, The Bahamas imports nearly all its food and manufactured goods from the United States. Its economy, due to its heavy dependence on U.S. tourism and trade, is deeply affected by U.S. economic performance. The current Ethiopian government has embarked on a cautious program of economic reform, including privatization of state enterprises and rationalization of government regulation. The Ethiopian economy is based on agriculture, which con tributes 46 percent to GNP (Gross National Product), accounts for more than 80 percent of exports and employs 85 percent of the population. The Brazilian economy will need to stay consistent for the Brazilian real’s value to beat the American dollar. President Luiz Lula da Silva and his economic team have implemented practical financial and monetary policies and have pursued necessary microeconomic reforms. Brazil’s economy, aided by a compassionate international environment, grew 2.8 percent in 2006 and 4.5 percent in 2007. The Australian economy is booming and operating at close to capacity with an unemployment rate at a 32-year low of 4.3 percent. Both the federal and state governments have recognized the need to invest heavily in water, transport, ports, telecommunications and education infrastructure to expand Australia’s supply capacity.


NEWS “The carnage from drinking and driving continues to mount ... This death toll must stop.” – Bill Gardner, Grand Junction Police Chief

drinking and driving have

FATAL CONSEQUENCES

Four fatal drunk driving accidents that occurred over a period of only three weeks filled the month of February with tragedy and heightened awareness about driving under the influence. The victims of the crashes, including two teens, two young adults and a six-month-old baby, are reminders of the tragic repercussions that result from drunk driving. On Feb. 8, Samantha Loy, 18, died in a one-vehicle crash on Interstate 70 after leaving a party where she had been drinking. Her blood alcohol content was twice the legal limit and is believed to have been the cause of the crash. The next crash claimed the life of John Fullmer IV, 23, who was killed when his car accidents linked to friend Jesse Reed, 21, drove alcohol in February into a light pole on U.S. Highway 6&50 on Feb. 15. deaths because of these Reed admitted to drinking accidents five shots of alcohol and six beers before the accident. MIPs given out Feb. 27 Diana Luttrall, 16, died of 100 students surveyed in a one-vehicle rollover accident on Feb. 26. The said they had driven vehicle was driven by Steunder the influence of phen Ludwig, 22. Colorado alcohol or drugs. State Patrol said alcohol and excessive speed contributed to the accident. The last crash occurred on Feb. 28 on the corner of Fifth Street and North Avenue and resulted in the death of a 20-yearold Shandi Boetel and her six-month-old baby, Natalia Casiano, when they were struck by a speeding vehicle. The driver, Derrick Maxfield, 20, was cited for driving under the influence of alcohol and was traveling at over 70 mph when he struck their vehicle. The community and families involved in the accidents are taking these occurrences seriously, and action is being taken to raise awareness about the consequences of drunk driving. “It’s a tragedy. I think it’s sad that people choose to drink and drive, but they are obviously learning the hard way based on the aftermath of just the last couple weeks,” GJHS freshman Danyelle Wiman said. The Grand Junction Police Department will increase liquor enforcement and is asking for support from the community. Police Chief Bill Gardner and Mesa County Sheriff Stan

BY THE NUMBERS 4

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Photos by Amy Nelms

Sarah Bolton

A woman visits the memorial for Shandi Boetel and her infant daughter Natalia Casiano on the corner of North Avenue and Fifth Street where the two died after a car accident Feb. 28.

Hilkey talked about the events of the crash in a news release. “We feel now is the time to reach out to the community and ask for help in curbing these types of senseless deaths,” they said. “Our community is reeling from multiple tragedies right now as a result of alcohol. We will work with our law enforcement partners to make a difference,” Hilkey said. In response to the accidents, the police department took action to fight alcohol abuse in Grand Junction. On the Friday night after the last crash, they handed out more than two dozen summons for liquor violations, 21 of which were for underage drinking. While this news may not be welcomed by all young people of Grand Junction, some students are glad to hear that action is being taken to fight deaths due to drunk driving. “I think the rules should be stricter. The way they are now, if you get a DUI all you get is a slap on the hand, and in a couple of years you forget all about it,” sophomore Kamron Medina said. Underage drinking is a huge concern for Grand Junction authorities because the crashes involved young drivers and young victims. A 2007 youth Risk Behavior Survey revealed that 45 percent of high school students had consumed alcohol, and 11 percent drove after drinking alcohol. In a survey of 100 GJHS students, 82 said they know someone who has driven under the influence of drugs or alcohol, and 51 said they had been in a car with a driver who was under the influence. “All of this tragedy is directly related to young drivers who are drunk behind the wheel,” Gardner said. “People of all ages, I hope, hear our message today. Don’t drink and drive!” ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

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NOW

THE REPORT:

Zbigniew Bzdak/MCT

THE BRIEF

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA Margeaux Prinster As Obama nears his fourth month in office, he has made several significant changes, but the American public still waits expectantly to see if he will keep all his promises. The war in Iraq is one of Obama’s main focuses. He hopes to remove all troops from Iraq within the next several years. “We can responsibly remove one to two combat brigades each month. If we start with the number of brigades we have in Iraq today, we can remove all of them in 16 months,” he said. General Wesley Clark, former supreme allied commander, reasoned that Obama’s military strategy in Iraq is risky. “Whenever you pull back troops in something like this, you take a military risk. And those troops have done a magnificent job over there,” Clark said. Another military issue that Obama has dealt with is the controversy over Guantanamo Bay. Obama imposed restrictions on the American prison in Cuba, and U.S. intelligence authorities now have to find a safe location where they can detain its 770 prisoners. While these military adjustments are taking shape, the definite changes come from the American Investment and Recovery Act, commonly known as the stimulus package. Obama said that the $787 billion economic stimulus package will be “the beginning of the end” for the hard times America faces with the economic recession and involvement in the Iraqi war. One very crucial part of the package focuses on the environment and conservation of resources. Obama has issued measures for all government vehicles to be hybrid, has set aside a large amount of the package’s money for alternative energy research and has started a project in Oregon that will benefit the environment and create jobs. The project, a power line that will be built along the Columbia River, will open up 700 new jobs and enhance energy-saving services in the Northwest.

PROMISES:

>> KEPT OR BROKEN?

Promise: Expand Pell Grants for low income students Status: In the Works Pell Grants help low-income students pay for college. Obama’s stimulus bill sent an additional $15.6 billion to the grants and another $200 million to work-study programs. The budget outline proposes enough money to boost the maximum Pell Grant to $5,500 for 2010. Promise: Prevent drug companies from blocking generic drugs Status: In the Works In his 2010 budget, Obama recognized the need for a period of exclusivity for drug companies to offset the cost of research and development and to encourage innovation. He offered two measures to prevent drug companies from blocking generic drugs when the period of exclusivity ends. Promise: Freeze the 2009 estate tax law Status: No Action This tax law exempts the first $3.5 million and has a top rate of 45 percent. Obama has taken no action to freeze this law.

Know Your Rights Samantha Weinberg Do you know what your rights are as a citizen of the U.S.? Take this quiz to see if you are among the 25 percent of Americans who can name the first five rights guaranteed to them.

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Which of the following violates a person’s First Amendment rights? a. A public school teacher teaching about religion in the classroom. b. A teacher forcing a student to pledge allegiance to the flag. c. A person burning the American flag as a form of political protest.

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>> STIMULUS PLAN

The $787 billion American Investment and Recovery Act, President Barack Obama’s first major legislation, was signed on Feb. 17 to combat current economic struggles. The stimulus plan is expected to ease the financial load on citizens by increasing health care benefits and support improvements in American lifestyles by giving tax credits to people who install energyefficient appliances in their homes. The government hopes to save jobs by providing funding for struggling businesses. Colorado will receive $2 billion, and the money will be used for projects like repairing highways and bridges, which will receive $403.9 million, while school districts and public colleges will get $611.5 million. Law enforcement will receive $29.8 million, and the food stamp program will receive $179.8 million. The impact on individuals will mainly stem from tax credits. Starting in June, millions of workers will see a $13 increase in paychecks every week, adding up to $400 every year per person. Eligible students will receive $2,500 to help reduce the high price of attending college.

The government can ban songs with lyrics that people may find offensive. True or False At what age does the First Amendment begin to protect a person’s free speech rights? a. 16 b. 18 c. 21 d. None of the above The First Amendment protects student rights at school. True or False

Go to page 9 for answers and see how well you know your First Amendment rights.


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Answers to the “Know Your Rights” quiz on page 8.

Have Pride Tigers

Support Your School!

1. ANSWER: B A public school teacher cannot force a student to say the pledge. The Supreme Court ruled in West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette that students can refuse to recite the Pledge of Allegiance because of religious objections. 2. ANSWER: False The First Amendment protects offensive speech from government censorship, but the Federal Communications Commission can restrict offensive speech from being broadcasted. 3. ANSWER: D The rights of the First Amendment protect all citizens of America, regardless of their age, sex, race or religion. 4. ANSWER: True In Tinker v. Des Moines Independent School District, the Supreme Court ruled that students do not shed their constitutional rights at the schoolhouse gate.

ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

09


CONNECTION

To Serve and Protect They are everywhere. They are strong, fast and can adapt to almost any situation. They are feared and loathed. They are loved and revered. They are officers of the Grand Junction Police Department. These officers have one main goal: to serve and protect society. After spending only five hours with Officer Caleb Church, the immense responsibility and sacrifice of law enforcement officers is exposed.

Name: Caleb Church Height: 6’1”

The Orange and Black sent reporter Moriah Black to ride along on night patrol with Officer Caleb Church. Here are her reportings.

Weight: 180 lbs. Hair Color: Brown

1. Grand Junction Police Department

Eye Color: Brown

(5 p.m. - 6:45 p.m.)

Moriah Black It begins in his office. It is barely an office at all, a bare, tiny exc use for a room, built from a small tra iler attached to the main Grand Junction Police Department building. Officer Caleb Church sits at his desk, checking the messages tha t fill the inbox on his telephone. His clients ’ voices fill the room, asking him to call them back immediately and to sig n and email papers. Church has been a memb er of the police department for ove r five years. He always knew that he wo uld be involved with law enforc somehow em both of his parents were po ent, since lice officers. “Becoming a police officer is what truly opened up all the do ors for me,” Church explained. “I soon found my niche in the Street Crime Department and am now a member of our SWAT team.” Now, Church deals with ma jor drug abuse, which requires him to use his

own personal judgment wit h every situation. It is that discretio n which draws the defining line bet ween those who respect police officer s and those who loathe them. “It’s easy when it comes to firefighters. They put out the fi save people’s lives—they are re, they seen as instant heroes,” Church sai d. “Being a police officer means that I will have to arrest someone’s brother, someone’s wife, someone’s dad and eve n though it may be saving a life, there is the stronger chance that I will not be see n as a hero.” The risk , though, he says, is well worth it. “It is the nature of the bea st difficulty understanding tha to have a t the things we do may seem negative, but they almost always are going to affect more people in a positive way,” Church said.

The Street Crime Department is in a small trailer on the side of the main Police Department. The police officers share both computers and phones. Officer Caleb Church checks his messages and proceeds in calling back his personal clients. We begin patrolling soon after. “In police work there are so many niches that it is fairly easy to find one that you will fit into. My niche is Street Crime,” he says. 2. Hwy 6 & 50 and 24 1/2 Road Intersection (7 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.) Church receives a call about a twocar accident. There are no injuries, and the two vehicles are moved from traffic. Church checks the licenses and registrations of both drivers before clearing them to leave. “People are a lot nicer about car accidents than you would think. Most of the time, they are more concerned that the people in the other car and their own are not injured,” he says.

Continued on page 11 10 ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009


LIFESTYLES & RELATIONSHIPS

Out for a joy ride 3

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3. Northwood Apartments (8 p.m. - 8:15 p.m.)

5. North Avenue Sonic (9:15 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.)

Church receives a call concerning a suspicious person loitering outside one of the apartments. We circle the parking lots where he was seen. We use the spotlights to brighten the areas where he could be hiding. After finding nothing, we left. “In my line of work, the biggest factor is looking for everything and anything that is out of place or abnormal,” he says.

Church pulls over a truck that suspiciously turns into the Sonic parking lot abruptly after Church pulls behind him in traffic. The bewildered man explains that he really was just going to get some food, but Church runs the man’s information on the computer in his car and when the man is cleared, we leave. “You must understand that I get lied to every single day. I must be able to read people and their body language and use my discretion to know if the person is potentially hiding something, or is dangerous,” he says.

4. Diamond Shamrock gas station (8:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.) Church pulls over a car with expired license plates. A few moments later backup arrives. The two police officers search the driver and two passengers, who were acting suspicous. Nothing was found on them, however, and they were released with a ticket for the expired license plates. “Individuals who have a bad experience with one police officer tend to push the bad experience onto all of us. It creates a vast distrust of law enforcers who are ultimately trying to protect citizens,” he says.

6. Downtown Parking Garage (9:45 p.m. - 10 p.m.) A group of teens is seen entering the parking garage, and Church was sent to check it out. Church says I should stay in the car with the doors locked, in case things turn violent. Five minutes later he returns and says it was just a group of high school students playing hacky sack, in lack of a better place to play. “A lot of police officers have some preconceived notions about teenagers because many teens we deal with are in trouble with the law,” Church says. “I personally try to keep an open mind and build my opinions off the information I gather from the situation.” 7. 10th Street and Pitkin Avenue (10:10 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.) Many police officers have informants who offer information about illegal drug dealers to the police. Church receives a call

on his personal cell phone from one of his informants, a woman with a cocaine addiction. She went to one of her dealers to purchase cocaine, when another man had pulled up in a car and began verbally harassing her, she says. We drive to the house to hopefully make some arrests. After surveying the house, Church decides we will return to the Police Department to map out where we would enter. “It’s the same 5 percent of Grand Junction being arrested for the same drug crimes over and over,” Church says. “It can’t be pinned on one type of person, either, because drug use reaches from the wealthy citizen with the top-notch job to the 8. Grand Junction Police Department (10:35 p.m. - 10:45 p.m.) Two other Street Crime Department officers join us in Church’s office and a map of Ute Avenue is pulled up on one of the computers. All three officers plan on entering the house and dealing with the cocaine dealers that night.

ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009 11


CONNECTION

Satisfaction not guaranteed McKenna Moe When dealing with depression, many turn to drugs and alcohol instead of seeking the healthy solution of medication and therapy. “Alcoholism is self-medication, but it only makes you more depressed,” Dr. Carol Guerrie said. While a large number of people understand that depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, many do not consider the emotional factor. A significant loss such as a family member or an important job can trigger depression, but it can also be hereditary. Many people who are depressed turn to substances. “They figure, ‘I feel hopeless and helpless, what could (the alcohol and drugs) hurt?’” Guerrie said. Also, Guerrie said the chances of experiencing depression are very common. “Depression is like the common cold of mental issues,” Guerrie said. The symptoms of depression include fatigue and loss of interest in daily activities. “It’s not usually being really sad. It’s more of nothing is interesting, nothing is worthwhile,” Mesa State College professor Susan Becker said. Psycho Motor Retardation leaves the victim unable to get out of bed, while Dystahmic Depression is the chemical imbalance in the brain over a long period of time and is often passed through the family by genetics. Many people suffering from depression turn to smoking marijuana to help them deal with their condition. “(Marijuana) makes you lethargic, it makes you zone out and puts you in a different aspect of reality. That’s what some people like about it,” Guerrie said. For those who are diagnosed with depression, treatments include taking medication as well as attending therapy. “Medication doesn’t work for everyone, but for some people, it saves their life,” Guerrie said. Although, in Becker’s opinion, medication is not always needed. “Sometimes counseling alone will help. Counseling is just as helpful as medication,” Becker said. Medication is not suggested for teens because taking the medication increases the risk of a teen committing suicide. “Depression has symptoms of reduced energy and negative thoughts

12 ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

including suicide, but when taking the antidepressants, the person’s energy level increases, but the negative thoughts continue, leaving them at a higher risk to commit suicide,” Becker said. Therapy is necessary in order to reduce suicidal thoughts and to help the victim deter away from drinking or taking harmful drugs. “Alcoholism affects people until they think they can’t get out from under it,” Guerrie said. Becker claims the stressful nature of teenage life is a major reason teens with depression struggle to get better. “Chances are pretty good you’ll feel better, but stress can make (getting better) harder,” said Becker. If someone is suffering from depression, Becker says the best thing to do is be there for them. “Sometimes people just don’t have enough support,” said Becker, “It’s not going to be a great friendship for awhile, but the support is needed.” But in order for friends to recover, they need the help of an adult. “If you’re worried about a friend, involve an adult,” said Becker. “Ask your parents to help you because all by yourself you’re not going to be able to get done what needs to be done.” Becker reinforces that when dealing with someone with depression, people should take everything they say seriously. “Take what people say at face value. If they say, ‘I want to die,’ take it (seriously) and get someone to help,” said Becker. “Let them know you care about them and that you like having them around. It can make a big difference.” While many use drugs and alcohol to numb the pain when suffering from depression, the healing only begins when they set the drugs aside and seek help. For Guerrie, the hope of a support group gives her hope. “It would be neat to have a support group for kids suffering from depression. Somewhere for them to go and have people supporting them.” Teens that cannot afford therapy can turn to the Suicide Prevention Foundation, www. suicideprev entionfound ation.org, to receive free counseling.

Graphics by: Kyle Rogers

Dealing with depression


LIFESTYLES & RELATIONSHIPS

No fear volunteer

Six sweet places to offer up time (and get credit for graduation) Colorado Discover Ability

Senior on the fast track Kurt Peterson Only halfway through her senior year, senior Mackenzie Schmalz began going to class only three days a week and taking a three-hour lunch break. No, she is not ditching—Schmalz is participating in the Fast Track program at Mesa State College. Fast Track allows high school students to take college courses at the expense of the school district. Juniors can sign up for Fast Track when they design their senior schedules. After making sure her graduation requirements were completed, Schmalz was able to block out her second semester of senior year for classes at MSC. “With all Schmalz’s three-day week consists my credits of five hours a day, meaning she is in class only 15 hours a week, compared done to the average high school student and the who is in class 35 hours a week. Her schedule ranges from tradiopportuntional classes that contribute to her ity to get major, like Probability and Statistics, free college to elective classes like the History of Modern Music. credits, why Schmalz is still involved in typical high school activities—she still goes to not?” Junction games and dances and plays on the GJHS girl’s golf team. Schmalz enjoys college and does not mind cutting her high school career a little short. “I don’t really miss it. I am only missing out on the dayto-day high school drama, which I don’t mind much at all,” she said. Attending MSC has not changed anything in Schmalz’s circle of friends. “Everybody I want to talk to, I can. Going to college doesn’t mean I don’t hang out with friends. It just makes it easier to avoid the people you aren’t friends with,” she said. Schmalz enjoys college and getting a free head start on her future career. She wants to be an actuary, a business expert specializing in financial risk. “I chose to Fast Track because I was done with high school,” she said. “With all my credits done there and the opportunity to get free college credits, why not?”

Western Colorado Botanical Garden

Elementary/ middle schools

Catholic Outreach Soup Kitchen

RoiceHurst Humane Society

Center for Indepedence

g

Enjoy working with special needs children and young adults? This program offers a wide variety of activities in need of volunteers. Some activities include rafting trips, kayaking, camping and fishing.

g

For the more peaceful soul, volunteering in a quiet environment like the Botanical Gardens is a perfect choice. Work to preserve both a plethora of plants and a bounty of Northern American butterflies.

g

There are many programs at elementary and middle schools across the Grand Valley that are in need of volunteers to help with everything from coaching football to helping kids with homework after school.

g

The Soup Kitchen is always looking for an extra hand to assist them in making the world a better place. Volunteer to serve food or help clean up after the meal.

g

Every animal needs a friend. Volunteer to work with a wide range of animals in need. Assistance at the shelter includes feeding, cleaning and playing with the animals.

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For those who enjoy spending time in the company of the old and the wise, volunteering here will provide assistance for the elders. Some activities include taking them on outings, helping with computers and just lending a hand.

The Low Down: New Reads

Mesa County Library District opened a new library located in a shopping mall in Orchard Mesa. Previously located in Orchard Mesa Middle School and closed because of lack of interest, the new branch can be found across from the fairgrounds. The small library reopened on Jan. 24 and now boasts up to 60 patrons a day. The library is decked out with brand new chic furniture and a redecorated interior to match the new building. Reading here is sure to be a pleasure. ORANGE&BLACK MARCH ORANGE&BLACK | |MARCH 20082009 13


ADS GREAT LUNCH IN A HURRY! HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT LUNCH SPECIAL $5.00 (PLUS TAX) PEPPERONI OR CHEESE PERSONAL PIZZA AND DRINK

$10 OFF COLOR

$5 OFF CUTS

Opens @ 10:45 For Students Daily Until 4:00 Dine In Only CALL WHEN YOU LEAVE SCHOOL Next To Safeway On Horizon WE’LL HAVE IT READY WHEN

Heather Strandberg (970)986-9024

SPEECH T S . R E I RELIGION V F I F HT E YOU ASSEMBLY S E PETITION V IG PRESS

YOU ARRIVE! 970-245-6425

Home Owners Realty, Inc.

John Duffy 970-234-4830

Need some extra cash? Bananas Fun Park is now accepting applications! Motivated, hard-working students are encouraged to apply. Part time and full time spring positions available. Apply in person.

We Got Yearbook! DO YOU?

You can buy one this semester in the main office for $55

“The Way You Look Tonight”

Dance 7-11 Pictures 5-9 $35 for couples $25 for single Mervyn’s

14 ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

Graphic by Greg Coleman

April 25


INSIGHT

STEM CELL

The advancement of stem cell research, the research of cells yet to be given a specific job, is currently one of the most controversial scientific debates of our time, one which the current presidential turnover has spotlighted for immediate change. This brings up a debate that will have significant repercussions on the future of medical technology. Stem cell research shows promise for curing previously incurable conditions and diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, stroke, heart disease, diabetes and sickle cell anemia. With future development, it could have staggering applications in every sector of medicine.

Previously, research had been limited because of its controversial nature and unpredictable results. One family trying to save their child from a lethal brain disease went to Russia to inject experimental fetal stem cells in the hopes of slowing the disease’s progression. Instead, the cells triggered tumors in the boy’s brain and spinal cord. Religious and moral arguments against using human embryos have also been key reasons for past concerns in furthering research. During his presidency, George W. Bush enacted policies that limited federal money for research and new development on human embryonic stem cells. His decision severely limited new research. Meanwhile, other countries were able to develop stem cell research without governmental regulation. Some people with debilitating diseases in America traveled out of the country to receive treatment where stem cell research laws were less stringent. Many say this type of treatment is very dangerous, especially

outside the United States where some corrupt medical facilities do not follow medical regulations or practice proper sanitation. However, out-of-country research centers have also generated miraculous cures and pioneered new medical procedures used to save countless lives. For patients with limited options like one former Grand Junction High School student, out-of-country stem cells may be a means to possibly reverse a lifelong battle with paraplegia. For all their hazards, out-of-country stem cells have proven to be for at least one GJHS graduate a beneficial, life-changing miracle.

Graphic by Greg Coleman

SALVATION

ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009 15


1

2

months and I was told I would never get off, but I fought it and fought it and finally did,” she said. “It just takes a lot of determination. Determination is everything.” After being released from the hospital, Menzies began the complicated procedure of altering her lifestyle to fit her new condition. “It was an adjustment going home. We had to move and remodel so (my house) was accessible to me.” “The whole thing was definitely a learning experience, living differently than everyone else. It was definitely a challenge,” Menzies said. After she became accustomed her new life, Menzies resumed college classes, though some changes were apparent. I was on a “It was a little bit of a change,” she said. “I had to have someone come to class and take notes for me.” ventilator for Sadly, some of her old friends did not adjust well two-and-a-half to her condition. months and I “I had to make new friends because most people was told I would are not used to it, being around it. They don’t know how to handle it.” never get off, but lllllSlowly, Menzies regained a sense of normalcy, settling down with her new friends and studying to I fought it and become a pre-school education major at Mesa State. fought it and A year after the car accident, Jordanne discofinally did. It just vered stem cell research and the possibility of using it to improve her quadriplegia. She began applying takes a lot of to out-of-country clinics online. determination. One of the websites informed Menzies that she Determination is was eligible and accepted for treatment at the Institute of Cellular Medicine in San Jose, Costa Rica, everything. where cord blood stem cell therapy could potentially help in giving her improved use of her arms and legs. “It was the only (website) I could find with an application online to fill out,” Menzies said. She found out that she was accepted for treatment a week later. She was also excited that her treatment would involve umbilical cord blood stem cells which did not come from highly controversial embryos. “I thought they were a better option,” she said. With a life changing opportunity before her, all Menzies needed was the financial support to achieve it. In a rally of community support, from November 2007 until Jan. 5, 2008, nine stores in Grand Junction and three in Delta held a recycled cell phone fundraiser for the Menzies family, which was hoping to raise $30,000 for the cost of her treatment. “It took a lot out of us,” said Menzies, “but we made enough money to go on (my) trip.” On Jan. 9, 2008, Menzies flew to Costa Rica and underwent treatment. The process lasted a week, and she received four stem cell replacement injections directly into the C-3, C-4, and C-5 spots on her neck.

3

4

5

“The people there were very generous, and the facility was very clean. I did therapy there as well and I learned so much,” Menzies said. “It was amazing. Overall, it was a great experience, and I’m glad I did it.” So far, Menzies has already seen improvement in her condition after undergoing treatment. “I have gotten more movement back in my arms and core muscles. I’m getting closer to feeding myself again and I’ve gained a lot more strength.” For Menzies, gaining feeling is a sign for hope that more is to come. Menzies hopes a second round of treatment will help her regain lost aspects of her life. “I haven’t gained any feeling back. That’s one thing I really hope will happen. I want to go back and get more feeling back after a second time,” she said. “I have big dreams of walking again. It’d be nice to at least have my arms back.” Though stem cell research has already improved her life in small ways, Menzies is determined for more. “I’m going to try to do another fundraiser,” she said. “Hopefully this spring and summer we’ll do more fundraising so I can go again.” The former GJHS student may one day beat her doctors’ prediction of never walking on her own again. Menzies may one day feel grass beneath her feet or sand beneath her toes, sensations that once seemed impossible. Though her life has been far from easy, Menzies holds an unshakable willpower and has already achieved the impossible. Hope and perseverance led her to the miracles of stem cells, and she believes no matter their condition, anyone can achieve their own personal miracles through optimism and determination. “No matter what life throws at you, don’t let anything stop you,” Menzies said. “Someone is always worse off than you are. Even for me, someone else is.”

Jordanne Menzies’ first injection of stem cells was through an IV in Menzies enjoyed working as a Menzies receives her first round of spinal drip stem cell her hand in Costa Rica, January 2008. Extensive physical therapy model in her teen years and often injections. The doctor attempted to find the injection spot was done before and after each treatment. made photo shoot trips to Denver. seven times before a success.

our years ago, Jordanne Menzies, a 2003 Grand Junction High School graduate, was working as a waitress while attending Mesa State College. She had an intense passion for her future and was driving back and forth to Denver every weekend to pursue her dream career in modeling. The events of Oct. 2, 2003 made that dream seem unattainable. Menzies was returning to Grand Junction from Denver at 1 a.m. from a late modeling job. Only 15 minutes from home, she fell asleep while driving without a seatbelt on the highway. The car she was driving rolled, and she was thrown from the vehicle. She crashed onto the pavement, injuring her head and neck on the hard asphalt. After one earth-shattering night, Menzies became an 18-year-old quadriplegic. Because her head hit the pavement, her memory was limited. “I don’t remember much about the accident,” Menzies said. “About two weeks are blank.” Menzies was immediately rushed to St. Mary’s Hospital and underwent surgery. Afterward, she spent three weeks in the hospital recuperating. It was in the hospital that she discovered the extent of her condition. “I’m an incomplete C-3 quadriplegic, which means I can move a little below my injury level,” said Menzies. “It’s better than complete (paraplegia), but it’s still pretty severe.” Because of this incomplete quadriplegia, Menzies’ condition would one day be eligible for stem cell treatment, which she could undergo to treat her disease and improve her condition. During her time in the hospital, however, Menzies was told by her doctors that she would never walk or breathe on her own again, a thoroughly discouraging diagnosis that left little hope. Still, Menzies found the drive to confidently strive for progress. “I was on a ventilator for two-and-a-half

F

McKenzie Binder

GJHS graduate receives stem cell treatment

INSIGHT

(1, 2) Lesley Wharton, (3, 4, 5) courtesy of Jordanne Menzies


1

2

months and I was told I would never get off, but I fought it and fought it and finally did,” she said. “It just takes a lot of determination. Determination is everything.” After being released from the hospital, Menzies began the complicated procedure of altering her lifestyle to fit her new condition. “It was an adjustment going home. We had to move and remodel so (my house) was accessible to me.” “The whole thing was definitely a learning experience, living differently than everyone else. It was definitely a challenge,” Menzies said. After she became accustomed her new life, Menzies resumed college classes, though some changes were apparent. I was on a “It was a little bit of a change,” she said. “I had to have someone come to class and take notes for me.” ventilator for Sadly, some of her old friends did not adjust well two-and-a-half to her condition. months and I “I had to make new friends because most people was told I would are not used to it, being around it. They don’t know how to handle it.” never get off, but lllllSlowly, Menzies regained a sense of normalcy, settling down with her new friends and studying to I fought it and become a pre-school education major at Mesa State. fought it and A year after the car accident, Jordanne discofinally did. It just vered stem cell research and the possibility of using it to improve her quadriplegia. She began applying takes a lot of to out-of-country clinics online. determination. One of the websites informed Menzies that she Determination is was eligible and accepted for treatment at the Institute of Cellular Medicine in San Jose, Costa Rica, everything. where cord blood stem cell therapy could potentially help in giving her improved use of her arms and legs. “It was the only (website) I could find with an application online to fill out,” Menzies said. She found out that she was accepted for treatment a week later. She was also excited that her treatment would involve umbilical cord blood stem cells which did not come from highly controversial embryos. “I thought they were a better option,” she said. With a life changing opportunity before her, all Menzies needed was the financial support to achieve it. In a rally of community support, from November 2007 until Jan. 5, 2008, nine stores in Grand Junction and three in Delta held a recycled cell phone fundraiser for the Menzies family, which was hoping to raise $30,000 for the cost of her treatment. “It took a lot out of us,” said Menzies, “but we made enough money to go on (my) trip.” On Jan. 9, 2008, Menzies flew to Costa Rica and underwent treatment. The process lasted a week, and she received four stem cell replacement injections directly into the C-3, C-4, and C-5 spots on her neck.

3

4

5

“The people there were very generous, and the facility was very clean. I did therapy there as well and I learned so much,” Menzies said. “It was amazing. Overall, it was a great experience, and I’m glad I did it.” So far, Menzies has already seen improvement in her condition after undergoing treatment. “I have gotten more movement back in my arms and core muscles. I’m getting closer to feeding myself again and I’ve gained a lot more strength.” For Menzies, gaining feeling is a sign for hope that more is to come. Menzies hopes a second round of treatment will help her regain lost aspects of her life. “I haven’t gained any feeling back. That’s one thing I really hope will happen. I want to go back and get more feeling back after a second time,” she said. “I have big dreams of walking again. It’d be nice to at least have my arms back.” Though stem cell research has already improved her life in small ways, Menzies is determined for more. “I’m going to try to do another fundraiser,” she said. “Hopefully this spring and summer we’ll do more fundraising so I can go again.” The former GJHS student may one day beat her doctors’ prediction of never walking on her own again. Menzies may one day feel grass beneath her feet or sand beneath her toes, sensations that once seemed impossible. Though her life has been far from easy, Menzies holds an unshakable willpower and has already achieved the impossible. Hope and perseverance led her to the miracles of stem cells, and she believes no matter their condition, anyone can achieve their own personal miracles through optimism and determination. “No matter what life throws at you, don’t let anything stop you,” Menzies said. “Someone is always worse off than you are. Even for me, someone else is.”

Jordanne Menzies’ first injection of stem cells was through an IV in Menzies enjoyed working as a Menzies receives her first round of spinal drip stem cell her hand in Costa Rica, January 2008. Extensive physical therapy model in her teen years and often injections. The doctor attempted to find the injection spot was done before and after each treatment. made photo shoot trips to Denver. seven times before a success.

our years ago, Jordanne Menzies, a 2003 Grand Junction High School graduate, was working as a waitress while attending Mesa State College. She had an intense passion for her future and was driving back and forth to Denver every weekend to pursue her dream career in modeling. The events of Oct. 2, 2003 made that dream seem unattainable. Menzies was returning to Grand Junction from Denver at 1 a.m. from a late modeling job. Only 15 minutes from home, she fell asleep while driving without a seatbelt on the highway. The car she was driving rolled, and she was thrown from the vehicle. She crashed onto the pavement, injuring her head and neck on the hard asphalt. After one earth-shattering night, Menzies became an 18-year-old quadriplegic. Because her head hit the pavement, her memory was limited. “I don’t remember much about the accident,” Menzies said. “About two weeks are blank.” Menzies was immediately rushed to St. Mary’s Hospital and underwent surgery. Afterward, she spent three weeks in the hospital recuperating. It was in the hospital that she discovered the extent of her condition. “I’m an incomplete C-3 quadriplegic, which means I can move a little below my injury level,” said Menzies. “It’s better than complete (paraplegia), but it’s still pretty severe.” Because of this incomplete quadriplegia, Menzies’ condition would one day be eligible for stem cell treatment, which she could undergo to treat her disease and improve her condition. During her time in the hospital, however, Menzies was told by her doctors that she would never walk or breathe on her own again, a thoroughly discouraging diagnosis that left little hope. Still, Menzies found the drive to confidently strive for progress. “I was on a ventilator for two-and-a-half

F

McKenzie Binder

GJHS graduate receives stem cell treatment

INSIGHT

(1, 2) Lesley Wharton, (3, 4, 5) courtesy of Jordanne Menzies


SCENE

Leave the

FAIRY

TALES to the

movies

Photo by Hannah Cook

I

Kurt Peterson Kaitlin Cain

t is the climax of every comingof-age‘90s flick. Prom is the symbolic finale of high school when the passionate teenage protagonists fall desperately in love. It is considered by many to be one of the vital components of a complete high school experience. Junior Dani Perry looks forward to her first prom this year. “In a way it is the coming of age and a rite of passage,” Perry said. For many high school students, prom marks the transition from adolescence to adult life. It is the last formal dance, and it is one of the senior class’ last high school experiences

18 ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

Prevent Prom Mishaps Scenario: Your new sexy stilettos go perfect with your elegant dress. Unfortunately your shoes are likely going to cause some serious blisters, and you might roll an ankle if you keep them on much longer. Solution: Show them off during dinner and pictures, but bring a pair of comfy flip-flops that you can boogie down in for the dance.

Scenario: It is the morning of the dance, and the sun is not the only thing bright and orange. No one will believe that you went to the Caribbean overnight with those self-tanner splotches. Solution: If your skin is radiating a soft orange glow than try rubbing lemon juice or the inside of a watermelon on your skin. It will smooth down the tan.

Scenario: When you are breaking it down on the dance floor with your date and friends, it is no secret if you have bad B.O. Solution: Bring and wear plenty of deodorant throughout the dance. Beware of overdoing it though— too much can be just as bad, and it can stain clothes.

Scenario: While enjoying your dinner, you have a messy Italian situation on your pristine tux shirt. Solution: To avoid spilling on yourself at dinner, order food that is easy to eat. In case you do decide to go for the ambitious meal, bring a Tide To Go stick to rub away those bothersome stains.

before the real world hits them. But prom is often drowned by its hype. Looking at anything in the media will tell you that. Everywhere one can look, from movies to magazines, prom is part of the quintessential, stereotypical high school experience, like homecoming football games and fighting for parking spots. “When I was little I used to see these movies that made prom seem like a wedding because everything is so planned out,” Perry said. In reality, what one is likely to encounter is a mob of sweaty teenagers jumping and grinding to rap music in a crowded gym with flashlight wielding teachers bearing down on the unsuspecting. It is far from the Hollywood-inspired scene that has been painted in our minds. Prom is an event of extreme spending. Budgets can become extremely tight. There are corsages, tuxedos, dresses, shoes, nails, hairdos, and of course the nice dinner, and tickets, the list just goes on and on. Unless generous parents lend a hefty amount of money, all these luxuries can add up to a considerable sum. If going the extra mile really makes the night, then by all means make it a night that will never be forgotten – rent that limo and get that expensive suit.

Senior Bryce Clark does not mind the extra expenses. “I spent over 200 bucks (last year), and I’ll probably spend about that much this year.” If the thought of shelling out all that hard-earned dough is gut wrenching, then make prom night an inexpensive one. “I know more tricks like going downtown to rent my tux where it is less expensive,” said Clark. Do whatever it is that will let the details and quirks of the night slip away and concentrate on having a blast. Prom is about having fun for one last time with the people that have made the last four years the best years. In the end, it does not matter where dinner is, what color the dress is, the drama that is always present, prom is just about having one last good time.


ARTS&CULTURE

Make the Cut? Try to identify the five major cuts of steak below.

1

2

3

4

5

1) Porterhouse, 2) Filet Mignon, 3) Ribeye 4) New York Strip, 5) T-Bone

Graphic by Greg Coleman

Seasoned Expert

Total Time: 15 min Cost: $11/person

WHAT’S AT STEAK There is something so wonderfully primitive about biting into a piece of red meat. But cooking steak has come a long way in sophistication. This recipe is the product of the collective advice of a few experts.

Why Sear?

Searing and baking is a technique used in steakhouses to ensure consistency and humidity. Searing, or cooking something quickly to create a crispy exterior, is said to hold in juices. That is often disputed. There is, however, an agreed upon

explanation as well. When meats cooks between 300 and 500°, carmelization occurs, creating a sugary coating.

The Gear

–Seasoning of choice –Olive oil –12” pan –Baking sheet –Oven preheated to 450° –Steak

Choosing Steak

If there is no rush and it is a day for adventure, try buying meat from a butcher instead of the supermarket. Ask what is fresh—let them know you respect their opinion. The prices are comparable, but the food is better. Either way, Rick

Nehm of Old World Meats says to look for marbling, the white fat that gives a cut flavor and makes it tender.

Here’s How

First, let the steak come to room temperature. About 30 minutes before beginning, preheat the oven to 450°.

Cover the entire steak with olive oil and dredge it in an approved seasoning (see below). Brush off excess.

one minute on each side then immediately transfer them to a baking sheet and slide it into the preheated oven.

Pour a thin film of olive oil into the pan and put it over high heat. The goal is to get the oil to the state known as just smoking. If it gets too hot, it will become apparent very quickly.

Bake for about five minutes and carefully remove. If a meat thermometer is available, look for a core temperature between 125 and 135°.

Lay the steaks down in the hot oil and be cautious of splattering. Cook them

Carefully remove and let the juices settle for 10 minutes. The residual heat in the meat will continue to cook the steak.

Salt and Pepper

Elway’s Seasoning

Weber Chicago Steak

The classic has been doing the trick for generations. Make sure to use freshly ground pepper from whole kernels and pick sea salt.

The best we’ve tested: near perfection. Only available at Elways, 3000 E. First Ave., Denver. (303) 3995353

Grocery store seasoning mixes, like Chicago Steak from Weber, usually sell for around $4. ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

19


SCENE

First Look Pictures

RecessionRentals

Paris, je t’aime 2006. Rated R. Florence Muller, Cyril Descourse. “Stories of love from the city of love.” This compilation of 18 short films reveals love of every shape and color, supported by a little-recognized but powerful cast. The stories are as varied as the city itself, but the theme is universal: Paris, we love you.

Arlo Guthrie performs in GJ Kayden Horwitz Arlo Guthrie performed in Grand Junction last Friday, bringing with him the history of a pioneer of Rock n’ Roll. The sold-out concert at the Avalon Theater was Guthrie’s first in Grand Junction and part of a continuous world tour. Guthrie is best known for “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree,” an 18-minute satirical protest song against the Vietnam War. Born to Folk legend Woody Guthrie in 1946, Arlo rose to fame in the ‘60s as an icon of the counter-culture movement. He has also acted on occasion, noteably in the movie “Alice’s Restaurant,” based on his life story. Guthrie performed in Aspen before moving on to the next leg of his tour.

In 2004, Guthrie wrote a children’s book, “Mooses Come Walking.”

20

ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

TODAY’S NEW RELEASES FILM The Haunting in Connecticut March 27 Based on the allegedly true story of a family in Connecticut which suffers from supernatural encounters. Rated PG-13

MUSIC Living Thing Peter, Bjorn and John March 27 The fifth album from the Swedish Indie band responsible for last year’s hit “Young Folks” drops tonight.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

Billy Madison

1995. Rated PG-13. Adam Sandler, Ferris Darren McGavin Bueller’s Written by Adam 2004. Rated R. Sandler, it is one Day Off Jim Carrey, Kate of the prime Winslet, David examples of his 1986. Not rated. Cross. Persepolis artistically obnoxMatthew Broderick. French director ious and comedic 2007. Rated PG-13. Charlie Sheen. Michel Gondry’s style that seems Persepolis Ever wondered eccentric exbreathes mohow to epitomize periment with the to have been replaced by Judd tion into Marjane the mid-‘80s? American drama Apatow and crew Satrapi’s graphic This cult comedy contrasts against in recent years. novel of the same classic addresses an uncharacterBilly Madison is name. It is an the basic need istically all-star a comedy about inventive way of to have a day off cast. The plot is an overwhelming telling the comfrom school and an exploration of underachiever ing-of-age story the lengths one human memory who finds the of a young girl in kid will go to get and the tragedies strength within Iran. Its stunning one. Despite its of love. It seems himself to exceed graphic art, coloraging release date, an unusual project the humor keeps for Carrey, whose everyone’s expec- ful soundtrack tations. This classic and distinct hupace with modmost memorable film is refreshingly mor are ahead of ern films, plus bad hits include “Liar funny. its time. hairdos. Liar.”

Facebook wins social network site battle, secures long term devotion Zack Kelley Ladies and gentlemen, we have a winner. It was not too long ago that there were countless clones of social networking communities, each battling for users. But in an industry obsessed with integration, one was bound to end up on top. For most of the decade, MySpace seemed to be in the clear. Meanwhile, in a dark Harvard dormroom, Facebook was born. Originally intended exclusively for college students, it earned a reputation for safety and cleanliness from the start. Even Facebook’s earliest designs did away with the overwhelming clutter found on sites like MySpace and Friendster. Then, in September 2006, Facebook opened its doors to everyone 13 and up. It took a few years for momentum to swell, but in January 2009 Compete.com reported Facebook took the lead with 1.2 billion monthly visits compared with

Facebook received 1.2 billion page views in January. 810 million for MySpace. Facebook, though, is on the verge of something bigger than page views. It has expanded its user base from students to adults, taking the place of reunion websites like Classmates.com. Its enormous success comes from its ability to predict what users want and add features before the public even knows they want them. In a desperate game of catch up, MySpace is imitating Facebook features one after the other. First tagging photos, then status updates. This month, MySpace asked its users if they wished to enter their full name to be found more easily. If that is not enough to proclaim a victor, a movie about Facebook’s history is in production. Game over.


ARTS & CULTURE

Festival Season

A&M/Octone Records

Six events that will spark the spring and summer mood

K’Naan spreads hope

Aspen Shortsfest

Ballpark Market

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Aspen Shortsfest is a five-day event showing international films of all genres at the Wheeler Opera House in Aspen and the Crystal Theatre in Carbondale.

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The Ballpark Market is a unique and eclectic way to experience Denver shopping. Vendors carry items for every taste and need. The market is open every second Sat. from April to October.

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The largest Cinco de Mayo celebration in the United States takes place in Denver, this year on May 910 in the Civic Center Park. It is the celebration the of Mexican victory against the French.

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The Downtown Denver Arts Festival takes place at the 16th Street Mall and Denver Pavilions over Memorial Day weekend, featuring artwork from 125 Colorado artists.

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Mountainfilm is a documentary film festival in Telluride, from May 22-25. Featured topics include world hunger, America’s national parks and a special presentation from Nicholas Kristof, a New York Times columnist.

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The Boulder Creek Festival is Boulder County’s biggest festival, featuring five stages of constant music and every kind of entertainment imaginable and considered to be the unofficial summer kickoff.

Grayson O’Roark While typical rappers convey some messages of violence and gangs, K’naan spreads one outside of the norm. Rather than talking about being the toughest thug on his block, K’naan seeks to provide a voice for his native country. His authentic style and urgency that many say he inherited from his grandfather, one of Somalia’s most famous poets, has brought him much recognition. His newfound popularity has quickly raised him to become a prominent figure in the world of Hip-Hop, and now he looks to use his fame to bring recognition to the shattered state of Somalia. Growing up in Mogadishu, “All Somalis Somalia during the civil war, know that which he says have “the meanstreets in the universe,” gangstererism est K’naan believes that American rappers have nothing to talk isn’t to brag about in terms of violence. about.” “All Somalis know that gangsterism isn’t to brag about. The kids that I was growing up with would walk into school, and all the cool kids would be like, ‘Ah, man, look at these Somalis. Yo, you’re a punk!’ The other kid won’t say nothing, but that kid, probably, has killed fifteen people,” said K’Naan. His experiences in Mogadishu as well as his life in North America have made the difference in issues between America and the magnitude of Somalia’s troubles apparent. Malnutrition and clan warfare wreak havoc on the country so people learn to survive and be tough rather than pick up a formal education, which is the idea behind K’naan’s songs. The country is full of serious dangers that K’naan strives to inform people about. “The people of Somalia just do not have a voice,” said K’Naan. By raising awareness about the dangers and threats that ravage his homeland, K’naan hopes he will be able to incite change and action.

Cinco de Mayo

Denver Arts Festival

Mountain Film

Boulder Creek

The Low Down Down: Flip Flops Now that the weather is warming up, flip flops are being pulled out of the depths of closets everywhere. Not only are they comfortable and cheap, there is a pair to match virtually any outfit. They come in hundreds of colors and styles and are easy to find. So trash last year’s beat-up shoes and stock up on a whole new collection of flip flops. ORANGE&BLACK MARCH ORANGE&BLACK || MARCH 20082009 21


STAFF EDITORIAL

Tempting

They are all reaching, yearning, struggling for their goal. The heroic struggle to reach up toward the tantalizing tabloid dangling before them like a carrot before a horse. They all jump and stretch, climbing on top of one another, trying to grab the

the

Masses

glittery magazine that will change their lives for several minutes. These are the people who are blind by the lure of the tabloids an their plethora of non essential information. What they don’t realize is that the real news, and a breath of fresh air, is merely a few feet away. Just over to the right, in fact.

C

onsider the word “news” for a moment. What comes to mind? Domestic abuse between celebrities, the latest results from American Idol or perhaps Britney Spears issuing a restraining order against her ex-boyfriend? The term news has been mutated to accept tabloid trivia as a tolerable definition. News used to be about expanding a person’s mind. Informing oneself about the world around them, being knowledgeable about current events and actually forming a unique opinion used to be the simple yet profound pleasures of avid news readers around the world. Instead, current events can be squeezed out of the latest issue of People, Star or Entertainment Weekly. But in the end what does the reader walk away with? Are they any smarter? That was, and still is, the true point of news: to educate the masses. The golden age of newspapers has long since ended, but that does not mean they are invaluable or outdated. Far from it, in fact.

22 ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

Yet the public can see that newspapers are fighting a seemingly losing battle with the tabloid and gossip empire. The Rocky Mountain News,, after almost 150 years, published their last issue in February. The Grand Junction Free Press downsized from a daily newspaper to printing three days per week. The Daily Sentinel cancelled a number of features from their publication, encouraging readers to visit their website for front page news. On the other hand, in 2008, People magazine recorded a 5.2 percent increase in sales. This slow decline of the newspaper began with the redefining of journalism shortly after televised media and the Internet were created. Newspapers, although considered outdated, have professional journalists on their staff who make it their job to accomplish two main goals: to simultaneously make the reader smarter and to entertain them.

Granted, these tabloids accomplish half of the journalist’s credo: to entertain. That is what they do best. But at what cost? These attention-grabbing morsels of gossip may inform the reader about what new scandal their favorite celebrity got into, but they don’t teach anything. If knowing what kind of make-up Penelope Cruz wears will ever be questioned on an exam or a job interview, The Orange and Black will gladly admit our mistake. But this seems too improbable for us to accept. Maybe the tabloid is what the world needs. Maybe politics, current events and real, everyday people don’t matter anymore. Maybe taking a peek into the lives of the rich and famous, and seeing that they too are human, is what is important to the human race at this point in history. We, however, respectfully disagree.


OPINION

Photo by Kristin Balbier

they sell their products, all the while having no real desire to help schools. These companies merely see the school’s student body as potential to build an economically beneficial relationship for themselves. Surely schools can find companies that wish to not only better themselves, but also better the students they advertise to. Companies promoting outdoor programs, healthy food products or other items and services that would be beneficial to students, while still funding the school, would be an ideal situation. Not all schools have decided to give into the flow of funding from ads. There are currently several districts in Seattle on the right track in solving this problem. Washington Middle School, as well as many other schools, are tired of “easy corporate access to students’ hearts, minds, and wallets,” and they have begun to attempt to create an advertisement-free zone. These efforts have brought them national acclaim and one anti-commercialism group, called Commercial Alert, is rewarding the district with a $5,000 reward. The nation needs more efforts like the ones in Washington and more groups like Commercial Alert that are willing to fight against the distracting and education hindering advertisements. If a little more effort was made by schools to rid themselves from ads and more companies were willing to offer rewards, perhaps they could once more become an ad-free haven.

Kaitlin Cain: Dude, how good does a chocolate milkshake with fries from Red Robin sound right now? Jillian Arja: Not so good when you think of all the calories you are consuming! Teenagers need to be watching what they eat instead of stuffing their faces. KC: One milkshake and a couple of french fries never hurt anyone. It is all about the proportions. JA: Have you ever heard of the phrase, “a moment on the lips, a lifetime on the hips?” Teenagers cannot control their proportions. KC: Have you ever heard of the phrase, “I don’t care?” I don’t see the harm of having a good time with friends over some scrumptious food. JA: You can still have fun without eating anything. Teenagers need to be careful about what they do and eat now because it will affect them for the rest of their lives. KC: It makes perfect sense for me to eat junk food while I can, as a teenager because old people have slower metabolisms. JA: I hope you enjoy your order of lard with extra grease, not to mention about 1200 calories worth of junk. KC: Oh not to worry, I will. JA: Call me afterwards at the gym when you are unable to fit into your prom dress.

– To students stealing from classrooms. – To teachers parking in Student Parking. – To posters around school with misspelled words. – To doors being locked during school hours. – To the graffiti on the new gym—let’s gow up and keep our school clean. – To the yearbook distribution on the seniors’ last day of school. – To the supposed gang initiations of shooting women at Wal-Mart stores. – To drivers getting behind the wheel intoxicated—your life is not the only one at stake. – To tanning shirtless on your cars at school. – To seniors having to attend certain classes after May 1. – To illiteracy around the world. – To budget cuts in the education system. – To censorship—especially in the school environment.

FLOPS

Ads cover nearly every corner of the planet and constantly pester and annoy society. However, there used to be a safe haven from the bombardment of advertisements, a place where people could work without ads bothering them, this place was school. Yet, this ad-free sanctuary has been breached because of poor choices from schools and greedy companies looking to exploit students and has in the process lost its educational environment. Companies have managed to work their way into public schools, and that is truly disappointing. If there is one place people should be allowed to escape the advertisement infested world it should be in a school environment. However, I do understand why school districts allow these companies to barge right into their schools. To put it simply, schools need money. Although it seems ridiculous that schools should have to resort to advertising to fund their students’ education, the truth is they do. School administrators, looking for ways to fund programs in cash-strapped schools, say they can not afford to turn away company advertisements and corporate sponsorships. When schools allow companies to sell and advertise their often unhealthy and harmful products, the education system is essentially supporting the idea that a school system should be teaching kids to eat junk food and soda while they earn their education. Building brand loyalty among students and market research is the primary focus of these activities. For instance, teachers are enlisted by Channel One, watched daily by 8 million students, to hand out discount coupons for J.C. Penney jeans and Subway sandwiches. These companies use the premise that they are helping fund schools to hide behind as

Grayson O’Roark

PROPS

Advertise this

+ To three-day weeks during CSAP for upperclassmen. + To maintenance and repairs done on campus. Now if only we could stop trashing the parking lots... + To the pro-safety belts posters, urging students to “Get it Together.” + To the beginning of an outdoors commons—thank you NHS. + To the senior’s excellent third quarter grades. + To a solid start for spring sports. + To the academic team for taking first at their regional competition. + To Bud Glover’s 21 years of dedication to Grand Junction High School. + To the orchestra going to New York and playing at the Lincoln Center. + To a successful run of “My Fair Lady”—we are looking forward to the upcoming One Acts. + To the seniors who still go to class in the last several weeks.

ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

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OPEN TO INTERPRETATION

Class customization is sorely needed Photo by Baylee Ragar

Drilling threatens ANWR Over the past eight years, America has felt the consequences of the Bush Administration and Baylee Ragar questioned the future of the United States economy concerning dependence on foreign oil. The U.S. government has put men on the moon, supervised the building of extraordinary structures and done things that were once deemed impossible. This efficiency needs to be used in the research and development of alternative energy sources to stop dependence on foreign oil. Instead of investing in the future with alternative energy sources, drilling on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge has been previously considered the best way to break free from foreign countries concerning oil and to reduce the cost of gas for Americans struggling in the economic turmoil. However it has been predicted by the U.S. Energy Information Administration that Arctic drilling would not cool the high price of oil and if congress voted the Refuge available for drilling today, it would not have the largest impact for more than 20 years. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge consists of 19 million acres in northeast Alaska and is inhabited by 45 species of mammals, 36 species of fish and 180 species of birds. The survival of hundreds of species of animals and thousands of miles of Arctic tundra needs to take precedence. This debate over the importance of the environment is not a new one. In 1977 the idea of drilling on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge made its way to Capitol Hill, where Republicans proposed drilling on more Alaskan soil. Since then, all permanent decisions regarding the controversial issue have gone in favor of the Refuge, but the North Slope of Alaska is not as lucky. Drilling on the North Slope began in 1968 with the discovery of petroleum and for over three decades oil drilling has affected ecosystems and communities on the Arctic tundra, which will take centuries to return to their natural state. Dependence on foreign oil in recent years has been driven to a whole new level, a level which drove George W. Bush to try and persuade Congress to dissemble the law protecting the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and begin drilling immediately. This prolonged goal of George W. Bush was never completed because the U.S. Senate rejected the Republican energy plan to begin drilling on the last bit of pristine Arctic tundra belonging to the United States. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is currently off-limits to oil corporations and some of the only Arctic land left in its natural state. The future of America lies with alternative energy sources and not in the devastation of the last bit of unaltered Arctic tundra in the United States.

24 ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

Imagine a high school where learning was customized to suit Eric List each student, where an individual’s needs, talents and interests would take precedence. Each student would advance at his own pace, not at the pace set for them by their classes. School would start later, around 9 a.m., because studies show teenagers naturally stay up later at night. They would also have the ability to test out of classes that would otherwise be too easy and boring. Successful students could end high school early and move to college and excellent grades in AP classes would exempt them from taking unnecessary state-mandated tests. It sounds like a dream, but in some states, legislation is being passed allowing for these changes to take place. In New Hampshire, select high school sophomores will soon be able to attend community college to receive their two-year degrees while completing high school. According to studies, graduation rates would be much higher if high schools were more flexible toward the student. Students are too tired in the morning to think like they need to, and it has affected their motivation. By starting later, students will be more awake and prepared for their classes. Jan Jones, a state representative in Georgia, introduced the “Move on When Ready” bill, which would essentially allow some high school seniors and juniors to complete their high school education at community colleges, and the highly motivated among them would even be allowed to move on to college early. “This option will primarily attract students uninspired in or unserved by a traditional high school setting. Instead of dropping out, they’ll be able to finish high school, prepare for a career, take online courses and even work or take care of family obligations,” Jones said. Today’s high schools are assembly lines cranking out students to graduate. Many students remember what they learned for only a short time, and many of their learned skills are lost. Individualized education would teach students in the way they best learn, and the students would retain their knowledge. That also means more flexibility in choices for students and an ease on the delicate balance between school, extracurricular activities, and other responsibilities. As graduation rates slip throughout the United States, legislation like these could provide an opportunity for students to graduate more easily at their own pace. Across the nation, more than one million freshmen do not finish high school four years later. Skills needed for higher-paying occupations are attainable only by completing high school and, for the most part, moving to higher education. Customization of high school will raise graduation rates and lead to a more successful graduation class and these jobs. With the economy the way it is, the only way to a better life is through higher education, and the best way to higher education is completing high school.


OPINION

Coexisting Today The six most widely-practiced religions in the world

Christianity

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Christianity is a monotheistic system of beliefs based on the Old and New Testaments which emphasizes Jesus as their Savior, with nearly 2.1 billion followers.

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This monotheistic religion teaches that Muhammad was the chief and last prophet of Allah. Their holy book, The Quran, is believed to be the direct word of God. Islam has about 1.5 billion followers.

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Hinduism focuses on a belief in a supreme being of many forms and natures. It is practiced mainly in India with around 900 million followers. It is generally regarded as the world’s oldest organized religion.

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Following the teachings of Buddha, roughly 376 million people believe that enlightenment is obtained through right conduct and wisdom, while meditation releases one from desire and suffering.

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Practiced in India, Sikhism has 23 million followers who believe in a cycle of reincarnation from which humans can free themselves by living righteous lives as active members of society.

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Beginning with the origins of Abraham, Judaism follows spiritual and ethical principles embodied mainly in the Hebrew Scriptures and the Talmud. Judaism has around 14 million followers.

words of

WISDOM

Islam

with Sutton Casey Language Arts teacher

When I was in college, I was recruited by the FBI to be in the field of research. I said no because I was compelled to be a teacher.

Hinduism

Students cannot be judged by their grades or assignments. They are people, and it is my job to see them as people and help them grow. One of my proudest moments was when two of my students asked me to hand them their diplomas at graduation.

Buddhism

Everyone deserves a chance to be themselves, and they should be appreciated for all they have to offer. Students have taught me to be tolerant and have an open mind. Some have touched my heart with their stories that have made me realize that I have a blessed life.

Sikhism

It is important that people accept people for who they are and what they contribute. Everyone has pain, and it is (my) job to never add to that pain but alleviate it whenever I can. When I have a kid who I know hates coming to class, but one day I see a spark of hope ignite in them that says, ‘I can do this,’ I know it was a good day. Being compassionate and accepting toward all people is the most important skill a person can have. I once had a classroom of students and each one of them had a parent that had been in jail or was in trouble with the law. Each one of them was a precious and valuable human being, and it was worth all of my effort to make their lives successful. I look up to people who are grounded and celebrate each and every person.

Judaism

The Low Down: Twitter

In a culture of instant information, people can now learn what friends and family are doing at any given moment, thanks to twitter.com, a social networking site founded in 2006. Similar to status updates on Myspace and Facebook, Twitter allows users to update their statuses constantly by text, instant message or the Internet, as well as receive updates by text about the users they are following. Creating an account is free, and the ability to instantaneously be connected to others is priceless. ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009 25


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Have an OPINION? Want your VOICE TO BE HEARD? Write a LETTER TO THE EDITORS...

Bring your LETTER to Room 131 today!


SPORTS & HEALTH

The Big 6

The top six vitamins your body craves and where to find them

1 2 Time-out with: Rachel Romero

3 4 5 6

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Vitamin A prevents eye problems and keeps your skin and immune system healthy. You can find your daily dose in milk, peaches, eggs and vegetables like sweet potatoes, carrots and pumpkins.

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Zinc is important for normal growth, a strong immune system and healing wounds. You can find zinc in red meat, poultry, nuts, dried beans, whole grains and soy products.

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Vitamin D can be found in food such as egg yolks, fish oils and fortified food like milk. This vitamin helps strengthen your bones by absorbing the bone-building calcium.

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Calcium is essential for building strong bones and teeth. You can get your daily calcium by eating dairy products or by taking a calcium supplement that you can buy at your local drugstore.

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Vitamin C helps your body absorb iron and calcium that is essential to normal growth. You can receive your vitamin C by eating red berries, kiwi, tomatoes, spinach, broccoli and drinking grapefruit and orange juice.

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Folic acid helps make the body’s red blood cells and is needed to produce DNA. You can get your source of folic acid by eating dried beans, asparagus, oranges, noodles, enriched bread and poultry.

The Low Down: Keep It Flossy

H H

To keep your mouth free of tooth-eroding diseases and so clean that it sparkles, floss everyday—the right way. Cut 12 inches of floss and “wind it around the middle index finger of each hand so that an inch or two of floss is stretched between the fingers.” Next, “guide it between your teeth, rubbing up and down and around the side of each tooth. Also slide it between the gum and Healthy Hints tooth—but do not snap the floss into your gums. Unwind a clean area of floss for each tooth.” Source: Berkeley Wellness Letter ORANGE&BLACK MARCH 2009 ORANGE&BLACK || MARCH 2008

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IN MOTION

HM

AR

NES

Last 5 years: ‘08: Kansas def. Memphis 75-68 OT ‘07: Florida def. Ohio State 84-75 ‘06: Florida def. UCLA 7357 ‘05: UNC def. Illinois 75-70 ‘04: UConn def. Georgia Tech. 82-73 Source: cbssports.com 28 ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

Jim Barcus/MCT

Jim Bates/MCT

Kirthmon F. Dozier/MCT

Craig Houtz/MCT

As March rolls around, basketball fans and all other competitive sports nuts can feel the tension that accompanies the annual NCAA basketball tournament. Packed stadiums, screaming fans, painted faces, buzzer shots for the win and passionate players fighting to achieve their lifelong dreams all come together to create one of the most exciting sporting events of the year. When the first annual NCAA basketball tournament took place in 1938, fans and players had no idea just how popular this friendly competition would become. Over the years, these games, which single out the best college team in the nation, have transformed into far more than just a basketball tournament. Fans of all sports view the single-elimination format as an exciting experience—with the “win or go home” attitude that forces even the most dominating teams to prepare themselves for the underdogs. Every year March Madness lives up to its name, and this year will be no different.

Chuck Liddy/MCT

Cody Holman

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NCAA championship titles won by UCLA— the most by any team. Kentucky has won 7, followed by Indiana with 6.

7 61

Times the number 4 seed has made it to the Final Four since 1992. The number 1 seed has made it 26 times, and the number 8 seed has made it two times. Points scored by Notre Dame’s Austin Carr in a 112-82 first-round victory versus Ohio University in 1970. Players have yet to top his record of the best single-game performance.

Know who’s gonna win it all? Put your basketball savvy to the test. Pick the final game of this year’s NCAA March Madness tournament, and turn it into Room 130 today, Friday, March 27, for your chance to win a prize. Include the two teams you think will be competing in the final game of this year’s tournament and the score of the game, along with your first and last name to be eligible to win. The person closest to the actual result will win a prize!

Your name: _______________ 6th hour room number: _____ Your pick for the 2009 NCAA Division I men’s basketball national championship game: winner, score: __________ loser, score: __________


SPORTS & HEALTH

G

atorade: not just for reptiles

>BRING IT. >BE TOUGH.

>NO EXCUSES.

>FOCUS.

>IS IT IN YOU? What is “It”” ?

Jillian Arja Millions drink the thirstquenching, rehydrating sports fluid Gatorade, but what is it about the drink that makes athletes desire more? Unlike other sports drinks, it motivates athletes to dream bigger, play harder and push their very limits to reach the top. With distinct mottos and inspiring commercials, Gatorade has become a symbol for all sports— athletes and coaches alike. This empire began as an experiment for the Florida Gator’s football team in 1965. The players needed help to beat the heat and humidity of Florida’s swamps, and many were suffering heat-related illnesses. Dehydration had taken its toll on the players. Some university experts found two reasons why the Gators were weaker, why they were failing: the fluid and electrolytes were not being replaced, and the large

amounts of carbohydrates were not being restored. They decided to take their findings to the lab. They came up with a drink that was fixed these problems and decided to call it Gatorade. After they brought this new beverage to the team, the Gators started winning. They went on to win the Orange Bowl in 1967. Once word got out about this new drink, other college football teams began ordering it to rehydrate their own players. Today, Gatorade is used to hydrate millions of athletes and can be found at 70 Division I colleges as the official sports drink of men’s and women’s intercollegiate sports. Gatorade was the first to step up and broadcast action sports in a positive way. Now, 43 years later, Gatorade is one of the biggest supporters of sports and athletes throughout the country.

The original Gatorade has been retested for many years to make it the recipie athletes drink now. Whereas water serves only to hydrate the body, Gatorade and other sports drinks replace necessary compounds that are lost during exercise. Gatorade contains sodium, which is the primary electrolyte required during and following any physical activity. Carbohydrates (CHO) provide energy for working muscles. These ingredients are the reason Gatorade keeps athletes healthy and well hydrated.The flavoring adds spunk that makes it desirable.

>What’s the difference? Gatorade Elite: Used for athletes that want to push the limits. It can be used before, after and throughout the activity. This is a helpful key in helping athletes reach their highest aspirations. Gatorade A.M. (Shine On): Rejuvenates athletes bright and early in the morning. This substance replenishes the body after sweating during exercise or competition. Gatorade Bring It: This formula, also referred to as Fierce, contains Vitamins B3, B5 and B6 that help athletes’ bodies metabolize. It helps athletes optimize their hydration and performance. Gatorade Tiger Focus: Contains theanine, which helps athletes focus during sports. It is endorsed by Tiger Woods to help athletes be “mentally tough.” Gatorade G2: Made with less calories but still has the same amount of electrolytes. It is prepared so athletes can still have enough energy without worrying about the calories they consume. Source: gatorade.com ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

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IN MOTION

New sports emerge among teens Rock Climbing Zack Kelley The rock climbing scene has exploded recently among high school students in the Grand Valley thanks to a high school rock climbing team. Although Grand Junction High School does not have a rock climbing wall of its own, Core Elements indoor climbing gym is conveniently located close to the school. Rock climbers of all levels are welcome to join at any time. GJHS Junior Scott Reed is a parttime climber for the team. “I started climbing for the team in the fall because soccer was ending and I wanted something to do,” Reed said. Practices for the team are fairly lax, according to GJHS Senior Daniel Tompkins, “but each climber sets the bar for himself.” Practices are Tuesday and Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. with various exercises aimed at strengthening core climbing muscles. “The best thing about the team is that it turns rock climbing from a solitary sport to a community event,” Tompkins said. “Going to tournaments lets you know how you compare to other climbers.” The team’s coach said that the team plans to begin outdoor climbing as soon as the weather warms up.

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Parkour or Free Running Eric List While martial arts trains you to fight, parkour is a physical discipline that trains you to escape in an emergency. The object of parkour is to quickly and efficiently clear obstacles as if escaping or chasing something or someone. Parkour comes from the French word, “parcours” meaning “course”. A male who practices parkour is called a “traceur,” while a woman is called a “traceuse.” Parkour enhances critical thinking skills in everyday situations by training both the body and mind “Freerunning to overcome obstacles. The trick with parkour is to think like is more foa child and find obstacles to overcome cused on flair like the area is a playground. and aesthet“Parkour is the art of movement from ics. Parkour, point A to point B as efficiently as possible,” said Phillip Shellabarger, Grand though, is based on ef- Junction High School senior and traceur local parkour group, Shut Up And ficiency and in Vault Something (SUAVS). speed.” Similar to parkour is freerunning, which combines acrobatics with parkour. “Freerunning is more focused on flair or aesthetics. Parkour, though, is based on efficiency and speed,” Shellabarger said. Shellabarger, along with his friends formed SUAVS last year when they wanted to take a fun hobby to the next level. “The team is always growing and changing and anyone can join,” Shellabarger said. “To get started, you should watch videos on YouTube and practice basic moves. Always strive to push your limits.” Information about SUAVS, including pictures and videos can be found at their website: www.freewebs.com/suavs. To find out more about parkour, visit www.parkour.com.au. or www.urbanfreeflow.com.

Lacrosse Emilie Pearson The Grand Valley Lacrosse team was sanctioned as a high school sport this year with all four schools playing together. “Club was more about playing for fun, while high school lacrosse is more competitive,” junior Bailey Clark said. Boys’ and girls’ lacrosse are played by different rules. Girls’ rules limit stick contact and prohibit body contact. Boys’ lacrosse rules allow some degree of stick and body contact, although violence is neither condoned nor allowed. Lacrosse is played by two teams of ten players each. The purpose is to score by causing the ball to enter the opponent’s goal. The ball is kept in play by being carried, thrown or batted with the crosse, or stick. The ball may not be touched by the hand, except by a goalkeeper in his goal crease. While serious injuries can and do occur, the game has evolved with an emphasis on safety and the rate and severity of injury are low. “Lacrosse combines hockey positions, the speed of soccer and the physical intensity of football,” junior Taylor Watkins said.


HUMOR & SATIRE

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Margeaux Prinster Kaitlin Cain

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tudents at Grand Junction High School will have to adapt to many new changes that will be installed next year as the school enforces budget cuts demanded by the economic recession. The school must cut out all unnecessary spending in order to save enough money so it can continue to run smoothly in these tough economic times. A good portion of this saved money will be put towards CSAP preparation. Special CSAP “ABC” flashcards and multicolored “confidence-booster” thinking caps will be purchased and distributed to the students. Also, the free cookies and more-frozen- than- necessary juice cartons handed out during breaks will be upgraded so they are only three years old opposed to the fiveyear-old cookies previously given out during testing breaks. This should help stem the heavy flow of food poisoning outbreaks that disturbed last year’s tests. “During the math section, my stomach cramped up and I started to feel dizzy. I’m pretty sure those oatmeal cookies had something to do with it.” junior Drake Green said. Not only will these budget cuts improve CSAP scores, but they will also bring on many physical changes around the school next year, and like all change, it will take some getting used to. The first major changes being made are centered on electricity. In fact, the high school has completely ORANGE&BLACK | FEBRUARY 2009

shut off all electricity. This action is expected to completely abolish the schools electrical bill; however, many parents are skeptical of its effect on the learning environment. “How is my kid supposed to learn if he can’t even see what the teacher is trying to do? It’s going to be too dark in there and that’s stupid because kids aren’t going to learn anything,” concerned parent Kelly Dock said. However, the students and teachers will not be left completely in the dark. Everyone will be required to self-finance the purchase of a personal headlamp, candle and/or lantern so they can maintain their level of hard work in the classroom. Headlamps have been added to next year’s school supply list to ensure that these money-saving tactics do not taper off. Also affected by the downfall of electricity will be computer use. Due to the high expense of internet access, and computer maintenance, the library will be converting to an archaic system for research material which does not require expensive software updates, instead using only books. “Along with the costs cut by turning off all computers, another great feature of this new system is the mobility and function books possess. You can take them any where with you, and they will take your mind to far and magical places,” enthused book lover, Assistant Principal, Jamie Curtsinger said. Ryan Nelson is making the best out of the electricity shortage as well, but for other reasons. “Dances are going to be way wild this year. It’s gonna be like dark

the whole time, which is awesome for two reasons: no one can hate on my lack of dancing skills because they won’t be able to see me dancing and also it will be like having four blackouts a year!” Dances will be held in the old gym as usual, but every dance from now on will, as Nelson pointed out, resemble Blackout due to the no-electricity standards. Save money… Dance in the dark! Because of the condensation and heat produced by the intense dance moves, ventilation in the old gym could present a problem. The school has permanently shut off their heating and cooling systems as a part of the budget cuts, so there is no way to combat the intense humidity produced. There will be no central ventilation or constant temperatures. The gym is going to reach record highs that will be similar to the heat in the Sahara Desert if dancing gets out of control. Please keep this in mind for homecoming next year. Also due to the budget cuts, simple processes like going to the bathroom have been changed. New rules will be posted on the stall doors in every bathroom, except for the boy’s bathrooms because they still do not, and probably never will have stall doors. Students and staff have also been limited to only “three squares of toilet paper.” The school has no inexpensive way to enforce this rule so they trust that their students and staff will be honorable and responsible. These new bathroom rules will help to keep the school’s water bill down and cut down the costs of toilet paper, therefore saving more money for CSAP. Overall, District 51 School Board feels that these changes will positively influence GJHS, not only by cutting down the budget, but also by teaching students to take pride in their education. ORANGE&BLACK | MARCH 2009

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Emmie Madison, junior, went to Arizona and visited the Grand Canyon for break. “It was fun because the hike was breath-taking,” said Madison. (1)

Michael Gebhard, junior, went alpine touring on Camp Bird Road in Ouray. After hiking through the snow-packed trail, he came upon a giant ice formation and later skied down. (3)

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Haleigh Jacobson, sophomore, took an opportunity to go parasailing with her mom, Alison Bormann, during spring break. “Parasailing was crazy. It was the best view I have ever seen. It was crazy being that far above the water,” said Jacobson. (2) Ralph Wahlers, foreign language, went to Italy with his family during spring break to gain more knowledge for ancient history class. Below is Wahlers and wife Mijung atop the Cupola of St. Peter’s basilica in Vatican City. (4)

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Mesa County Valley School District 51 Grand Junction High School 2115 Grand Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81501

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Photos courtesy of Emmie Madison (1), Haleigh Jacobson (2), Michael Gebhard (3), Ralph Walhlers (4)

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NON-PROFIT ORANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 207 GRAND JUNCTION , COLORADO

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A look into the real GJPD p. 10 Grand Junction High School | 1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, Colo. 81501 | Volume 91 • Issue 6 | March 20...