Polo Lifestyles-Haiti Jan-Feb 2022: And Just Like That...

Page 1

V O L U M E V I / I S S U E I / J A N U A R Y- F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 2

AR GENTINA'S TRIPL E C ROW N FIN AL ST R E G IS SNOW POLO C H AMP ION S H IP S AL HABTOOR POLO S E AS ON

PRESERVING PRICELESS ART

A CURATOR'S QUEST

IN HOT PURSUIT

OF THE WORLD'S BEST WINE

"MY DOGS SAVED MY LIFE"

AN EXTRAORDINARY JOURNEY FROM HOSPICE TO HEALING & PURPOSE THE ENDURING LEGACY OF VIRGIL ABLOH

RECHARGE YOUR BATTERY WITH POSITIVE ENERGY NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS AND BIG MONEY GOALS

WHICH MASK IS YOUR BEST BET AGAINST OMICRON?

10 POWER FOODS TO ADD TO YOUR GROCERY LIST

POSITIVE SELF-TALK

ON THE PATH TO GREATNESS

AND JUST LIKE THAT... IT'S

2022

N I C O L E A R I PA R K E R












VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

Ambassador Claude-Alix Bertrand Publisher

Joshua Jakobitz Editor-in-Chief

William Smith

Aubrey Chandler

Copy Editor & Philanthropy Contributor

Contributing Photographer

Claire Barrett

Contributing Photographer & Polo Contributor

Head of Photography

Eva Espresso

Contributing Photographer

Cezar Kusik

Wine Contributor

Raphael K. Dapaah Art Contributor

Jyoti Paintel

Sofya Khizhik

Michael J. Snell

Lifestyles Contributor

Joey Velez

Wellness Contributor

Brett Chody

Trends Contributor

Panthil Dwivedi

Spiritual Contributor

Wellness Contributor

Justin "Goliath" Johnson

Polo Lifestyles is a publication of HT Polo Publishing Co. 995 Detroit Avenue, Suite A Concord, CA 94518

Wellness Contributor

Brand Representatives Michael J. Snell - The Hamptons Stanley Pierre-Etienne Caribbean Jessica Foret Wax - Santa Fe K & Co. Media - Los Angeles Justin Johnson - Atlanta Contributing Photographers Global Polo Media Candace Ferreira Nick Tininenko Matias Callejo Dan Jackson Colin Boyle

page 12

Katerina Morgan

Polo Photographer

Content Copyright © Polo Lifestyles 2021 All Rights Reserved. For information or to advertise Contact editor@htpolo.com Read online at www.pololifestyles.com Cover Photo of Nicole Ari Parker


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

INTERNATIONAL POLO CLUB Iglehart Cup Joe Barry Memorial Ylvisaker Cup U.S. Open Women’s Polo Championship® The Gauntlet of Polo C.V. Whitney Cup® USPA Gold Cup® U.S. Open Polo Championship® GRAND CHAMPIONS POLO CLUB USPA North American Cup USPA National 20-Goal Legends of Polo Carlos Gracida Memorial The International Cup AUCKLAND POLO CLUB BMW "The Polo" Open

page 13




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2022

SCOREBOARDS & COCKTAILS

ST REGIS WORLD SNOW POLO

RICHARD MILLE TAKES THE TITLE IN THREE-PEAT FASHION Page 38 POLO LIFESTYLES EDITORS & CONTRIBUTORS

Ambassador Claude-Alix Bertrand Publisher Polo Lifestyles @haiti_polo_captain

Panthil Dwivedi

Wellness Contributor PanthilWrites.com @panthildwivedi

page 16

Josh Jakobitz

Editor-in-Chief Polo Lifestyles @joshuajakobitz

Eva Espresso Photographer

Eva Espresso Photography

@eva.espresso

Claire Barrett

Head of Photography

Claire Barrett Photography

@clairebarrettphoto

Michael J. Snell

Lifestyles & Automobiles Contributor @agnello_1

Raphael K. Dapaah Art Contributor Dapaah Gallery @dapaahgallery

Aubrey Chandler Photographer Polo Lifestyles @aubreychandler

Jyoti Paintel

Spiritual Contributor Polo Lifestyles @jyotipaintel

Joey Velez

Cezar Kusik

Wine Contributor Polo Lifestyles @cezartastesearth

William Smith

Brett Chody

Trends Contributor Polo Lifestyles @brettchody

Justin Johnson

Wellness Columnist

Philanthropy Contributor

Wellness Contributor

@velezmentalhealth

@willismith_2000

@goliathcoaches

Velez Mental Performance May & Stanley Smith Charitable Trust

Goliath Coaches


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

Preserving a legacy through Preview: Jackson Hole's Elk Run Estate, page 154 art digitalization, page 94

SS22 fashion is trending black and white, page 120

A tribute to LVMH's Virgil Abloh, page 80

AND JUST LIKE THAT The HBO Max reboot is more diverse and representative than previous attempts. Page 100

page 17


ST, REGIS SNOW POLO CHAMPIONSHIP

A

ND JUST LIKE THAT… IT’S 2022. TWENTYTWO YEARS AGO ON THE EVE OF Y2K, MY PARENTS WRUNG THEIR HANDS AS THEY WATCHED MY SISTER AND ME DRIVE OFF TO A NEIGHBOR’S NYE PARTY. DAD INSISTED WE DRIVE ONE OF HIS OLDER PICK-UP TRUCKS THAT DIDN’T RELY ON ELECTRONICS IN CASE THE WHOLE WORLD GROUND TO A HALT AT 00:00:00 ON JANUARY 1, 2000. WELL, 11:59 P.M. TURNED OVER TO 12:00 A.M. AND THE LIGHTS STAYED ON, BUT MY SISTER AND I HEADED BACK HOME ANYWAY – WE DIDN’T HAVE THE STAMINA FOR STAYING UP MUCH LATER. This year, I won’t be heading to a neighbor’s party, but I’ll still lay out my jacket and tie, shine my shoes and pick out some polka-dot socks (they’ll bring $$$ all year long, or so the saying goes) and put the bubbly on ice. What the pandemic has taught our household is that you don’t need more than three or four people to have a great time. While we’re doing the grocery shopping for our NYE festivities, we’re also picking up all 10 of the items featured in our “Boost Your Immunity Naturally” article this month, because with every news cycle bringing worse news concerning variants and contagion, we could use all of the natural and scientific protection possible. A photojournalist-turned-nurse took his camera into the Covid unit to document the harsh reality facing medical professionals, patients and family members. On a lighter note, “My Dogs Saved my Life,” profiles Zack Skow, who at 28 was in liver failure and on a transplant list, sent to hospice. With his last bit of courage and strength he looked at the loving faces of the three dogs in his bed and decided he couldn’t leave them. From hospice to healed, Skow’s miraculous recovery diverged into a passion for rescuing at-risk canines and eventually even pairing them with inmates at a prison not far from his home. Today, he runs 14-week programs with dogs and inmates as part of a rehabilitation program that’s graduating participants with skills and an ability to connect emotionally with an animal. Wellness life coach Justin Johnson aka Goliath joins Polo Lifestyles this month as a contributor with his first article about charging your personal battery. Jyoti Paintel wraps up her series on selflessness and Joey Velez shares his tips on improving our self-talk. We have a tribute to the menswear genius Virgil Abloh and information on the masks that experts say will best protect us from the Omicron variant. William Smith and Brett Chody both look at 2022 through the lens of big money moves and resolutions, respectively, and Raphael Dapaah is back after a hiatus with a profile on an emerging artist you won’t want to miss. And, of course, we captured the reactions of fans old and new to the reboot of Sex and the City’s And Just Like That… with insight from both cover girl Sarah Jessica Parker and her co-star Cynthia Nixon. Happy New Year! Best, Josh Jakobitz josh@pololifestyles.com



Beyond first class is a class of one. INNOVATION EXISTS PURELY TO SERVE YOUR COMFORT, SAFETY AND CONVENIENCE VIA MULTIPLE SENSES. A VIRTUAL VOICE ASSISTANT LISTENS TO SERVE YOU. LIGHTING AND FRAGRANCE SUBTLY SOOTHE YOU.

CHOOSE YOUR X. THE BMW X RANGE.

NOW WITH 0% FINANCING.

MBUSA.COM



VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

africapoloopen The sport of kings is at home in South Africa where polo education is alive and well

hermes The real question is, Where won't you be seen wearing these in 2022?

draperjames

Who else plans to spend the long New Year's weekend in their pajamas? page 22

christiesrealestate Fancy a castle for your next holiday a la Succession?

haitiluxe January 1 means it's time for Soupe Joumou on the Caribbean island of Haiti and throughout the diaspora

clairebarrettphoto What could be more picturesque for winter than this cozy cabin in the Virgina mountains?

champangetaittinger Happy New Year from Taittinger where they tailor make your champagne cocktails

saintlouiscrystal Majestic in blue or clear, this equine bust will complement any decor

eatingtools Handmade knives for choosy cooks and chefs who will only work with the best


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

Click and comment on our choices... Tag @pololifestyles. We will share noteworthy comments with you next month.

bartocastagnola La Natividad ended La Dolfina's multiyear domination of the Triple Crown of Polo in Argentina

snowpolostmoritz Snow Polo St. Moritz announced teams for January's event. Will you be there?

sarahjessicaparker Would you rent SJP's apartment through AirBnB for a fun trip to New York?

coatsofarms Sporty, chic and upscale, polos from Coats of Arms are right at home with the refined brands of Polo Lifestyles

baccarat 2022 is the year to get in touch with your wild side, if only just a little bit for fun

telegraphluxury Chanel's prices have tripled as their costs increased 30% over 2020, but sales evened out in 2021

harrywinston Put a little joy on your wrist with Harry Winston's winter jewels and timepieces

tomford

Sparkle, twinkle and shine on New Year's Eve and all month long in Tom Ford

tutu_legacy_foundation The world said good-bye to Desmond Tutu, a lion of South Africa's post-apartheid era page 23


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 24


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 25


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 26

AR GEN TI N A' S TR I PL E CROW N OF POLO


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

P H O T O G R A P H S B Y K AT E R I N A M O R G A N

page 27


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

AR GEN TI N A' S TR I PL E CROW N OF POLO page 28


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

VICTORY IN ARGENTINA FOR

LA NATIVIDAD

La Natividad, the revelation team of the season, became champion of the 128th HSBC Argentine Polo Open Saturday, Dec. 11, after defeating La Dolfina 15-13. The team of Camilo and Bartolomé Castagnola once again displayed the level of talent they exhibited in Hurlingham, and when they play like this they are unbeatable. Speed, intelligence, drive. Too many qualities even for Adolfo Cambiaso’s La Dolfina team, which had won this competition for the last eight years.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATHIAS CALLEJO & KATERINA MORGAN

page 29


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

A RGEN TI N A' S TR I PL E CR OWN OF POLO

page 30


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

P H O T O G R A P H S B Y K AT E R I N A M O R G A N

page 31


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

A RGEN T I N A' S TR I PL E CR OW N OF POLO

page 32


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

P H O T O G R A P H S B Y K AT E R I N A M O R G A N

page 33


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 34

AR GEN TI N A' S TR I PL E CROW N OF POLO


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

P H O T O G R A P H S B Y K AT E R I N A M O R G A N

page 35




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 38


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

ST. REG I S S N OW PO LO CH A M PI ON S H I PS

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CANDACE FERREIRA & NICK TININENKO

page 39


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

ST. REG I S S NOW P O LO CH A M P IO N S HI P

page 40


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

R

ICHARD MILLE MADE HISTORY AT THE ST. REGIS WORLD SNOW POLO CHAMPIONSHIP AT RIO GRANDE PARK, ASPEN, COLO. IN FRONT OF A SOLDOUT, HEATED VIP TENT AND WORLDWIDE CHUKKERTV AUDIENCE, RICHARD MILLE (SARAH SIEGEL MAGNESS, 0, JESSE BRAY, 7, PABLO MACDONOUGH, 10) WON ITS THIRD TITLE WITH AN IMPRESSIVE 9-6 VICTORY OVER ST. REGIS (MELISSA GANZI, 1, NACHO FIGUERAS, 6, NIC ROLDAN, 9) ON THE FINAL STOP OF THE WORLD POLO TOUR.

Richard Mille has won the tournament three of the last four years. MacDonough, the only player on all three winning teams, was named Most Valuable Player. “It was good to win for the third time,” said the Argentine 10-goaler. “We had a very good game. We played well. The most important thing was we won many throw-ins and we scored. It was an advantage toward the end of the game.” It was the first time Bray and MacDonough played together. “There is a reason the guy is 10 goals and one of the best players in the world,” Bray said. “He is a great teammate. It’s hard for players who play outdoor to go and play in the arena or only do it once a year, but he just picks it up so quickly. He is super talented, and it shows.” Bray earned the High Scorer Award after scoring 12 goals in the tournament. The 29-year-old scored a game-high five goals in the championship. He also scored four goals in his team’s 10-7 opening tournament win over Aspen Valley Polo Club and three goals in a 3-2 win over defending champion World Polo League. “I think throw-ins are a huge part of any polo, but especially in the arena or the snow because it’s so short,” Bray said. “If they throw the ball in and you win it you’re half a shot or breakaway to the goal.” It was Bray’s fifth snow polo tournament appearance and third final. It was also the first game his 2-month-old baby Dorothy Lily watched him play.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CANDACE FERREIRA & NICK TININENKO

page 41


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

ST. R EGIS S NOW POLO CHAMPIONSHIP

page 42


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

“The pressure was on, it wouldn’t have been good if I lost the first game she watched,” Bray said. “I’m really happy with the win. I knew it was going to be a hard game, that was a really good team. I knew we had a good chance once we got to the snow.” The victory avenged last year’s 11-10 overtime shootout loss to WPL (Riley Ganzi, Hilario Figueras, Alejandro Novillo Astrada). Bray, Siegel Magness and Jason Crowder played for runner-up Royal Salute.

“It’s good to see a town like Aspen alive again,” Nacho Figueras said at the St. Regis Snow Polo Championship. “I don’t know about you, but I’ve missed being with people I haven’t seen in a while and I think having contact with old friends, well, it’s something as human beings we need. It’s good to start to see things come back slowly in this beautiful place, so I’m happy to be back together.” Happiness was on the agenda at winter’s most glamorous event this side of St. Moritz, the World Snow Polo Championship hosted by St. Regis. Over two almost balmy Colorado days at Aspen’s Rio Grande Park, Figueras captained his St. Regis team in the annual charity tournament for the likes of the Aspen community and such VIPs as Kate

“Jesse Bray is a machine at this kind of polo,” MacDonough said. “This was the toughest tournament so far because there were so many competitive teams. I remember the last time I was here the field was good, but this time the quality of the field was even better so we could run more. It was outstanding and that made the polo a lot better and the final much more exciting.” It was Siegel Magness’ fourth snow polo appearance.

Hudson, Danny Fujikawa, St. Regis Connoisseur and designer Jason Wu, Delfina Blaquier, Anna Kendrick and more. It was the first time the tournament was played to such fanfare since Covid-19 broke out. As the only snow polo event held in North America, the St. Regis World Snow Polo Championship kicked off Aspen’s festive and social season, where guests watched team Richard Mille secure victory over the St. Regis team from an exclusive St. Regis alpine-inspired chalet with chandeliers fashioned from antlers and bedecked with evergreens, leather furniture and cozy fur throws. Guests enjoyed the signature St. Regis Bloody Mary from the makeyour-own Bloody Mary bar as well as other delicacies like oysters and shrimp cocktail, octopus tostadas

“I think it is the biggest win in my career just because it’s nearly impossible to make that final,” Siegel Magness said. “This tournament is won in the arena in the qualifying. It’s so hard. There are so many good teams and so many good players. And everybody wants to win. “You think about what it’s going to be like when you win. Honestly, the only thing I could think about was ‘I wish I had played a better game.’ That’s how polo is. Every day you just try and get better. Even winning, I think, What do I

and mini Wagyu steak atop crisped bread. The annual snow polo championship embodies an evolved point of view for the heritage hotel group that goes beyond luxury to a place of whimsy, surprise and accessible decadence. “As a brand that’s existed for over 100 years, it’s our job to stay relevant in this space,” says George Fleck, St. Regis Hotels and Resorts global brand leader. “If we can enliven our legacy and traditions for the next generation of luxury travelers, then that creates memories our guests are loyal to. And if we do it consistently, then I believe we can amplify in a more modern, diverse and playful way for all guests to enjoy.”

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CANDACE FERREIRA & NICK TININENKO

page 43


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

ST. REGIS S NOW POLO CHAMPIONSHIP

page 44


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

need to do to get better next time? “I felt like I played much better in the arena. I think I was really, really extremely nervous and really wanted to win. My teammates came alive which I knew would happen. I’m very appreciative of winning just because maybe next year I can relax a little bit.” Best Playing Pony was home-bred Centauros, played by Bray and owned by Wellington-based Santa Rita Polo Farm. Father Heckle, an American thoroughbred out of Hennessey and gray Argentine mare Juana. It was the most competitive final in the nine-year history of North America’s only snow polo tournament and fitting way to kick off the holiday social season in Aspen. “It’s arguably two of the best finals this tournament has ever seen,” said tournament cohost Marc Ganzi. “A huge thanks to the Aspen Ski Company’s whole team... great preparation and incredible effort by the whole staff; all our great sponsors and to everyone that came out in the city of Aspen, Mayor Torre, the City Council and everyone that made this part of a great tradition. It’s official, the holidays have begun in Aspen and Snow Polo 2021 is in the books.”

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CANDACE FERREIRA & NICK TININENKO

page 45


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

ST. REGIS S NOW POLO CHAMPIONSHIP

page 46


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CANDACE FERREIRA & NICK TININENKO

page 47


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

ST. REGIS S NOW POLO CHAMPIONSHIP

page 48


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CANDACE FERREIRA & NICK TININENKO

page 49


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

ST. REGIS S NOW POLO CHAMPIONSHIP

page 50


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CANDACE FERREIRA & NICK TININENKO

page 51


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

ST. REGIS S NOW POLO CHAMPIONSHIP

page 52


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CANDACE FERREIRA & NICK TININENKO

page 53




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 56


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

A L HA BTO O R P OLO T HE SPO RT OF KING S & S HEIKS

page 57


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

A L HA BTO O R PO LO page 58


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY AL HABTOOR POLO

page 59


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

A L HA BTO O R PO LO page 60


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CLAIRE BARRETT

page 61


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

A L HA BTO O R PO LO page 62


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY AL HABTOOR POLO

page 63




HIGH SOCIETY

VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 66

NYC COM ES TOG ET HE R


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

P H O T O G R A P H S C O U R T E S Y U S P O LO A S S O C I AT I O N

page 67


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

COLLABOR ATI N G FOR A C U R E GA L A page 68


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

N

OVEMBER IS GALA SEASON IN NEW YORK CITY WITH RED CARPETS AND BALLGOWNS AT THEIR FINEST WHEN A PHILANTHROPIC MISSION IS INVOLVED, AND THIS YEAR IS NO EXCEPTION. RETURNING TO A LIVE, IN-PERSON EVENT TO CELEBRATE THE BREAKTHROUGH RESEARCH IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CANCER, MORE THAN 700 PEOPLE ATTENDED THE APTLY THEMED TOGETHER AGAIN EVENT AT THE ICONIC CIPRIANI WALL STREET VENUE.

The evening began with cocktail hour and mingling at a private reception area across from the gala venue. Since making a true entrance is important,

When entering the Cipriani Wall Street building, guests were welcomed by a sea of white-coat waitstaff, standing underneath a 70-foot ceiling and Wedgwood dome in this grand venue. This New York landmark has served as the home of the New York Merchants Exchange, the New York Stock Exchange, the United States Customs House and the headquarters of the National City Bank and for this evening, the 24th Annual Collaborating for a Cure Gala.

Award to Debra S. Waller, Chairman and CEO of Jockey International, Inc. Waller, who has been personally impacted by cancer in her family, was selected for her dedication to eradicating cancer and decades of philanthropy and community involvement. The foundation also presented its first Breakthrough Science Award to Dr. Kevan Shokat, from the University of California San Francisco. Shokat, an SWCRF-funded investigator, recently discovered a new compound that effectively inhibits a cancer-causing genetic mutation – the overactive KRAS protein - which is a common driver in lung, colorectal and pancreatic cancers.

The night’s programming was guided by CBS’s Chris Wragge and included several monumental presentations and mentions. The Foundation continued its tradition of recognizing the fashion industry’s longtime partnership to fund innovative cancer research presenting this year’s Fashion Cares

“Over the past few decades, we have seen unprecedented advancements in the treatment of cancer, moving away from toxic treatments and developing more tolerable and effective pills such as this new drug,” said Dr. Samuel Waxman, CEO and Founder of

guests were ushered from the cocktail hour across the fully closed and carpeted Wall Street which was closed for 30 minutes to let attendees enter safely.

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY MJS GROUPE

page 69


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

SWCRF during his Gala speech. “This is a real game changer and it is a perfect example of why we do what we do – invest long-term in leading scientists and encourage collaboration to save lives.” During the gala, the foundation also announced a new collaboration with the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai to expand the Foundation’s Aging and Cancer program, which already includes partnerships with the National Cancer Institute, National Institute

page 70

on Aging, and the Israel Cancer Research Foundation. Additionally, the Foundation is funding breakthrough research to combat breast and ovarian cancers. In the past 10 years, SWCRF has allocated $4 million to its Women’s Cancer Research Program and is currently investing $1,550,000 toward 15 prestigious scientists working on finding new treatments for breast and ovarian cancer. The evening also included a combo

live and online auction with lots that the proceeds will go directly toward the foundation’s mission. The evening concluded with a concert by Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit with a special guest, Warren Haynes. In total, the evening raised auction which more than $4 million toward furthering collaborative cancer research programs. “The past year has been very difficult for all of us,” said William T. Sullivan, executive director of the Foundation.


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

“But the 2021 gala’s return is a true celebration of the scientists that developed these life-saving vaccines as well as the dedicated researchers around the world working tirelessly to combat the other global pandemic: cancer.”

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY MJS GROUPE

page 71


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 72


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 73


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

HIGH SOCIETY

PH OTO GRAPH ER S L I M A A RO N ' S CA RE E R D O C U M E N TIN G TH E L I VES OF T H E RICH A N D FA M O U S

S

U N AP OLOGE TIC P ORTRAITS OF AR I S TOCR ATS AN D S OCI ALI TES

LIM AARONS BUILT A CAREER DOCUMENTING THE LIVES OF THE RICH AND BEAUTIFUL.

Working for publications like Town & Country, Harper’s Bazaar and Life magazine, the late photographer spent five decades taking unapologetically glamorous pictures of aristocrats and socialites. Whether lounging in Italian villas, boating off the coast of Monaco or foxhunting in the English countryside, his globe-trotting subjects epitomized page 74

high society -- and old money. But according to the author of a new book on Aarons’ work, the photographer’s motive was neither to celebrate nor critique the opulence he encountered. He was driven by a journalistic curiosity about how the world’s most privileged people lived, said Shawn Waldron, who co-wrote “Slim Aarons: Style.” “He was a reporter,” Waldron said over the phone from New York. “You have to think that so many of these pictures

are created on assignment. He was sent somewhere to record what was happening at that particular place.” The photo agency Getty Images acquired Aarons’ entire archive in 1997, several years after his retirement. Waldron, who also works as a Getty curator, said that only 6,000 of the approximately 750,000 images have been digitized so far. At the time of the purchase, Aarons was “sort of forgotten about” and “a little bit out of favor,” Waldron added. But now,


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

some 15 years after his death, experts and audiences are revisiting and reinterpreting the photographer’s vast body of work. With social media giving today’s jet-setters close control over how their private lives are depicted, his oeuvre offers a refreshingly candid glimpse into a past era. And while Aarons moved with ease through the society’s most exclusive circles, he retained his objectivity and remained “very grounded,” Waldron said. “He obviously became close to some of these people,” he added. “He photographed subjects as they came up through society and then photographed their children decades later. These are long-term relationships... but he was also very (much) of a fly on the wall and always kept that professional distance. “He was constantly going from place to place, but he always came home to his little farmhouse in Westchester County, New York.”

STYLE, NOT FASHION Aarons may have spent half a century surrounded by affluence, but his fixation on glamour may have been rooted in experiences of poverty and war. Though the photographer always claimed to be an orphan from New Hampshire, a documentary produced after his death revealed that he hailed from an immigrant Jewish family in New York City’s Lower East Side. With an absent father and his mother in a psychiatric hospital, Aarons was “passed between family members,” Waldron said. Still using his birth name George Allen Aarons, rather than his later moniker Slim, he escaped poverty by joining the army as a photographer in his early 20s. Serving during World War II, he honed his craft not at polo matches or pool parties, but in military maneuvers including the Allies’ ill-fated assaults against Italy in the Battle of Monte Cassino. The photographer later “made light” of his experiences, but they stayed with him, Waldron said. “A lot of people who were photographers in the war, either army photographers or war correspondents ... just kind of stuck with it. And Slim said, ‘No, I’ve seen

enough,’” Waldron said, referencing Aarons’ famous response to the suggestion he might also document the Korean War. (“I’ll only do a beach if it has a blonde on it,” the photographer reportedly said.) Waldron’s new title is the latest in a series of thematic books on the photographer, published in recent years. Focusing on the photographer’s interactions with the fashion world, its 180 photographs feature a host of style icons, including Gianni Versace on Lake Como and model Veruschka

PHOTOGRAPHS BY SLIM AARONS

von Lehndorff doing the limbo in Acapulco. The photos also chart luxury fashion’s evolution through the decades, from the formality of the postwar years to 1990s patterned ski jackets. But while Aarons did some conventional fashion shoots in his early career, he eschewed the genre’s norms. Never using a stylist, and often carrying little more than a camera and a tripod, he did not identify with the fantasy attached to fashion photography, Waldron said. page 75


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

“Fashion photography is about creating a story and a typology and acting it out ... but Slim didn’t want to do that,” Waldron said. “He was interested in the real person -- not only what they were wearing, but what they were driving, where they’d go to dinner afterward. It’s

page 76

about all the different parts that make personal style. That’s what he really connected with.” Herein lies what Waldron described as the difference between fashion and style -- between the transient and the timeless. Indeed, Aarons appeared uncon-

cerned about his subjects’ wardrobes or the trends of the day. “I didn’t do fashion,” the photographer once said. “I did the people in their clothes that became the fashion.” Oscar Holland – Special to Polo Lifestyles


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

PHOTOGRAPHS BY SLIM AARONS

page 77




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 80

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY GQ


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

VIRGIL ABLOH

T H E D E SI G N E R W HO P U T ME NSW EAR B ACK I N THE SP OTLIGHT DEA D AT 41 F OL LOWIN G A BAT T LE WI T H A R AR E CAN CER

V

IRGIL ABLOH, THE LOUIS VUITTON AND OFFWHITE DESIGNER, AND THE BOUNDARY-BREAKING CREATIVE FORCE AT THE CENTER OF CONTEMPORARY FASHION AND CULTURE, DIED SUNDAY AT THE AGE OF 41. ABLOH DIED OF CANCER “WHICH HE HAD BEEN BATTLING PRIVATELY FOR SEVERAL YEARS,” LVMH, THE PARENT COMPANY THAT OWNS LOUIS VUITTON, SHARED IN A STATEMENT.

“We are all shocked after this terrible news,” said LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault. “Virgil was not only a genius designer, a visionary, he was also a man with a beautiful soul and great wisdom. The LVMH family joins me in this moment of great sorrow, and we are all thinking of his loved ones after the passing of their husband, their father, their brother or their friend.” Abloh fought a rare form of cancer known as cardiac angiosarcoma, according to a statement posted posthumously to the designer’s Instagram. “He chose to endure his battle privately since his diagnosis in 2019,” the statement said. Through it all, Abloh shouldered the workload required to

design numerous collections a year for both Louis Vuitton and Off-White. Abloh’s influence as a designer is hard to measure. He emerged from his role as Kanye West’s creative consigliere with his own vision for fashion, which he made real through his work first at Pyrex Vision and eventually Off-White and Louis Vuitton. If streetwear and fashion are now easy bedfellows, it’s thanks in large part to Abloh’s influence. His appointment as Vuitton’s men’s creative director signaled a change in the fashion industry: both in the types of clothes that were being made and the people responsible for making them. More than that, he helped craft a kind of page 81


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

modern creative life—characterized by endless iteration, constant collaboration, frequent travel, and a global community of collaborators—that almost immediately became the template for active and aspiring designers and artists of all stripes. “Virgil was driven by his dedication to his craft and to his mission to open doors for others and create page 82

pathways for greater equality in art and design,” the statement on his Instagram said. “He often said, ‘Everything I do is for the 17-year-old version of myself,’ believing deeply in the power of art to inspire future generations.” And as he told GQ Style in 2019 for an oral history of his life and career, he still

felt himself to be closer to the beginning of things than to the end. Just ahead of the opening of a career retrospective at the Art Institute of Chicago—his stated intent was for the show to create five new Virgils—he put it this way: “I feel like I’m figuring things out, but I don’t feel accomplished yet. I still feel like I’m an intern.


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 83




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

WITH OMICRON, YOUR MASK BETTER MEAN BUSINESS

W

ITH ANOTHER CORONAVIRUS VARIANT RACING ACROSS THE U.S., ONCE AGAIN HEALTH AUTHORITIES ARE URGING PEOPLE TO MASK UP INDOORS. YES, YOU’VE HEARD IT ALL BEFORE. BUT GIVEN HOW CONTAGIOUS OMICRON IS, EXPERTS SAY, IT’S SERIOUSLY TIME TO UPGRADE TO AN N95 OR SIMILAR HIGH-FILTRATION RESPIRATOR WHEN YOU’RE IN PUBLIC INDOOR SPACES. page 86

“Cloth masks are not going to cut it with omicron,” says Linsey Marr, a researcher at Virginia Tech who studies how viruses transmit in the air.

ter that you could have had with prior versions of the virus that would have left you uninfected, there’s now a good chance you will get infected from it.”

Omicron is much more transmissible than coronavirus variants that have come before it. It spreads at least three times faster than delta. One person is infecting at least three others at a time on average, based on data from other countries.

True, a cloth mask can be a “marginally OK to maybe a decent filter,” Marr said; but with something as highly transmissible as omicron, just “OK” isn’t good enough.

“It’s very contagious,” said Dr. Robert Wachter, chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. “And the kind of encoun-

Marr notes that preliminary data from scientists at the University of Hong Kong has shown that omicron multiplies 70 times faster inside human respiratory tract tissue than the delta variant does. That study also found that omicron


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

reaches higher levels in respiratory tract tissue 48 hours after infection, compared with delta. “That would suggest to me that maybe it reaches higher levels and then we spew out more {virus particles) if we’re infected,” Marr said. And while it’s too soon to tell, she says it’s conceivable that omicron is so good at infecting us, we just need to breathe in fewer viral particles of omicron to get infected. And virus particles from an infectious person can linger in the air indoors for minutes or even hours after they leave a room in some situations, says Dr. Abraar

Karan, an infectious disease physician at Stanford University. “I think that people need to realize that transmission here can happen even when you’re not near somebody,” he said.

and prevents you from inhaling those particles,” Karan said. “And that really is key” — because if you don’t inhale virus particles, they can’t multiply in your respiratory tract.

WHY HIGH-FILTRATION RESPIRATORS ARE BETTER AND HOW TO FIND A LEGITIMATE ONE

The material in surgical masks also has an electrostatic charge. But surgical masks tend to fit loosely, and a snug fit — with no gaps around nose, cheeks or chin — “really makes a big difference,” said Marr, who has studied mask efficacy.

Given all this, you want a mask that means business when it comes to blocking viral particles. Unlike cloth masks, N95, KN95 and KF94 respirators are all made out of material with an electrostatic charge, which “actually pulls these particles in as they’re floating around

KN95s tend to be a bit more comfortable than N95s. For maximum protection, make sure your N95 fits snugly as well, creating a seal around your mouth and page 87


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

nose. Still, surgical masks are cheaper than respirators. And if cost is a factor for you, at a minimum consider topping a surgical mask with a cloth mask to ensure a tighter fit or get a mask fitter — a frame that fits over your surgical mask to make it more snug. While these options won’t offer as much protection as an N95, they’re a big improvement over a cloth mask alone, Karan and Marr said. WHEN TO MASK UP As to when to wear a mask, obviously you want to cover up when you’re using public transit, including airports and page 88

airplanes, and when you’re indoors in grocery stores or other public places, as with previous surges. Check to see whether where you live has a lot of cases — most places do right now. Wachter said he’s also covering up indoors with small groups of friends and family unless everyone is vaccinated and boosted. If they’re not boosted, he says, “I consider them to be somewhere between vaccinated and unvaccinated, and I act appropriately if I’m going to be around them.” That means he either has everyone mask up, or he has everyone take a rapid test to make sure no one is infectious at that moment. “One or the

other.” This is especially important if anyone attending is high-risk. Combined with getting vaccinated and boosted, upgrading to a high-filtration mask will be key to enjoying a safer holiday season without having to hibernate, experts say. “I have a lot of confidence in the vaccines, if you’re boosted, in protecting against severe outcomes,” Marr said, “and I have a lot of confidence in an N95 and similar types of respirators. And I think that with those two things, you can still go about a lot of your normal activities.”


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 89


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

BOOST IMMUNITY NATURALLY WITH POWER FOODS

I

N THE AGE OF THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC, THERE ARE STEPS YOU CAN TAKE TOWARD HELPING YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM STAY STRONG AND HEALTHY.

Getting enough sleep, controlling stress and exercising are all things you can do, along with thorough hand washing and avoiding touching your hands to your face. Eating a diet that’s high in fruits, vegetables and whole grains is also important, especially when it includes some of these foods that can naturally give your immune system a boost.

ELDERBERRY

OYSTERS

the B vitamins riboflavin and niacin. That helps you in several ways. If you’re low on selenium, you may be more likely to get a more severe flu. Riboflavin and niacin play a role in a healthy immune system.

ACAI BERRY

They’ve got zinc in them, which appears to have some virus-fighting powers. That’s probably because zinc helps create and activate white blood cells involved in the immune response. It also assists your immune system with tasks such as healing wounds.

WATERMELON

It’s an old folk remedy. This fruit is loaded with nutrients called antioxidants, and it may help fight inflammation. In some lab studies, an extract from the berries appears to block flu viruses. But scientists caution that more study is needed.

BUTTON MUSHROOMS They give you the mineral selenium and page 90

Its dark color is a sign that it’s got plenty of nutrients called anthocyanins. There isn’t any research that shows acai is good for any specific condition. But in general, antioxidants from foods are a key part of a healthy lifestyle. Enjoy these berries in juice or smoothies, or try them dried and mixed with granola.

It’s not only refreshing. When it’s ripe, it’s also got plenty of an antioxidant called glutathione. It strengthens the immune system so it can fight infection. To get the most glutathione in your watermelon, eat the red pulpy flesh near the rind.

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY THE GUARDIAN


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

WHEAT GERM

It’s the part of a wheat seed that feeds a baby wheat plant, and it’s rich in nutrients. It’s a great way to get zinc, antioxidants, and B vitamins. Wheat germ delivers a good mix of fiber, protein, and some healthy fat. In recipes, you can substitute some of the regular flour with wheat germ.

LOW-FAT YOGURT

Probiotics, found in yogurt and other fermented products, may ease the severity of colds. Look for labels that say “live and active cultures.” Also look for added vitamin D. Studies show that people with low vitamin D levels may be more likely to get colds or the flu.

SPINACH

TEA

SWEET POTATO

You’ll find lots of nutrients in this “super food.” One of them is folate, which helps your body make new cells and repair DNA. It also boasts fiber and antioxidants such as vitamin C.

Feel free to choose white, green, or black. Each delivers disease-fighting polyphenols and flavonoids. These antioxidants seek out cell-damaging free radicals and destroy them.

Sweet potatoes have beta-carotene, which your body converts to vitamin A. This helps bolster the immune system and may even improve the aging process. page 91


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 92


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 93


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

PRESERVING PRICELESS ART A MUSE UM OF H AIT IAN ART IN CHICAGO W ILL DIGITI ZE I T S COLLE CTION FO R BROADER ACCES S IBILITY

E

LSIE HERNANDEZ STARTED THE HAITIAN AMERICAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO WITH A MODEST COLLECTION. NOW, THE INSTITUTION HERNANDEZ STARTED TO GIVE AMERICANS A MORE DETAILED, NUANCED VIEW OF THE CARIBBEAN NATION IS POISED FOR CRITICAL UPGRADES. A major grant will allow the museum at 4654 N. Racine Ave. to digitize its collection for the first time. The added visibility and opportunity to educate Chicagoans about Haitians and Haitian page 94

Americans comes on the heels of the city renaming one of its iconic roadways for Jean Baptiste Point du Sable, Chicago’s first non-Indigenous settler. For Hernandez, the grant is also a chance to tell more of Haiti’s history from a Haitian perspective. “Haitian history is so rich, but the narratives are not written by Haitians themselves,” she said. Her experiences motivated Hernandez to introduce a different Haitian narrative to the United States and highlight the country’s cultural richness. With hardly any art background, Hernandez opened the Haitian American Museum of Chicago in November 2012.

The museum — just 486 square feet — is tucked into the corner of Racine and Leland avenues, a large red and blue flag bearing the Haitian coat of arms waving at passersby. As Hernandez built up her museum, she was inspired by Estrella Ravelo Alamar, a Filipina and West Sider who self-funded a Filipino American museum and later became founding president of the Filipino American National Historical Society. Hernandez relied on donations from community members to fund her small collection. The initial museum board comprised five members, including Hernandez, her son, friends and

SPECIAL FOR POLO LIFESTYLES BY CINDY MEI / PHOTOGRAPHS BY COLIN BOYLE


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

TH E M U S E U M — J U ST 4 8 6 S Q UAR E F E E T — I S T UCK E D I NTO TH E C OR NE R O F R AC I NE AN D LE LAN D AVE N UE S I N CHI CAGO W ITH A HAI T I AN F L AG O F R E D AN D BLUE T HAT BE AR S T H E HAI T I AN C OAT OF AR M S WAVI N G AT PAS S E R S BY.

Elsie Hernandez in her museum of Haitian art in Chicago.

relatives. When Chicago’s Field Museum opened its exhibit “Vodou: Sacred Powers of Haiti” in 2016, museum leaders tapped Hernandez as a Haitian American consultant, her first major connection to a larger museum. Through that, Hernandez caught the eye of women’s volunteer organization Know Your Chicago, whose members facilitated a meeting between Hernandez and Nicole Smith, a fellow Haitian American and notable Chicago curator.

Nicole Gallery, where she became known for her collection of Haitian, African and African American art. The Nicole Gallery closed in 2011 after 40 years. “It was Nicole who loaned us all her big paintings,” Hernandez said. “It was Nicole who made it look like a real museum. She said, ‘Elsie, I have to help you.’”

“When the women from Know Your Chicago came to visit, they realized I had nothing,” Hernandez said. “It was all printed stuff.”

A painting that once belonged to Smith hangs on the west wall: an allegory of Haiti in the form of two horses pulling half of the island into the Caribbean Sea as colorful huts don the backs of the horses and Haitians mill about the island.

When Smith came to the United States in 1973, she sold Haitian artwork out of her home and car. She later opened

Before Smith died in March 2016, she asked Hernandez to take possession of the work she accumulated in her gallery.

Most of Smith’s collection, mainly paintings, are in storage because there’s not enough room in the museum to display them all, Hernandez said. The museum now boasts a permanent collection, a rotating collection, a library and a store. Current exhibits include work from Haitian and Haitian American artists, student artists at Truman College and oral histories collected and donated by Chicago historian Courtney Joseph, whose parents emigrated from Haiti. In July, the museum received a $20,000 Broadening Narratives grant from the Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, which supports archival projects sharing stories of racial, sexual, gender and other historically underrepresented identities. page 95


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

The grant helped hire archivist Eve Mangurten to digitize the museum’s complete collection so the public can view it anytime. Mangurten has been working in archival work for over a decade. “It’s important to have a collection be accessible to the public and to the museum, because it’s important to know what they have so that they can properly make material available to whoever wants to access it,” Mangurten said. Accessibility to the public is a common theme in the museum’s goals. Mangurten will spend a year archiving the museum’s extensive collection into a digital catalogue. She will also host public presentations of the collection. “Our collection will be available for the public to look at, think about, do research on,” museum Executive Director Carlos Bossard said. “Long term, digitizing the collection will help uncover stories from the Haitian community that go overlooked.” Bossard said he hopes the grant will help the museum find additional funding in the next year to keep the collection specialist position after Mangurten finishes her work. “What museums do is, it changes your perception,” Hernandez said. “I don’t have to impose my own views. People come in, they feel it, they touch it, they see it. The grant will help make my culture and Haiti more accessible to the public. Now they can feel, touch and see it in a digital space.”

Carlos Bossard is the museum's executive director in Chicago. page 96

SPECIAL FOR POLO LIFESTYLES BY CINDY MEI / PHOTOGRAPHS BY COLIN BOYLE


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 97




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

Above: Kristin Davis and Nicole Ari Parker portray new gal pals whose daughters share an elite piano instructor. Right: the new faces of AJLT page 100


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

AND JUST LIKE THAT...

W

HO AMONG US CAN HAVE IT ALL IN NEW YORK CITY? IN THE 1990S AND 2000S, THE ANSWER TO THAT QUESTION VIS-À-VIS “SEX AND THE CITY,” WAS: FOUR WHITE WOMEN.

Sure, Carrie’s apartment wasn’t a dream penthouse and she stored her sweaters in the oven, but she shopped until she dropped and she certainly wasn’t sharing her living space with her gal pals unless they were coming over for martinis. The original four had careers that were taking off, family money and connections, invitations to every desirable social engagement and love lives that matched the frenzy of the storylines. This time around, the SATC reboot, “And Just Like That…” was under pressure from the network, the stars, the fans and the critics alike to represent a broader spectrum of characters living their New York City dreams. And while

BY JO SH JA KO B ITZ

the characters all still exist in nearly unattainable world of luxury and comfort for most New Yorkers, so do (unapologetically) we. These characters are us. And this time around, goodness, some of the new characters even look more like us. HBO Max teased the diversity over the summer and had us all on the edge of our seats for episode 1, wherein we are introduced to four new supporting characters: LTW or Lisa Todd Wexley (cover girl Nicole Ari Parker), Dr. Nya Wallace (Karen Pittman), Chez Diaz (Sara Ramirez) and Seema Patel (Sarita Choudhury). On the new series, Nicole Ari Parker plays Lisa Todd Wexley, a documentarian and mother of three who is married to a hedge fund banker. Lisa is introduced in one of the very first scenes of the show as she runs into Carrie, Charlotte

page 101


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 102


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 103


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 104


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

and Miranda during brunch. She’s close with Charlotte, as their kids both take piano lessons together. Karen Pittman plays Dr. Nya Wallace, a professor at Columbia Law School. Though her character crosses paths with Carrie and Charlotte throughout the season, she mostly interacts with Miranda in the first two episodes as she teaches Miranda’s law class. They have an awkward first encounter as Miranda puts her foot in her mouth during her first class, though Pittman told the New York Post that the two eventually become good friends as the series progresses. “Nya really loves her life,” Pittman said. “She does encounter some obstacles … Miranda helps her work those things out. She goes through just normal everyday things that women navigate through as they realize themselves in the world. Part of what we start out knowing from the start [of the show] is that relationships change over time.” On the new series, Sara Ramírez plays Che Diaz, a non-binary, queer stand-up comedian who appears on a podcast with Carrie. In the first two episodes, we get a better glimpse of their dynamic as coworkers and friends. After a conversation on the podcast leaves Carrie feeling timid, Che pushes Carrie to open up more and get out of her comfort zone. “They are a very dynamic, funny character that comes in and sort of challenges other characters’ internalized oppression,” Ramírez said about their character. “They are a character who unapologetically speaks their truth.”

Karen Pittman and Cynthia Nixon initially get off to a rocky start, but become closer a few episodes into And Just Like That... page 105


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 106


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

Sarita Choudhury plays Seema Patel, a real estate broker in the city. Unlike the rest of the new characters, Seema doesn’t appear in the first two episodes, but she emerges as Carrie is looking at real estate options. “She’s a fancy lady — high powered, wears very expensive clothes, has a very strong New York but maybe European flair,” Choudhury told the New York Post. “She’s opinionated and is very current as well. She’s on all the apps and has no problem with dating sites. She navigates the world at ease. Seema speaks her mind — so even if there is a contentious moment, it’s revolved in five minutes.” Choudhury added that she looked at actresses like Katharine Hepburn and “early Sigourney Weaver” for inspiration on “how Seema carries herself.” “Initially, you see her in her job. And as you move along, you get to see a little bit of her personal life,” Choudhury said. “Seema is a very private person, but loud on the outside. And you start seeing that private side toward the end [of the season].”

Sarah Jessica Parker and Sarita Choudhury, as her real estate agent Seema Patel, share screentime in the reboot of the original Sex and the City. page 107


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

Left: Nicole Ari Parker in Central Park; above: Sara Ramirez and Cynthia Nixon take a relationship to new heights

page 108


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

In late December, Cynthia Nixon, who portrays Miranda, spoke candidly about being unsure she would participate in the reboot, largely due to the lack of diversity the first time around (as well as during the two SATC movies). “It

was a very hard decision. I really didn’t think I was going to do it – I was very reluctant. But the more I talked to Sarah Jessica and Kristin (Davis), about the things that I couldn’t go back without – a real sea change in terms of the lack of

diversity in the original series, they were on board,” Nixon said. So, in 2022, And Just Like That… once again asks and answers the question, Who can have it all? And this time the answer is, just about any one of us. page 109


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 110


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

Nicole Ari Parker joined a significantly more representative cast of And Just Like That...

page 111


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 112


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 113


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 114


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

FASHION & STYLE

INFLUENCERS WHO SLAY STREET STYLE IT'S ALL BLACK AND WHITE IN THE WORLD OF FASHION

page 115


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

SERENA WILLIAMS 13.9 MILLION FOLLOWERS page 116


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

F R OM T HE ST R EETS O F FAS H IO N CA P ITA LS

FASHION INFLUENCERS NAILING STREET STYLE

S

OME OF OUR FAVORITE INFLUENCERS WERE OUT ONCE AGAIN FOR SPRING 2022. ALTHOUGH ONLY SOME ATTENDED SELECT SHOWS, OTHERS TROTTED THE GLOBE, ALL ADDING THEIR STYLE AND FASHION SENSE TO THE STREETS AND WE COULDN’T BE HAPPIER ABOUT IT.

AIMEE SONG 6.1 MILLION FOLLOWERS

Dior boasts the largest consortium of influencers at their shows, from influencers with well over a million followers to those with only thousands, each adorning Dior while allowing their unique styles to come through. At Balmain and Miu Miu, the young up-and-coming influencers showed up in full force, while Etro was well-represented, too. Louis Vuitton was nearly exclusively attended by celebrities, influencers, athletes and high-profile

AMINA MUADDI 1 MILLION FOLLOWERS

individuals. From influencer Chiara Ferragni, with over 25 million followers, to the ever-stylish Caro Daur, Aimee Song, Camila Coelho, Gala González, Amina Muaddi and Chriselle Lim, here is a look at influencers making a positive impact in the fashion sphere. All having the most impact on fashion’s other catwalk – the Street.

STYLE

ALEXANDRA PEREIRA 2.1 MILLION FOLLOWERS page 117


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

ANN KATHRIN GOTZE 1.1 MILLION FOLLOWERS

ANNA DELLA RUSSO 2.2 MILLION FOLLOWERS

CAMILA COELHO 9.3 MILLION FOLLOWERS page 118

BARBARA PALVIN 17.1 MILLION FOLLOWERS

THASSIA NAVES 3.7 MILLION FOLLOWERS


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 119




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

BLACK AND WHITE

T

FASHION CONTRASTS ARE ALL THE RAGE

HOUGH IT’S NEVER QUITE NOT TRENDING, BLACK IS TRENDING ESPECIALLY HARD ON THE RUNWAYS OF SPRING 2022. It’s true that this season’s return to physical shows saw an appropriately celebratory burst of color and pattern, but returning to real life also means a page 122

return to stepping out in the evening, to turning heads by looking sexy, cool, and mysterious, and thus, of course, to wear all black. Today’s top designers are more than ready to help us out with this endeavor. Black is timeless, and though it may be dark, this season there’s nothing gloomy about it.

Balenciaga‘s all-black silhouettes looked especially striking against the background of their blockbuster red-carpet show. Though Dior‘s show featured a surprising and very colorful turn to the ’60s, Maria Grazia Chiuri still treated us to some excellent all-black looks. Marine Serre showed us that they could definitely be wearing upcycled knitwear in the Matrix. Considering all


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

STYLE

page 123


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

CHANEL

CHANEL

COURREGES

DIOR

CAROLINA HERRERA

AADNEVIK

ALBERTA FERRETTI

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

AADNEVIK

BALENCIAGA

page 124


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

this black it’s surprising that we didn’t see anything that felt truly goth, but Rick Owens probably came closest – though of course, his work is light years beyond trends and categorization. Yohji Yamamoto always and almost exclusively works in black, but this season’s show brought many of his audience members to tears. In contrast, like a snow-covered hillside or a single lily, white is here to fill us with a sense of renewal, peace, freshness, and possibility. It has been a messy and saddening year and a half (words fail to capture it), and this season’s return to physical shows has felt like a small but powerful light of hope guiding us forward. One way that designers responded to this moment of reflection and renewal was through the color white and all-over white looks. White’s simplicity creates a feeling of restfulness and ease for the wearer, while also giving designers interesting opportunities to experiment with pure form and shape.

STYLE

Courrèges looked back to the futuristic simplicity of the house’s origins in the ’60s. A master of subtle elegance, Giada's Gabriele Colangelo shared a trio of exquisitely cut, minimal looks in white. Givenchy's Matthew M. Williams’ found his footing with an expansive collection that combined the house’s historical codes with a contemporary vision, which, though we saw much more black, contained a few strong yet airy all-white looks. Bevza combined precise, whited-out minimalism with maritime reference to send a message of environmental consciousness. Alexander McQueen made excellent, restorative use of white in a collection that drew inspiration from the sky and clouds.

BALMAIN

FENDI

DOLCE & GABBANA

DOLCE & GABBANA page 125


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

FENDI

DIOR

HERMES page 126

BOTTEGA VENETA

LOEWE

ISABEL MARANT

GUCCI

GABRIELA HEARST

MICHAEL KORS

HERMES


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

GIVENCHY

BALMAIN

HUI

STYLE

JIL SANDER page 127


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

LOUIS VUITTON

PRABAL GURUNG

page 128

MICHAEL KORS

RICK OWENS

MUI MUI

RODARTE


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

SAINT LAURENT

TODS

VALENTINO

STYLE

SAINT LAURENT

page 129




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 132


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

{PRIVATE VIEWING}

MEGAN GABRIELLE HARRIS page 133


VERNISSAGE

VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 134


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

VERNISSAGE

REIGNITING A FLAME AND PASSION FOR EMERGING ARTISTS

MEGAN GABRIELLE HARRIS

RAPHAEL DAPAAH Art Contributor @dapaahgallery

S

OME TIME AGO, JUST AS THE SHACKLES OF THE GLOBAL PANDEMIC WERE BEING LOOSENED, AND A SENSE OF FREEDOM AND NORMALITY WAS FINALLY RETURNING, I FOUND MYSELF AT ONE OF MY FAVOURITE CIGAR LOUNGES IN KNIGHTSBRIDGE, WITH AN OLD FRIEND, AND A BUDDING ART COLLECTOR.

Between puffs of our cigars, and slow slips of our cognac, we caught up and laughed about the precariousness of business, work, and life in general, and our shared feeling of relief that there was light in sight at the end of the tunnel. As he reached the final third of his cigar, he took a deep pull, exhaled slowly, a cloud of smoke momentarily masking his sheer contentment, before he looked me squarely in the eye, and asked me frankly, and matter of factly; ‘so, who is next up...who’s work should I be looking into to buy?’ I paused for a moment, deep in appreciation for the fine taste and construction of my private blend cigar, but also in deep contemplation of his question. The truth was, I was deeply uninspired by a lot of the new artists I was coming

across, and the general state of the contemporary art market. Oversaturation, a lack of originality, and uncompelling narration was seeping in and festering, and besides the catalogue of amazing artists I either already promoted or had collected myself, I was completely at a loss, as to who to recommend.

That was until I came across the work of Megan Gabrielle Harris, whose work reignited my flame and passion for new and emerging artists that was burning out quickly, like a candle in the wind. Surreal, dreamy, seductive, original, coming across her work made me utterly heady with excitement and optimism. A thoroughbred Cali girl living in New York, who seamlessly fuses a career in page 135


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

fine art and high fashion, featuring her for Polo Lifestyles Magazine, also signalling my return after a short hiatus, was not only inevitable, but destiny. Raphael: Megan, first off, can I just say how deeply moving and trance inducing your work is? Regarding your portraits eerily reminded me of early Hollywood films from that golden era of the 1930’s to 50s, where time seems to float by, and life is so whimsical and easy, only this time shown through the lens of aspirational, independent, and self actualised black women. My mind was then hilariously transported from that era to the 2000’s, and I was reminded of the TV sitcom, ‘Girlfriends’, and found myself seeing parallels between your muses, and the lives of iconic characters like ‘Joan Clayton’ and ‘Toni Childs’. Does film or TV, as a creative medium inspire your work at all, and the wonderful, and seemingly easy lives of the ladies of leisure who serve as your muses? Megan: Film, TV and fashion all play as large inspirations for my work. Your comparison to the show ‘Girlfriends’ is spot on because for me, it was definitely one of the earliest visual representations of successful and independent black women I saw on TV. I’ve always been drawn to the carefree woman seen so often in vintage films and magazine editorials. Although this “carefree woman” was typically white, that feeling she embodied was something that I wanted to sort of reimagine from my own perspective. Raphael: You describe yourself as an escapist artist, and it’s pretty obvious to see why, as your paintings, with their loose brush strokes, and slightly blurred backdrops, present a dreamlike aesthetic and feel. My first thoughts upon seeing your work for the first time was of Salvador Dali, and his surreal portraits, and also of David Hockney and his use of vibrant colour to create a mood and ambience that perfectly captured his perception of California. But I have since come to learn that your greatest inspiration is actually your page 136

father, Thomas Harris, an artist whose work you grew up around - the original escape artist! Tell me, what was growing up with an artist as a father like, and how has it moulded you as far as the artist you are today? Megan: Growing up with an artist father was incredibly inspiring. I would be so excited to look through his sketchbooks, study the paintings throughout our home and to just watch him paint...I’m still amazed by the amount of work he’s created and continues to create, as well as the range of subject matter he’s explored over the years. I remember being in the fourth grade and being so determined to paint for the first time, my father guided me through it all and that was when I knew this was something I’d always wanted to do. I instantly fell in love with painting. I’m so grateful for his excitement and encouragement during those initial attempts as they tremendously shaped my experience as an artist. His style as well as his ability to work through different mediums inspires and influences me a great deal. Raphael: Just to dial back a bit to get a sense of your amazingly eclectic background and your journey so far. You were raised in Sacramento in California. You are currently based in New York. You have a degree in Art History, and when not transporting your art viewers to new dimensions through your surreal work, you double as both a fashion model and designer? How would you describe your upbringing, and growing up, what were your expectations of the life you wanted to lead, and who you wanted to become? Megan: My upbringing was quite special. Both of my parents are from Los Angeles but wanted to live a quieter, slower paced lifestyle so they relocated to Sacramento right before I was born. They made sure that my brother and I had the chance to enjoy our childhood which I am eternally grateful for. My mother always encouraged us to pursue our passions over the pursuit of mon-

ey. I later realized how fortunate I was to have the freedom to pursue higher education in a field I was genuinely interested in without having to work while doing so. Growing up in that sort of environment allowed me to be quite idealistic regarding the sort of life I wanted to lead. As a child I could never see myself doing just one job. In addition to being an artist, by the time I was nine or ten years old I had also hoped to be an author, photographer, and designer. It wasn’t until a year or so later that the idea of modeling was presented to me, which was eventually added to that list of professions I had hoped to eventually have. Raphael: Like Hockney, your portraits seem to evoke a lifestyle that is quintessentially Californian, or perhaps, specifically the lifestyle that most have come to associate with Hollywood; which is one of leisure, relaxation and easy living. In your own personal life however, you’ve traded sunny California for the ‘Big Apple’, a seismic shift in culture, lifestyle, and timezone, though one which makes absolute sense given that New York is one of the major art capitals of the world. How has moving to New York changed you from both a personal and artistic standpoint, if at all, and what do you love and dislike most about the city? Megan: I think it took a bit of growing up to realize how lovely California really is. Being born and raised there I think really caused me to take it for granted. The idea of me moving to a city like New York was one that I couldn’t shake. Moving to New York City changed my life in every way. I decided to take the leap in 2015, shortly after graduating from California State University, Sacramento (CSUS). I had a series of dreams leading up to the decision, I craved the change and it was the strongest calling I had ever experienced. I visited for the first time the year prior and with that one visit I knew it was where I was supposed to be. In my mind this city was the only place I could potentially achieve all of the creative professional


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 137


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

goals I had. I love NYC for its rich blend of cultures, the amount of opportunity and the people I’ve had the pleasure of meeting and building lifelong connections with. On the other hand, I’ve learned that NYC is truly a place that never seems to turn off. To be quite honest, the Cali girl in me is beginning to feel the heaviness of it all. Raphael: I alluded earlier to the affluent and aspirational muses you depict in your work, and by extension, you’ve had the great luxury of working with aspirational brands, such as Veuve Clicquot and Wander for Bergdorf Goodman. All too often, the narratives around black women are based on trauma, struggle and oppression, but counter to this, there appears to be a growing movement that celebrates black women excellence, indulgence, self care and appreciation, often colloquially referred to as ‘Rich Aunty’ vibes, which Polo Lifestyles’ love and are here for by the way! How important is it to you as an artist, and indeed as a black woman, to depict black women living their ‘best lives’ and being the best versions of themselves? Megan: As a black woman artist, I believe that depicting black women doing things solely for their own pleasure is critical to reshaping the narrative for us. I am of course just one of many artists with this focus, but every work of art with this kind of subject matter (whether it be a painting, film or photograph etc.) broadens the scope of which black women page 138

are viewed in this society, one piece of work at a time. Raphael: We are living in a new age of big data, cryptocurrencies and technology. The world is increasingly moving online, as we have seen with the art market entering the virtual realm through the global pandemic; which in my view has obvious pros, but also some daunting cons. What role has social media and virtual art viewings played in your journey as an artist, and your ability to connect with both your local and international market? Megan: Social media has allowed for my work to reach places I never dreamed it would and has been extremely instrumental in bringing wonderful opportunities my way. One of my first major collaborations was with the Dutch brand, Wandler which ended up becoming a collaboration with Bergdorf Goodman as well. Without the visibility that instagram allows I’m not sure I would have been on anyone’s radar, especially not so soon in my artistic journey. Through instagram, I’ve been contacted by people reaching out to tell me how my work has made them feel and why it spoke to them the way that it did. Making this work is fulfilling in itself, but receiving confirmation in real time from people from all over the world has been so incredibly rewarding for me. Raphael: I know your art career alongside your profession as a fashion model is one that you are increasingly investing more into, and given the strength of your work

to date, your background as a graduate of art history, and hailing from an artistic family, I expect nothing short of a great career ahead of you. What is next for you as an artist, and what can we expect in future, as far as a new series of work, or any group or solo exhibitions both domestically and internationally? Megan: t this point in my journey as an artist, I have decided to prioritize my art making and I will be relocating to California for an indefinite period of time. For the past six years I’ve been working full-time as a model and after experiencing a pandemic and living in NYC through all of it, I’ve had some personal realizations that require me to step back from the chaos for a bit. During my time at home I plan to create a new body of work that will hopefully lead to my first solo. I’m also currently exploring the NFT world and I’m working on my genesis collection. It’s such an excit-

ing new frontier for artists of every medium so I’m going to dive in and just see what happens. I haven’t ever before had the chance to put my art above everything else, so this coming year will be quite an adventure. Raphael: As an artist, when it’s all said and done, what do you want to be remembered for when you consider your contribution to the canon of art history. What do you hope your legacy will be? Megan: I can only hope that my legacy will be that I’ve presented a unique voice that provides an example for what it looks like to see black women dream. To see black women in their bliss. To see black women simply enjoy their lives with no limits, no expectations....No matter how my work changes over time in style, subject matter or mediums, it would be an honor to have contributed this kind of work to the canon.


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 139


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 140


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

LOOKING AT 2022

MY RESOLUTIONS FOR THE NEW YEAR BRETT CHODY Trends contributor @brettchody

A

S WE ALL KNOW, THE FIRST MONTH OF THE YEAR BRINGS, ALMOST LIKE CLOCKWORK, A NEW BATCH OF RESOLUTIONS. Whether it be to lose weight, cut back on alcohol consumption, or start practicing yoga, New Year resolutions are a great way to challenge and improve yourself and your day-to-day habits. The only issue is that many people rarely follow through with their resolutions

and by mid-January or even February they’ve fallen back into their old ways. According to a 2019 survey, only 7% of respondents kept their resolutions for the entirety of the year.

Here are three unique resolution ideas to embark on in 2022.

Obviously there are solutions to maintain your yearly goals like asking a loved one to hold you accountable or practicing a wild amount of self-discipline. Maybe even this article you’re reading will reinforce your New Year resolutions and inspire you to keep them up in 2022. But there’s also an entirely new route you can take to better yourself this year. While many resolutions surround personal habits like exercise, eating, and finances, there are many practices you can begin that affect the overall world and the energy across it that may be easier to sustain than a simple goal to stop getting a Starbucks coffee every day.

Do you know how big the online shopping’s carbon footprint is? Well it is absolutely massive. Between the excessive packaging used to ship the purchases to the fuel-guzzling trucks that deliver them, ordering things online is not the best for the environment. If you’re worried about climate change or concerned about your own carbon footprint, reducing the amount you online shop is a great resolution to take up this January. Not to mention how many people online shop at the end of the calendar year due to Cyber Monday and Christmas

CUT BACK ON ONLINE SHOPPING

page 141


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

shopping. Obviously cutting out online shopping entirely is somewhat unrealistic, which is why your resolution should be to cut back on it, instead of a dogged insistence to shop locally. Also, if you’re a big Amazon user, there’s an option at checkout to have your order come in as few boxes as possible (it just might take an extra day or two). These little things can add up and genuinely make a positive impact on the environment.

UTILIZE DEPOP, POSHMARK, THE REAL REAL, AND THRIFT STORES This somewhat goes in hand with the first resolution I listed. If we’ve learned anything in 2021, it’s that recycling and reselling clothes is the thing to do and thrift stores are back and better than ever. Utilizing reselling apps such as

page 142

Depop, Poshmark, and The Real Real is fantastic because it’s a way for you to get rid of and make money on the clothes you don’t wear anymore or a place for you to find pre-owned pieces for your own closet at a discounted price. It’s easy and it’s good for all three parties involved– you, the buyer/seller, and the environment!

COMMIT TO GIVING ONE COMPLIMENT A DAY. This one may sound trivial or unimportant but giving at least one compliment a day is a goal that can have profound positive impacts on both you and the person you compliment. Professor Nick Haslam from the University of Melbourne– who did this challenge himself in part of an experiment– explained that “compliments can lift moods, improve engagement with tasks,

enhance learning, and increase persistence. Giving compliments is arguably better than receiving them, just as giving gifts to charity has benefits to the giver.” Complimenting someone– whether it be about their outfit, their work, their smile, or anything in between– is quite an easy thing to do that can majorly improve someone’s day. Moreover, it may inspire them to pay it forward and compliment someone else, creating a chain reaction of positivity and kindness in the world. Obviously if you still want to make a resolution to tone up or drink more water, all the power to you. But I hope this makes you at least consider what other New Year resolutions you could create that make the world a better place and don’t solely focus on the benefits to self, but also ripple out into the world.


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 143


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

DOG TRAINER ZACK SKOW'S INCREDIBLE RECOVERY & NEW LEASE ON LIFE

MY DOGS SAVED MY LIFE page 144


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

O

N AN IDYLLIC SUNDRENCHED DAY IN CALIFORNIA, I FIND MYSELF IN JAIL. BUT UNLIKE THE 5,000 OR SO INMATES OF NORTH KERN STATE PRISON, LOCATED 150 MILES NORTH OF LOS ANGELES, I’M HERE VOLUNTARILY, ACCOMPANIED BY ZACH SKOW, A MAN ON A MISSION TO BRING DOGS INTO EVERY U.S. PRISON.

Skow is the founder of Pawsitive Change, a rehabilitation program that pairs rescue dogs with inmates. He began a pilot program at California City Correctional Facility in January 2016, teaching inmates to become dog trainers, and it’s now been rolled out to four more California state prisons and one female juvenile correction center. To date, more than 300 men have graduated from the program and roughly 200 dogs from “high-kill” shelters have been rescued and adopted as a result of the inmates’ work with them. Seventeen

of the program’s human graduates have been paroled, and so far, none has returned to prison. The majority of the dogs they trained have been awarded the Canine Good Citizen certification in recognition of good behavior and obedience. Two of the canine graduates have been certified as therapy dogs and several others are in training to be service dogs for military veterans. Skow was recently on Ellen to share his personal story behind the Pawsitive Change program: his own dogs saved his life when he’d been sent home to die of liver failure at the age of 28. Unable to qualify for a liver transplant after years of heavy alcohol abuse and drug use had ruined his quality of life, he found himself curled up in bed, sick, soiled and ready to die. That’s when he realized the three dogs in his bed with him didn’t care about how he looked – emaciated and yellow – or how he smelled – of feces and sweat. Skow told Ellen DeGeneres, “I decided in that moment to live, not for myself, but for my dogs. Their unconditional love and emotion support pushed me to get out of bed and take them on a walk.” He added, “At first, I couldn’t go very far, but on every walk,

we went further, and I found myself adding dogs to our group. We went from three to five to seven to ten… and just kept growing as a group.” Skow’s liver regenerated, and he was taken off the transplant list. He’s since made a full recovery and lives as a sober man, with a mission to pair humans and canines to repair emotional, mental, and physical traumas. During his time in AA meetings, a mentor piqued his interest in the U.S. prison system, where he thought he could pair inmates and large dogs from shelters at a high risk of being killed. His initiative has earned him accolades from the White House and, more recently, a guest appearance on Ellen, where she gave him $20,000 toward furthering his work. I joined him in the second week of the 14-week course at North Kern, together with two dozen inmate students and head trainer Robert Villaneda. I’ve been in some form of education my whole life – school, university, drama school, therapist training college – but what I witness in terms of student engagement is unprecedented. In every classroom I’ve ever sat in,

I NTE RV I E W S BY H I L DA BURKE AN D E LLE N D E G E N E R E S ADAP T E D BY JOSH JAKOB I T Z

page 145


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

RESCUE DOGS & INMATES

there’s been a healthy proportion of students checking their phone, looking out the window, chatting or grabbing a few winks. At North Kern, however, the students are totally engaged, taking copious notes, asking questions and sharing knowledge.

To have made it on to the course, they have each submitted essays on what they’d bring to the program and why they want to do it. The only inmates excluded are those who have been convicted of violence against animals or sexual assault. While Villaneda leads the session, he frequently hands over to the program mentors: men who’ve already completed the course several times. In terms of attentiveness to their canine charges, the students would put any dedicated helicopter parent to shame. They give detailed accounts of bowel movements;

page 146

how one dog won’t eat in front of other people; how another won’t go to the toilet until all the others have gone first. Skow explains that a core part of the program involves the students (he never refers to them as “inmates”, rather “trainers” or “rescuers”) being aware of and identifying their own emotional states at any given time. “Animals don’t follow unbalanced energy,” he says, “so we need the guys to be able to recognize if they’re off their center and, crucially, how to get themselves on a level again.” As I watch the men go through their paces with their dogs, I am immediately impressed. Working with the dogs and seeing what the animals are going through prompts the men to speak of their own experiences. When one student relates how his dog didn’t want to come out of the kennel in the first few days, another shares how he too

didn’t want to leave his cell when he first came to prison. As a therapist, I found the Pawsitive Change students’ level of emotional literacy and ability to be vulnerable staggering. Two themes that repeatedly come up in my conversations with the students are trust and responsibility. Many of these men have been told repeatedly from a young age that they’re not to be trusted, that they make a mess of things, that they’re not fit to take charge of anything. This message is then reinforced as they progress through the penal system. If I’ve learned one thing while working as a psychotherapist, it’s that what we’re told we’ll become, we’ll become. This program challenges the “branding” these men have had imposed on them from an early age. It allows them to create new narratives and build futures ready for integration with the outside world.


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 147


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

page 148


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 149


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

PHILANTHROPY

IN FOCUS

2 0 2 2 KE E P... GI VI N G WILLIAM SMITH Philanthropy contributor @willismith_2000

I

NO DOUBT LIKE SO MANY OF YOU, AM EXASPERATED BY THE PANDEMIC. I’M OVER THE VARIANTS. OVER MASKS. OVER THE POLITICIZATION OF PUBLIC HEALTH. OVER THE FEAR THAT HOSPITALS WILL BE OVERWHELMED AND RATION CARE. AND I’M OVER THE DISRUPTIONS TO LIFE, LARGE AND SMALL. AND SO, I WRITE THIS MONTH’S PHILANTHROPY COLUMN FROM SANTA FE, AFTER DECIDING TO ONCE AGAIN CANCEL TRAVEL PLANS DUE TO THE IMPACT OF COVID-19. Listen. There are far worse places to wait out a pandemic. Or so I was reminded today while out on a walk with the page 150

dog, inspired and feeling blessed by the snow-capped and magnificent mountains in the distance, both to my left (the Jemez range) and my right (the Sangre de Christo). It jolted me to consciousness and such reminders are necessary these days. But still, we begin 2022 with COVID-19 fully present in our lives, albeit with new and effective tools to help navigate the world more safely. That brings comfort but ought not mask the reality that the impacts of the pandemic are broad, profound, global, and evolving, with long term consequences for everyone on the planet. Over the past two years, people of great wealth and ordinary means alike have dug deep and have given generously to not for profit and charitable organizations as the pandemic wreaked havoc across the globe. Here in the United States, charitable giving reached an all-time high in 2020, particularly as pandemic-related giving and giving for racial justice issues both surged. The public sector also invested heavily with the federal and state governments moving significant financial resources into

place to bolster battered economies that impacted household incomes. But what also became clear was that the pandemic impacted different households differently. Families that struggled pre-pandemic to afford basic necessities like food, shelter, and child-care costs may have benefited from the outpouring of public and charitable dollars, but their precarious financial realities persisted even if they received some temporary reprieve. And as omicron is showing us in spades, the pandemic is far from over. As the new year begins, what we cannot be “over” is the importance of ongoing charitable giving as critical to getting through this pandemic. And even if and/or when, your own life seems to have returned to some semblance of normalcy, the economic and life disruptions to so many in our own communities and globally, will persist for many, many years to come. The clarion call to be philanthropic and give generously remains an economic and moral necessity in 2022. Here are a few ideas where giving, whatever the amount, can make a true difference.


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

Food Security – The pandemic underscored the inequities of access to healthy and affordable foods. Local food banks and pantries have been literal lifelines during the pandemic. They have been resilient and creative in meeting the needs of their communities and the need has been enormous. As someone involved in philanthropy, I can also tell you that these organizations know how to make a dollar stretch, so know that your contribution will fill more bellies than you might think. Housing Security – The pandemic has forever altered the ecosystem of work, and with it, the notion that being in an office is required. My own organization has moved to a model that allows for permanent remote work and nearly half the staff has escaped the environs of the Bay Area for more affordable and lifestyle-preferred locales. Here in Santa Fe, like so many storied towns of the west, the influx of those seeking a new place to call home has exacerbated an existing challenge for affordable housing. It’s gentrification on steroids. For those already struggling to afford rent or purchase a home (the largest generator of

personal wealth), the situation is severe. Many localities have organizations that support rental subsidies for people that allow them to stay in their homes and there are also organizations that support down payment assistance for families who can afford a monthly mortgage payment but have been unable to save the money for the down payment.

services are being called upon to help individuals address the trauma. You can frequently find these organizations through schools, healthcare providers, or lists of nonprofit organizations.

Supporting Healthcare Workers – Let’s be clear, the best way to support healthcare workers is to get vaccinated. Research overwhelmingly demonstrates that being vaccinated reduces severe illness and hospitalization and therefore avoids your taxing of healthcare workers and systems of care. In addition, gifts like food and gift cards for hardworking staff speaks volumes.

COVID-19 Relief and Recovery Funds – Many community foundations in the US and across the globe have established relief and recovery funds in the face of COVID and its ongoing impacts. Finding one of these funds may be as simple as an Internet search for your local community foundation or finding a public foundation that supports a particular country. For example, the International Community Foundation, based in California is supporting COVID-19 relief and recovery efforts in Mexico.

Mental and Behavioral Health – The death of a family member. A career sidelined. An education plan stymied. Social isolation. Economic instability. You name it, the pandemic has caused it. And the mental health implications of the pandemic can have devastating and lasting consequences for children and adults alike. Many organizations that support mental and behavioral health

However you decide to give in 2022, please consider that COVID-19 has profoundly impacted every corner of the globe. And whether your heart and philanthropic giving is in your own community or extends to that special place thousands of miles away, COVID has and continues to have consequences on how people live, each and every day. So for 2022? Keep…Giving. page 151






VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

MANSION OF THE MONTH ELK RUN ESTATE JACKSON HOLE, WYOMING

page 156


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 157


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

MANSION OF THE MONTH

ELK RUN ESTATE 127 ACRES TO ROAM

T

HIS EXCEPTIONAL ESTATE IS LOCATED JUST NORTH OF JACKSON, ALONG THE GROS VENTRE RIVER. THE PROPERTY CONSISTS OF THREE PARCELS, FOR A TOTAL OF 127 ACRES, WITH A PRIVATE POND FED FROM THE SPRING CREEK AND GROS VENTRE RIVER WITH VIEWS OF THE MAJESTIC TETON RANGE.

page 158

A recreational easement exists for an additional three neighboring parcels. The new owners of Elk Run Estate will enjoy the use of these parcels for fishing, hiking, etc. Only two other homeowners are granted the use of this easement. Some of the best fly-fishing in the valley can be accessed by the owners, along the confluence of the Snake and Gros Ventre Rivers. One of the parcels of Elk Run is vacant and will allow for development rights, adhering to only Teton Co. regulations.

The remarkable main home has seven bedrooms, all en-suite, two powder rooms and 10 wood-burning fireplaces. In addition to the spectacular great room, there are many gathering areas which include one sitting room off the kitchen, two additional areas adjacent to the guest bedrooms on the main and second levels, a library and office. The main home is 13,300 sq. ft. with amazing hand-crafted log construction, oak floors, and a commercial grade kitchen. The great room includes a formal dining area, two floor-to-ceiling fireplaces, and an inviting sitting area. The spa-


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

ELIZABETH VANCE REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL M. +1 307.739.8042 O. +1 307.413.1751

KEN W. GANGWER REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL M. +1 307.413.2550 O. +1 307.733.9009

1345/1245 BUGLING ELK TRAIL JACKSON, WYOMING, 83001

$48,000,000 BEDROOMS 9 | BATHROOMS 9 FULL AND 2 PARTIAL | INTERIOR 15,245 SQUARE FEET | EXTERIOR 127 ACRES page 159


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

cious master suite has every comfort imaginable. The sunroom has fabulous views of the large pond and Tetons. The charming guest home is 1,945 sq. ft. and has 2 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms plus a loft, and 2 wood-burning fireplaces. The Gros Ventre River meanders through the property. This is truly a fly-fishing and environmental paradise. The estate enjoys incredible privacy and is in close proximity to the town of Jackson, the Jackson Hole Mountain Ski Resort, the Airport, Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks. Jackson Hole, as part of the page 160

largest intact ecosystem in the lower 48 states, offers nearly 1.2M acres of designated wilderness. Our scenery is spectacular and destined to stay that way. Less than 3% of the land in Jackson Hole is privately owned. The remaining 97% is protected, for we are surrounded by National Forest lands, Jackson Hole Land Trust holdings and two National Parks. Our scenic corridors, trail systems, bike paths into National Forest lands, abundant streams, and rivers will remain protected. The Jackson Hole Mountain Resort is legendary with 2,500 acres of inbound terrain and an average of

459 inches of snowfall each winter. Forbes Magazine has ranked the ski resort #1 in North America for the seventh year running. Jackson Hole has several highly regarded golf resorts from which to choose, including Teton Pines, JH Golf &Tennis, 3 Creek Ranch and Shooting Star. Jackson Hole is one of the most beautiful places in the world with a small town feel and offering a lifestyle environment that is unique to our area. The splendor of Jackson Hole with the majestic Teton Mountain Range is a yearround paradise!


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

MANSION OF THE MONTH

page 161




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

ZORRO RANCH STANLEY, NEW MEXICO 87056 USA

PRICE $27,500,000 BEDROOMS 6 / BATHROOMS 7 FULL / 2 PARTIAL INTERIOR 33,339 SQ FT. / EXTERIOR 7.59 ACRES ZORRO RANCH The Zorro Ranch includes the grand three story, four-bedroom main house, nearby caretaker’s residence and multiple other residences throughout the property, including one separately and privately page 164

located residence and the four residences at Ranch Central, located near the ranch entry area, the Lodge and Log Cabin, both located in their own private area. The ranch includes a grass air strip and hanger. Other amenities include the

stables, fire house and yurt. Approximately 35 minutes from Santa Fe, providing inspiring views in all directions. Listed by Neil Lyon and Matt Desmond


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 165


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

CASTILLO CARIBE CARIBBEAN LUXURY IN THE CAYMAN ISLANDS PRICE UPON REQUEST

page 166


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

N

OW YOU CAN HAVE IT ALL: LIFESTYLE, LUXURY, LOCATION AND LIMITED TAX LIABILITY. WITHOUT DOUBT CASTILLO CARIBE IS ONE OF THE FINEST BEACH-FRONT ESTATE HOMES IN THE WORLD OFFERING EVERY LUXURY FOR MODERN DAY LIFE WITH ALL THE LIFESTYLE OPTIONS ONE WOULD EXPECT FROM THE CAYMAN ISLANDS AND THE CARIBBEAN.

Although the Cayman Islands enjoy year-round sunshine and a temperate climate, this benefit is eclipsed in most people’s eyes by the Islands’ offshore status. The Cayman Islands are well known as a financial center on the world’s stage and provide the highest quality of lifestyle available in a tax

neutral environment, making it very appealing to people of high net worth to seek residency here - a position that is actively encouraged by the local government and, as a British Overseas Territory, is a very stable option. There are a number of destinations in the world that are able to offer offshore status to a greater or lesser degree, but the Cayman Islands have no local taxes whatsoever: no property tax, no income tax, no capital gains tax and no inheritance tax. Castillo Caribe offers a rare opportunity to combine this with privacy, security, luxury and lifestyle all on a pristine white sandy beach overlooking the crystal-clear waters of the Caribbean Sea. The space afforded here is too limited to provide adequate description of all the properties features and amenities, please request a detailed package by emailing: heather.carrigan@sothebysrealty.com

page 167




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

C he ni n Bl an c

WINE GUIDE BY CEZAR KUSIK

SOMMELIER & WINE WRITER page 170


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

page 171


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

In Search The Holiday of Solace Vino Guide

IN HOT PURSUIT OF

"THE BEST WINE" CEZAR KUSIK Wine Contributor @cezartastesearth

L

EBANON IS A SMALL COUNTRY IN THE MIDDLE EAST, ON THE EASTERN SHORE OF THE MEDITERRANEAN, AND BORDERED WITH SYRIA AND ISRAEL; A VOLATILE PART OF THE WORLD IN RECENT HISTORY, TO SAY THE LEAST. This country of perpetual socioeconomic and political strife did not become an independent nation until 1943. With its capital in Beirut, Lebanon is one the page 172

most densely populated nations of the Mediterranean basin. Some of the oldest archaeological sites of human settlement come from this area. The Phoenician trade and culture thrived here in the Third Millennium B.C., centered around the ports of Tyre and Sidon. Wine was a significant part of Phoenician religious and social life, and its artifacts and mentions dating back thousands of years have been found here. The last few decades have been marked by a noticeable resurgence and modernization of the Lebanese wine industry. In fact, a few wineries have grown exponentially. One of the indisputable pioneers of the modern wine in Lebanon is Chateau Musar. The winery was founded in 1930 by Gaston Hochar and in 1959 his son, Serge, took over the operation. After his

studies at the University of Oenology in Bordeaux, Serge, energized and inspired by his newly acquired knowledge and experience, returned to Chateau Musar. Under his leadership, their wines achieved international recognition and a cult-like following. The iconic British wine critic Michael Broadbent was outspokenly enthusiastic of their wines and largely contributed to the wines’ popularity. In 1984, while Lebanon was going through a brutal and bloody civil war, Serge was chosen as the inaugural wine maker of the year by “Wine Spectator.” Talk about rising above adversity. I met Serge in San Francisco about 8 years ago on his last visit to the U.S. at a vertical tasting of Musar wines. He was a passionate, charismatic man of refined and acute intellect who spoke of his wines as if they were living creatures of his making. “Each wine has its own in-


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

dividuality,” Serge liked to say. We tasted both whites and reds going back to the vintages of 1960s. It was a revelatory experience in both sensory and cerebral terms. Sadly, and not long after that visit, he died in a swimming accident on New Year’s Eve in 2014 while vacationing in Acapulco, Mexico. Chateau Musar is located in Bakaa

Valley, about a four-hour ride east of Beirut, where roughly 90 percent of Lebanese wines are made and where vines have been cultivated for at least 6,000 years. Chateau Musar was the first Lebanese winery to acquire organic certification in 2006. The grapes are hand-picked, and ambient yeasts help in the fermentation process, an absolute minimum of sulfur is used, and the

red wines are unrefined and unfiltered. The flagships of the estate are wines are labeled Chateau Musar, and there are three: white, rosé and red. All three wines are composed of unique, idiosyncratic blends and undergo unconventional vinification. Two endemic, obscure grapes go into the white wine: Merwah and Obaideh. page 173


VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

The Holiday Vino Guide The author enjoying some Chateau Musar

The wines are fermented in French barriques for nine months. After bottling, the whites undergo a chameleon-like transformation. In their youth, they offer bright assertive flavors of citrus with touches of honey and pronounced acidity. With age, which can go for decades, the wines mellow out, round off and assume richer aromas of ripe tropical fruit and strong savory notes of sherry-like salinity. Rosé is also made from Merwah and Obaideh, with a small amount of red Cinsault added to give the wine its subtle pinkish color. A bit of oak treatment is part of the vinifying process, giving the wine a rounder structure. The wine is released two years after its harvest and offers enticing flavors of pear, orange blossom, peach, and almonds enhanced by a fresh herbal undertone. Reds are derived from an unusual mixture of Cinsault, Carignan and Cabernet Sauvignon. The grapes are vinified and matured separately in cement tanks and oak barrels before the blending process, the focus of which is to reflect the character of each specific vintage. After bottling, both whites and reds are page 174

released seven years after the harvest. The reds offer the richness of Bordeaux wines combined with the spiciness and warmth of Southern Rhone blends. I saved my tasting notes from the 1975 Chateau Musar red: “Opaque, light crimson color with significant brick hue at the edges of the glass. The nose is reminiscent of violets, kirsch and dried tobacco leaves. The palate offers a seemingly contradictory combination of lightness with rich and decadent flavors of plum, vanilla roasted nuts and chocolate. The mouthfeel is smooth and the finish long.” “From the time-tested and war-torn vineyards of Lebanon, the journey to France’s storied Loire Valley seems somehow like an exercise of escapism. Still, it holds firm to my narrative in pursuit of the “best wine.” Chenin Blanc is one of my favorites, even if a generally under-appreciated and oft overlooked white grape variety whose origins lie in France’s Loire Valley, where it thrives in the appellations of Vouvray, Quarts de Chaume, Bonnezeaux and Savennières. It has

also well-acclimated itself in South Africa, Australia, the United States and Argentina. South Africa, where the grape is known under the name Steen, is the leading producer of Chenin Blanc with more than 50 percent of global plantings. Chenin Blanc’s versatility compares to that of Riesling – without the latter’s notoriety. High in natural acidity and sugar combined with wide range of aromatics make the grape suitable for dry, off-dry, sweet and sparkling wines. One of the best expressions of Chenin Blanc dry wine comes arguably from the vineyards of Nicolas Joly in Loire Valley’s Savennières region. Joly makes three wines: Les Vieux Clos, Clos de la Bergerie and his top cuvée Clos de la Coulée de Serrant. All three are made from 100 percent Chenin Blanc. Clos de la Coulée de Serrant is considered one of the best, dry white wines in all of France and beyond, and the grapes for its making come entirely from the small, seven-hectare estate Coulée de Serrant, which is one of the smallest, independent AOCs in France. The vineyard is also exclusively owned by the Joly family.


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

It was during the 12th century that Cistercian monks first planted the vineyards here, and the property has been under vine ever since. 2020 marked the 890th consecutive vintage. The wines have been praised and coveted throughout history; Louis XI described it as “a drop of gold,” and Empress Joséphine (Napoléon Bonaparte’s wife) and writer Alexandre Dumas are known to have enjoyed these wines immensely. The Joly family purchased the estate in 1962. In 1977, Nicolas, who worked as a financier for JP Morgan in England and the U.S., returned home and embarked on a career as a vigneron. Since 2002, he has run the winery with the help of his daughter, Virginie. Nicolas is one of the pioneers of bio-dynamic viticulture and its most outspoken and fervent advocates. He has also written numerous books on the subject and has been promoting the concept in many public forums throughout the world. Inspired by the teachings of the early 19th century philosopher and visionary Rudolf Steiner, he converted Coulée de Serrant into a fully bio-dynamic winery in 1981. Ever since, all the stages of vine farming have been performed in the most natural, non-interventional fashion, incorporating the methods of flora and fauna’s symbiotic coexistence. Farm animals are used for ploughing and grazing while medicinal plants like yarrow, chamomile and stinging nettle serve as homeopathic remedies instead of chemicals. The vines are on average 35 to 40 years old, growing on mineral rich soils of flint, schist and quartz. I have tasted Clos de la Coulée de Serrant from many vintages throughout my career. Regardless of vintage variations, one thing has always remained unchanged; the wines are always sublime. The wine mesmerizes at all stages of the sensory experience. About 10 years ago, I was part of a

wine trip throughout France and while in the Loire Valley we were fortunate to visit the winery. There, we had a chance to sample a bottle of 1999 Clos de la Coulée de Serrant, a vintage considered archetypal by Nicolas himself. Here are my tasting notes: “In the glass, the wine shows an intense golden color with a tinge of silver glitter at the edges. Upon swirling, it reveals rich, oil-like viscosity reminiscent of melted precious metal. The nose is nearly overwhelmingly complex with sweet, fruity, savory, and mineral notes interlacing as if fighting for dominance. Honeysuckle, dry (sic) apricot sprinkled with clove and cinnamon, sun-drenched hay with a touch of cheesy waxiness… and more. The palate is silky, rich, fully absorbing and seamlessly balanced by pronounced acidity. Here, the fruit dominates with ripe cantaloupe, peach, honey with tart finish of blood orange and a faint note of flinty smokiness. Beautiful!” Two world-renown wineries, led by two legendary wine makers, with their respective visions to make their version of the best wine. What constitutes “the best wine”? It is not the price. The price tag is simply a reflection of the consumer demand, a winery’s pedigree combined with its critical acclaim (or the lack of it) where the quality may play a somewhat arbitrary role. It is not the wine’s taste. Taste is subjective and lies in the palate of the beholder. In my view, the best wine is that which profiles a wine maker’s genuine passion and devotion to the art of wine making. It comes from the wine maker’s understanding and respect for all of nature. The understanding that it is nature which is the true creator, and we, armed with our knowledge, are a mere helping hand in this magnificent process of wine making. CEZAR KUSIK WINE CONTRIBUTOR POLO LIFESTYLES 2022 page 175




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

ALIGN WITH YO SPIRITUALITY · FAITH · QUESTIONS · GROWTH · FOCUS

FINDING MEANING AND PURPOSE IN LIFE FOR 2022 PART THREE OF A SERIES ON SERVICE

“The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away.” — WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE JYOTI PAINTEL Spiritual contributor @pololifestyles

A

S THIS THIRD AND LAST INSTALLMENT ON THE COURAGEOUS PATH OF SELFLESSNESS IS BEING PUBLISHED, YOU ARE PROBABLY GETTING READY TO USHER IN A NEW YEAR WITH SOME CELEBRATIONS - ALBEIT LIKELY HEAVILY MUTED DUE TO MORE LOCKDOWNS AROUND THE GLOBE. As we enter into our third year of living through an unpredictable era of pandemic, severe climate change and related natural disasters, with the constant social, political and economic uncertainty of life, there is always something we can page 178

do to create something that brings sense to our life and creates a lasting positivity in the world: we can still give of ourselves to others. In this, we will find peace, joy, and purpose. As humans, the collective effort we made to survive the pandemic and lift each other up during 2021 made us stronger and wiser. Going forward, we must continue to do better than before if we are to leave something beautiful for generations ahead: we must now always make decisions that benefit the many, not just the few. Here are the profiles of two courageous people that took their own experiences and molded pathways to provide the tools for others to be a part of the change. “For our own success to be real, it must contribute to the success of others.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

Where is your Money? Choosing Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) InitiativesGeeta Sankapanavar the CEO and Founder of Ralius a financial tech company that focuses on

‘sustainable banking’ (an ESG strategy) explains the importance of putting our money in the right place: “Many people think that when they put their money in a savings account it just sits in a vault, but actually banks can use that money and lend it out to companies. Up to 40 percent can go toward companies that are actually very harmful to the environment and do not support sustainable social practices or diversity, etc.” She spoke of her own story and the struggle before the success, “Starting this company was really personal for me because as a woman of color who came up from poverty to a seat at the head of the table, I can say from experience that the way money flows matters in creating a positive change. Very few other minority women I met were able to get financial support for their businesses because they simply couldn’t find investors. I wanted to change that by creating more funding opportunities for them. Like many Americans, I, too, had a very


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

OUR PURPOSE IN SY N C W IT H YO UR V IB E

R E N E WA L · C O M M U N I T Y · S U P P O RT · E X P LO R AT I O N · E N E R G Y

visceral reaction to the stark social inequality amplified during the pandemic.” Geeta started Ralius, which directs all its funds towards ESG initiatives, because she wanted to move beyond just having conversations about inequality, to taking action. Want to invest in a company that supports ESG initiatives? According to a March 2021 article in Forbes, here is a quick guide to doing your research: Environment. What kind of impact does a company have on the environment? This can include a company’s carbon footprint, toxic chemicals involved in its manufacturing processes, and sustainability efforts that make up its supply chain. Social. How does the company improve its social impact, both within the company and in the broader community? Social factors include everything from LGBTQ+ equality, racial diversity in both the executive suite and staff overall, and inclusion programs and hiring practices. It even looks at how a company advocates for social good in the wider world, beyond its limited sphere of business. Governance. How does the company’s board and management drive positive change? Governance includes everything from issues surrounding executive pay to

diversity in leadership as well as how well that leadership responds to and interacts with shareholders. “What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal.” – Albert Pike

“Volunteering is the ice-cream!” says Kerry Rodgers, co -founder of Give a Day Global. Indeed, the common misconception about volunteer work is that there must be some sort of drudgery or unpleasant work involved, but a few minutes talking to Rodgers quickly dispels that myth. Conceived by Kerry and two other friends in San Francisco in 2012, Give a Day Global was a result of combining their extensive experience as travelers and from their volunteer experiences – from Quito to Cape Town, from Botswana to the Bay Area. Give a Day Global gave people traveling in developing countries an opportunity to donate their time, skills and physical resources to helping a local community thrive. A volunteer described how it had changed her life, “Give A Day Global provided us with the once in a lifetime opportunity to volunteer with researchers studying sea turtles during our family vacation to Costa Rica. Without Give A Day Global, we would never have known

about this amazing organization or had the chance to work with sea turtles in the wild. Now my children, ages 8 and 10, want to return to Costa Rica to do volunteer work when they are young adults; this experience has opened their worlds up to new possibilities beyond their backyard.” Unfortunately, today there is very little possibility of actually crossing borders and rolling up our sleeves in foreign countries to volunteer in person due to the pandemic, but Rodgers, who is always eager and excited to find ways to help out or give back, insists that giving our time and expertise through online mentorship is an excellent way to volunteer safely from our homes. One surprising benefit that has been reported of giving our time to others as the pandemic drags on is that according to a study published in The Atlantic, even helping others online can help with depression and anxiety. As you can see, the opportunities to give are endless and if you don’t see one that fits you, create a new way of giving back to your community at large. When you decide to live the courageous life of selflessness and shine your light on others, you can expect the sun to also shine on you. JYOTI PAINTEL SPIRITUAL CONTRIBUTOR POLO LIFESTYLES 2021 page 179




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

MOLD YOUR MIND

page 182


WWW.PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

T HE

B AT T L E

W I T H I N

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR

SELF-TALK

JOEY VELEZ MA, MBA @velezmentalperformance Healthy Lifestyles Contributor

T

HE LION IS KNOWN AS THE KING OF THE JUNGLE. BUT WHY?

The Lion is not the fastest, that is the Cheetah. The Lion is not the strongest, that is the Crocodile. The Lion is not the smartest, that is the Elephant. So why do we call the Lion the king of the jungle? It’s mentality. When a Lion sees an Elephant, it thinks “lunch”. When an Elephant sees a Lion, it thinks “run”. It does not matter if you are the fastest, the strongest or the smartest, what matters is your mindset. The key to building, maintaining and sustaining confidence ultimately depends on what you say to yourself.

CONFIDENCE IS NOT EASY Research tells us that our thoughts drive our emotional and physical states, which then influence our behaviors. If you were to have the thought, “I cannot do this,” you would likely experience feelings of doubt or anxiety, which would then leave your body feeling more tense. Try and perform a task while tightening your muscles and I guarantee it will not be easy.

Counterproductive thinking is common, and there are many factors as to why that is.

be your biggest competition. To win that battle, you must fill your mind with more productive forms of thinking.

First, the English Dictionary has almost a 2:1 ratio of words associated with negativity than positivity. Second, urges to act from positive emotions are not as clear cut as negative emotions. For example, when you are angered, you attack; when you are afraid, you run away; when you are happy, the action response is not as clear. Lastly, society is quick to point out your flaws and gloss over your strengths. However, if you can learn to be more deliberate in your thinking by focusing on what you can control, you can build more consistency during performance.

HOW TO MANIFEST CONFIDENCE

YOUR THOUGHTS MATTER Growing up, confidence was always a struggle. When it came to my education, I told myself I was not smart enough. When it came to athletics, I assumed my lack of playing time was because I was not good enough. When it came to physical fitness, I always felt girls would not like me because of how I looked. Not only did I lack confidence, but this mindset led me to being more pessimistic, more timid, and never reaching my full potential. At that time, I had no idea the power my thoughts had. Once I started graduate school, I started to understand that I was in control of my confidence. I heard a phrase that has stuck with me forever: “Your biggest competition will always be yourself. If you do not believe in yourself, then how can you expect others to?” You will always

According to research, there are four ways to build confidence. However, you only have realistic control over one of those sources: your self-talk. Self-talk is the inner dialogue that you have with yourself on a daily basis. In terms of building confidence, your self-talk does not have to be positive necessarily. More importantly, your self-talk should be purposeful, productive, and possible. Purposeful self-talk means being deliberate or intentional with rationale, typically coming in the form of motivation or instruction as opposed to “hoping” to have the right thoughts. Productive self-talk has an effective impact on your energy and attention where you are focused on the present moment and what you control as opposed to allowing the situation to dictate your self-talk. Lastly, possible self-talk simply means having an “I can” attitude versus an “I cannot” attitude. For example, statements such as “I got this,” “I did it before, I can do it again,” or “focus on your form,” all meet these criteria and would help you be more confident in your next repetition. Having your self-talk statements meet these criteria allows you to approach any situation with more confidence.

FINAL THOUGHTS There are many contributing factors that separate elite performers from the average. One of those is mentality. You can have all the skill in the world, but if you do not have the proper mindset to back it up, then your talent will be wasted. If you want to feel or be a certain way heading into a performance, it starts with what you say to yourself. Have your thoughts work for you, not against you, and win the battle within to give you a chance to come pageout 183 on top.




VOLUME VI / ISSUE I / JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

LIFE COACHING AND EXPERT

WELLNESS EXERCISES THE HUMAN BATTERY:

ENERGY IN MOTION JUSTIN JOHNSON Wellness contributor @goliathcoaches

T

AKE CHARGE. STEP INTO YOUR PURPOSE. STRIVE FOR THAT NEW POSITION. BECOME THE EXECUTIVE. Through the ages, taking charge is an action we have consistently rewarded. One thing we elevate is a strong leader. We worship the hero or heroine, the ones willing to sacrifice themselves for the idea, for the message, for what they believe is right. However, this month, I want to express a different version of taking charge, using the example of a human battery. We have several physiological systems, such as a digestive system, that convert what we consume into energy to keep our battery charged and in its best operating function. page 186

We need to stay charged, ready, aligned and operational. When you break the human body down atomically, we are merely a combination of positive and negative charges. The number of electrons determines the charge of the atom. When the electrons outnumber the protons, you have a negative charge. When the protons are the majority, the charge is positive. Biologically, this is the foundation for the energy we use. Oftentimes, thoughts, feelings and actions can help positively charge energy, while misuse can drain energy. Together, these charges transfer energy that literally powers us, ensuring these complicated systems, like the digestive system, get the needed energy to do their job. Have you ever walked into a room and thought, “The energy is different in here”? Or met someone and immediately felt good energy? That charge we’re talking about transfers energy. Although we use these terms figuratively, what we are saying speaks to a much deeper level. Technology allows us to be much more independent, and

through that, it gives a much different energy. Life has become less communal and much more self-centered. Recently, I’ve heard, “I don’t need you to help me, Google will,” or “I don’t need you to entertain me, I have Tik Tok for that.” We substitute high fives and good jobs for social media likes and comments. Now, this is not a technology-bashing piece, and, on the contrary, I believe that technology is one of the best things that has happened to us. However, I will say we need to remember to connect to the charges that authentically make us human. We consistently underestimate what real human positive energy does for us. To a point, we have lost the ability to understand what truly charges us. Our emotions would have us believe the joy we desire can only be found outside of us, as if we do not have the necessary systems to produce positive, loving and healthy energy. False! We are far too dependent on the world to fix individual problems, when we should look deeper into ourselves for the answers. What charges you? What gets your energy going in the right direction?


WWW. PO LO L IFES T YLES .COM

Don’t think about what you need to do, or your responsibilities, think about what makes you smile. Think about when your energy is in motion toward joy. Think about joy as a destination and you need energy to get you to the destination. In order to get to the destination, you need a charge to pull your energy to the destination of Joy. Where were you when you felt joy? Were you alone or with a loved one? In my opinion, emotions are just energy in motion. We choose the way we express our energy. No one can make you mad. They can say something that is offensive, and you can choose to give

said thing energy - or not. Your reaction to the offensive comment is what makes you mad and creates that accompanying energy – not the comment itself. You’re in control. This accountability gives us the ability to take charge. Anything you are accountable to, you can change. Through choosing positivity, you charge yourself to accept the accountability needed to fix the problem. We must find what truly charges us again. Your purpose is that thing that you would do for free. Learning our purpose – and living into our purpose – allows us to be positively charged. The world says it’s

the new house, the new car or the new girlfriend or boyfriend, but in reality, it’s just doing what you believe you are here to contribute and accomplish. Finding your purpose is not just for you. We need you to do what you’re here for, so you can add your true positive energy to society. Everyone is needed, everyone has purpose and a position that fits into the whole. Recognize that you are the tool, and your emotion, your physical attributes, your intellect, all work together to create your world. With so much to accomplish, respect your battery human and direct your charge. page 187