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VOLUME III / ISSUE VIII / AUGUST 2019

POLOLIFESTYLES.COM

GREENWICH · KING POWER GOLD CUP · SANDPOLO · WIMBLEDON

POLO &

BUBBLES

IT'S

PARTY TIME

UNFORGETTABLE VIP LOUNGES & PICTURE-PERFECT POLO DAYS

RUGBY MEETS POLO

BRITISH SANDPOLO RETURNS NEW YORK'S MOST-ENVIED INVITE VEUVE CLICQUOT POLO CLASSIC

DUBAI KNOCKS KING POWER ASIDE TO CLAIM BRITISH POLO OPEN TITLE

KENNETH CARRION'S

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO

HOSTING 5-STAR LAVISH CELEBRATIONS VOCABULARY UPGRADE: YOU WON'T 'TRY' AGAIN AFTER YOU READ THIS MAKE THE WORLD YOU WANT TO SEE IN YOUR CLOTHING

FASHION POLARITY MASH UP NEON & ANIMAL PRINTS


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Ambassador Claude-Alix Bertrand Publisher

Joshua Jakobitz Editor-in-Chief

Sara Ali

Jyoti Paintel

Assistant Copy Intern

Stanley Pierre-Etienne

Brand Representatives Anne-Isabelle Saint-Pierre - Dubai

Style Contributor

Fitness Columnist

Kenneth Carrion de los Condes Kemissa Racine

Contributing Photographers Claire Barrett

Lifestyles Contributor

Hans Ebenman

Travel Contributor

Cezar Kusik

Head of Photography

Raphael Dapaah

William Smith Philanthropy Contributor

Wine Contributor

Art Contributor

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Style Contributor

Joey Velez

Wellness Columnist

a.isabellesaintpierre@gmail.com

Rudy Volel - New York

Luxury & Culture Adviser

Mark Wine

Gregory Bertrand

Spiritual Guidance Contributor

Claire Barrett

volel.me@gmail.com

Eva Espresso

Candace Ferreira Aaron Vasquez Simbarashe Cha Michael J. Snell Ro Fernandez Wesley Glover

Polo Lifestyles is a publication of HT Polo Publishing Co. 995 Detroit Avenue, Suite A Concord, CA 94518 Copyright Š Polo Lifestyles 2019 All Rights Reserved. For information or to advertise Contact editor@pololifestyles.com Read online at www.pololifestyles.com


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Cowdray Park The Dollar Cup Cicero Cup Greenwich Polo Club East Coast Open Polo de Paris Tournoi de la Ville de Paris 125th Open de Paris Maui Polo Club Oskie Rice Memorial Santa Barbara Polo Club Pacific Coast Circuit Intra-Circuit Cup Polo Club Gstaad Hublot Polo Gold Cup Polo Club St-Tropez Sun Trophy Silver Whips Golden Wave Women's International IPC Sotogrande Santa Maria Polo Club Torneo de las Apuestas Ghantoot Polo & Racing Club British Polo Day Polo Club du Domaine de Chantilly PGH Cup Bourbon Trophy Champlatreux Trophy Inanda Polo Club Inanda High Goal Rosefield Polo Club Africa Polo Open

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VOLUME III / ISSUE VIII / AUGUST 2019

SANDPOLO BRINGS THE PARTY TO THE UK page 70 POLO LIFESTYLES EDITORS & CONTRIBUTORS

Ambassador Claude-Alix Bertrand

Publisher Polo Lifestyles @haiti_polo_captain

Cezar Kusik

Wine Contributor Polo Lifestyles @cezareatsdirt

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Josh Jakobitz

Editor-in-Chief Polo Lifestyles @joshuajakobitz

Kenneth Carrion

Kemissa Racine Style Contributor Polo Lifestyles @kemissa

Joey Velez

Lifestyles Contributor Mental Wellness Columnist De Los Condes Velez Mental Performance @deloscondes_inspired_living @velezmentalhealth

Mark Wine

Fitness Columnist Functional Muscle Fitness @functionalmuscle

Jyoti Paintel

Spiritual Contributor Polo Lifestyles @jyotipaintel

Anne-Isabelle St-Pierre Stanley Pierre-Etienne Brand Representative Polo Lifestyles @isasaintpierre

Style Contributor Lanmou Pou Ranyon @stanleypierretienne

Raphael Dapaah Art Contributor Dapaah Gallery @dapaahgallery

William Smith

Philanthropy Contributor Santa Fe Comm. Foundation @willismith_2000


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Williams and Murray team up on the court page 30

The wine country of Myanmar page 132

The Lion King opens in the UK page 24

Do this: Neon and animal prints for fall page 106

IT'S PARTY TIME A complete guide to throwing a destination celebration that your guests can't stop raving about page 56

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR I love the August issue. For the Northern Hemisphere, it’s the middle of the summer season and there’s no shortage of polo to cover. For this month, we turned our attention to high-quality, high-goal polo that’s matched equally with an over-the-top party (or two or three). Our top two contenders are, of course, the Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic in New York City and Sandpolo – British Beach Polo Championships in Dorset. The former is a one-day extravaganza of celebrities and champagne and the other is an entire weekend of polo, parties, celebrity matches, adapted rugby (on the sand), and DJs. Without knowing any of this, our resident lifestyles expert Kenneth Carrion de los Condes called me to pitch his August column: a pas-a-pas guide to throwing a party abroad. With his invaluable perspective on parties, destinations, catering, florals and amenities, I held myself back from being too enthusiastic about the topic. After reading his content, I called our publisher and we changed the cover complete. “It’s Party Time” had taken life. Also giving us life this month is Team Dubai, winning the British Open Polo Championship by defeating VS King Power in a seventh chukker showdown. By half-time, the two teams had given polo enthusiasts such a show that announcers couldn’t get people to take their seats after the divot-stomp. Photos and a full story from Cowdray Park Polo Club are in our Scoreboards & Cocktails section. Our fall trendsetters have their eyes on the latest from the runways in New York, Paris and Milan, while our wellness team tackles topics of assertiveness in communication and the purpose to refining your vocabulary. A profile of Tiffanie Delune by resident art critic Raphael Dapaah dives deep into the delicate psyche of an artist. And, reporting for Polo Lifestyles for the first time is Michael J. Snell, who’s eye for luxury and accessories I’ve personally appreciated for sometime now. He toured the all green Louis Vuitton pop-up shop in New York City. Read his review and thoughts on Virgil Abloh’s installation and aesthetic. Best, Josh Jakobitz josh@pololifestyles.com

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badgalriri The fifth annual Diamond Ball is two months away... Benefiting the Clara Lionel Foundation

jacquesantoinegannat Mombasa Blues series by @dvanweeghel symbolizing equality, freedom and diversity

hypebeast @pyermoss designer Kerby JeanRaymond named AD of @reebok new division "Reebok Studies__."

lalique No siren is alike, from hair to pose. "What interestes me is the woman as an individual." - Terry Rodgers

polo_club_gstaad The Gstaad Gold Cup will be played this month in the picturesque mountain venue

simbihaiti Summer travel wardrobe essential style by Simbi #simbihaiti #travel

fustana.veshje The perfect polo look for late summer from @rreth.femrave and @ gucci page 20

italian_places Simply dreamy in Genova #liguria photo by @prokopsha #travel #italy

itsjdixon Stepping on the red carpet with @niaholloway at The Lion King Live Action Canada Premiere


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Click and comment on our choices... tag @pololifestyles. We will share noteworthy comments with you next month.

meghan_harry_news The American-born Duchess of Sussex greeted Beyonce Knowles-Carter at The Lion King premiere in London

tkloves The new @christianlouboutin collection showcased here by fashion lover TKLOVES

sumfest_ht SUMFEST 2019 kicked off in Haiti at Wahoo Bay Beach #yontiselfie #sumfest2019

myhaititravels The first installation in an underwater museum at Moulin sur Mer in Cotesdes-Arcadins, Haiti

cowdraypolo Behind the scenes of the set up for @kingpower British Polo Open Championship

taelorthein Love to see natural curls on Cameroon-German-Scottish-Irish model Taelor Thein

polodeparis_officiel Opening day of the 125e Open de Paris Engel & Volkers. Photo by @lupeaizaga

stabledoorimages Copa de Bronce @heineken de Alto HCP del 48 Torneo Internacional Mansion de Polo at Santa Maria PC

thefocusedfeast1 Food and beverage photography perfectly executed with refreshing summer motifs page 21


THE ASTON MARTIN DB 11

UNLIKE ANY OTHER


ASTON MARTIN


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THE LION KING PREMIERE IN LONDON

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Beyonce and Jay-Z arrive at the premiere.


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Top: The Duke and Duchess of Sussex greet fans. The Duchess wore Jason Wu. Above left-right: Seth Rogen and Maya Jama.

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The television presenters cuddled up on the red carpet together, with Rochelle sporting a bright pink suit. page 26


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SANTOS DE CARTIER page 29


THE CHAMPIONSHIPS, WIMBLEDON All England Club

Men's Singles: Novak Djokovic Women's Singles: Simona Halep


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THE CHAMPIONSHIPS, WIMBLEDON U S POLO AS SN 9. 5 / 8 F L E X J E T

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Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are regulars in the Royal Box during Wimbledon.


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Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer faced eachother in the final, where Djokovic emerged victorious.

Serena Williams arrives on the court at Wimbledon. page 33


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CA RTI ER Q UE E N 'S CUP

Top: Serena Williams teamed up with Andy Murray in doubles. Above: Roger Federer faced Novak Djokovic in the final page 34


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T H E C H A M PI O N S HIP S, W I M B L E D O N

Simona Halep won the women's singles. page 35


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Rafael Nadal at Wimbledon. page 36


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T H E C H A M PI O N S HIP S, W I M B L E D O N

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KING POWER

BRITISH OPEN POLO CHAMPIONSHIP

Two exciting semi-Finals between VS King Power and Park Place and Dubai and Scone Polo saw victories for Top Srivaddhanaprabha’s VS King Power team and Ali Albwardy’s Dubai taking them to Sunday’s Final. The two sides last met in a Gold Cup Final at Cowdray Park in 2014. VS King Power altered their linepage 40

up for the Final. Vichai’s son ‘Top’ Srivaddhanaprabha played at number 1 as usual, but Polito Pieres took the number 2 slot, Marcos di Paola moved up to 3 and Juan Martin Zubia played at Back. Dubai kept their line-up unchanged with 16-year-old Camilo Castagnola at 1, Rashid Albwardy at 2, Bartolomé Castagnola at 3 and Ignacio

du Plessis at Back. Chukka 1 opened with Pieres immediately on the attack; his first attempt at goal went wide.  A couple of minutes of frantic action resulted in a penalty awarded to Dubai that Camilo Castagnola sent from 30 yards to secure the opening goal of the match for his side. At the end of the first half,


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the score stood at 6-4 in Dubai’s favor. The massive crowd went out to treadin, so large in fact that the commentators’ cries for them to return to their seats were swamped by the excited spectators’ comments. When the fourth chukka got underway, a fantastic piece of play saw Pieres leave the ball for Zubia who obliged with a huge lofted shot to score for VS King Power.  Rashid Albwardy won the ball from the throw-in but di Paola grabbed it back, Zubia stopped Bartolomé from snatching it while Marcos came through and passed to Top who made a superb goal to even the scores on 6-6.  Another fantastic goal from Top and King Power was ahead.  A 30-yard penalty awarded to King Power as the chukka drew to a close enabled Pieres to extend the lead to 8-6. By the sixth chukka, Bartolomé calmly sent the ball through the posts from 60 yards and it was 11-11.  The

excitement in the crowd was palpable. VS King Power won the throw-in and Pieres scored to take his side into the lead again.  Top saved the ball from Dubai’s next attempt at goal, but, aided by the power of du Plessis, Bartolomé was able to find a way through and even the scores at 12-12 before the whistle blew.

The match went into a seventh chukka and started with a throw-in. Away went Zubia with the ball, but du Plessis was having none of it and struck out for the other end. Top made a great clearance, the ball taken on by Marcos di Paola, Pieres and then Zubia who raced away to Dubai’s goal only to send the ball wide.  In page 41


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came the ball from the backline and off down the boards raced Bartolomé, the wonderfully intuitive combination with his brother which we have seen throughout this Gold Cup tournament coming to the fore as Camilo dived forward with the ball and put it through.  Dubai won the King Power Gold Cup on a score of 13-12 in a truly breathtaking finish. Jon Rudkin, Director of Football for Leicester City FC, presented individu-

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al prizes to all players, the tournament umpires and commentators before handing the coveted Gold Cup to Rashid Albwardy, son of the Dubai patron. The Most Valuable Player of the match award went to Pieres of VS King Power, Open Chacota, owned and played by Top Srivaddhanaprabha, was voted Best Playing Patron’s Pony, and Rebalde, owned and played by Camilo Castagnola, was awarded Best Playing Pony of the match, with a rug presented by The Hon Lila Pearson.

Following the match, Ali Albwardy, patron of Dubai said, “It was such an exciting match. I’m proud of all the boys in this young team, they played fantastically – in fact, both teams had a wonderful match.  The game was entertaining to watch, hard, fast and exactly what polo should be.  I thank Cowdray Park Polo Club for their fantastic organization of the tournament.”

Team Dubai defeated VC King Power in the exciting final.


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MONTY WATERBURY CUP ISLAND HOUSE 12 / 10 REELAY GREENWICH POLO CLUB

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It is given that many memorable sports showdowns are often accompanied by an interesting, if not fascinating, backstory. This certainly seemed to be the case last Friday, when Island House, the electric 16-goal squad, clinched its second consecutive major tournament title at the Greenwich Polo Club this season, with a 12-10 win against Reelay, the fierce 15goal contingent. The four-member Island House roster, which features Peter Holowesko, Toro Ruiz-Jorba, Peke Gonzalez and Santino Magrini seemed to wind up at the top of the leader board due to their fierce and fiery playing style.

Island House defeated Reelay 12-10 for the Monty Waterbury Cup final.

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2019 MONTY WATERBURY CUP

It's polo season in Greenwich with tournaments all summer long. Monty Waterbury was played in July.

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Feature:

AUGUST CALLS FOR CELEBRATION

IT'S

PARTY TIME

THE BEST DESTINATION PARTY YOUR GUESTS HAVE EVER ATTENDED - BRITISH SANDPOLO: A RIOTOUS GOOD TIME - VEUVE CLICQUOT HOSTS THE POLO PARTY OF THE SEASON page 57


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LAVISH LIFESTYLES A COLUMN BY KENNETH CARRION THAT YOUR CONCIERGE WILL LOVE TO HATE

TAKE YOUR PARTY

PARTY

TO NEW LEVELS ON NEW CONTINENTS by Kenneth Carrion de los Condes, lifestyles contributor, @deloscondes_inspired_living Photos by Claire Barrett and Christina Farmer

Like many of you, I travel—a lot. I’m sure that we can all agree, although there are many amazing places in the world, some of them are more special to us than others. Places like those just speak to us. They are the ones we return to again and again.

Sharing the place we love with loved ones is often the next step. A good time to do so is when there’s something to celebrate, be it a special wedding anniversary, or perhaps a milestone birthday. For me, that place is San Miguel de Allende. With its stunning architecture, delicious cuisine, sophisticated boutiques and wonderful art, it appeals to an ever-growing group

of travelers. I’ve visited her more than 35 times, and I wanted to celebrate my 50th birthday there along with the company of those I value most. So, how does one go about organizing a party in a different country? It can be tempting to hand everything over to an event planner. I am very fortunate to have been introduced to premier event planner, Cynthia Villagran, who is now a dear friend. Being an event planner myself, I recommend retaining their services, especially for local information and vendor contacts. Also, plan to travel up to half a dozen times to meet with them prior to the big day (poor you.) If the location is dear to you, you’ll probably prefer to be more hands-on.

Start it Off Right An invitation can convey a

lot. Aside from the overall ‘feel’ of the event, it should include all itinerary other than travel (unless you need to tell them to meet the jet on the tarmac): dates, times, locations, any themes and clothing requirements. They may need attire for a white party, pool party, black tie, or even hiking boots or snowshoes! Let your guests know about local currency and whether they need a passport or visa. Be sure to send it out months in advance, only revealing as much information as necessary. Nothing gets your guests buzzing with anticipation as much as an intriguing, unforgettable invitation, and a great way to make your party memorable is to brand it; stamping a logo on everything from the invita-

tions to the water bottle labels and menus!

Upon Arrival Nothing says welcome better than a gift bag waiting for your guests on their beds. This makes your loved ones feel that much more special. I personally left a handwritten letter for each of my 53 guests. A beach or city tote (depending on location) should be gender-neutral and filled with necessities; bottled water, maps, sunblock, nibbles and insect repellent. Frivolities or little luxuries (local crafts and travel candles) are also a good idea. In my case, I was able to procure some of my favorite organic loose tea from my favorite little cafe, have bags of homemade granola from my favorite bakery made page 59


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and included small jars of my favorite homemade guava jam. Under three ounces, of course, so that they wouldn’t be confiscated at the airport should a guest decide to take it in their carry-on bag on their return flight home. For a little fun, include a clothing item such as a hat or sarong that all guests wear at some point to create an inclusive bond between everyone. The gift bag is also a great place to repeat the itinerary.

Get Tech-Savvy With cell phones in hand most of your guests are likely to be plugged in. Use this to your advantage when planning your party. Use Google Maps to create an interactive map. Pinpoint accommodations and all of your local favorites; restaurants, bars, museums, beaches and anything you think they must see or experience. Create a WhatsApp chat group for you and your guests. That way, you can all communicate with each other and decide whether to join in certain activities or do your own thing. Create a hashtag for Instagram and let all of your guests know to post photos with it. page 60


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LAVISH LIFESTYLES taking them on another adventure.

Decor

Meet at the harbor for the boat that takes you to a secluded island, organize cars to whisk them somewhere wonderful you’ve likely discovered on one of your previous visits that you wanted to keep under wraps until now. Perhaps to dinner at a gallery downtown.

Even with an event planner to help with sourcing, some desired design elements might be difficult to procure and deliver abroad. The answer is to keep it simple and embrace everything local.

Host Meet-Ups

For me, that element of surprise began on one of the themed evenings, when private chauffeured coaches presented themselves at each of the eight villas housing all of our guests. They were whisked away to a secret location 45 minutes outside town. Guests were pleasantly surprised, arriving at a vineyard in time for sunset and a signature cocktail.

PARTY

Better yet, take your own photographer. That way, your guests can relax without fomo (fear of missing out), and knowing a professional has their best angle and the entire trip covered. Plus, everyone will love the group photos you send to them when they get back home! A videographer, as well, is a wonderful way to create living memories.

Getting everyone together daily is the perfect way for friends and family to get to know one another. It could be the pool one day and the lounge the next with cocktails and mingling at each soirée.

Create an Element of Surprise This award-winning vineyard, Cuna Your guests are likely to be in town for a couple of days before the main event. If they’ve been staying at a villa or hotel, wow them a little more by

de Tierra, with her seductive contemporary design, was a refreshing departure from the old-world charm in town.

Visit the marketplace—oftentimes inexpensive souvenirs and hand-made textiles are stylish when incorporated into an elegant theme. You don’t want flowers to wilt en route to you. What is abundant and close by? Maybe bougainvillea is sprinkled along your table runners on a Greek island, or huge, tropical green leaves become stunning, dramatic centerpieces in Mexico. Tiki torches double as romantic lighting when staked around lounge areas on the Caribbean beach, and never underestimate the visual impact of hundreds of candles!

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LOCAL FLAVOR

PARTY

I usually like to incorporate a personal locally-made place setting for each guest, one they can take home as a reminder of the good time.

Infuse Local Flavor With Both the Cuisine and the Entertainment!

As a food and wine lover, I’d recommend finding a local chef whose food is amazing and have custom pairings created for your party. Again, we were fortunate to have been introduced to the talented, up-and-coming chefs Carlos Segura and Ricardo Rafael, who apprenticed in world-re-

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nowned restaurants in Mexico City. On one of our half dozen visits in preparation for the event, their private food tastings won us over with that first bite as well, as the presentation. Perhaps you have a favorite restaurant in your ideal location. They might even cater your main event. What’s a local specialty dish? It might be fun for your guests to try something they can’t usually get at home: mofongo (a mashed green plantain dish from Puerto Rico), dry-cured Iberian ham when in Spain, a traditional Moroccan tagine, Kobe beef when in Japan, or a French-Swiss cheese called Raclette. The night of our group dinner, our guests raved about the Hamachi Crudo course and

the melt-in-your-mouth short ribs and mole. Traditional dancers make wonderful entertainment, or for something hands-on, try cigar rollers or maybe tarot readers, but you if want to have your guests on the dance floor, you need music. Do you recall a fun night you had on one of your previous visits? Ask around for the name of the band or DJ, and then secure them for your party if you can. We were asked to attend a concert, once again on a previous visit and looked no further than the ever-talented and beautiful Pamela Gámez and her band The Andersons. Her sultry voice and renditions set the mood for an unforgettable evening. 

And how about for a finale? Just when your guests couldn’t imagine it being any more amazing, the night comes to a close with the eruption of a spectacularly orchestrated fireworks display leaving everyone in awe.

The Send-Off Remember that your guests trekked all this way to celebrate you, so it’s a nice touch to try to say bon voyage to them all personally, if possible. Try to stay an extra day to be sure they all returned safely—you want them all available for the next party.

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BRITISH BEACH POLO CHAMPIONSHIPS

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SAN P


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NDPOLO PARTY

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BRITISH BEACH POLO CHAMPIONSHIPS

SANDPOLO PARTY Sorted Magazine 9 / 5 London European Securities Sandbanks, United Kingdom

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All images courtesy Sandpolo


Four teams headed to Sandbanks, Poole over the weekend for the annual British Beach Polo Championships in front of 2,500 fans. With the sand arena in good condition, a favorable weather forecast and record ticket sales the stage was set for a blinder. No one was disappointed. The opening games on Friday saw Louisa Watt’s Conker Gin Team lose to John Cooper, playing for Sorted Magazine. Charles Cooney had his Sandpolo initiation with a particularly good game. Chris Benford, playing for Hurlingham 1875 then had a nail biter against Martin Young’s 5.6.

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With the constant pressure applied by Adolfo Casabal, 5.6 were through to the final. From recent “I’m a Celebrity, Get me Out of Here” success, local resident Harry Redknapp, who had never ridden before, had a crash course from MHF Polo alongside Nick Knowles and Rita Simons ready for their penalty shootout. Simons beat Knowles while Harry commentated. Asked for comment he said, “I will stick to owning horses and paying people to ride them for me.” Simon Ledger kept the crowd informed and amused from the commentary box throughout the day.

On Saturday, the polo started with the HAC playing the Household Cavalry. A low-goal match, but good to see military teams at the event supporting the chosen charity of the Household Cavalry Foundation. The 3rd/4th play-off between Hurlingham 1875 and Conker was played in good spirits. The 2,500 people crowd enjoyed the spectacle on what was the perfect south coast beach day. Chris Benford, Howard Smith and Hugo Taylor did the event and Hurlingham 1875 proud but could not match the Watt, Porter, Cooney combination losing 8-5. Before the final, the customary Charity Race was held between a polo pony and an Audi Q8, driven by rally

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driver Andy Toy. For the first time in the 12-year history of the event, the car won. With the heavily watered 40 x 80m sand arena repaired after some celebratory wheel spinning from Mr. Toy, the final was underway. John Cooper, with Alec and Ed Banner-Eve were not going to give up the title without a fight. Young’s wingmen Casabal and Bautista Funes did not want to let their patron nor their manager Flaco down. Both teams knuckled down to the job in hand. The polo was spectacular, and the crowd was drawn in like nothing

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before. A few early goals by 5.6 gave Sorted something to chase. At half time there was little in it, but the competitive nature of the teams cut in, and the temperature rose. Umpire Richard Newman, supported by Howard Smith from the sideline, stood his ground and did his best to control the game. Both teams needed a pep talk from Smith. Cooper’s team, Sorted won 9-5 to retain the title.

Radio 1 DJ Nick Grimshaw hosted the closing after-party that followed the ‘Wear it Green’ fashion show in which Taylor and Cooney sported the “sweaty polo player” range. Bautista Funes' pony, Maruja, won the Best Playing Pony.

All images courtesy Sandpolo

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C E L L C I NAN DA A FRICA CU P

All images courtesy Sandpolo

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All images courtesy Sandpolo

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VEUVE CLICQUOT POLO CLASSIC NEW YORK CITY LIBERTY PARK VEUVE CLICQUOT 11 / 10 LIBERTY COMETS

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Scenes from the crowd-favorite, Veuve Clicquot Polo Class in New York. All images courtesy Veuve Clicquot.

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All images courtesy Veuve Clicquot

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All images courtesy Veuve Clicquot

When we think of polo parties, we think of Veuve Clicquot's signature events in New York City and Los Angeles. We think of endless champagne from tulip cups and celebrities dressed to the 9s. Veuve Clicquot mixes the Sport of Kings with summertime entertainment just perfectly. For all of those reasons, it is the hottest ticket in town and ultra-exclusive. We take you inside.

One of the most glamorous and stylish daytime events of the summer season, celebrities and guests at the Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic stepped out to enjoy the day – top trends included: two piece sets, straw hats, cat-eye sunglasses, 90s-inspired looks and accessories, summer white, Veuve Clicquot yellow and statement accessories like hats and jewelry. Guest donned summer dresses, polka dots, stylish yet comfortable wedges, light suits, floral prints and more styles that have long been associated with the sport of polo. FX network’s “Pose” actor Ryan

Jamaal Swain kicked off the gorgeous afternoon with an inspiring rendition of “The Star Spangled Banner,” and the ceremonial ball toss was thrown in by Julianne Moore with the breathtaking Manhattan skyline and Statue of Liberty in the background.

New bride-to-be, Jennifer Lawrence embraced polo style in an pink lacy Rosie Assoulin dress and flashed her stunning engagement ring while sipping champagne. She and former “Hunger Games” co-star Moore caught up and mingled with friends while soaking in the thrilling polo match. page 91


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PARTY

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All images courtesy Veuve Clicquot


PARTY

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Michael B. Jordan arrived for a boys’ day out and Emily Ratajkowski cuddled up to husband Sebastian Bear-McClard. Coco Rocha took an afternoon away from her kids and wore Canadian designer Sid Neigum in celebration of his win at The Canadian Arts & Fashion Awards the night before.

Nacho Figueras and Delfina Blaquier once again teamed up on the field to lead their team to victory, with Cara Casino awarded the MVP award, and Figueras receiving the highest scoring award with a limited-edition timepiece from Hublot, the official timekeeper of the match. page 95


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FASHION & STYLE

INCORPORATE NEON INTO FALL LOUIS VUITTON GOES ALL-GREEN IN NYC page 99


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WHAT TO WEAR: ANIMAL PRINT & NEON

TWO POLARITIES PERFECTLY MASHED UP STANLEY PIERRE-ETIENNE @stanleypierretienne Style Contributor

STYLE

F

all is undeniably the most fashionable season. Because we need to cover ourselves, we do it in style; we dress in dramatic outerwear in dark tones and colors, in fur and chic coats. That will never change. What is changing right now and what we noticed for this upcoming fall-winter season is the way we are advised to do fall. The biggest trends for fall 2019 invite us to try new ways to be stylish. Not only when it comes to color trends, but also, and perhaps most surprisingly, when it comes to traditional fabrics and textures that we normally use for winter. Animal print will never be the same after how it was presented in these fall collections. Of course, whenever we say fall, we see animal prints of brown, khaki, and cream, but this is the first time we’ve seen animal print in those traditional shades with a profusion of options from major fashion houses. The most unexpected colors were worked into animal print; from vibrant greens, reds and yellows to navy blues, pinks and even lavender. We even saw some tie-dyed t-shirts in different shades of animal print.

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Never would we expect to see this sunny and summer-y trend of vibrant colors moving its way to fall, but fashion is unexpected. From Saint Laurent with bold looks of short dresses to Balenciaga, Off-White and Versace, it seems like we will have neon sightings for seasons to come now. page 101


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STYLE

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ANIMAL PRINT & NEON

The highlights: •

Prairie dresses in flowy leopard fabric, trousers in animal print fabric at DSquared2.

We also saw a dark rose color, over-the-knee-jacket at Paco Rabanne and the obvious and predictable fur coat in leopard print at Celine.

Even Jacquemus followed the trend and gave us a yellowish-brown, extra-long coat in animal print. While at Versace, we spotted an animal print coat mixed with some leather jacket elements.

Also, at Paco Rabanne, we saw a shiny outerwear in animal print, bringing us down to the second

must-see trends for fall: disco shine. At Alberta Ferretti, Altuzarra gave us a golden monochromatic shiny look from head to toe, and of course, Dolce & Gabbana with a Victorianinspired gold ensemble with matching clutch. How can we not mention the neon trend that is breaking the fall barrier? Never would we expect to see this sunny and summer-y trend of vibrant colors moving its way to fall, but fashion is unexpected. From Saint Laurent with bold looks of short dresses to Balenciaga, OffWhite and Versace, it seems like we will have neon sightings for seasons to come now.

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LV GOES GREEN IN NYC YOUR GUIDED TOUR TO THE POP-UP SHOP MICHAEL J. SNELL Special to Polo Lifestyles

I

n New York, green was an understatement. The city of iconic luxury was where Virgil Abloh brought a higher level of cultural aesthetic and detail into his designs for the Louis Vuitton Fall 2019 Collection.

LV doesn’t skimp – even in the 98-degree New York heat. Guests waited impatiently to see the collection with bottles of chilled water on Abloh-designed trays. Entrance was limited to 20 people in the space at a time and to groups of just four. An associate, dripping in LV19, greets you and becomes your host as you are guided through the entirety of the activation. The associate explains key design cues and iconic collection pieces and where the heart-beat of each originated. They highlight pieces representing unity with rainbow enamel and leather motif. Other iconic pieces nod to Louis Vuitton design history, such as a beautifully styled cashmere-flannel overcoat featuring a stitched artisan-and-tool imagery panel that was found in the company archive. The collection also features a selection of sneakers that were amongst the most popular, coming in vivid colors like electric purple— they sold out almost immediately.

Photos by Michael J. Snell for Polo Lifestyles or from The Impression

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I believe this collection captures Abloh’s true mission: make the clothing you want to see in the world and make the world you want to see in your clothing.


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VERNISSAGE {PRIVATE VIEWING}

ft

TIFFANIE DELUNE page 113


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The artist in her studio.


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The Life Experiences and Artistic Evolution O F T I F FA N I E D E LU N E

Upfront and open about her early grapples with the notion of being an artist, Tiffanie Delune is finding herself and her purpose. RAPHAEL DAPAAH @dapaahgallery Art Contributor

It’s an unusually sunny Sunday when I pull into the Sarah Lane studios in Hoxton, East London. Quiet, secluded and unassuming, the area on first impression makes for the ideal location for any recluse or artist to get away from the typical hustle and bustle of London’s East End. A council estate looms large and defiantly above the studio, perhaps one of the last few relics of an increasingly gentrified Hoxton, which has in recent years been heralded as the art district of East London. I find Tiffanie Delune waiting by the entrance of the studio, keys in one hand, and a rolled-up canvas underneath one arm. She cuts an angelic figure in an airy, white cotton dress with perforated detailing, which instantly conjures up memories of the elegant African women I used to see attending Pentecostal church services every Sunday in Peckham. Tiffanie is in high spirits as she shows me to her new, shared studio space. It has been a few months since she gave me a tour of her amazing debut exhibition, “Metamorphosis,” at Something Gallery, and she has been working

prolifically ever since. The studio is spacious with natural lighting pouring south through a wide panoramic window, spotlighting several of Tiffanie’s works lined up against the studio walls. Tiffanie is gracious enough to show me some of the new pieces she is working on and explain the themes she is exploring and the significance they hold for her.

One piece, in particular, catches my attention and ignites my imagination. It’s an abstract depiction of her father; bejeweled with large crystals, and bold, vivid colors that remind me of the stained-glass windows of a catholic church. Tiffanie alludes to the symbolism of this piece, speaking to the duality of her father’s Belgo-Congolese heritage and his upbringing. Indeed, several of Tiffanie’s works reveal aspects of her personal life, experiences and evolution. From her strained relationship with her mother depicted in striking pieces like “Monsters,” to her evocative exploration of femininity, and sexual liberation in works like “Lobsters and Desire.” Tiffanie’s work is raw, emotionally charged and vulnerable, but above all else, it is freeing and oddly therapeutic. Amid the conflict, dichotomies and sometimes aggressive energy that pulsates from her work, there is a sense of harmony and peace that comes with

her acceptance and genuinely letting go. It’s as though through her cathartic expression, the viewer is invited to explore their innate demons and come to peace with their personal traumas and history. Impressed and intrigued by Tiffanie’s journey to date as an artist, and in light of her upcoming exhibition at 1:54 art fair represented by Ed Cross Fine Art, I ask her about what the road to this point in her career has been like. Tiffanie is upfront and open about her early grapples with the notion of being an artist, and finding herself and her purpose. Before moving to London from Paris in 2017, she had worked in the advertising industry, spent time working in Geneva and studied art history in Montreal before leaving to find her way, supporting herself through a string of odd jobs which afforded her the chance to perfect her now impeccable English. Her career as an artist began in earnest in 2018 after she received an unexpected invitation to become the first artist in residence at Gallery 16/16 in Victoria Island, Lagos, Nigeria. This opportunity would signal her first visit to the African continent, as well as prove to be the turning point in her fledgling career, resolving any doubts she had about being a serious artist with a bright future ahead of her. In the true spirit of universal law, once Tiffanie accepted her destiny greater opportunities were presented to page 115


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her, culminating in her first UK solo exhibition, and her representation by Ed Cross Fine Art, one of the most reputable specialists and dealers in Contemporary African art in London. With a few months to go before 1:54 art fair, the mecca of Contemporary

African art in London, if Tiffanie feels any pressure or is nervous, she certainly doesn’t show it. The anticipation and excitement are palpable as she indulges me in some of the pieces she is considering showing; all strong, bold works, that would wow the most astute art collector.

It’s obvious she is ready. Ready to make a name for herself, ready to take the art industry by storm, and ready to walk in her purpose. I, for one, cannot wait to witness the rise of a star.

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FRANCE'S FLYING MAN STUNS ON BASTILLE DAY

Has the future of personal aircraft arrived? And, is it sustainable? How will it be regulated and when will it be available? The topic raises more questions than answers, but as humanity draws nearer to personal aircraft, all things must be considered.

PRACTICE FLYING... BETWEEN FLIGHTS

A Japanese hotel debuted its latest in-room amenity and it may not be what you'd expect. Guests can book an experience with an in-room flight simulator at an airport hotel in Japan.

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UPCYCLED GOLD MEDALS

2020 TOKYO OLYMPICS MADE FROM CELL PHONES The Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic medals are entirely made from the metals extracted from almost 80,000 tons of old electronics, including more than 6 million cellphones. The Tokyo 2020 organizers collected old electronics in a two-year span, and extracted enough metals for approximately 5,000 Olympic and Paralympic gold, silver, and bronze medals. The 2020 Olympic and Paralympic games in Tokyo don’t start for another year, but Japan hasn’t wasted any time in getting the medals ready. Tokyo 2020 is making the gold, silver, and bronze medals entirely from 78,985 tons of recycled electronics, includ-

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ing 6.21 million recycled cellphones, according to the Tokyo 2020 Medal Project. It turns out that gadgets contain everything that’s needed to make the medals. Tokyo 2020 didn’t say if the ribbons were also made from the old electronics, but perhaps the recycled plastic could make for good ribbon material? I wouldn’t start tearing apart electronics to extract their precious metals, however. Of the nearly 80,000 tons of recycled gadgets, only 32 kilograms of gold, 3,500 kilograms of silver, and 2,200 kilograms of bronze (copper and zinc in this case) were extracted, according to Tokyo 2020. In two years, Tokyo 2020 extracted enough metal from old gadgets to make

approximately 5,000 Olympic and Paralympic medals. The Tokyo 2020 Medal Project — including Japanese mobile carrier NTT Docomo, which collected the cellphones — started collections between April 2017 and March 2019. In those two years, the project amassed enough relevant metal for approximately 5,000 Olympic and Paralympic medals. The recycling process included dismantling and sorting the gadgets as well as smelting and refining their parts until they turned into this: usable metals. In the case below, gold. Eventually, that gold would turn into this: the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic gold medal.


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TECH

The Tokyo 2020 Medal Project — including Japanese mobile carrier NTT Docomo, which collected the cellphones — started collections between April 2017 and March 2019. In those two years, the project amassed enough relevant metal for approximately 5,000 Olympic and Paralympic medals.

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COMING SOON: UNLIMITED HAIR NEW USES OF STEM CELLS AND 3D PRINTING MAKE BALDNESS OBSOLETE, BUT AT WHAT COST?

In the tunnels under New York, commuters squeeze into lumbering trains and try not to make eye contact with the people whose sweaty bodies are pressed against theirs. As they surrender to the will of the transit authority, their eyes wander upward to find an unlikely promise of control: Many cars are plastered with ads that say, “Balding is now optional.” These ads feature men in various states of elation. The men all have hair—and not simply the errant tufts that have appeared for years in infomercials for “hair restoration.” No, this hair comes in the form of thick, leonine coiffures. The ads are for a company called Hims, an online seller of the drugs finasteride and minoxidil (known by the trade names Propecia and Rogaine). page 128

The marketing copy implies there has been some sort of breakthrough in the science of hair loss. But Propecia and Rogaine have been available for decades. They have proved modestly effective at slowing hair loss, but they cannot entirely prevent or reverse it. Even for people who can afford $44 a month for the company’s hair-loss-drug package, balding is still not “optional.” The physiology of balding has long vexed even the most entrepreneurial of scientists. Despite a rare confluence of commercial forces and scientific interest, generating new hair remains outside the realm of the possible. This could be changing, though—and not owing to new packaging of the same old medicines. Recently a series of scientific publications has explored advances that involve both stem-cell research and 3-D printing, with the goal of cloning a person’s actual hair and then inserting it into his or her scalp—in tremendous, unlimited quantities. “For a long time, we’ve been saying this

is 10 years away,” says Robert Bernstein, a dermatologist in Manhattan who specializes in hair transplantation. “But now it actually might be less.” Of all the parts of the body to create in a lab, hair could seem like the simplest. It’s a strand of protein filaments wrapped around one another. Hair doesn’t have to “function” in the way of a liver or brain; it just has to sit around and grow and not fall out. But hair is much more complex to make than many researchers initially expected. To produce a single, hardy strand, the body relies on thousands of stem cells called dermal papillae at the base of each hair follicle. Human scalps contain about 100,000 hair follicles, but their life spans are limited: As dermal papillae disappear over time, follicles “miniaturize” and become dormant. (In this way, a bald person’s head still has hair, technically, but only in wiry strands that are the result of dormant follicles with only a few hundred dermal papillae.) When a hair follicle goes dormant, it


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cannot be restored. So any ads for hair “restoration” that you might see are actually ads for surgical transplantation of hair follicles—taking hair from one part of the scalp and moving it to another. The procedure can cost about $10,000, and its results are limited by how many vital hair follicles a person has available to move.

Last month at the annual meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, Hamilton recounted successfully transplanting human hair follicles into mice. Images he shared with me showed a small tuft of doll-like hair sticking off the back of a mouse—a distant cry from the luminous manes on the subway.

Doctors in some parts of the world will move a person’s body hair (back or underarm) onto his or her head, but most surgeons agree the aesthetic outcome is not pleasing. Conceivably, a person could have someone else’s hair put onto their own head, but that would require a blind eye to the ethics that prohibit the purchase of human organs.

These results are not necessarily long-lasting. “When you try to clone hair cells, over time they dedifferentiate and stop producing hair,” says Bernstein. “For a long time, no one could figure out why.” But researchers gradually solved the problem. Over the past few years, they noticed that cells spread out when they’re cultured; the follicular structure essentially melts away. “The epiphany was that if you can keep the cells together in their teardrop shape so they continue to signal each other, they continue to grow into hair follicles,” Bernstein says.

The answer, then, lies in generating new hair. This science is progressing alongside the creation of other bodily structures in what is known as cell therapy, a promising area of medicine in which therapies are derived from a person’s own stem cells. Pancreatic cells could replace those that stopped producing insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. Immune cells could be used to attack tumors. Nerve cells could be used to repair spinal-cord injuries. And, of course, hair follicles could be used to cover hairless skin. Using cells from a person’s own body minimizes the risk that the immune system will reject the hair transplants (as happened to Arrested Development’s Dr. Tobias Fünke). The ultimate goal among scientists is to create “hair farms,” as the entrepreneur Geoff Hamilton and others put it. Hamilton is the CEO of Stemson Therapeutics, a San Diego–based start-up that is working on cloning hair follicles. It involves growing hair from stem cells—not fetal, but stem cells derived from a person’s own skin or blood—and implanting hair follicles rich with dermal papillae into the space around a person’s old, shrunken, dormant follicles.

The shape of the follicle is also necessary just for keeping the hairs growing in the same direction. Hamilton’s colleague Alexey Terskikh learned this a few years ago, when his lab cloned human hair follicles and transplanted them into mice—only for many of the hairs to grow inward or sideways. Those that did sprout through the skin came out at all different angles. “Simply putting the follicle in the skin means a lot of ingrown hairs and lots of weird directions,” says Hamilton. Even slight differences in angle make hair look deeply unnatural. This discovery has launched a global arms race to generate sustainable hair follicles that will hold their shape. At the meeting last month, Hamilton’s group proposed one solution. It involves a synthetic scaffold, which Hamilton will describe only as proprietary. The scaffold would be implanted around the cloned follicle to direct the growth of the hair. Stemson Therapeutics recently partnered with

the pharmaceutical giant Allergan to develop this scaffold for cloned hair, and Hamilton says they expect to start a clinical trial in humans in about a year and a half. Meanwhile, Angela Christiano, a professor of genetics and dermatology at Columbia University, has used 3-D printing to generate a Jell-O mold that holds the follicle and dermal papillae in place as they differentiate into hair. Christiano reported the results in the journal Nature Communications last December, writing that the ability to regenerate an entire hair from cultured human cells “will have a transformative impact on the medical management of different types of alopecia, as well as chronic wounds.” Christiano, who has an autoimmune disorder that caused her body to attack the hair cells on her head, notes that though much attention around hair loss is paid to men, some 30 million women in the United States experience thinning of their hair. Bernstein believes the idea of a biodegradable synthetic guide is the most promising approach out there. “It’s a huge breakthrough,” he says. “There are many other factors that have to be worked out, but this certainly is really exciting.” At least for the people who can afford it. A head of hair has long been among the few things money can’t buy—a system beyond the control of rich and poor alike. Creating new hair for a person, follicle by follicle, in bespoke 3-D printed scaffolds, stands to be exorbitantly expensive. Though as technological develops costs should decline, hair regeneration will not likely be widely affordable. Even a wealthy country like the U.S. struggles to provide basic medical care for tens of millions of citizens. Balding could become “optional,” but only for the people with the means to make it so. page 129


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UNCOVERING

MYANMAR CEZAR KUSIK @cezareatsdirt Wine Contributor

I always wanted to visit Myanmar. I was a ferocious reader of travel non-fiction in my early adolescence; an affliction passed on to me by my father. World travel for regular people in communist Poland was unattainable for both political and economic reasons, so that was my way of satisfying my curiosity of the big, wide world. Myanmar—or Burma, as it was called until 1989—stuck out as a place of mystery, exotic culture and ethnic diversities. The recent history of Myanmar has been a tumultuously complicated one. It is a place where the struggle for democratic ideals has intermingled with military interference in governmental institutions and social life, leaving its political status vague. For the majority of the second half of the 20th century, Burma was in a political, economic and cultural lockdown; nearly nothing was allowed in or out. Tourism was practically

Myth, lore and... wine

banned. The army was in full control of all aspects of life, and complete isolationism was one of its tactics. Civil rights were violated on a daily basis. Domestic unrests—mainly of ethnic nature—were common occurrences, often leading to bloody cleansings. On the international stage, Myanmar was a hot potato, and despite other countries’ vocal objections and sanctions, nothing seemed to be changing. While most of the world was moving toward technological uniformity and economic globalization, Burma was kept in the dark; literally and figuratively. The 21st century appears to be kinder to Myanmar. In the last couple of decades, the army’s grip has loosened, and progressive tendencies have been on the upswing. Finally, in 2015, in the first truly democratic elections in 50 years, a non-military president was sworn in. The borders have been opened and international exchange on multiple levels is allowed. I recently traveled to Myanmar and spent two and a half weeks there. I visited three distinctly different parts of the country. Yangon, the largest city of Myanmar, was my first stop. At first look, with a population of over 7 million people, the city matches other South East Asian metropolises. It is busy and in your face! Seemingly lawless and uncontrollable vehicular and human traffic can give any visitor

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Myanmar

an anxiety attack. Intense contrasts of wealth and poverty make one question any sense of ethics they hold. Yet, Yangon feels gentler somehow. I never felt endangered while walking through some of the most unbeaten paths of the city and its suburbs. As a lone tourist with an expensive shoulder pack, I stood out like a sore thumb. People in Myanmar are generous, welcoming, considerate and engaging. There is a magnetic sincerity to them without superficiality and ulterior motivation. During purchase transactions at free-for-all local markets, there is a sense of decency and fairness to the vendors. I visited a flea market near Yangon where I easily, and without any discomfort, managed to walk away from an initiated transaction- something rather unheard of in other big cities in South East Asia. Twice I got stuck on the outskirts of Yangon; parts where tourists do not venture. While asking for directions, I

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was even offered bus money; not much even by their standards but definitely a heart-warming gesture. Buddhism is the dominant religion in Myanmar, with 80 percent of all people of faith in the country practicing the religion. Its presence is visible and felt everywhere. As a staunch opponent of institutional religions but a man of strong faith, I find Buddhism to be one of the most spiritually quenching, appeasing and noninvasive doctrines. It is not based on a threat or a false promise, but offers an interpretive vision of what life could be, rather than must be. That attitude is reflected in the people of Myanmar. The economy is going through a rapid and chaotic growth spree where infrastructure has a hard time keeping up with the population’s demands and their acquisitions; both the conditions and capacities of the roads in large cities are far from adequate for the volume of the traffic. The electronic communication

providers are having difficulties keeping up with the service needs of their customers. Internet and Wi-Fi connections can be spotty and unreliable. The flood of pop culture in the country is brutally evident, yet it seems to stand against the fairly conservative social values stemming out from the cultural and religious modesty. Decency in attire is still considered a fundamental virtue. Bagan, is a 450-mile, 10-hour trip from Yangon to Mandalay province, an adventure but not for the faint of heart. The only option currently is the bus, whose accommodations were surprisingly comfortable. The seats were spacious, offering a generous recline and the air conditioning worked almost too well, so the complimentary blanket came in handy, and we even had a bus attendant who must have seen the movie “View from the Top� with Gwyneth Paltrow. She took her job seriously. She walked through the bus in a neatly tailored uniform with the air of formal professionalism, distributing hand


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wipes, offering sodas and checking on passengers’ comfort. The condition of the roads was another matter. It was a bumpy ride as they say. So, sleep didn’t come easily. Bagan charmed me. In the first centuries of the second millennium, roughly between the year 1000 and 1250 nearly 10,000 stupas or Buddhist pagodas were erected by a number of kings of Bagan as a tribute to their newly adopted faith. They range from a few feet to hundreds of feet tall. Each is home to at least one statue of Buddha. Over 2,000 of these structures remain scattered over the vast area near the banks of Irrawaddy river. Architecturally, historically, and spiritually, it is a sight to remember. The locals practically live among these dramatic monuments. I rented a small, zippy electric scooter and buzzed between Old and New Bagan, stopping at local shops, slurping on noodles and off-roading to remote pagodas in search of an epiphany that never came. I stayed in Bagan for five days, and these were some of the carefree moments of my adulthood. Next came Inle Lake in Shan province.

It took another overnight bus ride to go from Bagan to Inle Lake. I got there early in the morning after another fairly comfortable trip. My hotel turned out to be almost an hour boat ride away from the bus stop. So, I hopped on and cruised through the early morning waters of the serene lake, watching the local fishermen casting their nets and scooping big gobs of freshwater seaweed while grebes dove and white cranes glided by. And yet again, it felt good to be on the move. While traveling, you’re often tempted by stagnation, by the deceiving comfort of routines. Mobility has always proven to be a good friend of mine. I spent four days in the area cruising through the narrow channels, stopping at local markets, restaurants and craft shops. A lotus flower silk shop was my favorite. Here, local women extract stems from the flowers. They weave their fibers into one of the most expensive fabrics in the world. It takes about 20,000 lotus stems and 40 days of skilled crafting to produce a square meter of the fabric. I also loved boat strolling through water gardens where the shallow waters of the lake are utilized to grow vine vege-

tables; predominately tomatoes. Are there wineries in Myanmar? That possibility never even occurred to me (presumption is the enemy of knowledge) until a friend of a friend who was showing me around Yangon took me to a supermarket. I spotted a wine section and felt that it was my sommelier’s duty to give it a quick look. The selection was decent, considering the society’s minimal interest and demand for wine. The usual suspects filled the shelves; some generic Bordeaux, a few offerings from Aussies and Kiwis, the ubiquitous Italians. One label looked completely unfamiliar, so I gave it a closer glance. “It’s ours. From Myanmar”, my guide announced. “What?” my surprise was genuine. “It comes from Shan province near Inle Lake,” he said. It was a red blend; Syrah, Tempranillo, Dornfelder. Later in the trip, I drank that red on a terrace of a hotel overlooking Inle Lake with a gorgeous Venice lawyer, Elisabeth, whose perfect features, mesmerized the locals. The wine was good in a simple, unpretentious way. It had a charming rusticity about it. An honest rough around the edges structure with spicy page 135


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flavors of brambly mountain fruit. There are only two wineries mentioned in any “wines of Myanmar” Internet research. Aythaya Vineyard and Red Mountain Estate Vineyards and Winery. Both properties located near Inle Lake. In climates like Myanmar’s, where heat can burn the grapes, and humidity promotes fungus, wine grape farming becomes an almost impossible undertaking. High elevation is the saving factor. Here at the altitude of 4,000 feet, the temperatures are more moderate, the air is drier, and the nights bring a cooling effect. Both wineries produce all three colors of dry wines. Red Mountain throws also a late harvest dessert wine based on Sauvignon Blanc. Myanmar is a perfect example of wine production’s global expansion. Due to climate changes and our constantly improving understanding of viticulture, vines are grown, and wines are made now in parts of the world where it was unthinkable in the past. The last leg of my visit to Myanmar was a two-day trek from Inle to Kalaw over the Shan Highlands. It humbled me. I went unprepared, without the proper shoes. My feet blistered on the first day during an intense 10-hour hike. Overnight I stayed at a house in Pa’O tribe village; sleeping on the floor. I didn’t get much rest, and the next day was even more painful. Despite the pain, I felt happy. I hiked through buffalo villages, rich mountain farmlands, and rice fields. The locals examined me with curiosity and amusement. Children waved and giggled. Traveling tests one’s capacity for vulnerability, a human feature that requires the most courage. Almost daily, you find yourself in an unfamiliar environment where you are left with no choice but to trust strangers with unforeseeable intentions. I call it a karmic litmus test; the energy you give, you’ll receive in return. page 136

Burmese food is marvelously diverse. Naturally, coastal areas (and Myanmar has 1,200 miles of coastline along Andaman Sea and Bay of Bengal) offers a lighter, seafood-based affair whereas inland provinces use poultry, pork, beef and mutton as their main source of protein. Watch out for mutton. In most of Asia, mutton is actually goat, so it is in Myanmar. Vegetables and spices abound. Myanmar has 135 different ethnic groups recognized by its government. Imagine the cultural richness it results in, food included. Myanmar’s cuisine is a true definition of fusion. The strongest influences come from their immediate neighbors: China, Thailand, India and Bangladesh. And then you have variations on variations, though there are dishes which are intrinsically Burmese and here are a few of my favorites. Mohinga. It is a noodle fish soup traditionally served for breakfast. Talk about a picker-upper! It’s delicious! Main ingredients include fish (usually catfish), noodles, fish paste, ginger, lemon grass, garlic and a boiled egg. Tea leaf salad or Laphet Thoke. I’m obsessed! I had at least one each day of my stay in Myanmar. It’s all a person needs, and it is damn good for you. Ingredients include fermented tea leaves, romaine lettuce, garlic, ginger, lentils, lemon juice, and seeds and nuts. Lots of them: peanuts, sunflower seeds, sesame, split peas. I like it spicy with small, green chilly peppers. Boom! Interpretations of this dish vary quite dramatically, making it even more enticing. Shan-style rice (nga htamin). Rice cooked with turmeric shaped into a disc and served with flakes of freshwater fish and garlic oil. The dish usually comes with sides of leek root and deep-fried pork rinds. Nan Gyi Thoke. One of the most famous dishes. Rice noodle salad with

chicken curry, boiled egg, and onions. Sounds simple? Yes, but often magic lies in simplicity. It’s absolutely delicious. Buthi Kyaw. Burmese cuisine offers an abundance of deep-fried dishes. This deep-fried gourd is simple and fulfilling. Crispy on the outside and sumptuously soft inside; a textural dish as I call it. Served with sweet and sour sauce. And finally, last but not the least, goat testicles. Oh yes! It is what it’s called. Usually served in curry sauce with some side dishes and ubiquitous rice, it’s like the Uni of Myanmar; either you like it or hate it. Guess what? I like Uni. Almost every meal I washed down with a local beer appropriately called Myanmar. Crisp, cold, and noncommittal; just the way I like them. To say that Myanmar is in the clear and on its way to a prosperous and peaceful future would be greatly misleading. The country has great potential, but its political and economic stability is tested daily. Signs of progress and democratic tendencies are encouraging, but they are far from ensuring long term stability. The army’s presence and influence are still strongly evident and ethnic conflicts far from over. There are also tensions on the borders—mainly with China. But if there is any country and its people I’ve visited in my travels that deserve peace and economic stability, in my book, it’s Myanmar. Closing thought- we are intellectually and emotionally regressing by relinquishing our spiritual needs and dumbing down our cerebral challenges. Tearjerking, provincial sentimentalities have become our epiphanies, ignorance powered by arrogance replaced subtleties of in-depth erudition. Glittery glamour and one-dimensional sensationalism is taking place of the immensely complex, mystically inspired human creativity. And the worst of it is that we don’t seem to mind it. On the contrary; we seem to encourage it.


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SPIRITUALITY DEFINING THE DIVINE

AUTHENTIC COMMUNICATION

BEING ASSERTIVE PART II

JYOTI PAINTEL-BOWLES @jyotipaintel Spirituality Contributor

In 2017 the former CEO of Tesla, Elon Musk, sent out a company-wide email to his employees on the topic of corporate bureaucracy titled “Communication within Tesla.” Musk, who is as much admired as he is criticized in the tech world for his visionary ideas, eccentricity and bold business style, went on to explain why communication hierarchy creates a toxic environment and impedes creativity. “Instead of a problem getting solved quickly, where a person in one department talks to a person in another department and makes the right thing happen, people are forced to talk to their manager who talks to their manager who talks to the manager in the other department who talks to some-

one on his team. Then the info has to flow back the other way again. This is incredibly dumb. Any manager who allows this to happen, let alone encourages it, will soon find themselves working at another company. No kidding.” I admire Musk’s innovative style and his desire to create a new approach to achieving an equitable corporate culture. I’m not sure how successful this was at Tesla, but I do have my suspicions that implementing such a radical communication practice was not as seamless as he had envisioned. For one, it is an assumption that an employee would feel free to go to a supervisor about a problem. In fact, most people are avoidant of any uncomfortable conversation or conflict, not to mention the fear of reprisal from management or colleagues for complaining. In closing his letter, Musk acknowledged that better communication could bridge a divide between employees and management.

“One final point is that managers should work hard to ensure that they are not creating silos within the company that create an 'us vs. them' mentality or impede communication in any way. This is unfortunately a natural tendency and needs to be actively fought.” This same communication problem is often mimicked in our personal relationships as well: We have something we need to express but fear the reaction of the other. When we can’t communicate without fear, we tend to separate ourselves and create emotional or physical barriers. As in most things in life, change takes courage and determination but being “seen and heard” is ultimately vital to our happiness and sense of fulfillment.

Aggressive, Passive or Assertive? No one person communicates the same way in every circumstance, but there are three types of communication styles that we will utilize based on the popular Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator: aggressive, passive and assertive. For the

“To be passive is to let others decide for you. To be aggressive is to decide for others. To be assertive is to decide for your self. And to trust that there is enough, that you are enough.” - Edith Eva Eger page 139


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SPIRITUALITY DEFINING THE DIVINE

AUTHENTIC COMMUNICATION BEING ASSERTIVE: PART II sake of this article, I will focus on the characteristics of assertive communication, as it is what we should strive for, but it is important to remember that life sometimes gives us situations where we need to adjust. Aggressive communication is unproductive as it largely ignores the needs of the listener, but there are times when it may be essential to use a more aggressive tactic: when there is a time-sensitive decision, an emergency, or when a fact is crucial to the conversation. On the same token being passive while communicating also has its benefits when applied to correct situation such as: when emotions are running high and returning to a place of calm will help regain perspective or when an issue is minor and/or impossible to change. Another key to understanding when and where to use passive communication is in situations where your power is considerably higher or lower than the person you are communicating with.

Assertiveness: The Key to Communicating with Intent Being Being an assertive communicator starts with some basic beliefs such as accepting that our input is as valuable as othpage 140

ers and that we don’t always have to win a situation to be right, but rather handle it effectively. Setting boundaries is essential when being an assertive communicator –setting some initial limits and expectations can prevent a conversation from getting derailed. Setting parameters is also helpful if the person you are communicating with tries to move on from an important point or change the subject without acknowledging what you have said. Instead of becoming upset or frustrated, acknowledge that the person might be uncomfortable. After you check in with their feelings, don’t be afraid to bring up the original issue again to ask for more clarity before moving on.

“Express yourself completely - then be quiet.” - Dao de Jing Being an assertive communicator only works well if we choose our words with intention, and then once we have made our point, we stop talking. When we speak with some measure and avoid excessive explaining about what we want or need, we have a better chance of keeping the listener engaged.

Communicating is a delicate process for most of us because it is a way of giving, receiving, and building trust between two people. If we want people to trust us, we must do our best to be nonjudgmental. When faced with a conflict or problem that doesn’t seem to have an immediate solution, an assertive person negotiates or makes compromises and uses language such as, “What are my options here?” giving others a chance to provide more options. Assertiveness in communication also means being proactive about not allowing negative feelings to build up. When we hide our upset feelings and let them later come up in some unexpected way, we are usually too sensitized and volatile to handle it gracefully. Don’t wait for the hard conversation to become unbearable – take steps now to pave the way for better relationships. The most authentic conversation you can have is with your heart. So then ask your heart, “what is it that you want to say?” Then, listen as if your whole life’s happiness depended on it, because actually, it does.


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COACH WINE: FUNCTIONAL TRAINING

ANAEROBIC OR AEROBIC

TRAINING FOR BURNING BELLY FAT

The entire balance of your bank account and all the tips on the Internet can't help if you don't follow some basic guidelines. MARK WINE CSCS, BA, USAW, PT, PES, CES @functionalmuscle Healthy Lifestyles Contributor

The best way to burn belly fat is through anaerobic high-intensity training (HIT). HIT consists of short and intense bouts of muscular contractions. HIT must be performed at a semi-large volume. However, the amount of work needed for HIT is significantly less and far more effective than aerobic exercise. Anaerobic interval training forces your body to burn fat to sustain high levels of intense training. Along with an extended energy burn 24 hours plus, post-workout (i.e. EPOC, which we will get into later), this metabolic

adaptation makes anaerobic training the best belly fat burning method. A study done in 2008 highlighted that a six-week anaerobic training program decreased the oxidation of carbohydrates, increased fat burning and built lean muscle. On the other hand, aerobic exercise activates pathways that breakdown muscle and activate carbohydrate burning first. Other research highlights HIT efficiency by showing fat burning in half the time than aerobic training. An example of that would be 30 minutes for HIT participants versus 60 minutes for aerobic participants. Another trait of anaerobic training is excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). EPOC is responsible for energy expenditure post-workout. EPOC is a result of muscle cells restor-

ing physiological factors within the cells post-workout, resulting in high energy expenditure, which leads to high amounts of fat burning. Physiological and hormonal factors are also critical components to body composition (i.e. fat loss). Two hormones that produce high levels of fat burning are growth hormone (GH) and adiponectin. Although both hormones are produced through heavy weightlifting, there are some training differences. GH, a fat burning and muscle restoring hormone, is released in vast quantities as a response to physical stress above the lactate threshold. The lactate threshold is when your muscles can no longer buffer out the hydrogen ions at the rate that they are accumulating during exercise. Adiponectin is released from fat tissue during powerful muscular contractions, say

during Olympic weightlifting, which produces substances like PGC1 that enhance metabolic functions. Regardless, both hormones are produced through anaerobic training programs. Anaerobic training is far more effective, less time committal, and far more challenging than aerobic training. Here are some TRAINING TIPS for body composition/belly fat loss: Compound Exercises – choose big lifts; like squats, pull ups, dead lifts, split squats, lunges, bench and other multi-joint lifts over isolation exercises. Eccentric Muscle Actions perform long, say three to four seconds, eccentric actions with an explosive concentric action. This is favorable in performing strength and GH responses. An eccentric action example is the downward motion of a squat or bench press. page 155


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ANAEROBIC OR AEROBIC

TRAINING FOR BURNING BELLY FAT A study done in 2008 highlighted that a six-week anaerobic training program decreased the oxidation of carbohydrates, increased fat burning and built lean muscle. Sled Style Training – sled pushing, tire flipping, sledgehammering and other forms of strongman work can be a great finishing HIT circuit that elevates fat burning; not to mention challenging and fun. Hill Sprints – the grade is favorable in building strength and elevating lactate (i.e. GH production); sprint up as fast as you can and jog down, perform this 10-20 times. Short Rest Periods – heavy weight and short rest periods produce drastic results. Cross-training performed correctly is superior at fat burning and muscle building. High Load Training – think heavy and you’ve got it right. Don’t be afraid to pick up near 85% 1RM loads and push or pull that around, as long as you can maintain your technique.

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M U S C L E

F I T N E S S page 157


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VOCABULARY MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE

JOEY VELEZ, MA, MBA @velezmentalperformance Wellness Contributor

Fundamentally changing something ingrained into our DNA at a subconscious level is a difficult task. The last time we met, we began the process of adjusting our vocabulary to reduce the amount of pressure we placed on ourselves. By utilizing the term “want” instead of “have” or “need,” we provide ourselves with motivation rather than stress. Not only does this change take time, but it also takes practice and continuous messaging to sink in fully. Therefore, we are going to present another fundamental change to our vocabulary; we are eliminating the word, “try.” Yoda, the wisest cinematic character ever created, once told Luke Skywalker, “Do, or do not. There is no try,” while discussing the phenomena of The Force. The meaning of this statement is that by saying “try”, you are implicitly stating that you lack confidence and that you are more likely to fail than succeed.

Personal Experience I rarely felt confident in anything that I did when I was in high school, especially with academics, never a strong suit for me. My reading comprehension was page 160

below average, my interest in studying minimal. Despite these circumstances, I became frustrated when I received poor grades. I went into exams with the “I’ll try my best,” mentality. When I failed those exams, I chastised myself, knowing that I just proved the fact that I was not smart enough. When I received a passing grade, I assumed that I did a phenomenal job at guessing. When people would tell me to try a new approach or a new way of doing things, I attempted them with extreme hesitancy out of fear of embarrassment. When I failed in those situations, I told myself, “I knew it,” and I thought of myself as a failure. On the other hand, when I succeeded, I told myself “You got lucky,” implying that there was no way to succeed without a fluke. It was not until later that I understood learning is a natural part of self-growth, and that failures and mistakes are prerequisites to learning. Once I began to “do” things instead of “trying” to do them, I noticed that I had started to toe the line of my comfort zone and was improving as a person by doing new things. I also began to realize how the word “try” was essentially me saying the word, “no.” •

For example, invitations to events I did not want to attend— my response was, “I’ll try.”

Thinking about going to the gym— my answer was “I’ll try.”

However, these responses conjured negative feelings. By telling my friends that I would try to make it, I knew I was lying to them—because I did not want

to go—and that was not how I wanted to be viewed. Setting time aside for the gym gave me an excuse to stay home and lie on the couch, which caused me frustration and disappointment. The simple act of removing one word from my vocabulary changed the world for me. I felt more truthful and trustworthy in my responses, and more motivated to go to the gym because it was something I wanted to do instead of something I wanted to try to do.

So, what can you do? Of course, continue utilizing mental cues that help you recognize and adjust your vocabulary, but another tool we can incorporate is visualizing ourselves “doing” an action with a desirable outcome. Visualization is creating or recreating an experience in your mind using your senses or describing a situation and your ideal response to that situation. Visualization can have a positive effect on the enhancement or learning of a new skill, building confidence. It can also correct skills after a mistake or be useful in implementing new strategies. For visualization to be most effective, we utilize as many of our senses as possible, making sure the images are positive, controlled, vivid and as close to real-time as possible. For practice, think about something you have been meaning to do, but have hesitated to tackle because you are scared, unsure or are lacking confi-


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MOLD YOUR MIND dence. Picture yourself completing that activity in an ideal fashion. What is it you would like to complete? How would you like to feel during and after? Picture yourself going through the activity with confidence and what it would feel like upon completion. Try to make the image as real and as clear as possible, with a positive outcome. By forming this image in your mind,

it creates a mental blueprint for the activity and can help increase your level of confidence going into it because you have visualized what to expect. You can use this information to push through mental hurdles and reach that euphoric feeling at the end of the activity that you envisioned.

Final thoughts I never thought about it until now, but

the slogan for Nike is so simple, yet compelling: Just Do It. That is how we should approach new opportunities. Just do it. Do not try and make time for the gym; make time for the gym. Not only does removing the word “try� from communication increase our motivation toward a particular task, but it helps us branch outside of our comfort zone to experience something new. page 161


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August 2019: It's Party Time... the season's best parties: Sandpolo (British Beach Polo) and Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic, plus, plan the ult...

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