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VOLUME III / ISSUE III / MARCH 2019

WEALTH

IS 2019 THE END OF OPULENCE?

SECURITY, ANONYMITY EDUCATION & TRAVEL

SPENDING LIKE THE WORLD'S TOP 1% EXTENDED COVERAGE:

$27.95 USD

WINE PAIRING

INDUSTRY KNOW-HOW

SNOW POLO ST. MORITZ WORLD CUP

CHOGUN TEAM & SUPERCAR WEEK

$1 MILLION AT STAKE: THE GAUNTLET OF POLO C.V WHITNEY CUP

THE GRAMMYS

IN PHOTOS


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VOLUME III / ISSUE III / MARCH 2019

Ambassador Claude-Alix Bertrand

Contributor

Joshua Jakobitz

Kelly Caldwell

Editor-in-Chief

Contributor

Sara Ali

William Smith

Luxury & Culture Adviser

Contributor

Mark Wine

Brand Representatives Anne-Isabelle Saint-Pierre - Dubai

Fitness Columnist

Joey Velez

Wellness Columnist

Kemissa Racine

Fashion & Style Contributor

Hans Ebenman

Travel Contributor

Cezar Kusik

Wine Contributor

Jyoti Paintel

Spiritual Guidance Contributor

Raphael Dapaah Art Contributor

Stanley Pierre-Etienne Fashion Contributor

Tara Cummins

Fashion Contributor

Jennifer Sims

Style Contributor

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Susan Wise

Publisher

a.isabellesaintpierre@gmail.com

Rudy Volel - New York volel.me@gmail.com

Contributing Photographers Marina Kondratenko Kathrin Gralla fotoswiss Tony Ramirez/Images of Polo Gala Kanaval Organizing Committee Lucy Nicholson Tehran Chogun Team U.S.P.A. Global Licensing Polo Lifestyles is a publication of HT Polo Publishing Co. 995 Detroit Avenue, Suite A Concord, CA 94518 Copyright Š Polo Lifestyles 2019 All Rights Reserved. For information or to advertise Contact editor@pololifestyles.com Read online at www.pololifestyles.com


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International Polo Club Lucchese 40-Goal Challenge Butler Handicap U.S. Open Women's Final The Gauntlet of Polo USPA Gold Cup U.S. Open Polo Championship Gay Polo League Tournament World Polo League All-Star Challenge Founders Cup Palm Beach Open Triple Crown of Polo The Gallops of India Dubai Gold Cup Series: Silver Cup 18 Goals Polo Masters Cup 10 Goals Julius Baer Gold Cup 18 Goals Dubai Challenge Cup 18 Goals Dubai Cup 8 Goals Lagos Polo Club Lagos Internationals Ghantoot Polo & Racing Club British Polo Day Val de Vie Estate Veuve Clicquot Masters Polo Inanda Polo Club Inanda High Goal

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GAUNTLETpage OF36POLO POLO LIFESTYLES EDITORS & CONTRIBUTORS

Ambassador Claude-Alix Bertrand

Publisher Polo Lifestyles @haiti_polo_captain

Cezar Kusik

Wine Contributor Twenty Five Lusk @cezarkusik

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Josh Jakobitz

Editor-in-Chief Polo Lifestyles @joshuajakobitz

Anne-Isabelle Saint-Pierre Brand Representative Polo Lifestyles-Dubai @isasaintpierre

Kemissa Racine

Fashion & Style Contributor KEMISSA RACINE @kemissa

Joey Velez

Mental Wellness Columnist Velez Mental Performance @velezmentalhealth

Mark Wine

Fitness Columnist Functional Muscle Fitness @functionalmuscle

Tara Cummins

Fashion Contributor Teryn Grey @teryngrey

Raphael Dapaah Art Contributor Dapaah Gallery @dapaahgallery

Jyoti Paintel

Spiritual Contributor Polo Lifestyles

William Smith

Philanthrophy Contributor Santa Fe Community Foundation @willismith_2000


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SuperCar Week Palm Beach pg 44

Winners and surprises at the Grammys page 52

Gala honors culture and influencers page 50

Pairing for Health page 128

WEALTH

Is discreet wealth the new opulence? The world's wealthiest 1% are investing in their security, education, health and travel. A closer look starts on page 64. Marina Kondratenko, Traditional Russian Hunting with Greyhounds Series (Copyright of Marina Kondratenko, Courtesy of Katarina Zavodszka Contemporary)

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

A year ago, we profiled a successful, private security company founder as part of our Youth Issue. Quite a discussion ensued in our weekly editorial meeting prior to its publication. “Why exactly are we profiling a security guard?” I believe was one of the questions raised. Answers wavered from, “He photographs well,” to “It’s an interesting business angle.” We ran the story in the end, and the story garnered more click-throughs and reads than any other story that month. Polo Lifestyles readers, you spoke – and you were heard. The truth is, we all live with security in some form or another. Cameras at shopping centers, that friendly security guard in the lobby of the building, and apps that track where we are and report to our families when we check in at home are just a few of the ways we interact nearly seamlessly with security every day. However, many of us have security issues beyond this. I was assigned my first security guard, Marc, while living in the Caribbean. It was the intention, more or less, of my employer, that Marc would keep me out of trouble. Instead, I convinced Marc to take me to parts of the neighborhood most people wouldn’t have ventured. We ate mais moulu and legume served by smiling market-mamas on ancient china while balancing three-legged chairs under a hastily constructed tent. I convinced Marc to get a drivers license and then we hit the road every Sunday in my Land Rover. I had traveled quite a bit within the country at that time; Marc hadn’t ventured far out of the city limits. I gave clumsy directions and got us lost; Marc pulled over and asked just about anyone for directions. We documented our Sunday trips on Instagram: lambi and banane pesée at the beach and blown out tires on mountain passes while the sun was setting. He showed me how to change a tire, but never let me do more than hold the flashlight. This month, we explore where the world’s wealthiest are investing. Firms and journals that profile the wealthy show significant changes in spending in the last ten years: dying are the days of overt opulence; today, the wealthy want anonymity and security, the best schools for their children, private wellness counsel and concierge bankers, the most-exclusive travel destinations, and some are even opting for secure bunkers and safe rooms in case of global catastrophe. Investing in health and wellness is a major part of Polo Lifestyles each month, and this month our contributors hit the mark with choosing the path of least resistance, kicking the blame game, and addressing the core issues of weightloss. Raphael Dapaah is back this month with a profile of an art patron and ambassador. Our resident sommelier breaks down wine and food (or is it food and wine?) pairings for your health. Karl Lagerfeld, whose career spanned decades in fashion, was honored by Fendi and his homologue Anna Wintour. We’re proud to present both tributes in our pages this month. Best, Josh Jakobitz josh@pololifestyles.com

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Photo on left: Marina Kondratenko, Portuguese Series II (Copyright of Marina Kondratenko, Courtesy of Katarina Zavodszka Contemporary) (cropped)


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adamrussellpolo Hi Form Equine UK supplements @hiformuk #equinecar #equinesupplements #detox

bravoandy Andy Cohen hits the streets with baby and man's best friend both in tow "I'm that guy" he says.

graymalin Just window shopping @hermes #camelpolo page 20

almudena_perezminguez On the pages of @elleusa two complete looks from Ferragamo #ferragamoss19

enews Glenn Close's furry date on the red, er blue, carpet at the Spirit Awards in February.

hmystique @liyakebede in the #monclergenius 01 collection in collaboration with @pppiccioli

blackandwhite7776 @dior Cruise Collection #blackandwhite #equinefashion

femexpolo Team BMW took the title at the Nacional de Polo Tecamac in Mexico

justef76 The Viennese Philharmonic Ball was beyond #wunderbar #likeapainting


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Click and comment on our choices... tag @pololifestyles. We will share noteworthy comments with you next month.

maisonvalentino On a trip to Casablanca, HRH Duchess of Sussex #meghanmarkle wears a red dress with cape and #VRING bag

uspoloassn The Gauntlet of Polo comprises the C.V Whitney Cup, the USPA Gold Cup and the US Polo Open Championship

pololifestyles Congratulations to the winners of the big awards at the Academy Awards this February

millionaire.life.style The $400m Sailing Yacht "A" in Formentera last summer; photo credit: @carolfeith

atodoconfetti Find someone who looks at you like Bradley Cooper looks at Lady Gaga in "A Start Is Born"

bazaaruk The Duke and Duchess of Sussex at the stables in Morocco

nzpoloopen In New Zealand, Team Tiger Polo defended their title after an epic battle against Team Semco PDL on the field

know.definition Icons of the screen together for @officialspikelee win at the Academy Awards

theoutnet Perfect blue from @tods for this season's polo matches and events page 21


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Snow Polo World Cup St. Moritz La Martina Cup Azerbaijan Land of Fire 5 / 0 Cartier

The Cartier Trophy Badrutt’s Palace Hotel 7 / 3 Maserati

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Three Firsts for the 35th Snow Polo World Cup St. Moritz The 35th Snow Polo World Cup went down in history as the tournament of firsts: It was the first-­ever overall victory for Team Badrutt’s Palace, and, for the first time in the history of the tournament, a female player, Melissa Ganzi from the USA, bagged the coveted Cartier Trophy. The 2019 event on the frozen Lake St. Moritz saw a turnout of some 18,000 spectators, more than ever before.

mesmerizing Land of Fire Azerbaijan show at the birthday celebration for Queen Elizabeth II.

The breathtaking performances of the Sardhadchi cavalry team were another novelty. These artists on horseback from Azerbaijan, who appeared for the first time in Switzerland, delighted the audience with their fast-­paced acrobatic show. The 12-­strong troupe on their noble Karabakh horses have appeared regularly at top-notch international events since their first show in 2012. Notably, they performed their

Sponsors and partners showed a firm commitment, and demand for VIP, Chukker Club and gala night tickets was unusually strong. With a tournament budget of CHF 2.5 million coupled with the favorable circumstances, the organizers estimate to have generated an economic benefit for the region of some CHF 12 million, which is a significant year-­to­ year increase.

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SN OW POLO WO RL D CUP ST. M O RIT Z

ext year, the Snow Polo World Cup will take place from 24 to 26 January 2020.

more than 200 journalists, photographers and camera teams from around the world attended.

This year’s tournament was not only a first-rate event on the polo field – with some of the world’s best polo players, such as 10-­goaler Juan Martin Nero, competing on the frozen Lake St. Moritz – but also aside from the playing field,

Two thousand eight hundred sushi rolls were served in the VIP tent over the three days of the tournament by the official caterer of the Snow Polo World Cup St Moritz, the Badrutt’s Palace Hotel, who also uncorked some 500 bottles of

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red wine and an equal amount of white wine. Zwyer Caviar served 15 kilograms of first-­rate caviar. Champagne flowed both in the VIP tent and the Polo Village with more than 2,000 bottles of PerrierJouët consumed – and some 115 liters of Royal Salute whiskey were poured.


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THE GAUNTLET OF POLO C.V WHITNEY CUP International Polo Club Pilot 13 / 6 Las Monjitas FINAL

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Left: Late-breaking photos from the final played between Pilot and Las Monjitas. Top: Peke Gonzalez and Francisco Elizalde; Above: Jeff Hall, team captain

T

he first final of the GAUNTLET OF POLO saw Pilot dominate Las Monjitas 13-6 to capture the C.V. Whitney Cup and the $125,000 prize on the U.S. Polo Assn. Field 1 at the International Polo Club Palm Beach.

The convincing victory for Pilot saw Facundo and Gonzalito Pieres play the two-man game to perfection, with numerous runs and passing plays to set up scoring opportunities. The variety of attacks provided difficulties for Las

Monjitas throughout the second half as they were unable to contain the multiple facets of Pilot’s attack. After inaccurate 2 for 7 shooting in the first half, Pilot converted all seven shots in the second half, while Las Monjitas

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T HE GAUN T L E T O F P O LO : C .V W H ITNE Y C UP struggled to find the goal, converting just 1 of their first 12 shot attempts. Along with perfect shooting from the penalty line, Pilot cruised to the commanding victory and with capturing the first leg of the GAUNTLET OF page 38

POLO, remain the lone team capable of claiming the $1,000,000 prize. Most Valuable Player was awarded to Pilot’s Matias Gonzalez, who finished with two goals in the game, while Best

Playing Pony went to Facundo Pieres’ “Open Pennsylvania”. The second leg of the GAUNTLET OF POLO, the USPA Gold Cup, begins Thursday, February 28 at the International Polo Club Palm Beach.


W W W.P O LO LI FESTYL ES .COM Top right: Maureen Brennam purple helmet, Matt Coppola orange #4, Camilo Bautista Orange helmet, Francisco Elizalde orange #2, Matias Magrini white helmet, Peke Gonzalez picking ball out of the air Bottom right: Cessna captain Felipe Marquez, Postage #4 Joaquin Panelo, Postage #2 Lerin Zubiaurre, Felipe Viana blue helmet

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NATIONAL POLO CHAMPIONSHIP CHOGUN TEAM Tehran, Iran

Founded in 2018

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SUPERCAR WEEK THE ART & TECHNOLOGY OF SPEED AND DESIGN Reporting by Tara Cummins

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HORSEPOWER & POLO

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There’s a lot happening in Florida during the winter. With promising forecasts of sunny days with sea breezes, snowbirds make their annual migration to escape the cold and families jet southbound on holiday. While the wildly popular vacation destination certainly sees an influx of tourists and beach-goers, every winter, skilled show jumpers and professional polo players from around the globe descend upon Wellington, Fla., for another season of competition. After all, Florida is home to the equestrian capital of the world. However, for the last nine years, the Sunshine State welcomed another type of horsepower: January’s annual SuperCar Week that puts Palm Beach County on the map as the premier destination for auto enthusiasts. With nine full days of VIP and public events, SuperCar Week attracts over 100,000 individuals. It all started as a one-day event back in 2010. Since then, SuperCar Week has gained momentum, doubling in size ever year. Now it’s the largest South Florida event of its kind. It has become so big that, for the last five years, both Palm Beach County and the City of West Palm Beach issued official proclamations proclaiming the second week of January as Supercar Week. The event’s slogan, “Art & Technology of Speed & Design” sets the tone for this impressive automobile extravaganza. When attending SuperCar Week you can expect the latest and greatest from Ferrari, Audi, Lamborghini, Porsche, Aston Martin, Rolls-Royce, and more. Along with these exotic pieces of machinery, Palm Beach County hosts a range of luxe VIP events to celebrate the sponsors, live music events and art exhibits for the whole family. To kick things off this year, hotel host and presenting sponsor, TIDELINE Resort Palm Beach, revved up excitement with its swanky invite-only VIP cocktail party. On day two, SuperCar Week moved to the International Polo Club for the Horsepower Show. The action continued the rest of the week with exhibits throughout Palm Beach County. Events in Boca Raton, Delray Beach, Worth Avenue, and Palm Beach page 46


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International Raceway in Jupiter made for a thrilling week of ongoing celebration and fun. SuperCar Week shifted into high gear at its Grand Finale SuperShow along the one-mile stretch of the West Palm Beach Waterfront on Sunday. The final stop included designated areas for local and regional brands and dealers. SuperCar Street, Muscle Beach, Memory Lane, Green Street for Electrics, Corvette Court, Viper Blvd., Mustang Manor, ArtCar Avenue, Marine Village for Off Shore PowerBoats and the Race Village of Race Teams, Tracks, and displays of race vehicles made up the self-proclaimed auto enthusiast cityscape. There was also a special Super Jeep Invitational display featuring over 300 Jeeps and Off Road Vehicles. SuperCar Week’s final lap concluded with a stylish after party at the Camelot Yacht Club. With its wide collection of exquisite automobiles, from vintage to classics and rare to luxurious, SuperCar Week is undoubtedly garnering the reputation as “Auto Enthusiast Heaven.” The return of this thrilling week-long event is already scheduled for 2020. Join the non-stop action next January 4-12.

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SUPERCAR WEEK + POLO

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AYITI COMMUNITY TRUST GALA KANAVAL Fountainbleau Hotel, Miami, Florida

The highly touted inaugural Gala Kanaval raised funds and recognized leaders in the Haitian and Haitian-American community including prolific writer Edwidge Danticat, middle left, and Wanda Gilles Tima, whose media platform L'Union Suite, reaches millions of readers. Marc-Alain Bouccicault, pictured with Tima, is a young entrepreneur. Tabou Combo, top left, performed, as did DJ Gardy Girault, below. BakaArt (previously featured in Polo Lifestyles) by Valerie Pompee, was on display at the fundraiser. Traditional dancers, opposite right, performed for gala-goers.

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THE 61 GRAMMY st

AWARDS

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t a ceremony dominated by female performers and presenters, Kacey Musgraves won album of the year and Cardi B became the first woman to win best rap album as a solo artist. Lady Gaga performed and won multiple categories. Dua Lipa won Best New Artist.

Childish Gambino, who was noticeably absent, won multiple honors and Drake won Best Rap Song. At the beginning of the show, Alicia Keys, the host, was joined by “my sisters”: Lady Gaga, Jada Pinkett Smith, Michelle Obama and Jennifer Lopez.

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The complete list of winners follows: Record of the Year: “This Is America” — Childish Gambino Album of the Year: “Golden Hour” — Kacey Musgraves Song of the Year: “This Is America” — Donald Glover and Ludwig Goransson, songwriters (Childish Gambino) Best New Artist: Dua Lipa Best Pop Solo Performance: “Joanne (Where Do You Think You’re Goin’?)” — Lady Gaga Best Pop Duo/Group Performance: “Shallow” — Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper Best Pop Vocal Album: “Sweetener” — Ariana Grande You have 3 free articles remaining. Best Rock Performance: “When Bad Does Good” — Chris Cornell Best Rock Song: “Masseduction” — Jack Antonoff and Annie Clark, songwriters (St. Vincent) Best Rock Album: “From the Fires” — Greta Van Fleet Best Alternative Music Album: “Colors” — Beck Best R&B Performance: “Best Part” — H.E.R. featuring Daniel Caesar Best Urban Contemporary Album: “Everything Is Love” — The Carters Best R&B Album: “H.E.R.” — H.E.R. Best Rap Performance: “King’s Dead” — Kendrick Lamar, Jay Rock, Future and James Blake and “Bubblin” — Anderson .Paak Best Rap Song: “God’s Plan” — Aubrey Graham, Daveon Jackson, Brock Korsan, Ron LaTour, Matthew Samuels and Noah Shebib, songwriters (Drake) Best Rap Album: “Invasion of Privacy” — Cardi B Best Country Solo Performance: “Butterflies” — Kacey Musgraves Best Country Album: “Golden Hour” — Kacey Musgraves Jennifer Lopez' tribute to Motown was a hot topic on social media during and following the performance.

Best Jazz Instrumental Album: “Emanon” — The Wayne Shorter Quartet

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THE GRAMMYS Best Latin Pop Album: “Sincera” — Claudia Brant

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album: “Aztlán” — Zoé Best Americana Album: “By the Way, I Forgive You” — Brandi Carlile Best Song Written for Visual Media: “Shallow” — Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson, Anthony Rossomando and Andrew Wyatt, songwriters (Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper) Producer of the Year, Non-Classical: Pharrell Williams Best Music Video: “This Is America” — Childish Gambino Best Comedy Album “Equanimity & the Bird Revelation” — Dave Chappelle Best Musical Theater Album: “The Band’s Visit” — Etai Benson, Adam Kantor, Katrina Lenk and Ari’el Stachel, principal soloists; Dean Sharenow and David Yazbek, producers; David Yazbek, composer and lyricist Best Instrumental Composition: “Blut Und Boden (Blood and Soil)” — Terence Blanchard Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella: “Stars and Stripes Forever” — John Daversa Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals: “Spiderman Theme” — Mark Kibble, Randy Waldman and Justin Wilson, arrangers

Documented by William Ferris” — William Ferris, April Ledbetter and Steven Lance Ledbetter, compilation producers; Michael Graves, mastering engineer

Media: “The Greatest Showman” — Hugh Jackman (and Various Artists); Alex Lacamoire, Benj Pasek, Justin Paul and Greg Wells, compilation producers

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical: “Colors” — Julian Burg, Serban Ghenea, David “Elevator” Greenbaum, John Hanes, Beck Hansen, Greg Kurstin, Florian Lagatta, Cole M.G.N., Alex Pasco, Jesse Shatkin, Darrell Thorp and Cassidy Turbin, engineers; Chris Bellman, Tom Coyne, Emily Lazar and Randy Merrill, mastering engineers

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media: “Black Panther” — Ludwig Göransson, composer

Best Remixed Recording: “Walking Away (Mura Masa remix)” — Alex Crossan, remixer Best Immersive Audio Album: “Eye in the Sky - 35th Anniversary Edition” — Alan Parsons, surround mix engineer; Dave Donnelly, P.J. Olsson and Alan Parsons, surround mastering engineers; Alan Parsons, surround producer Best Contemporary Instrumental Album: “Steve Gadd Band” — Steve Gadd Band Best Gospel Performance/Song: “Never Alone” — Tori Kelly featuring Kirk Franklin; Kirk Franklin and Victoria Kelly, songwriters Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song: “You Say” — Lauren Daigle; Lauren Daigle, Jason Ingram and Paul Mabury, songwriters

Best New Age Album: “Opium Moon” — Opium Moon Best American Roots Performance: “The Joke” — Brandi Carlile Best American Roots Song: “The Joke” — Brandi Carlile, Dave Cobb, Phil Hanseroth and Tim Hanseroth, songwriters Best Bluegrass Album: “The Travelin’ Mccourys” — The Travelin’ Mccourys Best Traditional Blues Album: “The Blues Is Alive and Well” — Buddy Guy Best Contemporary Blues Album: “Please Don’t Be Dead” — Fantastic Negrito Best Folk Album: “All Ashore” — Punch Brothers Best Children’s Album: “All the Sounds” — Lucy Kalantari & the Jazz Cats Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books and Storytelling): “Faith - A Journey for All” — Jimmy Carter

Best Gospel Album: “Hiding Place” — Tori Kelly

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano): “¡México Por Siempre!” — Luis Miguel

Best Recording Package: “Masseduction” — Willo Perron, art director

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album: “Look Up Child” — Lauren Daigle

Best Tropical Latin Album: “Anniversary” — Spanish Harlem Orchestra

Best Album Notes: “Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by William Ferris” — David Evans, album notes writer

Best Roots Gospel Album: “Unexpected” — Jason Crabb

Best Regional Roots Music Album: “No ‘Ane’i” — Kalani Pe’a

Best World Music Album: “Freedom” — Soweto Gospel Choir

Best Music Film: “Quincy” — Quincy Jones; Alan Hicks and Rashida Jones, video directors; Paula Dupré Pesmen, video producer

Best Historical Album: “Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians page 56

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual


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Cardi B (top left), Kacey Musgrave (middle left) and Pink (bottom left).

Best Country Duo/Group Performance: “Tequila” — Dan + Shay Best Country Song: “Space Cowboy” — Luke Laird, Shane Mcanally and Kacey Musgraves, songwriters Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: “My Way” — Willie Nelson Best Engineered Album, Classical: “Shostakovich: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11” — Shawn Murphy and Nick Squire, engineers; Tim Martyn, mastering engineer Producer of the Year, Classical: Blanton Alspaugh Best Orchestral Performance: “Shostakovich: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11” — Andris Nelsons, conductor Best Opera Recording: “Bates: The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs” — Michael Christie, conductor; Sasha Cooke, Jessica E. Jones, Edward Parks, Garrett Sorenson and Wei Wu; Elizabeth Ostrow, producer Best Choral Performance: “Mcloskey: Zealot Canticles” — Donald Nally, conductor Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance: “Anderson, Laurie: Landfall” — Laurie Anderson and Kronos Quartet Best Classical Instrumental Solo: “Kernis: Violin Concerto” — James Ehnes; Ludovic Morlot, conductor Best Classical Solo Vocal Album: “Songs of Orpheus Monteverdi, Caccini, D’india & Landi” — Karim Sulayman; Jeannette Sorrell, conductor; Apollo’s Fire, ensembles Best Classical Compendium: “Fuchs: Piano Concerto ‘spiritualist’; Poems of Life; Glacier; page 57


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Rush” — Joann Falletta, conductor; Tim Handley, producer Best Contemporary Classical Composition: “Kernis: Violin Concerto” — Aaron Jay Kernis, composer Best Dance Recording: “Electricity” — Silk City and Dua Lipa featuring Diplo and Mark Ronson Best Dance/Electronic Album: “Woman Worldwide” — Justice Best Reggae Album: “44/876” — Sting and Shaggy Best Improvised Jazz Solo: “Don’t Fence Me In” — John Daversa, soloist. Track from: “American Dreamers: Voices of Hope, Music of Freedom” Best Jazz Vocal Album: “The Window” — Cécile Mclorin Salvant Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album: “American Dreamers: Voices of Hope, Music of Freedom” — John Daversa Big Band featuring DACA Artists Best Latin Jazz Album: “Back to the Sunset” — Dafnis Prieto Big Band Best R&B Song: “Boo’d Up” — Larrance Dopson, Joelle James, Ella Mai and Dijon Mcfarlane, songwriters Best Metal Performance: “Electric Messiah” — High on Fire Best Rap/Sung Performance: “This Is America” — Childish Gambino

Michelle Obama made a surprise appearance at the Grammys, joining Lady Gaga, Jada PinkettSmith, Alicia Keys and Jennifer Lopez

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Marina Kondratenko, Untitled II, Portuguese Series II, Archival Pigment Print, 2018, edition of 7 copies only, signed, dated, and numbered in pencil on verso. (Copyright of Marina Kondratenko, Courtesy of Katarina Zavodszka Contemporary | Palm Beach)


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WITH A DEPARTURE FROM TRADITIONAL SIGNIFIERS, THE WORLD'S WEALTHIEST ARE EMBRACING DISCREET SPENDING ON SECURITY, EDUCATION & TRAVEL Long synonymous with dripping diamonds, flashy Lamborghinis, Louis Vuitton luggage, and shiny Rolex timepieces, the world's wealthiest are becoming more discreet with their riches. Showing off wealth is no longer the way to signify having wealth. Investing in things like education and health helps the rich propel social mobility and gain access to what the middle class cannot. While flashiness is becoming less ubiquitous among the ultra-high-net-worth crowd, they’re spending more than ever before on security and privacy, trading in hilltop houses for homes in neighborhoods hidden from Google Street View. And in an era where mass consumption means both the upper class and the middle class can own the same luxury brand, the rich are forgoing material goods to invest in immaterial means as a way to signify status. It’s what Elizabeth Currid-Halkett calls “inconspicuous consumption” in her book “The Sum of Small Things: A Theory of an Aspirational Class.” It’s the opposite of “conspicuous consumption,” a term conceived of by

Thorstein Veblen in “The Theory of the Leisure Class” referring to the concept of using material items to signify social status — a hallmark of previous elite spending, Currid-Halkett wrote in an article last year.

“Given that everyone can now buy designer handbags and new cars, the rich have taken to using much more tacit signifiers of their social position." Yes, oligarchs and the super-rich still show off their wealth with yachts and Bentleys and gated mansions. But the dramatic changes in elite spending are driven by a well-to-do and educated elite. This new elite cements its status through prizing knowledge and building cultural capital, not to mention the spending habits that go with it – preferring to spend on services, education and human-capital investments over purely material goods. These new status behaviors are called inconspicuous consumption. None of the consumer choices that the term covers are inherently obvious or ostensibly material but they are, without question, exclusionary. Essentially, showing off wealth is no longer the way to signify having wealth. In the U.S. particularly, the top one percenters have been spending less on material goods since 2007, Currid-

Halkett wrote, citing data from the US Consumer Expenditure Survey. Association, for example, with the equestrian community of Wellington, Fla., home to private estates, ranches, and villas; or Aspen, Colo., with its winter glitterati who turn out for major holidays and events, are both non-conspicuous indicators of wealth. The same crowd that uses the private, back-door entrance at Roland Garros in Paris will be on-hand each year at Wimbledon and the Monte-Carlo Grand Prix, watching from penthouse balconies, far above the crowd. It’s a growing trend among not only millionaires and billionaires, but what Currid-Halkett calls “the aspirational class.” “This new elite cements its status through prizing knowledge and building cultural capital, not to mention the spending habits that go with it,” CurridHalkett wrote.

She adds, “Eschewing an overt materialism, the rich are investing significantly more in education, retirement, and health — all of which are immaterial, yet cost many times more than any handbag a middle-income consumer might buy.”

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Wealth Indicators

Marina Kondratenko, Untitled II, Traditional Russian Hunting with Greyhounds Series, Archival Pigment Print, 2018, edition of 7 copies only, signed, dated, and numbered in pencil on verso. (Copyright of Marina Kondratenko, Courtesy of Katarina Zavodszka Contemporary | Palm Beach)

While much inconspicuous consumption is extremely expensive, it shows itself through less expensive but equally pronounced signaling – from reading The Economist to buying pasture-raised eggs. Inconspicuous consumption in other words, has become a shorthand through which the new elite signal their cultural capital to one another. In lockstep with the invoice for private preschool comes the knowledge that one should pack the lunch box with quinoa crackers and organic fruit. One might think these culinary practices are a commonplace example of modern-day parenthood, but one only needs to step outside the upper-middle-class bubbles of major cities to observe very different lunch-bag norms, consisting page 66

of processed snacks and practically no fruit. Similarly, while time in Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York City might make one think that every American mother breast feeds her child for a year, national statistics report that only 27 percent of mothers fulfill this American Academy of Pediatrics goal (in Alabama, that figure hovers at 11 percent).

spending time in elite social milieus and expensive educational institutions that prize this publication and discuss its contents. Investing in education propels social mobility. That inconspicuous consumption often goes unnoticed by the middle class but noticed by a fellow elite is what makes it so discreet.

Knowing these seemingly inexpensive social norms is itself a rite of passage into today’s aspirational class.

Currid-Halkett describes it as a shorthand for the elite to “signal their cultural capital” to each other and cement status. It reproduces privilege in a way that flaunting luxury couldn’t, she said.

And that rite is far from costless: The Economist subscription might set one back only $100, but the awareness to subscribe and be seen with it tucked in one’s bag is likely the iterative result of

Displaying knowledge, such as referring to New Yorker articles, expresses this cultural capital, giving a person leverage to climb the social ladder and make connections, Currid-Halkett wrote.


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Marina Kondratenko, Untitled, Traditional Russian Hunting with Greyhounds Series, Archival Pigment Print on Archival Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Baryta paper 310 gsm, photographed in 2017 in Russia, Moscow region, printed in 2018 in an edition of seven copies only, signed, dated 2018 and numbered 1/07 in pencil on verso, size: 14"x21". (Copyright of Marina Kondratenko, Courtesy of Katarina Zavodszka Contemporary | Palm Beach)

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Marina Kondratenko, Russian Lady Rider, Traditional Russian Hunting with Greyhounds Series, Archival Pigment Print, 2018, edition of 7 copies only, signed, dated, and numbered in pencil on verso. (Copyright of Marina Kondratenko, Courtesy of Katarina Zavodszka Contemporary | Palm Beach) (cropped detail).

Exclusive and invite-only clubs, events, and even smartphone apps are available to the top one percent. At Art Basel Miami, Ruinart gave an invitation-only party at the Miami Botanical Gardens. And when it comes to dating, there are a few apps out there that only cater to the wealthy, such as Raya and Tinder Select. They don’t let just anyone sign up. Those in-the-know are keenly aware that kidnapping insurance exists. It’s typically a product purchased by wealthy individuals to protect themselves from extortion. As much as $1.5

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billion per year is paid to kidnappers for ransoms.

learning sessions and lessons, or private market research firms.

When it comes to finances, the wealthiest one percenters expect a direct phone number to management and bank executives. They also expect – and look for – access to private banking. “My private banker told me…”

Art investments and limited-edition pieces such as the ones in this story by Marina Kondratenko are the ultimate conversation pieces for the foyer.

Knowledge is power, and the world’s top earners pay for knowledge, which in turn is basically paying for power. The wealthy have access to all sorts of specialized information such as squawk services, research groups, private

Lifestyle management service is a big-business and multi-million dollar line item on annual budgets for the wealthy. Book a jet? Check. Craving something from your favorite dinner-only restaurant at 11am? Check. Have champagne delivered? Check. Rent the best villa in St-Barth? Check.


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Wealth Indicators “In short, inconspicuous consumption confers social mobility,” she said.

J.C. Pan of The New Republic described how parents try to reproduce their class position for their children. "They buy their kids boutique healthcare, take them on enriching trips to the Galapagos, and — most importantly — equip them with every educational advantage, from high-end preschools to SAT tutors to Ivy League tuition. In 2014, the top one percenters spent 860 percent more than the national average on education.” Just consider the wealthy families who are spending millions to live within walking distance of the world's best public elementary and secondary schools, or those paying as much as $60,000 for a university tour via private jet— they make such an investment in education in hopes of setting their children up for a successful, well-connected future. And often, the parents invest in their own knowledge and achievement by working all the time, another mod-

ern way of signifying status, Business Insider’s Shana Lebowitz reported. As Currid-Halkett put it: “For today’s aspirational class, inconspicuous consumption choices secure and preserve social status, even if they do not necessarily display it.”

Health and wellness also signify status. Vogue reported in 2015 that health and wellness had become a luxury status symbol, and it makes sense. And in an analysis last year, the Financial Times columnist Simon Kuper wrote, "The cultural elite spends relatively little on beauty products, but splurges on exercise, because it thinks that bodies (like food) should look natural."

The security concerns of the world's wealthiest only begin with departing from a secure compound or private neighborhood. Bullet-proof cars and SUVs transport children to school or caregivers to the local grocers to pick up a few items. These beefed-up autos are nearly impossible to detect to the untrained eye, but the weight of a door, the slightly lower sit of the car due to weight, the larger turning radius and extra-thick windows are appreciated by those in-the-know.

"The thin, toned body expresses this class’s worldview: Even leisure must be productive,” Kuper continued. “Instead of trawling shopping malls, class members narrate their family hikes on Facebook.”

The French company Carat Duchatelet takes normal luxury automobiles and turns them into machines through a process known as "blindage" in French. The resulting car revels the U.S. president's armored limousine.

It’s the same feeling evoked by stepping out of a $30 SoulCycle spin class to buy a $10 green juice, or having a $200-plus membership to one of the United State's swankiest gym chains, Equinox, which even offers a $26,000 ultra-exclusive membership for the traveling mogul.

Some well-off New Yorkers pay up to $900 a month for a membership at Manhattan’s Performix House, an elite gym with a rigorous application process, a private entrance, and a content studio for social-media influencers.

ARMORED CAR SERVICE "BLINDAGE"

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“It’s like the only acceptable lifestyle brag,” a spin enthusiast told Vogue. “You are a douche if you brag about your car or how much money you make, but bragging about how much you spin is normal, though still very annoying.”

Marina Kondratenko, Russian Lady Rider II, Traditional Russian Hunting with Greyhounds Series, Archival Pigment Print, 2018, edition of 7 copies only, signed, dated, and numbered in pencil on verso. (Copyright of Marina Kondratenko, Courtesy of Katarina Zavodszka Contemporary | Palm Beach)

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SECURITY Forget penthouse views and rooftop pools. The ultra-wealthy are shelling out up to $500,000 for an unexpected amenity: luxurious panic rooms complete with flat-screen TVs, high-end décor and even bars. “Panic rooms have become more popular, particularly in London, especially with international clients from the Middle East and Russia, where they are prevalent,” Richard Westell, commercial sales manager for Safe and Bolt Co. and Opulent Safes, two companies that make and install safes, vaults, and panic rooms. “These people want to replicate what they have in their other houses.” In New York City, some members of the urban elite build panic rooms into opulent homes such as an $88 million Upper East Side mansion that the New York Times called an “urban fortress.” Internationally, Business Insider Australia reported in February 2018 that American billionaire Peter Thiel was building a panic room into his $4.8 million house in New Zealand. Of course, safety is still paramount in these fancy safe rooms, which are made of blast-proof and bulletproof material. But some have decorated their panic rooms to look like a 1920s speakeasy and or a Ralph Lauren catalog, as Chris Cosban, the owner of New York-based Covert Interiors, which makes luxury panic rooms for the elite of New York City and the Hamptons, told Mansion Global. These luxurious panic rooms cost between $50,000 and $550,000 for the basic armored room, and more for the furnishings and décor. Interest in luxe panic rooms has spiked as mass shootings become more and more prevalent, said Chris Acevedo of Panic Room USA, a panic room firm based in Parkland, Florida. “The volume of our business increases commiserate to the increase in gun violence,” he told the site. After decreasing for years, homicides and suicides that involve guns have been on the rise, according to recent data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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THE EXPERTS PICK AND PREDICT THEIR TOP DESTINATIONS FOR 2019


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EXPERTS CHOOSE

BEST 2019 DESTINATIONS

HOT SPOTS

Winter is dragging on with record snow fall, plunging temperatures and short days. Summer feels both a long time ago and a long way away, which leaves us thinking about one thing: where to go on holiday? In 2018, places like southern Italy and Bali infiltrated our Instagram feeds, whereas the year before, Vietnam, Mykonos and Lisbon definitely had a moment. To ensure you can stay one step ahead (and bag the most luxe accommodations while you’re at it), we asked a group of travel experts where to visit in 2019.

JORDAN The Middle East country has been touted by a few industry experts as a 2019 hot spot. First stop: the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Petra, which trends forecaster WGSN believes will see a visitor spike next year. The fee to enter the archaeological city is $50,

which WGSN says has partly helped to make the city a bit safer, leading to more lifestyle influencers heading to the destination. Adventure holidays, which include hiking and sightseeing, are also likely to be a big travel trend, according to Booking.com. The online booking site surveyed 21,500 page 79


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people from a range of countries, asking where they plan to take a trip over the next year, and determined the Wadi Rum desert as an emerging destination. Jordan also ranked sixth on Lonely Planet’s Best In Travel list for 2019.

SRI LANKA The Indian Ocean destination has been crowned the winning country of Lonely Planet’s Best In Travel for next year. Following a brutal civil war that ravaged

THE PACIFIC ISLANDS In the few days that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex visited the Pacific nations of Fiji and Tonga on their first official overseas royal tour, Expedia recorded a 95% increase in holiday interest to the region. Due to this, Sophia Parviez, head of EMEA communications at the travel booking company, said they expect to see more travelers enjoying the unspoiled beaches, dive havens and authentic culture in 2019. page 80

many parts of the country from 1983 to 2009, tourists have been slowly and steadily returning to the region as previously off-limits areas have opened up. There’s so much to do in the country, too. The Harper’s Bazaar guide recom-

JAPAN In 2019, Japan will host the Rugby World Cup across various city-spanning venues. According to Expedia, interest in visiting the city of Osaka soared by more than 230%, partly aided by new direct flight routes launching in spring 2019 from London Heathrow. “With attractions such as Universal Studios or the option of taking a 15-minute bullet train to see the temples of Kyoto, Osaka is a hot spot for all types of tastes and ages,” Parviez said.

mends traveling on the famous train ride from Kandy to Ella, climbing Lion’s Rock, heading on a safari, visiting a tea plantation and seeing at least one of the many beautiful beaches.

BULGARIA The country has been recognized by ABTA (the Association of British Travel Agents) as a destination to watch next year. The variation in the type of holiday people can choose in the eastern European country is part of the reason of its increasing appeal. There are stunning city breaks, from the capital Sofia or the ancient city of Plovdiv, plus beach resorts along the Black Sea and inland countryside locations. In the winter months, there are affordable skiing destinations like Borovets, Bansko and Pamporovo, too.


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CANADA Tour operator Topdeck has seen their Canada Rockies trip become one of their highest sellers as the country grows in popularity among British tourists. “Not only does Canada have great cities like Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver that are filled with beautiful cultural spaces and iconic sights, but Brits are now flocking to the multiple national parks in the country,” the brand’s head of product Saul Burrows told us. “With the growing appetite to experience more active holidays, destinations such as the picture perfect Lake Louise and the stunning Canadian Rockies (where Lake Moraine, pictured, is located) look set to fill our Instagram feeds in 2019.” WGSN reports that Vancouver, in particular, is set to see a spike in British visitors. “The balance and fusion of urban with the outdoor lifestyle here is unrivaled,” said Quentin Humphrey, from City by City Travel. “Locals jokingly refer to the city as ‘Manhattan with mountains.’ I personally think it’s one of North America’s most under-rated tourist destinations.” The city is also home to global fashion brands like Lululemon and Herschel. Earlier this year, Off White chose the British Columbian destination to house its largest Canadian flagship store.

RWANDA Chris McIntyre, the managing director of tour operator Expert Africa, which specializes in tailor-made safaris and beach holidays to the continent, says the East African country is likely to see more tourists next year. “There’s a generous sprinkling of luxury properties opening in Rwanda, causing a marked change in the kind of trips we’re arranging there,” he said. “Until 2017, the accommodation options were fairly basic, but comfortable. Recently, a number of sophisticated lodges opened and now we’re mostly putting together high-end trips to luxury camps. The new direct flights from Gatwick to Kigali have added to its appeal.” The capital, Kigali, made the list of where Booking.com users suggested they might like to go in 2019. The company said the country, which was struck by a brutal civil war and genocide in the 1990s, has since become more accessible for travel, with the capital city undergoing “rapid economic transformation in the past 10 years” leading to a booming food scene, markets and nightlife. page 81


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ARIZONA, USA The Grand Canyon State is becoming increasingly popular in the fashion world after Miu Miu shot its SS18 campaign – starring Elle Fanning, Adwoa Aboah and Cameron Russell - in Arcosanti. The town, located north of Phoenix, is a volunteer community project that was started in the 1970s to find a sustainable way of living. According to Humphrey, it marries architecture with ecology in order to do this. With sustainability being another key travel trend for 2019 as people look to improve their carbon footprint, places like Arcosanti are likely to become more popular. The Travel Corporation has also said that desert locations of iconic Western films are likely to see resurgence in interest next year as 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of classics like Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and True Grit.

ALBANIA The southern European country has long been in the shadows of neighboring tourist-attracting countries Greece and Montenegro; however, some travel experts are predicting 2019 to be the country’s year. Booking.com points to the island village of Ksamil, in the south of the country, which it calls a hidden gem. The platform says its users have praised the resort for its seafood and friendly people. The country also made it onto Lonely Planet’s Best In Travel List for Value for 2019 with the guide summarizing: “Albania remains a destination where you can hike amid beautiful mountain scenery, stay in tiny and timeless villages and explore the buzzy capital Tirana for far less than pretty much anywhere else in Europe.”

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NEW ZEALAND Another of the countries Harry and Meghan visited on their royal tour has made our list of popular destinations for 2019. The Luxury Travel Fair recently surveyed 1,500 people and found the place people most wanted to visit was New Zealand. Catherine Thake, director of the Fair, told Harper’s Bazaar that the increased

popularity of the country is reflective of a number of emerging travel trends. “Our research has found that more people enjoy traveling alone but in a safe environment and that’s exactly what New Zealand provides,” she said. “You can also get what feels like completely off the beaten track in New Zealand thanks to the large expanse of space with very few people which is something people love in this digitally

obsessed, always switched-on world. Reassuringly for many, this comes with a certain level of luxury that we’ve seen a big demand for – hot spring hotels, world class wine tours, the world’s best golf courses and first-class spas.” Thake noted that travelers are choosing to go from place to place on their holidays which couldn’t be easier in New Zealand.

DURBAN, SO. AFRICA While Cape Town might be the go-to destination for South Africa, the country’s third largest city, Durban, is set to witness an increase of travelers following new, direct flights to the city from major destinations. As well as great beaches and a revamped waterfront thanks to the 2010 World Cup, ABTA says it’s also the gateway to safari hot spot Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park where you can expect to tick the big five – elephants, lions, leopards, rhinos and buffalo – off your bucket list.

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COSTA RICA According to ABTA, the premise of being a good tourist is progressively more important to the holidaymaker, with 45 percent of people saying sustainability

is a key element when choosing their holiday. The experts at ABTA attribute this to Costa Rica’s rise in popularity. The Central American region is a global lead-

UZBEKISTAN The ancient Silk Road route continues to be of fascination for modern day travelers, which helps to explain its inclusion on both ABTA and Booking.com’s 2019 must visit countries lists. ABTA reports that travel to the region has become easier due to relaxed entry requirements (a new electronic visa system is being tested), easier access to currency and improved transport. Booking.com recommends including the city of Samarkand on your Uzbekistani itinerary. It’s one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in Central Asia and it offers beautiful medieval architecture, like Registan Square.

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er in conservation and boasts a diverse and intriguing wildlife population. With direct flights, along with its reputation for beautiful landscapes and adventure-filled treks and activities, it’s no surprise the country has made the list.


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WESTERN AUSTRALIA For those who put off visiting Australia due to the lengthy flight time from just about any of part of the globe, traveling to the west of the country is now quicker than ever. It’s thanks to Qantas’ introduction of the 17hour London-Perth route that took off for the first time earlier this year.

In addition to visiting the vibrant city of Perth, ABTA recommends seeing the Ningaloo Reef off the coral coast, as well as a trip to the outback in the north of the state to take in the stunning Karijini National Park.

THI S TRAV EL S E C T ION PR E S E N T E D BY T U MI

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DEAR FASHION CRITICS,

DECONSTRUCTING THE INDUSTRY, THE CFDA, DESIGNERS, MEDIA, AND ELEVATING NEW YORK FASHION WEEK

Throughout February, a number of media players published remarks regarding what they believed was a diminished state of affairs for New York Fashion Week, questioning its reason to exist and future. A few have even gone so far as to subtly point fingers at show organizers and designers alike lamenting the loss of big names from the schedule to the addition of presentations and look books, to the rules which govern the show calendar and which designers qualify for rights to be on the calendar. These questions come in the midst of the most significant paradigm shift our page 92

industry has faced as digital has upset the apple cart of timing and distribution, challenging traditional gatekeeper control with little sign that the dust will settle soon. Why have these comments been raised, and nary a one with a positive suggestion? I haven’t the slightest; you would have to ask the dissenters. What I can speak to is the power of the U.S. fashion system. A system that is not unlike America itself, consistently great at communication, limited only by its imagination, and whose greatest strength is the ability to stand up and admit that we can do better, then do it.

GIVE ME YOUR TIRED, YOUR POOR, YOUR HUDDLED MASSES YEARNING TO BREATHE FREE. Emma Lazarus’ sonnet, New Colossus,

is at the base of The Statue of Liberty as a reminder of how America was built on acceptance – and our participants in fashion week should be no exception. I speak from experience on this subject having arrived in New York with little more than $5,000 dollars and a credit card going on to launch my designer business in 1992, mounting approximately 40 runway shows in subsequent years. The fashion calendar wasn’t a barrier to our success; it was a partner to it. The Councile of Fashion Designers of Americ owns the fashion calendar and has done a magnificent job at managing its growth while supporting American fashion. They do indeed have a process and qualification that must be met for designers to show, albeit it does allow for nascent talent to gain exposure. Their role is to empower, which they do with countless programs from educa-

by Kenneth Richard/The Impression

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FASHION & STYLE

NYFW SHOES & BAGS REMEMBERING KARL LAGERFELD page 93


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NYFW

tion to finance. To be clear, it is not the CFDA’s job to prevent designers from showing, manage where and how they show, or grow designer’s brands through press and sales. That is the designer’s job. So, it is with that in mind that I would like to speak to those accountable. It is us. The designers and media alike who when the integrity of New York Fashion Week is called into question, we have to stand up and say ‘We can do better.’

HERE IS HOW. Recognize that we only have ourselves to blame for our reputation. Our reputation on the international stage is entirely in our circle of control. I care about The Impression score’s given to each show and take the role seriously. Looking at every image, averaging over 1,600 per day, I believe I page 94

see more fashion show images than any person I’ve had the pleasure to meet. Those images include close-up details shots, which enable us to look at every stitch and seam. Having designed for 15 years coupled with the access to shows imagery puts me at a unique advantage to be able to say with certainty, our industrial complex is sub-par.

MAKE MATTERS BE VIGILANT ABOUT QUALITY. We need to fight to ensure that the make does not undermine our ideas. And our make falls short of that shown on runways of Milan, Paris, and Japan. Each designer needs to be a champion of craft. If it feels wrong, it is wrong, and your weakest piece represents your highest standard. Fight at every turn for quality. Quality of materials, quality of cut, quality of fit, but most important is

the quality of make. Find or build better resources. Be it the mountains of Italy or of China, go to where you can to assure your make is stellar. If it is here, raise your bar... Then raise it again. Do not waiver. Understand you have a perception to surmount that you have earned. This will take time. More does not mean better. If need be, show less. It is wiser to present 25 great looks than 42 mediocre ones.

COMMENTARY DOES NOT MAKE UP FOR LACK OF CRAFT Americans are magnificent storytellers. Our stories deserve to be heard, are often socially meaningful, and necessary to drive change. Many designers showing in New York today have commentary that far outweighs the quality of both their design and construction.


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Often they receive media praise for that commentary that can lead to big heads and soft minds. Those designers mustn’t be fooled into thinking that just because their stories are keen that the audience will forgive production shortcomings. Because as soon as someone else comes up with a better story, theirs ends.

IF YOU WANT TO KEEP TELLING STORIES, MAKE THE WORDS WORTH PAYING FOR. This also applies to fashion media that must balance fostering and championing newness with being a shepherd, one aware of the dangers of promoting business too soon. We have all witnessed countless designers propped up with press attention only to find themselves without the means to support the next round of expectations in their life cycle. Even those who have been in business for over 10 years struggle. We must foster the right balance of attention at the right time and help to connect designers with partners who can help them on their journey.

THINK RETAIL Europe’s real estate is localized and driven by small streets that never allowed for malls with parking lots. Therefore, each designer’s vision was created with a small box retail store with their name on it. Sure, they have wholesale, but they think like a retailer, envisioning a 360 degree offering for their customer, the actual customer, not the buyer whose vision for their brand is driven by sales results from last season. European collections are focused on their customer. They offered accessories much earlier in their business cycle. They grow slowly with control of markdowns, merchandising and distribution. They make mistakes in their stores before putting it in others. Wholesale partners have less leverage over them. Everyone has an online store today. If you don’t and don’t have a relationship with your customer, then get one. Now.

DON’T GO IT ALONE Many collections in the U.S. look lonely, especially when it comes to contemporary houses and evening-wear. A lonely collection lacks styling details, lacks proper footwear, proper handbags, proper eyewear, proper details to round out a designer’s statement. Solve those problems before you start the design cycle and don’t make money an excuse. Walk a trade show, and you’ll see just how many firms there are that make accessories. Your ability to gain exposure is an asset. Leverage it and make deals. Figure it out. Fast and now. Not as an afterthought. Because your afterthought reads like an afterthought. 

BRING THE TEAM TOGETHER AT THE BEGINNING Many shows look as if they were styled by the designer or the stylist days before the show with little to work with. Stylist are valuable; partners are valuable. Find one. Build relationships and bring them into the design process at the beginning. Do a kick-off meeting to bounce your vision off them even if you aren’t ready. Who knows maybe they will inspire you. Stylist, hair, makeup, show producers, casting agents are all a part of your toolkit. They are a sounding board that can simultaneously work to help take the weight off your shoulders, rounding out your collection and inspiring new directions. Isabel Marant was wearing wooden clogs when Emmanuelle Alt suggested heels. The idea was foreign to her. Look how that worked out.

INCLUSION IS A STANDARD; IT CAN’T BE YOUR ENTIRE STORY New York is a progressive city that leads the world on social issues, and that is a role we should maintain. While today it may feel as though championing for inclusion is in itself a meaningful story, and it is, it can’t be the entire reason for your house to exist. Why? Because inclusion will be a standard tomorrow and your brand will have helped make

that a reality but without some other reason to exist, you won’t. Develop your point of view that is inclusive of inclusion, but has meaning on its own.  Press, too, needs to separate the inclusion as part of a vision but not the only reason for that designer to exist.

STYLE

LOOK BOOKS WORK; MAKE THEM WORK MORE Plenty of designers this season from Jason Wu Collection to Zero + Maria Cornejo stepped off the runway and built look books to showcase their collections. Yes, we miss you from the runway. But if spending $30k on a look book rather than $250k on a runway show helps you grow, then by all means, grow. There are plenty of collections that may be better served by look books. Look books are as easy to share as runway shows. They can live in all the same places. But if you are going to do look books, give them more meaning, add video, add dialogue, add movement – think of them as fuller stories. Use integrity talents, engage public relations in how to make them cut through the fashion week clutter to be talked about. Build small events around them. Engage art directors who can turn 30 looks into 300 reasons to speak to your audience without driving them crazy. For those who have made it this far, thank you for the time. We are here to help. That is the role we play. New York Fashion Week is a strong fashion week and will get even stronger. Because like the fab four said, “Life is very short, and there’s no time for fussing and fighting, my friend.”

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MICHAEL KORS page 96


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GCHAMPS

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"MY BRILLIANT FRIEND

KARL LAGERFELD"

Anna Wintour / Vogue

A TRIBUTE BY ANNA WINTOUR

Karl Lagerfeld was a standard unto himself. He defined what it means to be a twenty-first-century designer, and he did it with humor and joy. It’s doubly painful to have lost him because he never fell out of love with his work or with the world, and his death marks the end of the era of craftspeople who could do it all. Karl was the living soul of fashion: restless, forward-looking, and voraciously attentive to our changing culture. He recognized earlier than most that readyto-wear wasn’t just couture-lite but the vibrant center of the new, accomplished woman’s lifestyle. And at a time when his peers were seeking shelter in fashion houses, he branched out alone as perhaps the world’s most dazzling freelancer, designing multiple labels with electric energy. I’ve joked that Karl was a one-man super-brand, as distinctive as the Chanel suit he imbued with a second life. To me, however, he was something more. Through decades of adventures and misadventures, he was a true and loyal friend. We were often in touch, but Karl prized his solitude and working hours, which would regularly run to 2:00 or 3:00 a.m. He was not a morning person. He loved parties and could be counted on to rise to any social occasion, often with a startling display of unexpected skills. I can recall one evening, many years ago, when Karl neatly rolled up the exquisite carpet from the Salon de la Paix, pulled the dauntingly debonair Oscar de la Renta onto the floor, and danced a perfect tango in the classic style. Karl and page 100

I kept a standing dinner date in Paris on the first Sunday of every Fashion Week, often joined by our great friend Amanda Harlech, but we never spoke of our work during those evenings. He was witty and winsome, and seemed to have an endless supply of risqué jokes—in other words, the world’s best dinner companion. The hours I spent with him at the table make me feel luckier than any stroke of fortune I’ve had at my editing desk.

Because Karl had a natural eye for style and beauty, because he dressed like no one else, and because he (and his extremely pampered cat) took to the glitter of social media better than any other octogenarian I know, it was often assumed that he worked in the realm of surfaces. In truth, his private passions ran deep. Karl loved nothing more than reading alone, and books used to pile madly around his workplace: At one point, a table laden with them collapsed from its own weight through the floor. It sometimes wasn’t clear, until one talked with him, that he had found inspiration in everything from the week’s news to eighteenth-century decorative arts and the philosophy of David Hume. No designer had more esoteric references, or such varied ones. Karl was a renaissance man who, by virtue of his interests and background, devoured the world. He was a linguist, a photographer, an interior decorator, a collector, a filmmaker, and a philanthropist—among many other things. That openness and energy always showed. If fashion is the personal expression of a world in transformation, design is the practice of noticing those changes a moment ahead of everyone else, and embodying them in clothes that help people find their sense of self.

That was Karl, not just in his taste but in his soul. He hated to be called an artist. He was “working class,” he insisted—a commercial craftsman doing his best to fill the stores with new and interesting wares. For all his prolificacy and professionalism, though, what made Karl Karl was something far more intimate and squarely in the artist’s realm: a hidden thread of love, and maybe loss, that drew him to reach out, in life and work, and try to connect with the singular person hiding in the fashionable crowd. Speaking personally, I want to say the connection was real. I’ve worn Karl’s beautiful clothes during the most important, emotional moments of my life: at my wedding, at my children’s weddings, when I received a damehood from the queen, at Franca Sozzani’s memorial service. Partly it was because of how much I loved his designs, how well they expressed who I was and what I hoped to be. But partly it was because of Karl. Putting on his exquisite dresses or perfect suits made me feel close to him, and secure in crucial moments in the comfort of a friend. What helps me now is knowing I’ll still find him there when he’s gone. If the most joyful part of my work is discovering new talents, the most heartbreaking is watching those I’ve known and loved depart the world. I was always thrilled to celebrate Karl’s incredible creativity in Vogue, yet it’s as a person, not as a designer, that I will miss him most. My colorful compatriot. My brilliant friend. Karl would want us to think only of the future, but today I’m leaving a place for sadness at what has passed.

Anna Wintour's tribute originally appeared on Vogue's Web site.


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STYLE

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FENDI PAYS TRIBUTE TO

KARL LAGERFELD Karl Lagerfeld died earlier this week at 85 and the fashion industry will never be the same. As the creative director of Fendi, Chanel, and his namesake label, this monumental loss will be felt across multiple brands, but especially Chanel and Fendi, the latter where he worked for 54 years.

“The bond between Karl Lagerfeld and Fendi is fashion’s longest love story, one that will continue to touch our lives for years to come,” said creative partner page 102

Silvia Venturini Fendi in a press release. Lagerfeld’s final collection was decidedly feminine. Shoulders were defined, waists were nipped, and hemlines softly grazed the calf. A palette of neutrals contrasted against saffron yellow and turquoise. In true texture play, sheer chiffon swished against structured leather coats. The brand also reintroduced an archived monogram print from 1981, named ‘Karligraphy,’ created from Lagerfeld’s own script. 

In the most emotional part of the show, Gigi Hadid closed to a standing ovation. As a tribute video of Karl Lagerfeld describing what he wore on his first day on the job at Fendi played, there wasn’t a single eye in the house left dry. At his other label, Chanel has plans to honor the designer at a later date following a “strictly private ceremony” for his funeral. Lagerfeld’s final collection for Chanel will be presented on March 5 in Paris.


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NYFW SHOES

Feathers, toe ring sandals, crystals, and seashells: Spring 2019’s biggest shoe trends are anything but basic.

If the runways were any indication, this season is all about having fun with your footwear. Haters will say it’s too early, but we’re already ready to start thinking ahead to open-toe shoes and sandals again. In anticipation of a new season in footwear, we rounded up the best shoes from the Spring 2019 runways in New York. Consider it a spark of inspiration as you start to think ahead to your spring wardrobe.

PRABAL GURUNG

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MANOLO BLAHNIK


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BROCK COLLECTION

PHILLIP LIM STYLE

TOM FORD

TORY BURCH

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VERNISSAGE {PRIVATE VIEWING}

ft

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VERNISSAGE { PRIVATE VIEWING }

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La Bohême BECOMES L’Ambassadeur LANRE OLAGOKE

Raphael Dapaah | Art Contributor raphaeldapaah@hotmail.co.uk

In March last year, I had the immense pleasure of attending the private viewing of an exhibition curated by My Runway Group, a creative agency headed by Kojo Marfo, an inspiring peer of mine. Admittedly, after what felt like a lifetime in the office, I was pining for nothing more than to get to my flat, sink in the sofa, put my feet up, and meditate over a snifter of brandy. However, loyalty, and of course my unquenchable thirst for art, abled me to summon the strength to hop on the tube from Westminster, Soho-bound, to la bohême centrale. After a round of speeches given by the curator, George Osei-Prempeh, and the brilliant artists, notably Sarah Owusu, Koby Martin and Emanuel Unaji; a slender and unassuming gentleman was beckoned to the front of the adoring audience by Kojo Marfo to say a few words. The gentleman in question had been silently observing everyone during the height of the exhibition, but I noted his quiet presence prior to his announcement. At first glance he struck me as a passerby, perhaps stopping by briefly before heading off to some unknown

destination. But the longer I took him in, the more I sensed he must either be an artist, or perhaps even a patron. Though dressed in what can only be described as a rakish, almost sapeur-esque manner, he had an unmistakable air about him, somehow noble and maybe even aristocratic. As he walked passed the curious faces to take his place by the side of a beaming Kojo Marfo, I heard a whisper from behind me, “Who is that?” before the stranger broke his silence. Lanre Olagoke would not only reveal himself as the esteemed sponsor and patron of the exhibition, but would also go on to deliver a moving testimony about how his own troubled past had fueled his desire to help young people in the arts. In that moment, I knew that in the not-too-distant future, I would have to reach out to the art master, patron and mentor, to find out more about his incredible journey to date. Lanre gracefully accepted my invitation to learn more about his story not long after arriving back in London from an cultural ambassadorial tour of duty in China. Naturally I was curious to know what his recent trip entailed. “They invited me out there because they want me to be the cultural bridge between Africa, China and the UK,” he tells me. “The Chinese have a great appreciation for African art and want to be more involved.” As amazing as his revelation is, a part

of me is not surprised, though I do take warmly to the news. Contemporary African Art has been one of the fastest growing sectors in the global art industry, so it was inevitable that the Chinese, who have been investing considerably in the African continent over the past decade, would soon turn their attention to the world of African art. What did surprise me however, was Lanre’s revelation that he was once a mentee and student of one of the most iconic African artist’s in modern history; Professor Ben Enwonwu, MBE, whose long-lost masterpiece, “Princess Tutu” recently broke records at an auction overseen by Bonhams’ Modern and Contemporary African Art department. “It was in the late 80s, and I had received word that the professor needed an apprentice at his Swiss Cottage studio in North West London,” he recalls. “I would do his washing, cleaning, all his domestic chores for him, whilst also eating with him, painting by his side, watching and learning.” While Lanre had the unparalleled opportunity to learn by the side of Africa’s greatest pioneering artist, and hone his own gifts as an artist, his journey to become an artist did not come without its challenges and tribulations. Lanre opens up to me and tells me of how after dropping out of studying Economics at North East London Polytechnic in pursuit of his true page 113


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passion, art, he left the family home at the behest of his mother whom he describes as a socialite from a wealthy Nigerian family, and was soon was squatting in some of the most shocking conditions in London. It wasn’t long after that Lanre found himself homeless and indulging in cocaine. As Lanre recalls, the troubles he experienced in the early segment of the 80s, I can’t help but notice the parallels between himself and the iconic, Jean-Michel Basquiat. Both, exceptional artists, from relatively

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well-off backgrounds, who clash with strict authoritarian parents, end up homeless and abusing drugs, all in the pursuit of art. Fortunately, in the case of Lanre, he is alive and well to tell his tales from the punk era of the 80s. His complete recovery fueled his lust for life and art. That same lust for life and sense of purpose inspired Lanre to launch art projects in prisons to give prisoners a creative outlet and a cathartic release. He eventually launch his own charity, Arts Alive Trust, which is dedicated


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to supporting young people in the Arts. From squatting in some of London’s most deprived drug dens in the early

80s, to supporting young budding artists, and more recently warming up to his role as a cultural diplomat, it’s fair to say that Lanre Olagoke’s journey from La Bohême to L’Ambassadeur

has been nothing short of thrilling and inspiring. It’s no wonder his work pulsates with such life and vibrancy; it is a true reflection of the man himself.

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INFLUENTIAL PHILANTHROPY

MAC COSMETICS / MAC AIDS FUND

LIPSTICK

SAVES LIVES “We raised over $350 million dollars selling lipstick. That's mind-boggling to a lot of people,” says Nancy Mahon, executive director of MAC AIDS Fund. “We woke people up. It was disruptive, and at the same time it was a good product.”

William Smith, philanthropy contributor

Philanthropy, as a term, has its origins in the Greek language, roughly meaning “love of human beings.” In the early 17th century, the term took hold in English and entered the lexicon as a way to refer to persons of considerable generosity and goodwill toward others. The “philanthropist” was born. Today, philanthropy – or charitable giving – is, well, big. In 2017, Americans gave $410 billion to charities. And while the US has long held the record of the most generous nation, New Zealand, Canada, and the UK round on the top four most generous nations in the world when counting monetary contributions alone. If you add in indicators other than money, such as “helping a stranger” or “volunteering time,” nations with considerable distress actually pop to the top. In 2018, for example, according to global data collected by UK-based Charities Aid Foundation, Indonesia ranks highest, Kenya eighth, Myanmar ninth, and Haiti 14th. When it comes to financial resources, both public and private foundations are

also well-known as major philanthropic actors. They help identify and financially support solutions to global problems large and small. Not to be overlooked is corporate philanthropy. While global data is harder to come by, we know that in 2017, corporate giving in the US totaled $20.77 billion and increased eight percent from 2016. And while many corporations and businesses give generously, MAC Cosmetics made a monumental turn by deciding to tackle the global AIDS crisis with a corporate philanthropic strategy for their signature product line, “VIVA GLAM.” Founded in Canada in 1984, MAC (Make-Up Art Cosmetics) was the brainchild of salon owner Frank Angelo and makeup artist and photographer Frank Toskan. As the brand itself tells the story, they were frustrated by makeup products that did not photograph well - so they made their own. Production started in their kitchen and as word spread, so did the market for their products. MAC officially launched from the Hudson’s Bay department store make-up counter in Toronto. In 1994, and with success in staking its claim as an edgy and contemporary

brand, MAC became part of the Estée Lauder Companies – it is now sold in over 120 countries around the world. The Estée Lauder Companies embraces a plethora of well-known brands under its umbrella. In addition to its namesake Estée Lauder label, the company also owns Aveda, Origins, Clinique, Lab Series (for men), and Bobbi Brown. Luxe labels like Le Labo, RODIN, La Mer, and Jo Malone are also part of the Estée Lauder family. Yet even prior to its acquisition by Estée Lauder, MAC set its mind to a bold charitable strategy. In the same year it joined Estée Lauder, the MAC AIDS Fund was formed. The brand, having always been unique and in celebrating diversity and individuality, sought to be similarly bold in their corporate philanthropy. In the early 1990s, the AIDS crisis was in full swing. In fact, the same year of MAC AIDS Fund’s launch, AIDS became the leading cause of death for all Americans ages 25-44 over a quarter of a million deaths recorded and nearly 500,000 infections reported in the country. The famed artists Keith Haring and Ryan White, for whom the first federal legislation to support AIDSrelated organizations would be named, page 121


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Since 2005, MAC AIDS Fund has contributed more than $27 million USD into HIV/AIDS and health programs in the Caribbean. HIV/AIDS has affected Haiti in a greater way than any other part of the Caribbean with more than 2% of the adult population living with HIV. As a result MAC AIDS has focused resources into the country. Over $8 million USD from MAC AIDS Fund has supported programs in Haiti to expand HIV testing, linking those living with the virus to treatment, and to keep people in care to keep themselves healthy and prevent transmission of the virus to others. Two of the primary grantees have been GHESKIO and Partners in Health, renowned health organizations serving urban Port-au-Prince as well as the rural area of the Central Plateau.

both died at the start of the decade. Also leading up the MAC AIDS Fund’s decision to address the epidemic, Magic Johnson revealed his HIV-positive status. Tom Hanks shocked the global conscience on HIV and AIDS in the film “Philadelphia,” and the younger, MTV generation witnessed the death of “Real World” cast member Pedro Zamora. In other words, HIV/AIDS was everywhere and the search for solutions was never stronger. Into that mix of desperation and hope, stepped the MAC AIDS Fund. While some companies favor the philanthropic approach of setting aside a certain amount of money for charitable work, MAC created the VIVA GLAM line of lipstick and lip gloss with all proceeds from the sale of the products going to the MAC AIDS Fund. In other words, when shopping online today and ordering the VIVA GLAM III in matte finish at $18.50, that entire $18.50 goes directly to the Fund. “The fact that we have raised over $350 million dollars selling lipstick is page 122

mind-boggling to a lot of people,” says Nancy Mahon, executive director of MAC AIDS Fund. “We woke people up. It was disruptive, and at the same time it was a good product.” The MAC AIDS Fund also wanted their efforts to be as in-your-face as the epidemic it sought to address. This was abundantly clear when the campaign named their first spokesperson, the drag queen performer RuPaul. Hardly shy or unassuming, RuPaul set the stage for an unabashed approach to the MAC AIDS Fund’s campaigns. Mary J. Blige, Lady Gaga, k.d.Lang, Ricky Martin, Nicki Minaj and Ariana Grande are a few of the luminaries who have led past campaigns for the MAC AIDS Fund. Since inception, the MAC AIDS Fund has raised nearly half a billion US dollars through the VIVA GLAM campaign, with nearly $33 million USD raised last year alone. The grants made to non-profit organizations from the MAC AIDS Fund are diverse, but focus on three specific areas: prevention, treatment and basic needs.

In addition to a geographic focus on the United States, the MAC AIDS Fund also prioritizes funding for the Caribbean and India. The 2018 VIVA GLAM campaign spokesperson was the singer Sia. And while the singer may be known for hiding her face – in addition to being an incredible singer and performer – her signature red lipstick in the VIVA GLAM line screams for eye-catching attention. While the tragic death toll from HIV has significantly slowed and highly effective treatment for those infected with HIV is a reality, the work of the MAC AIDS Fund continues. After all, nearly 2 million new HIV infections occurred in 2017. That’s about 5,000 new HIV infections per day. Products in the VIVA GLAM line can be purchased at major retailers such as Macy’s, Nordstrom, and Sephora, as well as at MAC Cosmetics counters or at www.maccosmetics.com.


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WINE

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PAIR Food & Wine Cezar Kusik, wine contributor

FOR YOUR

HEALTH & WELL-BEING

Food and wine, wine and food – which comes first doesn’t matter. What does matter is the marriage of the two, which nourishes our bodies, warms our hearts, and uplifts our spirits. The sophisticated, fashionable, hyped, analyzed and philosophized world of wine as we know it now, is a very recent phenomena. Wine has always been a crucial element of human culture, yet its role, perception and interpretation have changed dramatically. In the past, wine was simply a visceral source of sustenance and valuable nutrition promising a person’s overall

physical well-being. Wine wasn’t swirled, looked at, and described in poetic and provocatively eccentric terms. To the contrary! It was drunk, chugged, spat while laughing, and consumed with food, usually both in unashamedly huge quantities without absolutely any concern for a perfect pairing. Vineyard farmers were no different than beet farmers. Romanticism had no place in grape growing. But wine, like other aspects of human experience, is subject to evolution and progress. With basic wine knowledge, you can impress your social circle by casually mentioning that Pinot Noir is the grape

used all high-quality red Burgundy wines, that Barolo and Barbaresco are not names of red grapes but names of two neighboring villages in Piedmont, Italy, that produce world-class red wines from the local grape, Nebbiolo. Put your guests (gently) in their places when they grimace while you decant a white wine at a dinner party by telling them that most wines, regardless of color, benefit from aeration. Aren’t you a know-it-all, hot-shot now? But wine, by itself, comes always through as an incomplete experience, calling for food to make it whole. Just like wine can enhance food flavors, food can refine a wine. Sometimes page 129


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Food & Wine

wines that aren’t great sippers, that is, not enjoyable by themselves; can offer a surprisingly pleasant and palatable experience if paired with the right food. The French region of Jura produces oxidative white wine made from a local grape Savagnin that, by itself, comes across as… funky – to say the least. When paired with a local mountain cow cheese, Tomme du Jura, though the wine loses all the funk and changes flavors, beautifully complementing the cheese. So let’s bring it up a notch, a step or a level, and learn how effectively match wine with food to elevate your dining and wining experience. Did you know? The term “sommelier,” now envied and surrounded with a

WINE

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gleam of sophistication and mystique, may have stemmed from the old French “sommerier“ or “somier.” Historically, the profession of a sommelier was that of a provisions manager who overlooked food and beverage supplies for noblemen, sampling them to test for possible poisoning attempts. Things have changed, haven’t they? In my world there are three basic approaches to pairing food and wine: the pragmatic, the natural, and the anarchic.

The pragmatic pairings This is where the science comes into play in the forms of nutrition, chemistry, and biology. The pairings can either be congruent or contrasting. Congruent

pairing mean that the flavors of the food and its “weight” are mimicked in wine: juicy, smoky, fatty BBQ ribs with a bold Australian Shiraz. Contrasting pairing would obviously be the opposite: a crispy, salty, fatty, and slightly spicy pork belly with a light, fruity, slightly sweet, and acidic German Riesling. It’s proven and practiced that big, tannic red wines like Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah or the Italian Aglianico complement fatty, juicy red meats. The fattiness of the steak softens the tannins, and its juiciness brings out the flavors of the wine. Spiciness in foods is mitigated by low alcohol, slightly sweet, and high-inacid wines like Riesling or Pinot Blanc. The same rule applies to salty dishes.


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Wine making is a balancing act wherein a wine maker strives to create a final product of seamless structure where all the components coexist in perfect unison. There are four fundamental traits in wine that determine wine’s overall structure and its balance: acids, tannins, sugars, and alcohol. If any of these ingredients occurs in excess overpowering other elements, the wine will taste off-balance. When pairing food and wine, these components have a significant impact on what the taste sensation to your palate will be. It can be synergy or a gagging mismatch. Stark examples: sushi and a tannic Cabernet Sauvignon CLASH! Champagne and Oysters MATCH!

Tannins: counteract fatty and high-protein meats.

Sugars: mimic sweet flavors in desserts but also counteract saltiness and spiciness.

Acids (three principal acids in wines: tartaric, citric, malic): enhance flavors in food by opening our taste buds. That’s why it’s a good idea to have wines such as Champagne, Sauvignon Blanc, or a dry Riesling before a meal. The acids “warm up” your palate for what is to come. Alcohol: High alcohol helps with rich, high-fat content dishes; low alcohol pairs better with spicy

foods. A few basic guidelines to follow while pairing food and wine •

Big tannic wines with fatty red meats

Earthy foods with earthy wines

Spicy dishes with low alcohol, unoaked, slightly sweet wines

Rich, creamy foods with decadent, oaky wines

The acidity in wine should be higher than that in food

Match the wine with the sauce of the dish than with its meat

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• •

Food & Wine The wine should be sweeter than the food An easy way to identify a match or mismatch for a pairing is to take a bite of food and chew, sip on wine with the food in your mouth, and wait for the palate and taste buds to react.

The natural pairings What grows together goes together. Traditional, regional cuisines and their wines evolved together over the course of centuries. The signature foods of one area are often created to match well with the wines of that area. Some dishes are prepared with local wines as their ingredients. We all know that while traveling to wine countries, sentimentality takes over and affects our palates. We tend to idealize the local foods and the wines that go with them. But the locality rule can be applied in your own kitchen – and it usually works. So while testing your chef skills by trying to recreate some authentic dishes of a region, look a up the wine suggestions made in the same area. The region of Muscadet in France, where the Loire river falls into the Atlantic Ocean, produces white wines from the indigenous grape Melon de Bourgogne, which pairs fantastically with abundance of seafood fair sourced locally. Caldereta Pastoril, a traditional country meat stew from the Spanish region of Rioja, calls for Tempranillo grapebased reds of the area. Piedmontese, a slightly sweet and effervescent Moscato d’Asti wine, is a match made in heaven with the sensual, local dessert of Panna Cotta. Also in Piedmont, Brasato al Barolo is a braised veal dish with local herbs and vegetables that pairs seamlessly with Nebbiolo grape wines from the local wineries. page 132

A traditional Portuguese dish of Arroz de Tamboril – delicate, flaky fish cooked in tomato, laurel, garlic, rice and often completed with delicious prawns and other seafood – calls for the local refreshing white Vinho Verde from the Alvarino grape. These are just a few examples in the vast repertoire of food and wine pairings from all over the wine growing world.

The anarchic pairings Finally, there is what I humorously call anarchic pairings. These are pairings that defy logic, cultural experience, locality, and all the laws and rules of human taste and palate, but which you, as an individual, chose and persist. Because after all, it is your personal experience that matters and there is no food and wine pairing police out there to cite you. As a longtime restaurant professional, I’ve seen it all and reacted with disbelief, cringes, and on occasion, with a gag reflex at what wines people can drink with some foods. Raw oysters with a Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. Pepper steak with New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc, crab and avocado citrus salad with Australian Shiraz, and let’s not forget about a spicy papaya, lemon grass and shrimp salad with earthy, tannic Madiran wine from Southwest France made from a local Tennat grape (that’s the gag reflex). Atrocious yet human. As people we differ individually and so do our palates and flavor preferences. We have different sensitivities and susceptibilities. Some of us prefer extra spicy; others opt for mild flavors. What tastes salty to you doesn’t necessarily come across to others. Wine is no exception. We have our likes and dislikes. Starting with the basics of color – red, white or rose – to more nuanced components like alcohol level, sweet-

ness, tannins, oak, and countless aromas. Follow your taste, but don’t be rigid. Wine should be an adventure and adding food enriches that adventure. So whether you are dining out with your honey, attending a dinner party for a friend’s birthday or trying


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out some new dishes in your own kitchen, don’t be afraid to experiment, to step out of your comfort zone, and push your personal palate boundaries.

You may find yourself giddily surprised at what works for you and brings you pleasure, because above all, when it comes to food and wine, it is pleasure that matters the most. page 133


SPIRITUALITY DEFINING THE DIVINE

CHOOSING HARMONY

THE PATH OF LEAST RESISTANCE

Jyoti Paintel-Bowles Spirituality Contributor

The path of least resistance is about making choices to create harmony in our lives. On the surface, it appears to be an easy equation, but there is a great duality that exists in the path of least resistance. Namely it is doing the exact opposite: confronting the difficult and the ugly, and squarely facing that to which we are most resistant. This actually paves the way to living life in perfect harmony. Often baffling is, that in life, we are presented with difficult decisions resulting in creating disharmony. Having the courage to accept, act accordingly, and live with the fallout of that decision is the only way to create authentic harmony. The word harmony itself is important to understand to delve deep into the subject and deconstruct it. Harmony is often used to describe a musical melody that has a pleasing progression of chords, strings, or notes. Harmony in a relationship is subjective – just like our own individual wiring allows many interpretations of what is considered harmonic excellence in music.

In art, harmony is seen as the embodiment of a balance in color and line. In respect to how humans view the quality of their life, harmony is used to describe a state or conditions that reflect tranquility and accordance in our inner and outer selves. Unfortunately, this is where perception and reality can be quite deceptive. For the sake of this article, I will describe the path of least resistance as living our life in harmony, no matter what it takes to get there. But let us return to the path of least resistance – because I want to dispel a myth: choosing the path of least resistance is not about being passive or lazy, as it would suggest. While it is true that superficially the action of doing nothing in the present requires very little physical effort, it may have a major impact on our harmony in the long run. The option of choosing the path of least resistance is actually given to us at a very young age. When we understand that we can’t play with our friends later unless we clean our room, which requires work and effort, we will make our decision based on how important it is that we play later (a state of harmony for us). When we decide to clean the room, we create and follow the path of least resistance, perhaps having also avoided potential punishment. In this decision, we chose the difficult thing

– addressing the disharmony in the messy room – which results in a clean room, pleased parents, and most importantly the reward of playtime. However, when we decide we don’t want to fix our disharmony, we will likely have to deal with it anyway. Ultimately, this decision creates further disruption and chaos in life and dealing with feelings of regret later on when we miss playtime. Let’s use the example of two high students: both have the same academic responsibilities and also the same busy social lives outside of school. For the student choosing to study, missing out on social events may create some disharmony – especially with the knowledge that others are out having a good time. This student may feel like they have chosen the opposite of the path of least resistance because they are upset. Later, when good grades result in admission to the college of choice, the disharmony that was created by choosing to work instead of socializing has long been forgotten. There is even an appreciation for the disharmony because it paved the way for a more lasting and tangible harmony. To put this in the context of adults in real life, I would like to share a common story. In relationships, the truth revealed when we choose the path of least resistance can often lead to the cosmic sledgehammer coming down page 137


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SPIRITUALITY DEFINING THE DIVINE

CHOOSING HARMONY

THE PATH OF LEAST RESISTANCE

Let us return to the path of least resistance – I want to dispel a myth: choosing the path of least resistance is not about being passive or lazy, as it would suggest. While it is true that superficially the action of doing nothing in the present requires very little physical effort, it may have a major impact on our harmony in the long run. and shattering our life into pieces. While this sounds terrible, in fact, it may be just what is needed sometimes. A good friend of mine was in a serious relationship with a woman he met in high school. Both came from broken families and thus found comfort and a safe place in each other that bonded them through the trials of their turbulent personal lives at home. Because her family had little money, he became her financial provider at a very young age and even financed her college tuition through his part-time job. Even though he secretly longed to experience life as a single college student, he didn’t want to disappoint his high school sweetheart, so he remained loyal to her. Later in therapy, he revealed his resentment and bitterness over this responsibility. He did not choose the path of least resistance; just a side path that later led to heartache. Now well into their 20s, they matured and developed different personalities with new interests and soon both of them realized that they actually didn’t have anything in common. Moreover, the physical and romantic spark that he felt for her at 17 had faded – she was his best friend and companion, but he in truth, he was no page 138

longer in love with her. Resentment grew in him as she continued to rely on him for her livelihood. She had grown accustomed to his control of everything and assumed it would always be so. He suggested a break, but she gave him an ultimatum: either marry her or lose her forever. He was torn, and not long after that, they walked down the aisle. Soon, there were children involved and many more reasons to stay together, just not ever the right ones. Both decided that the illusion of harmony was better than dismantling the years they had invested in each other. Unsurprisingly, they grew apart. Unable to face the cosmic sledgehammer and the mounting pressure, he fell into depression while she lived in denial. Instead of revealing his true feelings, he began affairs when he traveled for business. He was living a double life and eventually, when caught, he confessed it all. Upon doing so, he found that she, too, was involved with other men who fulfilled her in the way he couldn’t. Their fragile marriage fell apart and they spent the next few years trying to salvage what they had left, but it was clear that the path they had once thought was the one of

least resistance was fraught with excruciating pain – it had simply been a mirage. Eventually, they decided not to uproot their children so they lived under the same roof as co-parents, but were as emotionally, physically, and intimately estranged as a couple could possibly be. Today, they are waiting for children to move away to officially end their union, but discreetly they live like two singled people; no longer lying and sneaking around anymore. They both live in a resigned peace with their choice. Tearing their life apart certainly didn’t look like it was the path of least resistance at the time, but it did lead to a more authentic type of harmony – one that didn’t include deception and betrayal because actions that we cannot be proud of are never the path of least resistance. So as you see, the path of least resistance is the universe asking us what we want out of life and how hard we are willing to work for it. It’s the decisions we make at these crucial moments, and the hard work that follows, that can truly determine what the quality of our life- our harmony- will be like. Insight: Actions we are not proud of are never the path of least resistance.


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DOJO 5 étagères noires, 4 formes mobiles géométriques devant et 3 fixes à l’arrière : telle est la bibliothèque Dojo, inspirée des cloisons coulissantes traditionnelles japonaises. À finir en chêne ou en laque brillante, suivant son penchant.

D O J O, B I B L I O T H È Q U E . M O N T G O L F I È R E , FA U T E U I L . C H E S S , TA B L E S B A S S E S E T D E S S E R T E S . D O J O, B O O KC A S E M O N T G O L F I È R E , A R M C H A I R. C H E S S , C O C K TA I L A N D S I D E TA B L E S .

The Dojo bookcase was inspired by traditional Japanese sliding partitions and features 5 black shelves, 4 mobile geometric shapes in front and 3 fixed shapes in the back. It is available with oak or glossy lacquer finish.


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Welcome Home

CAPRI SOUTH BEACH 280 SOUTH COCONUT LANE, MIAMI STEPS FROM LINCOLN ROAD

Adi Dotan Zilberberg

I am very pleased to announce the latest addition to Zilberberg’s Property Showcase. Luxury super modern brand new Biscayne Bay waterfront home with over 6,000 SF. Dramatic water views welcome you to the open floor plan with expansive foyer, custom staircase, and 20-foot ceilings. Featuring 6 bedrooms, 7.5 bathrooms, living, dining, chef ’s gourmet custom kitchen, 90 bottle wine cooler, family room, terraces, atriums and extra space for a home gym at ground level. 2 car garage, elevator, lush garden, Infinity pool, dock and coveted roof terrace for entertaining. Palm Island living beyond expectations. It comes furnished and ready to go.

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COACH WINE: FUNCTIONAL TRAINING

HEALTH IS WEALTH WEIGHT LOSS MADE SIMPLE

The entire balance of your bank account and all the tips on the Internet can't help if you don't follow some basic guidelines.

Mark Wine CSCS; USAW; NASM PT, PES, CES

The most common pitfall we make in an attempt to lose weight is inconsistency. If you want to lose weight, or see any results, consistency is your only option. Neither the entire balance of your bank account nor the millions of tips out there on the Internet weight loss will necessarily lead you down the weight-loss path. Professional help can motivate you and some of the tips online are helpful and simple, but really, there's no need to get into anything too complicated or too detailed. Too detailed, you ask? Yes, too detailed.

Instead the realization that completely living by the basics, which is proper nutrition in all aspects of life, is the first step to success. If the basic steps have not been integrated fully into your life, then there is no need to go into specific details such as detailed diets. Before we begin there are a few things you must understand. First, be sure that you understand that nothing will replace hard work and physical exercise. To truly lose weight and become healthier you must start to pay attention to your body composition, which is fat-tolean mass ratio. Exercising four to six days per week is required. Second, smoking is not cool, so just don't smoke. Kick that habit now. Third, reduce or stop the excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages.

Fourth, sugar will always be sugar, no matter how they sugar coat it (get it?). Avoid drinking sugary juices and sports drinks. Fifth, there is no such thing as a magic weight loss pill. Sixth, fried food tastes better because it makes you fatter, avoid it. With the pre-basics out of the way, let’s delve in a little deeper.

1. "Fat-Free" leads to a fatter me. Fat-free labels are the popular fad equivalent to skinny jeans. The truth is that fat-free foods contain far fewer nutrients with far more contaminants. Fat-free dairy foods are stripped of the fat-burning, cancer-fighting ingredient Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA), which is found in animal fats.

CLA is often only found in organic foods that are less processed like organic milk. CLA is primarily responsible for promoting lean body mass, fat burning, and combating cancers such as prostate and breast.

2. Eat Healthy Fats As we look beyond CLA, we find other reasons to eat healthier fats. Our bodies' cells are comprised of two layers of lipids or fats. The types of fats that we consume dictate if our cells are comprised of healthy or unhealthy lipids. If our cells are unhealthy due to consumption of trans fat for example, we become more resistant to insulin. Resistance to insulin leads to diabetes and excessive fat gain. On the other hand, if our cells are made up of healthy page 151


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CONTINUED...

COACH WINE: HEALTH IS

WEALTH RESPECT IT

fats, then they will become more sensitive to insulin.

Insulin sensitivity allows for glucose to be used as energy rather than being stored as fat. Insulin sensitivity will also promote a healthy metabolism. In short, healthy fats lead to greater levels of fat loss.

3. Balance in everything. Fats are still fats, so even too much healthy fat is a bad thing. Therefore, balancing your fat intake is vital ,yet simple. Choose Omega-3 enriched foods such as fish, grass-fed beef, and wild meats. My personal favorite is bison - it's packed with antioxidants. Avoid consuming mass quantities of vegetable oils that contain high amounts of Omega-6s. Your diet should consist of both Omega-6 and Omega-3. Most people consume too much Omega-6 and herein lies a major problem. Solution, supplement with Omega-3 fatty acids. Fish oil from a wild, organic source can contain superior Omega-3s. Supplement one gram of Omega-3s with every meal to stabilize blood-sugar levels. The long and short of it is that eating healthy, balanced fats (Omega-3s and Omega-6s) while avoiding fat-free and unhealthy fats (trans fats) will keep your cells sensitive to insulin, which will result in greater fat and weight loss, improving your overall health. page 152


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F I T N E S S page 153


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MOLD YOUR MIND

WHOSE FAULT IS IT? ACCOUNTABILITY MATTERS

LEARN TO RESOLVE CONFLICT WITH COMMUNICATION Ever blamed someone else for a mistake you made? Or seen someone break the rules and said nothing? Chances are that this has happened to you at some point in your life, but placing blame or disregarding a defiant action from your peer inhibits your ability to learn, grow and resolve a conflict through communication. A common phrase I hear is, “I was late because my mom didn’t get home in time.” This places the blame on others for your inability to show up on time. My response to this excuse is, “You know your mom’s work schedule – you should have prepared a ride earlier.”

The Blame Game Take mom out of the picture now, and, instead, imagine a scenario at work: someone in your department – under your direction – makes a drastic mistake in an area where page 156

they were untrained. Sure, you can blame the untrained employee for the mistake, but how did they arrive in that situation without proper training? This is not to say it is always someone’s fault, or that someone is right or wrong in every situation, but we must take accountability for our actions, looking to ourselves to reflect on what we could have done better. Through receiving feedback from ourselves and others, we grow as individuals, while also learning how to respond when a similar situation presents itself.

Forms of Accountability I view accountability in two forms: self-directed and peer-directed. Self-directed accountability is simply taking responsibility for your actions. Self-directed accountability is important because it shows a heightened sense of awareness, which is essential in continuing down the self-development path. Peer-directed accountability can be viewed as communicating to others when their actions do not parallel previously established values. For example, I coached high school basketball this past season. In practice, when we run liners, some of the athletes won’t touch the lines even though that’s part of the drill. Peer-directed accountability, therefore, is when a teammate informs

the others to ensure they touch the lines and not short-change the drill. Being able to exemplify all forms of accountability helps to develop leadership qualities that are essential for personal and team growth.

Called Out When I was working in the fitness industry as a manager, I was in charge of a staff of approximately 15. There were countless times when it was my job to hold people accountable for their actions. One particular battle was against improper cell phone use. I brought this up in meetings and to individual offenders on the daily, but still the problem persisted. One day, while I was standing by the entrance using my phone, I turned around to see one of my staff members on their cell phone. I called him out saying, “Hey, we’re are not supposed to use our phones at the front, remember?” To which he responded, “Then why are you on your phone?” I realized in that moment, that I couldn’t expect others to follow rules if I didn’t lead by example. Part of holding others accountable is holding yourself accountable. I realized I was wrong, took responsibility for my actions and changed the way I lead my staff members from that day forward.


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Thrive Accountability is a fantastic quality to develop. It assists you in following through on your commitments, it

keeps you grounded in reality and it prevents little problems from turning into bigger ones. The time for placing blame onto others has passed. The time has come for you to take control of your

actions by holding yourself accountable, whether by keeping yourself in line or notifying others of their transgressions. Increase accountability, increase personal growth and watch yourself thrive! page 157


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Profile for Polo Lifestyles - Haiti

Polo Lifestyles Haiti - March 2019 "Wealth"  

Will 2019 be the end of opulence? The way the world's wealthiest 1% spends is changing as the super-rich seek out security, anonymity, educa...

Polo Lifestyles Haiti - March 2019 "Wealth"  

Will 2019 be the end of opulence? The way the world's wealthiest 1% spends is changing as the super-rich seek out security, anonymity, educa...

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