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5 Days To Go 2 Touring Candidates 1 Swing State Sarah Palin packs Suplizio Field as election day nears p. 7

Grand Junction High School

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1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, Colo. 81501

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Volume 91 • Issue 3

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October 2008


INDEX The Orange & Black is... Spotlight 9 Dejan Jestrovich Now 9 Jenna Hansen • Stephani Soto Connection 9 Jessa Dearth • Chelsea Tomasi

FEATURES

InSight 9 Nic Murdock • Lesley Wharton

Connection explores the “mean girl” pandemic at GJHS • p. 11

Scene 9 Kayden Horwitz • Kirstin Maska Open to Interpretation 9 Bekah Gallegos • Dylan Proietti In Motion 9 Emily Dohm • Brionne Griffin Photography and Graphics Editors 9 Shreya Pokharel • Nick Powell

Can’t Touch This: Local man helps Hindu Untouchables in InSight • p. 15

Advertising Manager 9 Jenny Jessup Advertising Assistants 9 Jessica Gillis • Samantha Weinberg

In Motion helps to dissect food nutrition labels • p. 30

parent/teacher 20 conferences

Graphic Artists 9 Garrett Brown • Greg Coleman Kyle Rogers

Photographers 9 Kristin Balbier • Alyssa Behrens Cody Blankenship • Hannah Cook Noelle DuPuey • Richard Gonzales Amy Nelms • Natalie Pipe Video 9 Philip Shellabarger • Kevin Reed Austin Ross Adviser 9 Rick Jussel

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4 election day 8 pigskin

Webmaster 9 Tom Nelson Zachary Bryner (assistant) Jon White (assistant)

Reporters 9 Jillian Arja • McKenzie Binder Moriah Black • Sarah Bolton Kaitlin Cain • Cody Holman Zack Kelley • Katie Langford Eric List • McKenna Moe Grayson O’Roark • Emilie Pearson Kurt Peterson • Margeaux Prinster Baylee Ragar

November

Scene gives the skinny on Smart Cars • p. 19 Policy The Orange and Black, a legally recognized public forum for student expression, is published six to nine times a year by the Newspaper Class for students of Grand Junction High School. Expression made by students in the exercise of the freedom of speech or freedom of press is not an expression of District 51 school board policy. The views expressed in The Orange and Black do not necessarily represent the views of the entire staff, adviser, GJHS administration or the School District 51 administration. Board policy regarding student publications (JICE, JICE-R) is available in the journalism room (Rooms 130-131) or in the principal’s office.

27 thanksgiving

They will be edited for space and legal considerations, but not for inaccuracies, grammar or spelling. Letters must contain information pertinent to the students of GJHS. The staff retains the right to not publish any letter not meeting these requirements. Unsigned letters will not be published. Please submit typed letters in person to Room 130 or via mail or email. Contact The Orange and Black, Grand Junction High School, 1400 N. Fifth St., Grand Junction, CO 81501. Phone: 970-254-6929. FAX: 970-254-6973. Web site: GJHSNEWS.com. Adviser e-mail: rjussel@mesa.k12.co.us.

Letters to the Editor The Orange and Black welcomes and encourages letters to Cost the editors. This is a chance to express your viewpoint on Single copies free. Where available, additional copies of important issues. Letters should be limited to 250 words. this paper are available for purchase for 50 cents each.

Contact The Orange and Black for more information. Taking more than one copy of this paper with the intent to prevent other individuals from reading this edition of the paper is prohibited (C.R.S. 18-4-419). Violators, subject to prosecution and penalty under C.R.S. 13-21-123, will be prosecuted. Some material courtesy of American Society of Newspaper Editors/MCT Campus High School Newspaper Service. © 2008 The Orange and Black Grand Junction High School. All rights reserved. Cover photo by Kayden Horwitz


HUMOR & SATIRE

Homeless Heroes

Tongue in Check Questionable quotes from celebrities

Jillian Arja

Crime rates rose 2.1 percent in Grand Junction last year, prompting the Mesa County police force to take extreme measures towards a temporary solution. The police force is currently understaffed, so, in order to fix the problem, they plan to supply the homeless of the city with handguns. “The homeless are a very patriotic people,” SGT Fred Bullet said. “We believe they will drastically decrease crime rates.” The majority of homeless people would feel safer and more secure with physical means of self-defense due to their vulnerability on the streets. Over 67 percent of the public voted against the solution. In response to this statistic, Schott Guhnn, the local chief of police, said, “There is no other possible solution.” “I certainly wouldn’t mind having a gun,” said Jimbo Hobb, a man who has lived on the streets for over six years. “That way I can protect my bench.” Some believe that this move could decrease the amount of robbery and manslaughter in the area. Homeless people would have the ability to catch criminals in action because they linger on street corners. Criminals would think that they would only have to escape the police, but now they have to run from the homeless as well. This quick fix has been in effect for three weeks now and Guhnn believes it is working. “There have only been 4 deaths in a couple weeks. That’s great compared to last year’s 10.”

-I like the moose, but not on your head while I’m talking about sex poetry.

“I always listen to ‘NSYNC’s Tearin’ Up My Heart. It reminds me to wear a bra.” -Britney Spears

Find the

-You sound like my mom to my brother.

-There’s a lot of mint in my mouth right now. I can’t concentrate. -I think I’m going to have to make my own mouth.

-He beats the drums to his own teriyaki sticks. -We’d be like . . . puke friends!!!

-I’m hungrier than polecat on a hot tin roof.

-I’m always playing with my mouth. Only the devil cares about good teeth care.

‘Stache

In every issue, we will hide a secret ‘stache for your amusement and well-being. Be the first to bring the issue with the ‘stache to the newspaper room (131) and you will be rewarded with a prize!

-I just wish I was a goat right now.

-Yeah, we practice thrusting as a band.

-I thought you were supposed to be paper colored.

“Smoking kills. If you’re killed, you’ve lost an “If there is one important part word to describe of your life.” Atlantic City, it’s Big -Brooke Shields Business.” -Donald Trump

Watch Your Mouth

-GAH, a hair on my head! Is it attacking you? YES!! -I look like hell in your eyes. -That’s so gross! I need a poncho. -I’m sweating in weird places. -What does the magic wand do? -Do not touch it! It loves you too much. -Don’t look me in the eye and tell me that Papa Smurf isn’t a Christ figure. ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

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GJHS Booster Club Supporting our Tigers since 1954 Investing in our kids’ tomorrow. . . today.

WHO BENEFITS FROM THE BOOSTER CLUB?

The GJHS Booster Club is somewhat unique in that it raises funds not only for student athletics, but all recognized student activities as well — from football to drama, from band to German Club, from Link Crew to Academic Team, from The Orange & Black newspaper to volleyball, from ...well, you get the idea.

Booster Club has donated over $1,300,000 to Grand Junction High School Student Activities and Athletic Programs; $68,000 was donated just last year To continue this tradition of financial support, we need parent volunteers. Booster Club’s primary fundraiser is Bingo. Volunteers needed to work 1 or 2 sessions a month. Bingo is held on: — Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. — Friday afternoon at 1 p.m. — — Sunday afternoon at 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. — Gold Mine Bingo 511 281/4 Road in Grand Junction.

Contact Booster Club at gjhsbc@aol.com 04 ORANGE&BLACK |OCTOBER 2008


Moriah Black Grand Junction High School lost a beloved teacher to a fatal shooting on the morning of Oct. 11. Floyce “Flo” Gallagher was a lit teacher at GJHS for the past 10 years. At 60 years old, this was Gallagher’s first year of retirement. Gallagher and her husband Mike were preparing to take a vacation with their friends Terry and Linda Fine when they noticed a car following them. Upon arriving at the Fine’s house on Chestnut Drive, 22-year-old Stefan Alexander Martin-Urban, who had been following the Gallaghers, confronted both the couples in the driveway. Martin-Urban fired more than a dozen times, killing Flo Gallagher and Terry Fine. Linda Fine and neighbor Paco Larson were injured. Later that day, Martin-Urban shot himself and died in the hospital on Oct. 12. Both students and staff were greatly affected by the loss. “I feel like the world has lost a bit of light,” Sutton Casey, british literature teacher, said. “The loss had quite an impact,” school pyschologist Pat Schneiderjan said. Staff and students remember Gallagher as a humorous, intelligent and caring woman who had the capacity to empathize with people of all backgrounds. “She is a woman to celebrate,” Adrea Tilford, literature teacher, said. “She went out of her way to help others. She was the type of teacher most of us would want to be like.” The language arts department is especially feeling the loss. “Sometimes it doesn’t feel real,” Tilford said. “She was such a generous and humble person.” “It was a senseless act of violence by someone with little concern for others,” speech teacher Jerry Halpin said. Despite the tragedy of the shooting, teachers, friends and loved ones celebrate Gallagher’s life. “(Gallagher) wouldn’t want anyone to wallow in sorrow,” Casey said. “Flo is an unforgettable person. She had a special spark, a real shine to her,” Halpin said.

Six important international, national and local news stories

The minimum height in feet of the proposed world’s tallest building to be built in Saudi Arabia. The project would cost $26.7 billion and span 23 million square meters.

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25%

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Chuck Kennedy/MCT

Teacher’s death shocks Grand Junction

News by the numbers Record low approval rating for George W. Bush. The disapproval rating is 71 percent so far this year, one of the worst presidential ratings in modern American history.

Oct. 2 g

Date Stefan Martin-Urban bought the gun used in the random shooting on Chestnut Drive Oct. 11 that ended with three dead and two injured.

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Text message phone number for Crimestoppers, an organization that allows informers to send anonymous texts to police. All messages should begin with Tip729 for the GJ area. Price of gas in some areas of Colorado. Due to a decline in the cost of crude oil, prices at the pump decreased. As ofOct. 29, the lowest price in Grand Junction was $2.05.

$2.05 g

1%

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Abaca Press/MCT

Photo courtesy Stephen Yanowich

NEWS

Percentage points that Barack Obama is leading John McCain by in a recent AP-GfK poll. The poll found Obama at 44 percent and McCain at 43 percent. Sources: gjsentinel.com, CNN.com, 9News.com, USAToday.com

The Low Down: Gas in the Southeastern U.S. Hurricanes Gustav and Ike hit the Southeastern U.S. back to back, leaving oil refineries without power and affecting the gas pipelines transporting gas from the Gulf Coast. Consumers have added to the crisis by stockpiling gasoline, leaving others without gas. Georgia and North Carolina have been hit the hardest because they receive their gasoline from the damaged refineries on the Gulf Coast. ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

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NOW

On the issues:

Where the candidates stand

ELECTION

Photos courtesty of MCT

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IRAQ:

W

ith the presidential election quickly approaching, many people are unsure about who to vote for and what issues to consider. Read up on the two major candidates to find out which one you really want to support in this year’s election. To help you out, The Orange & Black brings you some quick facts about the candidates. You can also check out websites like ontheissues.org and votesmart.org.

Presidential candidates: Name: John Sidney McCain Party: Republican Age: 72 Home state: Arizona Experience: Has 26 years of government experience. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Arizona in 1982, then to the United States Senate in 1986 after serving two terms in the House. McCain spent 22 years in the Navy, five of those years as a prisoner of war in Hoa Lo Prison, or “Hanoi Hilton,” in Vietnam. McCain also sought the Republican nomination for president in 2000.

Name: Barack Hussein Obama Party: Democratic Age: 47 Home state: Illinois Experience: Has 12 years of government experience. He was elected to the Illinois State Senate in 1996 then to the U.S. Senate in 2005 and has served until now. He is the fifth African-American to be elected as a senator. Obama worked as a lawyer, a lecturer at the University of Chicago and was a directer of Illinois’ Project Vote, a voter registration and education program, in 1992.

Vice presidential candidates: Name: Sarah Louise Palin Party: Republican Age: 44 Home state: Alaska Experience: Was on the Wasila City Council from 1992-1996 and was the mayor of Wasila from 1996-2002. She chaired the Alaskan Oil and Gas Conservation Commission from 20032004 then became the first woman and youngest governer of Alaska from 2006 to the present. In her first term as governor, a process to construct a gas pipeline was established.

Name: Joseph “Joe” Robinette Biden Party: Democratic Age: 65 Home state: Delaware Experience: Became an attorney in 1969. In 1972, at the age of 30, he became the fifth youngest senator in history. He is currently in the U.S. Senate and is the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee. He was also the chairman of the Judiciary Committee. He ran on the Democratic Presidential ticket in 1988.

Information compiled by Kurt Peterson, Katie Langford and Cody Holman 06 ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

McCain wants to ensure that the Iraqi government is strong and militarily self-sufficient before withdrawing. He said that American forces “can only be responsibly withdrawn when it is clear that doing so will not jeopardize the tremendous gains for which our troops have fought.” Obama says that once elected, he will begin withdrawing troops from Iraq and be out of the country by March 2010. He said, “Iraq is not going to be a perfect place, and we don’t have unlimited resources to try and make it.”

THE ECONOMY: McCain says he would keep taxes low and cut corporate taxes to increase profits for all. His $52.5 billion plan includes eliminating taxes on unemployment benefits, ensuring a spending restraint and guaranteeing 100 percent of savings for six months. Obama says he will give the middle class a tax cut. He said he will increase trade with foreign countries and create more jobs for Americans. His $60 billion plan includes extending unemployment benefits and allowing people to withdraw up to 15 percent of their retirement funds.

TAXES: McCain plans to give upper-income people a tax cut. His tax cuts, according to the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center, would “primarily benefit those with very high incomes, almost all of whom would receive large tax cuts.” Obama advocates just the opposite. “The largest tax cuts ... would go to those at the bottom of the income distribution, while taxpayers with the highest income would see their taxes rise significantly,” said the Tax Policy Center.

ENERGY: McCain plans to get America off foreign oil by 2025 and expand domestic oil exploration and drilling. He would build 45 new nuclear power plants and invest over $2 billion in clean coal technology. Obama plans to get America off foreign oil within 10 years and create five million new jobs by investing over $150 billion in private sources to insure a clean energy future.

IMMIGRATION: McCain says that he wants to secure the U.S. borders and create a temporary worker program. Obama says he will ensure border security and crack down on employers who hire illegal immigrants. Then he wants to create a path to citizenship for existing illegals. Sources: msnbc.com, usnews.com, votesmart.org


NEWS

The presidential race of 2008 may be decided by one of the most overlooked states in the union. Colorado only has nine electoral votes, yet both John McCain and Barack Obama have toured extensively throughout Colorado and devoted time, energy and money campaigning in a state that has seldom been a national priority. One thing is for certain: Whoever is successful in Colorado may just ride the same wave into the White House. Colorado is a conservative state. There are fewer registered Democrats in the state than Republicans. Pueblo and Boulder may be culturally liberal, but the rest of the state, from Grand Junction to Colorado Springs, has historically voted overwhelmingly Republican. Every Republican presidential candidate in the last 50 years has won Colorado, with the exception of Bob Dole in 1996. So how could Obama challenge the GOP in a state they have controlled for several generations? Even though most Coloradans are Republican, Colorado Democrats have dominated state politics for the last decade. According to milehighdelphi.com, Democrats control both the governorship and a majority in the state

legislature. Democratic success has been attributed to the moderate candidates the party chooses. If Obama did carry Colorado, he could control enough smaller states that he would not need to rely on the larger states. McCain, on the other hand, needs to keep Colorado in the fold because losing Colorado adds to other potential losses in once-guaranteed GOP states like Virginia, Missouri and Florida. Obama is the confident victor in California, Delaware and New York. Similarly McCain will, in every probability, carry states like Texas, Utah, Alabama and South Carolina. Statistics can calculate the likely result for nearly all the other states, divvying up the country in a blue-red checkerboard. Looking at a national poll conducted by usaelectionpolls. com, shows that excluding Colorado’s nine electoral votes, the prospective presidential score between Republican Obama’s true blue and Democrat McCain’s Swing states GOP strongholds is 261 Democratic votes to 268 Republican. 270 votes are needed to win the election. This means that Colorado’s nine votes would push either candidate past the margin of victory, clinching the election for that candidate. An Oct.11 poll by TIME Opinion Research showed Obama leading McCain by a sound margin of 51 to 47 percent. However, just a month before in the same poll, McCain led by almost the same margin 49 to 44 percent.

Graphic by Kyle Rogers

Kurt Peterson

Get more election coverage

The Orange and Black asks students what they think about the presidential election. – “I want Obama to win because it’ll be the first time a black man will be president and that will be a huge step in our country.” – Chris Jay, junior – “I want McCain because he won’t raise taxes on businesses. He deserves it more because he has served our country.” – Logan Bell, sophomore – “Honestly, I’m more for McCain but I don’t think either of the candidates are ready to take on the responsibilities of running our country.” – Taryn Baughman, junior – “I want Obama because he has a good head on his shoulders. I think he will follow through with what he says.” – Camille Goodsell, sophomore – “I like McCain because to me, the man’s a hero. Anybody who knows the system that well is going to be able to lead the nation.” – Brittani Kreinberg, senior

gjhsnews.com

Other 10.9% McCain Obama 38.7% 50.4%

The Orange and Black polled over 330 students at GJHS.

Photo by Kayden Horwitz

Colorado key to election

Sarah Palin speaks to the crowd gathered at Suplizio Field Oct. 20.

Palin visits GJ Stephani Soto Regardless of age and in some cases, affiliation, many Grand Junction High School students joined over 10,000 people who swarmed into Suplizio Field Oct. 20 for a speech by Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin. Junior Logan Lally, a supporter of McCain-Palin, was thoroughly impressed by both the rally and Palin’s speech. “It was beyond amazing,” he said. “Even though it’s propaganda, it’s better for people to go see (the speech) than watch it from their T.V.” he said. “As expected, Palin was the highlight.” Sophomore Kendra Strickland, on the other hand, went despite the fact that she does not support John McCain or Sarah Palin. “I thought the speech was good, and she was confident, but she needs to remain more truthful and pay more attention to what she says,” Strickland said. Senior Stephanie Kazokas said she had an incredible experience that she would never forget. “It’s not that often that you’re in a crowd of people who believe in the same things you do and want the same for our country as you do,” she said. Kazokas got Palin’s autograph after shaking her hand and thanking her. The autograph is now on her wall. “The energy from the crowd was incredible,” Kazokas said. “Palin was speaking for the people and they were hearing what they wanted to hear.” ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

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NOW Oct. 31, 2007 13,930.01 Dow’s 52-week high

Jan. 22 11,971.19 Fed cuts interest rates

Baylee Ragar The United States economy has plummeted to levels similar to the Great Depression and is causing a domino effect on the rest of the world. The recent U.S. stock market plunge has resulted in an economic crisis felt internationally as well as individually, from huge bank owners to high school students, from Germany to Grand Junction. In the last 10 months, more than 600,000 jobs have been lost in the U.S., stocks recently had their worst singleday drop in two decades, the national debt is at $8 trillion, national inflation is the highest since 1992 and the U.S. government has created a $700 billion bailout plan to try and save the economy. Countries like Germany, Iceland, Russia and Israel are experiencing economic difficulties as well. The current economic crisis is a result of many contributing factors, including the stock market. The stock market deals with buying and selling money, called stocks, to try and make profit. Businesses and corporations issue stocks to raise money. People who invest in the stock market buy parts of a company, called shares. If the company earns money, the stock gains in value. The Dow Jones industrial average, an

indicator of how stock market prices are doing, sunk 18 percent or 1874 points having the worst week in decades and causing the economy to spiral. When the stock market crashes, the value of stocks drop, affecting many companies, which in turn causes an investor panic where people try to sell their stock, making the market drop even more. Many U.S. families who have money invested in the stock exchange are feeling the extent of damage from the past weeks. Grand Junction High School junior Melanie Mosinski said that the stock market has financially impacted her family. “Right now my family has lost about $10,000 in the stock market, and we have to cut back on our budget, only buying the essentials and hoping for the best,” Mosinski says. However, the stock market was not the only cause of the economic downfall. Harder-to-get credit, the war in Iraq, a housing slump, falling paychecks and increased consumer costs also contributed. Inflation, the rise in the level of prices of goods and services, is now relentless and the cost of living is much higher than it was just a few years ago. This burden is felt by students who have hopes of attending college in the near feature. “The drop in the U.S. economy is affecting my education,” junior Lehl Chase-Nason said. “My college fund is invested in stocks, and in the last two weeks, it lost half its value.” According to Larry Jones, an investment banker in Grand Junction, “the majority of people in the Grand Valley are not being greatly affected by or seeing the present economy due to low unemployment rates and the presence of strong oil and gas revenue.” However, residents may be affected in the long run by sinking retirement plans and a rise in national and local inflation. On Oct. 1, a $700 billion bailout plan was passed by Congress to try and help the financial crisis. After the largest government interference with the economy since the Great Depression, the world anticipates its results. The bailout is intended to rescue the U.S. financial system but has become a controversial issue. “I don’t agree with the bailout plan. The companies should have to pay for their own debt,” said junior Ehrin Pruett, “We are going

Economy Vocabulary Dow Jones: short for Dow Jones Industrial Average, an indicator

of stock market prices that shows the average closing prices of the common stocks. 08 ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

April 30 12,820.13 Fed cuts interest rates

Sept. 29 10,365.45 Bailout falls in House Oct. 3

Graphic by Garrett Brown

Effects of market hit hard

ECONOMY PLUNGES

to 10,325.38 have Bailout passes and is to deal signed by Bush with the Oct. 8 problems 9,258.10 they have caused in Dow’s 52-week our future.” low On Oct. 14 President Bush announced that the Oct. 10 U.S. Treasury will 8,451.19 take $250 billion and directly buy shares in the nation’s leading banks as another measure to help save the economy. Countless economists agree that the nation will not be as fortunate in this economic crisis as in the past years and believe that this oncoming recession could be much more severe. “Given the likely drawn-out nature of the prospective adjustments in housing and financial markets, I see the most probable scenario as one in which the performance of the economy remains subpar…and then gradually improves in late 2009 and 2010,” Donald Kohn, vice chairman of the Federal Reserve, said to the Associated Press. The United States, along with the rest of the world, will have to wait to see if this financial crisis will turn around in the future.

Source: dictionary.com

Recession: a period of decline in business activity often limited in

scope or duration and less severe than a depression. Stocks: the shares of a particular corporation, or their outstanding capital.


MONEY IN THE BANK GREAT LUNCH IN A HURRY! HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT LUNCH SPECIAL

Home Owners Realty, Inc.

$5.00 (PLUS TAX) PEPPERONI OR CHEESE PERSONAL PIZZA AND DRINK Opens @ 10:45 For Students Daily Until 4:00 Dine In Only Next To Safeway On Horizon

CALL WHEN YOU LEAVE SCHOOL WE’LL HAVE IT READY WHEN YOU ARRIVE! 970-245-6425

John Duffy 970-234-4830

FREEDOM

RELIGION P R E S S S P E E C H USE THEM OR LOSE THEM.

ASSEMBLY PETITION

Go Tigers! Dave F. Proietti, D.D.S., P.C.

Diplomate, American Board of Orthodontics 2558 Patterson Road Grand Junction, CO 81505

Tel: (970) 245-2826 On Call: (970) 640-7367

ORANGE&BLACK |OCTOBER 2008 09


CONNECTION

Daniel Laczo “Habcsok –means marshmallow.” Age: 17 Hometown: Kecskemet, Hungary Host Family: The Adams

Interests:

Movies:

Music:

Books: Heroes:

– Women – Basketball – Acting – Snowboarding – Youth Group – Writing – “Meet the Fockers” – “The Nightmare before Christmas” – “The Matrix” – Hip Hop – Rock – Country – Bob Marley – Johnny Cash – Eminem – Harry Potter – Paulo Coelho – LeBron James because he is a good basketball player. – Bob Marley– just because.

Favorite Food:

– Lasagna – Asian food – Pizza

Status:

Single

10 ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

About Him: Although it might seem intimidating to come to a country where English is your second language, Daniel Laczo is feeling right at home with new friendships and loving host family. Laczo is looking forward to this winter because he loves snowboarding. He is also hoping to make the basketball team. He is actively involved in the Rotary Club downtown which holds meetings and sponsors the exchange program. Laczo enjoys participating in his youth group and Boy Scouts. To keep track of his busy schedule, he keeps a journal with him and writes in it every evening. Overall Laczo is having a great American experience and does not have much to complain about, “Everyone is kind and friendly. This makes it easier. I like my teachers and I’ve made many friends.”

Who I’d like to Meet: If Laczo could have dinner with anyone it would be Jessica Alba, “because she has beautiful eyes,” he said.

Q&A with exchange student pre-America The Orange and Black interviewed Alexander Knoch, a German exchange student, about his thoughts on America before he arrived on Oct. 24. Orange and Black: Why were you interested in being an exchange student? Alexander Knoch: It’s always (been of) interest to (me to visit) another country, so I decided to apply for the exchange to America. O&B: What is your perception of Americans? AK: What I have heard about Americans are some prejudices, like all Americans are eating fast food all day and (are) pretty lazy. Like Germans eat sauerkraut and wear leather pants. (Also), Americans are very proud (of) their culture, history, and achievements. O&B: What are you expecting life to be like in America? AK: I’m not quite sure how it’s going to be. Americans are concerned (about) their traditions (being) kept up. O&B: Are you nervous about living with someone you do not know? AK: I’m a bit nervous, but I think my exchange student will be (involved) in the same things as I am. So I am not too concerned about it. O&B: What are you involved in at your school? AK: I’m in the 10th grade at school. This year I’m playing the bass in our (school band.) O&B: What are you going to miss about your home country? AK: I think I’m going to miss the variety of bread here in Germany.

Page compiled by Kaitlin Cain


LIFESYLES & RELATIONSHIPS

The Mean Girl Epidemic McKenzie Binder Moriah Black

You know her. She is Regina George from “Mean Girls,” telling you how adorable your bracelet is and pretending to be your best friend, but gossiping about your tacky sense of style behind your back. She is Heidi from “The Hills,” creating nonstop turmoil and frequently spreading scandal, purposefully hurting her best friends. She is Blair from “Gossip Girl,” an expert at backhanded compliments and the art of using boyfriends for revenge. She is in “Desperate Housewives,” “One Tree Hill” and “America’s Next Top Model” and she is in the highest rated TV shows. Worst of all, she is in your high school. *

*

*

The “mean girl” syndrome is widespread in popular television. As children start watching TV shows like “Hannah Montana” starring the epitome of the mean girl as the antagonist, they may imitate the behaviors of their

favorite characters. Grand Junction High School is no exception to this behavior. “In elementary school, girls pushed me off the slide and made fun of me. In middle school, they would call me names all the time,” junior Caitlin Young said. “Now in high school, I see it happening to girls all around me.” The mean girl attitude is widely glamorized and has negative associations, but the callous manipulation tends to work, as many girls have discovered. Maria Pierce, junior, was a part of a clique that subscribed to this lifestyle in middle school. Even as an insider and a close friend in this group, she was routinely subjected to their ridicule and heartless gossip. “My friends acted like they liked me, but really talked about me behind my back. They would make promises they would always break,” Pierce said. While other girls would look at this group with admiration and envy, Pierce was con-

stantly miserable in the midst of the tension and backstabbing. After enduring this abuse for a few years, Pierce decided to abandon the vicious cycle of her friend’s politics. Pierce later saw that the quick results these girls got did not last. Though they could manipulate and get their way, negative effects in the future counteracted any immediate positives. “Guys fell for their flirty voices, and their grown-up looks. However, after they started seeing their true evil sides and how they treated other girls, they drew away from them,” Pierce said. Though Pierce was directly affected by the drama her friends created, at times she found herself falling back into the effective but questionable behavior her friends endorsed. “I catch myself envying them sometimes but I realize I shouldn’t because they are not who I want to ever become,” Pierce said. “I think karma has already started to hit them. I’m glad I left.”

ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008 11


CONNECTION

Using stimulants to get ahead Eric List Sarah Bolton taking it more and more to get high,” he said. “It got really bad.” After three months, he decided to quit. “I didn’t want to go down that road,” he said. Students with no ADD- or ADHD-related disabilities are using Adderall and Ritalin to help them stay awake and stay organized into the late hours of the night. The use of Adderall without a prescription can also cause insomnia, paranoia, convulsions and psychotic episodes. “It gave me headaches when I would come down from it and I stopped sleeping,” John said, “I would find myself sitting up in my room for hours and hours.” John stopped using Adderall because, “It’s way too strong of a drug to be in the hands of people who are not prescribed to use it,” he said, “they don’t understand the power of it until they get addicted.”

Photo by: Noelle DePuey

The usual association with drug abuse is recreationally getting high, but in some cases, the motive behind it is about being successful in school. Between hours of homework, sports practices, work and planning for the future, high school stu“I started dents are more than with being to notice familiar stressed about their demanding lifestyles. myself With so much to taking it balance, it is easy to start scrambling to get more things done. and more Every student has been there, but stuto get dents with Advanced Placement classes high.” and heavy academic schedules are especially taking the punch from all the pressure caused by school work. In an effort to overcome the stress,

some students are taking stimulants like Adderall and Ritalin which help increase the ability to pay attention and stay focused and are mainly prescribed to people with ADD and ADHD. High schools have begun to noticed the effects these drugs have on students as this trend trickles down from college students to teenagers. While many students think Adderall is a harmless drug with no side effects that will help them excel in school, this and other drugs of its nature can be habit-forming, just like cocaine or methamphetamine. Students who take Adderall recreationally can end up using other drugs as well. John*, a Grand Junction High School student, took a trip down this road. Succumbing to pressure from homework and peers, he took Adderall in order to get more work done. Soon, however, he began to feel the consequences along with the benefits. “It definitely helped me focus, but I started to get addicted really fast. After about two weeks I started to notice myself

Source: media.www.fsunews.com and goaskalice.columbia.edu

*Editors note: name has been changed

Raising the standard Baylee Ragar Each year, students from third to tenth grade dread taking the Colorado Student Assessment Program standardized tests, though most do not understand that the test requirements are set at the federal level. On Jan. 8, 2002, President Bush passed the No Child Left Behind Act, which set new requirements for all schools in the United States. The No Child Left Behind Act was put in place to improve performance in primary and secondary schools in the United States by increasing the standard for schools throughout the nation. According to Principal Jon Bilbo, the program was a good theory, “but did not provide the money.” Many agree that the idea lacked the funding to implement the suggested requirements. In order to uphold these requirements, the Colorado Department of 12 ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

Education plans on making adequate yearly progress reports through CSAP and SCAPA scores, as well as graduation rates. Test results were all over the board last year with some areas going up, some staying the same and a few dropping below expectations. “We felt that last year was a successful year for Grand Junction High School,” said Bilbo. Teachers and administrators are prepared for this year. All departments have planned ahead of time how they will review for CSAP. This year, writing is being stressed into the curriculum to help students with standardized testing as well as with their overall performance. “All classes need to be using higher level thinking skills,” said Bilbo. Bilbo believes that students need to have a good work ethic as well as a competitiveness to succeed in the challenges of the 21st century and his goal is to get “more students to the top of the pack.”

9th grade CSAP proficiency for 2008

10th grade CSAP proficiency for 2008

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LIFESTYLES & RELATIONSHIPS

Go Green Go

Six ways to to conserve energy for a healthier earth

Conserve

Recycle

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Turning off the water in the shower can save gallons while you soap up. Showers use an average of 2.5 gallons of water per minute, and by conserving, you could save over eight gallons of water every day.

g

For as little as $1.75, glass, plastic, cans and paper can be picked up from your house once a month to be recycled. Recycle your old cell phone or pager, which contains materials harmful to the planet.

g

Appliances or chargers that are turned off but left plugged in is a huge energy suck. According to U.S. Department of Energy, electronics that are left plugged in consume 75 percent of all energy used in houses.

g

Hairspray and other products that come in aerosol cans contain chlorofluorocarbon, or CFC, a gas that is believed to contribute to global warming. Switch to spray bottles to help reduce the CFC’s.

g

Computers that are left on all night are pointless and a waste of energy. Unless you want to update your Facebook at 3 a.m., there is no reason to leave it on all night.

g

Riding your bike instead of driving is one of the best ways to go green. Every four-mile car trip adds 15 pounds of pollutants into the air. Instead of adding smog to the atmosphere, fit in a mini workout instead.

Student draws Havana Nights Katie Langford When children grow up, they want to be ballerinas, firefighters, superheroes, astronauts and artists. But childhood hopes and dreams rarely continue into high school years. For junior Forrest Jensen, his passion has always been clear. Ever since his childhood, Jensen has been creating art, following the example of his family. “My family has always been really artistic. I grew up in it,” Jensen said, “I’ve been (creating) art ever since I can remember.” Jensen’s artistic beginnings can be “It’s always traced back to his grandmother who his talent when she cared been there encouraged for him about once a week. to help me “She used to sit with me and draw until my parents came to pick me up,” Jensen get away said. “I always looked forward to going over there to show her my recent drawfrom my ings.” problems. His artistic ability has always come naturally. He does not think of it as a It’s an job or a conscious choice. “It’s always been there to help me get escape.” away from my problems. It’s an escape.” Of the many aspects of art, Jensen’s favorite is “creating something people haven’t seen before. It’s like being able to show your thoughts.” Jensen sketches constantly, both in class and in his free time. “People are my favorite subjects. I like to pursue the challenge of putting their personality on paper.” Jensen has taken four art classes at GJHS and left a lasting impression on his teachers. “Forrest is a fine young man with incredible artistic talent,” art teacher Sal Salas said. “He raises the standards in my room.” As for Jensen in the future, Salas hinted at a project to be displayed at Barnes and Noble. He is entering between three to five pieces into the art show, and designed the homecoming T-shirt.

Unplug

Switch

Power down

Pedal

The Low Down: The ACT The SAT and ACT test scores are becoming increasingly insignificant to college acceptance. According to a report released by the National Association for College Admission Counseling, test scores are not the best way to measure the college success for a student. They have discussed the possiblity of removing the ACT and SAT from the admission process altogether. There are 770 colleges in the U.S. that no longer require applicants submit test scores. ORANGE&BLACK ORANGE&BLACK ||OCTOBER MARCH 20082008

13


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INSIGHT

Himalayan Healers

Members of the lowest class in the Hindu caste system in some rural areas of Nepal are condemned to a life of poverty and seclusion from birth. It is socially unacceptable for these people to touch or be touched by members of higher classes. The Untouchables are given a chance at a class-free life with the organization Himalayan Healers, which teaches and practices massage therapy to connect people of different classes. Himalayan Healers is appropriately symbolized by a hand. The red symbolizes the “raato-maato,” the red mud in Nepal that traditional homes are made of, which connects all people at the roots. The spiral in the palm signifies the “Shaligram,” which symbolizes new beginnings in Nepalese culture. The final part of the hand, the spectrum of colors, represents the inclusion of all people despite their race, gender, religion or caste. As a whole, the Healers’ hand serves as a reminder of the ability to bring people together with the power of human touch. ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008 15


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imalayan Healers, an organization founded by Robert Buckley, a Grand Junction native, zeroes in on the Untouchables of the Hindu caste system by helping them redefine their lives. These poverty-stricken people, living at the very bottom of the social hierarchy, are condemned by the rest of society and are forbidden to mingle with those of higher class, restricting them from accessing water supplies and temples of the community. Because of the harsh realities of their situation that they are born into, they are left with the most labor intensive and unhygienic jobs, leaving little hope for a better future—until now. Through Himalayan Healers, the first massage therapy school in the country of Nepal, Untouchables are given a second chance at life, an opportunity that they never had before. It all started when Buckley traveled to Katmandu, Nepal, with the Peace Corps. In order to truly experience the lives of the people that they helped, Buckley and fellow members of the Peace Corps lived in poverty on a local level, sharing the same living conditions as the people around them. Over the course of two and a half years, Buckley contributed to the construction of a regional library and worked to create social change for the Untouchables, but that was only the beginning for Buckley. When the Peace Corps left Nepal, Buckley decided to stay and live independently, the only one out of the 100 workers who volunteered to work there. “I love Nepal for some reason. I figured out the language before I went, and when I got there, I really clicked with the people,” he said. After working with the Untouchables of the Hindu caste system while in the Peace Corps, Buckley knew he wanted to continue to help improve their lifestyle. When Buckley thought of founding a healing arts school that would allow Untouchables to defy their title and pursue better lives, he was determined to make it a reality. “The idea just came to me one day,” Buckley said. “It gave me goose bumps, and it still does to this day.” It was rigorous work getting the program started because of a lack of money, a location and prejudices against the Untouchables. Buckley said that he even received death threats from some members of a higher class who opposed his program as it began, but he did not let that discourage him. “You do what you have to do,” he said. The prejudices made it exceptionally difficult for Buckley to find a home base for his program because his work was condemned by higher ups in the caste system who did not want the Untouchables working in their locations. Fortunately, Buckley maintained connections he made through the Peace Corps and was able to get the support he needed, including two rent-free resorts which became the base of his operations. He worked without pay and took out personal loans to finance the program. Buckley’s first group of people to enter the three to four-month program and begin their training in the healing arts of the school were chosen through an interview and rating “When process. Those with higher scores were admitted to the schools. Although the program targets people are Untouchables, Buckley does not want to “put up walls,” so the program remains open to everyone. opposed “When the first group came in, they were hurt, and when they left, they were shining,” to what Buckley said. “We are there to help the people, and the main goal is to help them heal their soul.” you are People who came from lives of abuse and torture are learning how to heal themselves and doing, others through the ancient massage traditions that the school is striving to preserve and teach. The success of the students is phenomenal, in spirit and in opportunity, for those who graduate that is from the program can go on to become employed and make 10 times the national average when you income. “These people are told from the day (they are) born that they cannot touch other people,” know you Buckley said. “But through the program, they are constantly healing themselves and others have done through massage therapies taught at the schools.” Buckley has witnessed many stories as students come and go from the school, but one in something particular seems to hold special significance to him. One of Buckley’s students that entered the program, Ram Kumar, was second from the right.” bottom of the lowest class of Untouchables. Eager to participate in the school, Kumar left his job and lost his girlfriend because of it, but he was extremely successful in the program. “Every once and a while a student comes along who has something extra. Kumar had that something extra,” Buckley said. Simultaneously, Sabita, a high-caste woman who is now the main teacher and best massage therapist in Nepal, was also attending the school. Over the course of the program, Kumar and Sabita fell in love despite their different standings in the caste system and the disapproval of Sabita’s parents, who temporarily tried to hurt Kumar until they saw the love the two shared. “(Sabita) broke the barrier of the caste system,” said Buckley. “They are the heart of what we do,” Buckley said, because he wishes for the program to promote acceptance and equality. Kumar and Sabita now help run the Himalayan Healers program. After the first group had been selected and completed their training, they were put in charge of recruiting the next group. “I wanted it to be in their hands,” Buckley said. Having expanded to eight locations in Nepal, Himalayan Healers is now managed mostly by former students, giving Buckley the opportunity to return to the United States where he is working on raising money to build a school that the Himalayan Healers can call their own. Buckley is always looking for local support to help with the organization. If any teachers or classes are interested in helping out, Buckley is willing to give a presentation on his project and the next fundraiser, selling Nepali earrings for the holidays. Prizes are available for any students or classes who want to help out, and if 600 or more earrings are sold, enough money will be raised to build the entire school. The official website of the Himalayan Healers is www. himalayanhealers.org. With the growing help of others, Buckley continues to chase his dream despite some opposition, reminding himself that “When people are opposed to what you are doing, that is when you know you have done something right.”

H

Sarah Bolton Zack Kelley

A Touch Of Nepal...

INSIGHT

Alyssa Behrens (1), Garrett Brown (8), Courtesy of Robert Buckley (2-7)

8


5

4

3

2

1

6

7

imalayan Healers, an organization founded by Robert Buckley, a Grand Junction native, zeroes in on the Untouchables of the Hindu caste system by helping them redefine their lives. These poverty-stricken people, living at the very bottom of the social hierarchy, are condemned by the rest of society and are forbidden to mingle with those of higher class, restricting them from accessing water supplies and temples of the community. Because of the harsh realities of their situation that they are born into, they are left with the most labor intensive and unhygienic jobs, leaving little hope for a better future—until now. Through Himalayan Healers, the first massage therapy school in the country of Nepal, Untouchables are given a second chance at life, an opportunity that they never had before. It all started when Buckley traveled to Katmandu, Nepal, with the Peace Corps. In order to truly experience the lives of the people that they helped, Buckley and fellow members of the Peace Corps lived in poverty on a local level, sharing the same living conditions as the people around them. Over the course of two and a half years, Buckley contributed to the construction of a regional library and worked to create social change for the Untouchables, but that was only the beginning for Buckley. When the Peace Corps left Nepal, Buckley decided to stay and live independently, the only one out of the 100 workers who volunteered to work there. “I love Nepal for some reason. I figured out the language before I went, and when I got there, I really clicked with the people,” he said. After working with the Untouchables of the Hindu caste system while in the Peace Corps, Buckley knew he wanted to continue to help improve their lifestyle. When Buckley thought of founding a healing arts school that would allow Untouchables to defy their title and pursue better lives, he was determined to make it a reality. “The idea just came to me one day,” Buckley said. “It gave me goose bumps, and it still does to this day.” It was rigorous work getting the program started because of a lack of money, a location and prejudices against the Untouchables. Buckley said that he even received death threats from some members of a higher class who opposed his program as it began, but he did not let that discourage him. “You do what you have to do,” he said. The prejudices made it exceptionally difficult for Buckley to find a home base for his program because his work was condemned by higher ups in the caste system who did not want the Untouchables working in their locations. Fortunately, Buckley maintained connections he made through the Peace Corps and was able to get the support he needed, including two rent-free resorts which became the base of his operations. He worked without pay and took out personal loans to finance the program. Buckley’s first group of people to enter the three to four-month program and begin their training in the healing arts of the school were chosen through an interview and rating “When process. Those with higher scores were admitted to the schools. Although the program targets people are Untouchables, Buckley does not want to “put up walls,” so the program remains open to everyone. opposed “When the first group came in, they were hurt, and when they left, they were shining,” to what Buckley said. “We are there to help the people, and the main goal is to help them heal their soul.” you are People who came from lives of abuse and torture are learning how to heal themselves and doing, others through the ancient massage traditions that the school is striving to preserve and teach. The success of the students is phenomenal, in spirit and in opportunity, for those who graduate that is from the program can go on to become employed and make 10 times the national average when you income. “These people are told from the day (they are) born that they cannot touch other people,” know you Buckley said. “But through the program, they are constantly healing themselves and others have done through massage therapies taught at the schools.” Buckley has witnessed many stories as students come and go from the school, but one in something particular seems to hold special significance to him. One of Buckley’s students that entered the program, Ram Kumar, was second from the right.” bottom of the lowest class of Untouchables. Eager to participate in the school, Kumar left his job and lost his girlfriend because of it, but he was extremely successful in the program. “Every once and a while a student comes along who has something extra. Kumar had that something extra,” Buckley said. Simultaneously, Sabita, a high-caste woman who is now the main teacher and best massage therapist in Nepal, was also attending the school. Over the course of the program, Kumar and Sabita fell in love despite their different standings in the caste system and the disapproval of Sabita’s parents, who temporarily tried to hurt Kumar until they saw the love the two shared. “(Sabita) broke the barrier of the caste system,” said Buckley. “They are the heart of what we do,” Buckley said, because he wishes for the program to promote acceptance and equality. Kumar and Sabita now help run the Himalayan Healers program. After the first group had been selected and completed their training, they were put in charge of recruiting the next group. “I wanted it to be in their hands,” Buckley said. Having expanded to eight locations in Nepal, Himalayan Healers is now managed mostly by former students, giving Buckley the opportunity to return to the United States where he is working on raising money to build a school that the Himalayan Healers can call their own. Buckley is always looking for local support to help with the organization. If any teachers or classes are interested in helping out, Buckley is willing to give a presentation on his project and the next fundraiser, selling Nepali earrings for the holidays. Prizes are available for any students or classes who want to help out, and if 600 or more earrings are sold, enough money will be raised to build the entire school. The official website of the Himalayan Healers is www. himalayanhealers.org. With the growing help of others, Buckley continues to chase his dream despite some opposition, reminding himself that “When people are opposed to what you are doing, that is when you know you have done something right.”

H

Sarah Bolton Zack Kelley

A Touch Of Nepal...

INSIGHT

Alyssa Behrens (1), Garrett Brown (8), Courtesy of Robert Buckley (2-7)

8


SCENE

Drama dept. kicks year off with “Little Women” Moriah Black Grand Junction High School’s drama department began what they believe will be their best year yet with the production of Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women”. “It is a strong novel, rich with character development. It shows the dynamics of a family going through a hard time,” Justin Whiteford, the director of the department said. The play is set in Massachusetts and follows the footsteps of four young sisters and their mother struggling to survive the hardship of the late 1800s while their father is fighting in the war. Fans who are familiar with the book “Little Women” were frustrated with the condensed version used in the school production. The script left out many key elements of the story, and the short length hindered the full development of many characters. “Little Women,” however, included a diverse array of talents, ranging from Austin Ross, senior, to Allisyn Thompson, freshman, all of whom built their roles into likable and relatable characters. Jordan Fellhauer, junior, starred as the secondoldest sister, Josephine “Jo” March. Fellhauer may have adopted some of her character’s boldness. “By far, I feel more confident. (The stage) feels like home now,” Fellhauer said. It is easy to tell that Fellhauer’s talents have blossomed with hard work. Her portrayal of Jo was focused and promised.

Photo courtesy of George Brown From left: Bryce MacEvoy, Austin Ross, Kalinda Theobold and Tessa Espinosa. This can be said of most of the cast of “Little Women”. “We have a strong foundation, with good officers who have developed powerful goals for the department,” Whiteford said. The drama department is involved with monthly charity work, including performances for assisted living homes and donating portions of their money earned to different funds.

One of their causes is the Chani Capps Fund, which finances the medical treatments of a 2008 Grand Junction High School alumnus. “We are really a family; we all work together and everyone is so loving and caring,” Fellhauer said. “This year, it’s good.”

The impending return of ‘80s fashion Alyssa Behrens Nike high-tops. Wayfarers. Vibrant colored headbands and accessories: could it be the return of the outrageous fashion of the ‘80s? Some Grand Junction High School students are bringing sexy back by re-introducing the styles and fashion from over 30 years ago. Thinking outside the box, or rather dressing outside the box, is starting to catch the eyes of the younger generation, who are adding a new twist into everyday wardrobes. All over the country, clothing stores are stocking their shelves with a twentieth century flare to ‘80s fashion. Many stores in GJ, such as Zumiez and Wet Seal, have already caught on. One of GJHS’ notable ‘80s clothing aficionado is senior Colton Duncan. “My ideal outfit is short jorts [jean shorts],

18

ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

lime green suspenders, Crocs and a neon colored polo.” Duncan may be one of the few who wear this new variety of clothing, but the obsession is expected to hit GJHS and other high schools in the near future. Emily Lozow, an employee at Urban Outfitters, a clothing franchise known for reviving the trends of decades, has her own theory about the upcoming ‘80s boom. “Everything in fashion comes and goes around in a circle, and right now the ‘80s are in a full swing comeback.” With the availability of this new style, more and more people are expected to be decked out in ‘80s clothing styles. From LA to NYC and GJ to Denver, the ‘80s are on the rise.

Photo courtesy mctcampus.com


ARTS & CULTURE

SMART FORTWO

From $11,590 Power: Gasoline (Hybrid in development) Fuel Economy (mpg): 33 city/41 highway Capacity: 2 adults 0-60mph: 12.8 seconds

Get smart Kaitlin Cain Getting an impressive 41 miles per gallon on the highway, the latest big car trend comes in a small eight-foot package. The smart fortwo has been making its way onto American streets since spring of this year, although it has been zipping around Europe for ten years. Do not be fooled by the golf cart-like demeanor; this car is a lean, mean, eco-green machine. On top of its game-changing fuel economy and undeniable cool factor, good parking is nearly guaranteed, even when visiting big cities. Even if the driver’s parallel parking skills are not up to par, there is no need to worry. The exterior of the car is made of scratch and dent-resistant plastic paneling. The interior stays true to the earth-friendly theme. It is made from a hemp-based material. A 2009 Smart fortwo comes in three trim levels ranging in price from $11,590 to $16,590. Factory-installed options include a convertible roof feature, a

premium audio system, heated seats and power steering. The small body and lightweight structure raise some concerns for prospective Colorado customers who regularly navigate dangerous weather. Albert Cohen, who recently moved to Denver from Paris, reports that the fortwo® treated him well in past winters. “It had good traction and handled nicely on the snowy streets of Paris,” he said. The engineering team at Daimler has also achieved the highest front and side crashworthiness ratings from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. “It’s an offset test that replicates most real-world crashes,” Dave Schembri, president of Smart USA, said. Drivers can thank the smart’s electronic stability program for these ratings. ESP comes standard four years ahead of the federal requirement of the feature. Despite its’ safety, however, Edmunds, a major vehicle review company, calls the car “not suited to highway travel.” There are consistent complaints about the transmission being grabby as well, especially in automatic, with a near-absurd lag time between first and second. In reality, the car probably falls somewhere between revelation and a good first try. The small car sector still needs work before it can appeal to the majority of the American market, especially here in Colorado. For now, the fortwo provides a smart option for the right buyer— the air traveling, city-dwelling eco-advocate with a knack for what is new.

MEET THE COMPETITION

TOYOTA PRIUS From $22,000 Power: Hybrid (Gasoline/Electric) Fuel Economy (mpg): 48 city/45 highway Capacity: 5 people 0-60 mph: 12.7 seconds

HONDA FIT From $14,550 Power: Gasoline and Hybrid Fuel Economy (mpg): 27 city/33 highway Capacity: 5 people 0-60 mph: 10 seconds

Photos courtesy of media.daimler.com, hondanews.com, media.toyota.ca ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

19


SCENE

THE

Zack Kelley Emilie Pearson “‘Keeping it real’ has been pimped and perverted,” said DJ Kool Herc, a Jamaican DJ who is commonly accredited with creating Hip-Hop in the Bronx. “It ain’t about ‘keeping it real,’ it’s about keeping it right.” Hip-Hop is a lifestyle, a voice of multiple generations and something that obtains great power by keeping it right. “Keeping it real” used to be the lifestyle of Hip-Hop artists, but in recent decades it can be seen that the phrase has lost its touch and is “nothing more than a fad word. It sounds cute,” Herc said. “Keeping it right,” on the other hand, is telling Hip-Hop artists not to abuse their gift of a voice. They have the power to sing about what touches them and an immense population will hear them. Hip-Hop was not established as an art form to sing about expensive Nikes or bling, but was a lifestyle that grew to be expressed through art to connect with people one on one. “That is why it has so much universal appeal. It has given young people a way to understand their world, whether they are from the suburbs or the city or wherever,” said Herc. The Hip-Hop style consists of an American-

Graphics by Greg Coleman

REAL

ized combination of beats influenced by music from the African and Jamaican cultures and is said to consistently follow four main elements that include emceeing, DJing, graffiti and break-dancing. According to DJ Kool Herc, however, there are not just four main elements of Hip-Hop but a vast array of things that make Hip-Hop more than just music. “I think there are way more than those. The way you walk, the way you talk, the way you look (and) the way you communicate,” said Herc. The most formidable opponent of keeping it real is perhaps the monster that Hip-Hop birthed. Rap, a genre that evolved from Hip-Hop and has become much more accessible, is a source of frustration for many Hip-Hop fans due to its lack of important elements. According to purists, commercial Rap music has deteriorated the respectable reputation original Hip-Hop emcees strived to build in the ‘70s and ‘80s. The difference between the two styles, though, is blurry for many Grand Junction High School students. One common misconception is that Rap is a more hardcore version of Hip-Hop.

“Rap is harder. If they’ve got beef, they say it,” Ty Nielson said. “Hip-Hop is about happy stuff like bling. Girls like Hip-Hop. It’s the stuff you dance to.” Taylor Watkins, junior and local Hip-Hop spe“ All the cialist, clarifies the differstuff on ence. “Rap is a Hip-Hop the radio is artist who sold out. “Artists that sing about weak. You their lives are legit; they’ve have to actually been around and they know what’s up, their go under(songs) have more passion ground to in them,” he said. get the real Since the commercial(stuff ).” ization of Rap, Watkins said, Hip-Hop is a harder commodity to find. “All the stuff on the radio is weak. You (have) to go underground to get the real (stuff ), the good (stuff ).” When confronted with the complications of going ‘underground,’ there are few who know where to turn. Sophomore Kyle Klements suggests searching Google for underground Hip-Hop. “On the Internet is where you can find a lot of good stuff.” Despite the ever-growing popularity of Rap, Hip-Hop is still very much alive and well today, dwelling in alleys, street-corners and even on the unexplored shelves of iTunes.

The Orange and Black’s Hip-Hop Starter Kit 1 2 3 4 5

Name

Close Edge

Mellow My Man

Who Do You Call? Fire in the Eye 30 Something

20 ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

Album

Release Date

The Roots

Do Ya Want More?!?!!?!

1998

Brother Ali

Present off the Record

Artist Mos Def

New Danger

2004

J-Live

You Don’t Know the Half

2001

Jay-Z

Kingdom Come

2007 2006


ARTS & CULTURE

Last Minute

Six costumes that you can put together in time for tonight. Piece of Gum

Crash Course in Halloween History

Gold Digger

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Dress head to toe in a pink sweat suit and then tie a sneaker to your head. Or you can also glue a sneaker to a hat.

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Dress entirely in gold clothing and cover yourself in gold glitter. Carry around a trowel that has been painted gold.

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Dress in all black and glue barbies all over yourself. Start practicing embarassingly terrible pick-up lines to deliver to door answerers tonight.

Jillian Arja Halloween dates back to an ancient Celtic festival called Samhain. The end of summer harvest and the beginning of winter on Nov. 1 was the Celtic New Year. On the night of October 31, they believed that ghosts returned to earth. The Druids, or Celtic priests, were beleived to be able to make predictions about the future. As part of the event, crops “ During the and animals were used as sacces. They wore costumes of parade poor rifi animal heads and skins to avoid citizens being seen by the ghosts. By the 800s, Christianity had would beg spread into Ireland and the U.K. Pope Boniface IV designated for food and November 1 All Saints’ Day. families This day was also referred to as All-hallows or All-hallowswould mass, meaning All Saints’ Day. give them It eventually became known as Halloween. pastries.” England’s All Souls Day parades were where the American tradition of ‘trick or treating’ references. During the parade, poor citizens would beg for food and families would give them pastries in return for the promise to pray for the family’s dead relatives. The holiday of Halloween continues on to this day. High school students are still participating in Halloween traditions because it gives them a chance to be a kid. “Yes (I still trick or treat), because it’s tradition and the candy is delicious,” sophomore Amy Flukey said. Trick or treating has not died with GJHS students. Freshman Ashley Funke has a plan for trick or treating this year. “I go with my friend Siarra and we go to the ‘ritzy’ houses and they hand out jumbo candy bars and we take two!”

Babe Magnet

Picnic

Martha Stewart

iPod commercial

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Cut a hole in red and whitecheckered tablecloth so you can wear it like a poncho. Attach plastic food and utensils, paper plates, and fake ants.

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Wear khaki pants, plain pastelcolored shirt, apron, and simple shoes. Have gardening gloves sticking out of back pocket and a basket of freshly baked muffins on arm. Handcuffs are optional.

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Dress in all black with iPod and headphones in. Listen to your favorite songs and dance as wildly as humanly possible.

The Low Down: Express Trail of Terror The Express All-Star Dance Team has created a haunted mansion at 6th and Pitkin Ave. called Trail of Terror to raise money to go to Nationals and Worlds competitions. “The house was scary to begin with,” senior Breanna Jones said. “We helped make it and we know what’s coming and it’s still scary. The attraction will close Nov. 1.

ORANGE&BLACK | | OCTOBER 2008 21 ORANGE&BLACK MARCH 2008


STAFF EDITORIAL

Nobody can ignore the initial fall of the stock market—700 points was not and is not easy to forget. Nobody can ignore Barack Obama slandering John McCain and vice versa. Nobody can ignore the way conflict in the Middle East is affecting our nation. We can, however, acknowledge that our generation can be a beacon of hope for a better future.

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et’s face it—we as high school students do not have the ability to change very much right now. But that doesn’t mean that we should’t get involved in our community or try to make a difference. Sooner than most people think, high school students are going to be adults. Then, before we know it, we will be expected to work and live in the real world. However, we’ll be ready. We will be ready to make change because we know what is going on. More than ever, we should be the ones who are informed. Our generation was born in the Information Age, the age where communication occurs in half of an instant. To borrow the title from former president Ronald Reagan, we are the Great Communicators. Change comes with the click-clack of a keyboard and the face on a webcam broadcasted from across the globe. If we can communicate in an instant, if we can bring change before the day is over, if we can produce results, nothing can stop us. Communication, as everyone knows, breeds understanding and understanding breeds acceptance, and who can argue that a little acceptance won’t make the world a better place to live in?

22 ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

Photo courtesy of apple.com

SO HERE WE ARE...

We are going to be the electricians, doctors, plumbers, senators and ambassadors of the future, and then we will be the ones calling the shots. Maybe it’s too much to press upon ourselves right now, too much to think about, but if anyone can do it, it’s us. The key is for us, as a group of young people, to realize that while we may not be the ones in control right now, we should not be bitter but rather optimistic about change. We are the hope for the better future, the better future that, if we play our part, will become reality the instant our adult lives begin. So let’s look at the world in a new light from now on. Maybe John McCain and Barack Obama don’t matter quite so much anymore. Maybe all the slander and hatred we’ve been hearing won’t affect us. Maybe the nation can pull through this economic decline with positive spirits and a greater sense of community. We, the Orange and Black, think so. We are the future, and no matter what the current presidential candidates say, it is the high school generation who are the change, the change we need. Sincerely,


OPINION

The evolution of the American dream

banter

Photo by Cody Blankenship

Natalie Pipe

The American dream is ideally being able to achieve whatever you want if you work hard enough at it. For some, this means having thr ability to put food on the table every night and send their kids to college. However, for the majority of Americans, this dream means that they can buy the next biggest television, part of the reason for the current credit crisis. The materialistic American dream would not be such an atrocity if it was not drawing our attention away from important matters such as the fact that the graduation rate in cities like Detroit is less than 50 percent. Taxpayers will not pay for education funding because they are so busy paying for their material possessions. In a survey conducted by bankrate.com, two-thirds of those surveyed said they viewed paying their credit cards as “more important than saving for retirement or funding their children’s education.” The majority of Americans value what they own more than the quality of their lives. They are willing to put themselves in debt if it means they can continue to live their consumer lifestyle. Therefore, the solution to credit

Cody Holman: What is wrong with athletes nowadays? All they care about is money and fame. Grayson O’Roark: Of course. People want to see one-handed catches, 360 dunks, and front flips into the end zone, not a congratulating handshake for a good attempt at winning. CH: That is the problem. Sport athletes should be protecting the integrity of the game. GO: The integrity of the game does not draw crowds. CH: The game is about more than crowds. Sports should be about competition and sportsmanship. GO: Without a crowd or the possibility of making ESPN’s top plays of the week, athletes would not play with the same passion and intensity. CH: The passion to win in respectable athletes like Tiger Woods has proven to be superior over those that are merely fame-hungry. Woods has money and still goes out every

card debt is a lifestyle change. The change would not only alleviate debt, it would allow us to concentrate more on other issues that affect Americans. An issue on the Nov. 2008 ballot that calls for the funding is Amendment 41, which deals with providing additional assistance for developmentally disabled. Currently, 2,700 adults and children are on the waiting list for services for the next two years, and this number is expected to grow to 12,000 by 2012. Our possessions distract us from significant matters that require thought, planning and effort to work through. In this sense, we cannot progress as a society as long as we are preoccupied with what we own while ignoring bigger problems in our lives, such as helping the developmentally disabled. This current American dream requires no work. It is as easy as swiping a card. If America wants to take pride in the American dream in which anyone has the freedom to become anything, we should curtail our obsession with buying material possessions and become better people by investing in education, our futures and a better quality of life. Source: CNN News, state.co.us

Photo by Shreya Pokharel

Dear Editor, I am writing to share my disappointment regarding Homecoming week. Let me first say that necessary thanks are in order. Thank you to Exec for putting on a great dance and showing superb creativity when creating the Dance-Off for the halftime show. Also, thank you to the girls and guys who took the time to put themselves out on the field and make all of us not miss the band as much. No, my qualms are in regards to the administration’s actions. The administration put the kibosh on color wars and the pep assembly newspapers, citing that the competition between classes harbored disunity in the school. Color wars has been a long standing tradition, and the spirit competition between grades helps to harbor healthy competition and pride. When I walk into the school on color war day, I do not notice individual colors of grades, but the overwhelming color scheme we all make. Color wars allows each person to take pride in their grade and ultimately the school. I speak for many when I say we are not against the administration or their policies. We just want the same opportunities the senior classes of the past have had to have fun and carry out Junction traditions. We want the chance to represent our class (in any color), to lead the cheers at the football games and make sure our senior year is unforgettable. So, please administration, give us the opportunity to be part of the Grand Junction High School traditions, or at the very least, give us our newspapers back. —Anonymous

week with honor and works on improving his game. GO: People would much rather watch Terrell Owens win with swagger and a crazy celebration while competing at the same level as Tiger Woods. That is what defines a memorable athlete. CH: The only passion guys like T.O. have is for money, while respectable athletes put hard work into improving the game. Tiger Woods will be remembered forever. Terrell Owens is just a fad. GO: Money and fame are the only reason sports have evolved as much as they have. Without money, games would not be able to be nationally televised. CH: Money helps, but that is not what the basis of sports is built upon. It is about the love of the game, not the love of money. Hopefully future athletes can learn from the mistakes of many present day athletes. GO: Hopefully I get paid for this. ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008 23


OPEN TO INTERPRETATION

Bin Laden: American Idol M

Graphic

by Greg

Colema

n

Stephani Soto

eet Osama bin Laden. He is not a deity, he is not a prophet, he does not have all the radical Muslims of the world under his control. He is a 51-year-old man with a degree in public administration, a knack for organizing and quite a bit of money. He is not behind every anti-American, or any other kind of Taliban, al-Qaida or terrorist-related act of violence. Ye Yet to us, he is the face of terrorism. It is true that Osama bin Laden is idolized as both a religious figure and a “strategic commander,” but he does not have the power we accredit him to have. It is ridiculous to think that getting rid of bin Laden will solve the problems in the Middle East. What is even more ridiculous is that our politicians appeal to our sense of justice and revenge, claiming that they will chase bin Laden into what is currently an ally country or into the very gates of hell, but realistically, what good would that do? It would probably just really piss off Pakistan and leave McCain at the gates of hell, and really I think our efforts should be placed elsewhere. Somewhere that will improve our lives, not just satisfy our thirst for blood. Bin Laden is not the only man with influence in the Jihadist movement, and the movement will not dissolve without him. There are many other men like Al Zawahiri, who is thought to be the head of al-Queda, along with radical Islamic scholars who

PROPS

+ To youth awareness and participation in the 2008 presidential election. + To the free lunch on Mondays and Tuesdays—thank you for feeding the hungry masses. + To having two major political figures visit Grand Junction in the last two months. + To all fall sports athletes who made it to state—congratulations. + To the marching band for being chosen to play at the Palin rally. + To the drama department for another great production. + To executive council for a wonderful homecoming—it was a great success.

24 ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

have just as much or more sway in many cases than bin Laden. Osama bin Laden’s first declaration of war against the West would not have had influence without the support of a senior Islamic scholar who passed a religious decree, or Fatwa. The Fatwa, which declared that training and readiness against religious attack was a religious duty, along with the United States’ presence in Kuwait was interpreted as a newly launched crusade against the Muslims and convinced over 40,000 people that they needed to take up a defensive jihad. As a result, those 40,000 went to be trained in Afghanistan, but they did this not just because bin Laden told them the United States was evil, they did it because of the scholar’s decree and the religious implications. A study by the Combating Terrorism Center stated that while men like bin Laden and Al Zawahiri have had an enormous impact on the wider Jihadi movement, they have had little to no impact on Jihadi thinkers. According to a CRS report to congress in 2006, when bin Laden said that he would agree to a conditional truce with the United States, it was unlikely that he could have guaranteed a total cessation of hostilities. We give Osama bin Laden the power that he has by chasing him and destroying places where he allegedly is, continuing an occupation that lends itself to the image of a western crusade against Islam. Besides the fact that we place blame on one man for mass destruction that belongs to many people, our plan of action is no better than terrorism itself. It comes down to the fact that bin Laden is one man. He is an icon of a movement, but he is not the movement itself. If the president is killed, the U.S. continues to be the U.S. If the pope is killed, Catholics continue to be Catholics. Even as our soldiers are killed, we continue the war on terror and if we kill bin Laden, the radical Islamic movement will not only survive, it will be fueled by the death of a martyr we created.

– To unsportsmanlike conduct at sporting events—we’re adults, let’s act like it and not throw things at cheerleaders. – To reckless driving around campus—as the sign says, get it together Tigers. – To the use of racial slurs—grow up. – To the fights at the pep assemblies—we got them taken away once already, let’s not make it twice. – To the lack of PRIDE that led to prohibition of food in the library. – To animal abuse, especially on campus—not cool. – To students tearing off political campaign stickers from cars in the parking lot.

FLOPS


OPINION

Know your rights Six ways to use your five First Amendment rights Publish a blog

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words of

WISDOM

Write a letter to the editor

g

with David Cooper math teacher

Wisdom is the knowledge of how to use knowledge.

Create a petition

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The ability to create relationships with students and being the Tiger mascot makes a teacher successful. Effort and attitude makes a student succeed. Life prioritizes itself when it needs to.

Hold a protest

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Treat the copy lady right and your job will be easy. My life is pretty much an awkward moment. Mondays are exciting because it’s a new week. Tuesdays are the worst. Life is an epic battle of good vs. evil—just like Star Wars. To be a Tiger mascot you have to have lots and lots of energy, which is funny because I do not have much (energy). I just feed off of the crowds. I agree with you, but you have to agree with me too. I don’t like being cliché—I strive to be unique. I like watching “Lord of the Rings” and “Star Wars”—I know this classifies me as a nerd. Roosters is my favorite restaurant—not for their wings but for the glorious fries. If you want to create a great atmosphere, become servants for each other.

Pray at school

Wear your politics

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With www.blogger.com, a free and easy way to create a blog, you can start something interesting and exercise your freedom of speech by expressing your opinions online. Email letters to letters@gjds. com for consideration in the Daily Sentinel or submit them to room 131 to see your opinions in the Orange and Black. Search petition on eHow.com and receive tips on writing, circulating and organizing a petition for any cause you choose. Easy step by step instructions make petitioning a snap. Use your right to assemble to call attention to an important issue and hopefully achieve change, like the wrestling team did last year for Coach Glover. Just remember, keep it legal and peaceful. All students have the right to pray at school, so if you need a little help from your respective deity to pass a huge test, go for it as long as it is not disruptive. Get the trendiest McCain, Obama, or political belief fashion items, like T-shirts, buttons and bags at www.cafepress.com. Make a statement and use your First Amendment rights, while supporting a cause.

The Low Down: Russia Leaves Georgia In August, the world watched as Russia invaded Georgia under pretenses of keeping peace in South Ossetia. Now, after nearly two months of fighting, Russia has begun pulling its forces from its neighboring country. With the European Union and the rest of the world watching closely, Russian forces began dismantling camps and bases on Oct. 10. ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

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ADS Have an OPINION? Want your VOICE TO BE HEARD? Write a LETTER TO THE EDITORS...

CLIFTON

Bring your LETTER to Room 131 today! In memory of

Flo Gallagher Beloved teacher, mentor and friend

• Dental Implants

Simply present this ticket at BIG LEAGUE for a FREE haircut

26 ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008


SPORTS & HEALTH

The Big 6

Pro athletes penetrate fashion arena with their own clothing lines

1 2 Time-out with: Lisa Hughes

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Air Jordan, the Nike line of clothing by basketball legend Michael Jordan, consists of unique pairs of shoes and clothing to sport on the court and off.

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Olympic gold medalist Shaun White has his own line of Burton snow gear, as well as a full range of clothing for Target including denim, hooded sweatshirts, shorts and graphic tees.

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Aneres is tennis tycoon Serena Williams’ line of clothing, cosmetics and accesories for women. Aneres offers daytime and evening attire, as well as wedding and red carpet designs.

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Lance Armstrong launched 10//2 by Nike, a line of cycling jerseys, casual apparel and athletic accessories named for the date he was diagnosed with cancer.

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David Beckham’s Adidas label, depicting a famous Beckham free kick, consists of footwear and apparel made for performance but also everyday wear.

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Basketball wonder LeBron James can now add fashion designer to his repertoire. His collection, named L23, includes a myriad of classy hats, shorts, sweatpants and jackets.

The Low Down: Coffee Drinkers The popularity of Starbucks and small corner cafes has prompted a- study of how coffee affects its drinkers. Researchers have found that coffee may actually help prolong the lives of loyal drinkers. According to a study of 125,000 health professionals, people who drank coffee—regular or decaf—were slightly less likely to die over the course of two decades than those who did not, mainly due to fewer deaths from heart disease. Source: Berkeley Wellness Letter

H H

Healthy Hints

ORANGE&BLACK | | OCTOBER 2008 27 ORANGE&BLACK MARCH 2008


IN MOTION

The sound of the restless crowd fills the Greek stadium. The anxiety of the upcoming competition unnerves the formidable athlete. As he approaches the starting line, self-doubt creeps into his mind. The competitor cannot let down his state. The year is 776 BCE, and the first Olympic games are about to begin. The early events consisted of wrestling, boxing, foot races and horse races. Over the years as technology advanced, boxing gloves began to be used and specific shoes were used for the foot races, along with other advances in equipment. In Rome 512 years later, the first gladiator fights took place. This event began as three pairs of gladiators fighting during a funeral celebration. Over the next couple of decades such fights transformed into a sport. At any one event, more than 300 pairs of gladiators would fight. Of the competitors, most were males and either slaves, criminals, prisoners of war or Christians. As years passed, violence in sports decreased, and they became more of a hobby. Nonetheless, their popularity drastically declined. During the 11th century, sports re-emerged in England by way of tournaments and leagues. Many wealthy Englishmen were members of fencing and archery clubs. During this period, the early forms of rugby and football also surfaced. While playing a soccer-like game, athletes grew tired of kicking the ball and decided to pick it up and run with it. Thus, the game of American football was born. By the 19th century, colleges in America and England had begun to incorporate athletics and sporting events into curriculum. At first, sports could not gain public support and were almost dropped. Many thought the games to be too violent, as frequent injuries, sometimes deaths, occurred. In 1910, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) revamped the rules of various sports, especially football, and fans slowly salvaged their love for sports. Today, athletes hoping to continue their careers after college can enter professional leagues, and the entertainment market in sports continues to expand. In 1896, the Olympics was re-introduced as a world sporting event, hosting thousands of athletes from almost every country to compete in a variety of 30 sports. The year is 2008. Michael Phelps warms up for a final Olympic race. One more victory and he will make history for the most gold medals won by a swimmer in a single Olympics. As he steps onto the starting platform, Phelps’ desire to succeed builds. Winning is not only an accomplishment to himself, but a huge success for his country. 3-2-1, go!

28 ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

Graphics by Garrett Brown

Cody Holman


SPORTS & HEALTH

, when it k as 688 BCE es. The c a b r fa s a s e pic Gam Boxing go ancient Olym to the ruthless e th in d e d lu in was inc rned boxing mes Broughton tu lly a tu n e v e Romans In 1743 Ja iator battles. s and increased the d la g f o t r o sp le or t. Up fficial set of ru created an o g was primarily a British sp braced in em idea that box rica had not par ticularly s e it m d A , re 0 until 192 7, boxing ente pt the spor t. -2 0 2 9 1 n e e to acce it. But betw America grew plaints and lawsuits d n a , e g a n e gold com re have been nued to Although the ing’s brutality, it has conti ox against the b the world. d n u survive aro

Up until th th to par ticipa e 20 centur y wome n were not te in most o allo rg the 1920s, w omen such anized spor ts. Howev wed champion, a er, during as Helen W n il around athle d Babe Didrikson Zaha ls Moody, tennis ri te golf, showed that competed in tra as, outstanding allc th k and field a e w or ld th at a high lev el, and poss at women could both s well as essed their It was not u compete ow n Amendmen til 1972 that the Title IX n talents and skills. ts gender in e Act outlawed discrim of the Education du in then promo cation, including schoo ation based on ted female l spor ts. Sc sp ho female athle tics formed or ts and eventually pro ols . fessional

Wilt Chamberlain immortalized himself in the world of spor ts as a basketball sensation with his staggering statistics and legendary will to score. His greatest feat was ls scoring a phenomenal rts Immorta o p S f o y s e rt 100 points in one game. Images cou

Grayson O’Roark

1869 - First college game, Rutgers vs. Princeton. 1882 - Only 11 players per side called “scrimmage.” Also, the idea of a man called the center was used to snap the ball for the first time. 1892 - Pudge Heffelfinger was paid $500 to play in a game, becoming the first person to be paid to play football. 1912 - A touchdown was changed from 5 to 6 points. 1920 - NFL established. 1967 - January 15, First Super Bowl: Green Bay 35, Kansas City 10. 1970 - First Monday Night Football game (New York Jets vs. Cleveland Browns). 1970s- Plastic helmets used.

ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

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Navigate the nutrition label

IN MOTION Low fat foods have less than three grams per serving. Such items cannot be trusted to mean a product is actually low in fat unless the serving size is low. The food has been processed or altered in some way. Most times, since so much is taken out of the grain products initially, the new addition is insignificant. The producer began with a natural source, but may have processed, chemically altered or changed the product later on. These foods usually have “sugar alcohols” in them, such as maltitol and sorbitol. Such substitutes can be as bad or worse than sugar.

While nutrition labels are supposed to make healthy eating easier, many companies purposely clutter nutrition labels with confusing language or advertise certain benefits of their food products that are not always completely true. Here is a guide to navigating through the schemes food companies use on their food labels: Serving size and calories: This is the first place to start on the Nutrition Facts label. Examine the serving size and number of servings in the package, then ask yourself, “How many servings will I consume?” and figure the number of calories and nutrients accordingly. Calories measure how much energy you get from a serving of this food. In general, a food with less than 40 calories is low, 100 calories is moderate and 400 or more calories is high.

1

Limit these nutrients: The first five listed nutrients are the ones Americans eat in excess, but should actually be consumed in very limited amounts. Consuming too much fat, cholesterol, or sodium may increase your risk of certain chronic diseases.

2

Get plenty of these nutrients: Most Americans do not get nearly enough of these nutrients. A diet that provides sufficient amounts of these nutrients can improve your health and help reduce the risk of diseases such as osteoporosis and heart disease.

3

Percent daily value: This is based on the Daily Value (DV) recommended for key nutrients for a 2,000 calorie diet. In general, five percent DV is low for all nutrients and 20 percent or more is high for all nutrients.

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McKenzie Binder

Fall sports wrap-up Boys Tennis

Wins

Losses

Volleyball

Football

Boys Soccer

Softball

Boys Golf Cross Country

10 6 2 9 15 # # # # 7 7 6 3 1 1

30 ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

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HUMOR & SATIRE

The Declaration of Independence From an Islam ic extremist

Kurt Peterson When in the course of huma n events, it becomes necess ary for a people to dissolve the economic, mi litary and petroleum bonds which have tethered them to another vast and un predictable giant, who has no exit strategy, then according to the Laws of Na tural Occurance and Allah’s Nature, a decent respect should be given to the citizens should they declare the causes which impel them to the separatio n. We hold these truths to be sel f-evident, that all Islamic, ort drinking, and pious men are hodox, noncreated better than all those who are not, and that they are endowed by the Cr eator with certain unalienab le Rights, that among these rights are the oppressi on of women, the right to aw esome beard-age, and head turbans. Whenever a form of govern ment becomes destructive of is the right of the people to these ends, then it alter or abolish it, primarily with car bombs. The histor y of the present Pre peated injuries and memorab sident of the United States is a histor y of rele quotations, of embarrassin g slips of the tongue and bloody fiascos. To prove this, let the Facts be submitte d to the candied world. He has said that “Our enemi es are innovative and resource we. They never stop thinking ful, and so are about new ways to harm ou r countr y and our people, and neither do we.” Who voted for this guy again? His right hand man likes to shoot people in the face wh ile pretending to hunt birds. He has caused the deaths of tens of thousands in our cou sight. Just kidding. Laugh ou ntr y with no end in t Loud. But seriously. His daughter has kicked my dog. He has sponsored the found ation of a blasphemous state of the Jew. He has allowed for the prodig ious growth of the heroin tra stan, which, do not get us wr de in Afghaniong, we dig, man, its groovy , but it is just not so stellar for the kids eh? He has ruined all aquatic fun for us; water boarding has bee from a relaxing vacation act n transformed ivity into a dreaded torture procedure. He is the embodiment of hat e; a rich white Christian Am erican. At every state of these Oppre ssions we have petitioned for redress in the most humble terms; did those pla nes crashing into those tow ers tip off nobody? Our only answer has been repeat ed injury. What gives?

This article is strictly inten ded to be humorous and no assertions made in the article are int ended to be taken seriously .

ORANGE&BLACK | OCTOBER 2008

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TIGER TRACKS (2) Wyatt Colloty, 11, sprints to the finish at the District 51 championship race on Oct. 9 where he placed sixth in the district.

4

(4) Bailey Evans, 10, Kalinda Theobold, 12, and Tessa Espinosa, 12, receive tips from Director Justin Whiteford at an afterschool rehearsal for “Little Women.”

(5) The GJHS Marching Band pumps up the crowd with a pepband tune at the football game against Highlands Ranch on Sept. 12th.

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(7) Zeph Quigley and Rob Hale, 12, show their ferocious sides during the Homecoming Game against Durango. (8) The senior boys perform for the crowd during the dance competition. (9) Poms squad make a paw during half-time.

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6 (6) Lyndi Hoffman,12, and Rachel Sherman,11, pick up trash for the National Honor Society Oct. 22.

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Amy Nelms (1), Natalie Pipe (2,3), Kristin Balbier (4,7), Richard Gonzales (5), Noelle DePuey (6,8,9)

(1) Stella Parker, 12, dances to “Alexander’s ragtime Band” during the Carmina���s Show Choir concert on Oct. 9.

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Mesa County Valley School District 51 Grand Junction High School 2115 Grand Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81501

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(3) Students from Grand Junction High School participate in the protest opposing Republican Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin on Monday Oct. 20. Palin spoke to a crowd of over ten thousand at Suplizio Field.

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 207 GRAND JUNCTION , COLORADO


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