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CONTENTS| Spring 2016

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CONTENTS | SPRING 2016

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60 How to Spend Summer 2016 in Haiti | 22 Before You Go Transportation Mango Season Bassin Blue Jet Ski Fresco in the Summer Fresh Coconut Street Art Haiti Gotten Safer La Coquille

Top 10 Haitian Business Leaders | 54 (Organized in Alphabetical Order) Mr. Belizaire, Junior Ms. Berry, Guylene Mr. Blemur, Anis Ms. Deglace, Evelyne Mr. Joseph, Max Dr. Latortue, Flore Mr. Noel, Rodney Mr. Odilon, Celestin Mr. Saint Surin, Alex Dr. Smith, Edwin

Haitian Business Pioneers | 46 Dr. Jules A. Cadet Dr. Franklin Casthely Mr. Jan Mapou

Dr. Rudolph Moise | 50 Inspirational Story (Exclusive)

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

Extras | 74

Andre Berto Anastagia Pierre Vicky Jeudy Meet Briana Roy Alex “China” Garcia Chef Alain Lemaire Elect Fayola Delica Rankonte T-Shirts

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From

Publisher

the

Publisher and Editor-in-Chief Jean Alfred Delva, 30 @alfred_haitiopen

W

elcome to Our Spring 2016 “Top 10 Haitian Business Leaders” Edition. Each year in spring, the magazine puts together a people edition to recognize and promote some of the talented leaders living in the Haitian Diaspora. Last year we ran a mainstream celebrities edition. This year we’ve chosen to profile a select group of business leaders from different fields in the South Florida market. It’s not a list based on who makes the most money. If that was the case, we’d be writing about a lot of lawyers, doctors and other folks with beaucoup money. The list is instead about one individual per profession who has been in the Haitian community for a while and making a difference.

Our Winter 2016 billboard ad – located on the I-95 to promote our “2015 Year in Review” edition – captured a lot of attention. This year, our ongoing advertising campaigns to help promote Haiti and the Haitian Diaspora at the highest (mainstream) level will continue with our “Top 10 Haitian Business Leaders” edition. We have 5 Metro Buses and 10 Bus Shelters from Little Haiti to Miami Gardens.

Our Summer 2016 issue – our “Top 10 Hotels in Haiti” edition – will feature informative, in-depth articles about insider access to destinations around Haiti. You’ll find our signature mix of smart advice, immersive photography, and expert reporting on hotels, restaurants, entertainment, culture, shopping, accommodation, top attractions, tour vehicles, transportation, communication, health services, security measures, and trends. Until then, #HAITIOPEN

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

“We hope their stories can inspire you.”

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Photographer

Photo Editor

and

Mackinley “Spex” Madhere of Spex Phototographic, @spexphoto

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pex is a collaboration of self-expression through the arts of photography, movement and color. At Spex we take your ideas, and bring meaning by advances them with creativity and imagination. Both of these components play a major role in human vitality, as humans creativity helps us deal with stress that is a major issues in today’s society, while provide room to unleash the inner you through the works of pictures and florescent colors. Photography is the main ingredient in our business. Our services include attraction, laughter and fulfillment after each photo shoot. Spex brings life, through vivid memories that are captured through the eyes of both the artist (photographer) and his muse (camera). They say a picture is worth a thousand words, well at Spex each image explicates beyond words, it is lifelong stories that give great details, through the process of imaginations and emotions. We provide goods known as love, from a wedding party, laughter from that sweet sixteen you attended and accomplishments from that graduation day celebration. In other words we keep and preserved precious moments in life not only for a while but a lifetime.

Go big or go home and I mean BIG. My goals include expanding within the community. My philosophy with any business is to start from home and branch out. One of my goals is to provide job and internship opportunities for our young. At Spex, we are all about beauty, character and advancements, what better way to do that then to start from home and branch out. I want Spex to be like a museum, you see how inside of a museum there are all sorts of painting, statues and pictures. Spex would be the museum, while all the adolescents would be my displays. I want to use my business as an aid to the community while making my dreams of advancing Spex, into an upper division market, creating more employment opportunity while still bringing smiles and creating stories. HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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Writer

and Director of

Public

R

elations

Sarah Brutus of SARAH PR @sarahprworldwide

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Greetings,

H

aving the opportunity to individually interview and spend time getting to know these influential individuals that have made significant contributions to our community has been a truly inspiring experience. Each individual has had their own plight and has become successful in their own right. They were able to overcome various obstacle and with their unwavering persistence they have become the top producing members in their field. They were not discouraged by the difficult situations that they face and he naysayers. Instead they challenged themselves to think outside the box pushing the envelope to dominate their field. These ten individuals each present a unique story of triumph. One undoubted overall theme you will find as a reader is passion. Each and every one of the interviewees have exhibited nothing less than a passion for the work that they do every day. This has allowed them to be focused on the bigger picture despite all odds. I encourage you to carefully read each story and be open to the inspiration and motivation that it contains. Be inspired to create. Be inspired to be fearless. Be inspired to be persistent. Be encouraged. Nothing is impossible. Nothing is unattainable. Focus on your vision and you vision alone. You have been given a gift. Become an ordinary person that does extraordinary things. Life is about experiences both good and bad. As the owner of SARAH PR I have gained valuable insight into what is needed to continue to grow and be successful as business owner and entrepreneur. My hope for you as the reader is that you will gain the same guidance that will translate in you day to day life. My final thoughts: No matter what you do, be the BEST at it. All the Best,  Sarah 

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CONTRIBUTORS Cover with Dr. Rudolph Moise: Photo: Mackinley “ Spex” Madhere @spexphoto Makeup: Nathalie @picaasso Graphic: Mendes Chevalier @mendes_1812 Videopgrapher: Junior Dieubon @jd.productionss Layout: Mohammad “MA” Alaudin Photographers: Johnny Redlight Photos Stephanie Trapp Jamie McCarthy Frazer Harrison Jashua Dwain Renee Kaiser Daniel Lentz Steve Bennett Writers: Sarah Brutus Megan Collier Christine Winters Sandra Chan Shannon Bullman Ron Stern Raluca Velker Vladimir Milojevic

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 21 ÂŤ

on m e v Sa and go

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HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016 ÂŤ Info@xumba.com


« Photo by Daniel Lentz

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TAKE A PIECE OF HAITI WITH YOU HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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Going to Haiti Tips

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Before You Go,

Getting There, and While You Are There By Sandra Chan

BEFORE YOU GO

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. Know what you want to do. Before you book your trip to Haiti, ask yourself what you want to do while you are there. If you prefer a Haitian resort experience, then you may want to head to La Côte des Arcadins, where you can enjoy the beaches and water sports. On

the other hand, if you would like to learn more about the Haitian culture, then you may enjoy checking out the French colonial era architecture and colorful carnival in the city of Jacmel.

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. Hunt for the best deal. Check out all the hotels and resorts listed on HaitiOpen.com to see if they offer any discounted rates. Many hotels offer early bird specials for guests who book in advance. Even if you don’t see any advertised discounts on the hotel/resort listing page, you can contact each hotel and resort to see if they can offer you a deal if you stay multiple nights. “If you are not already a member of HaitiOpen.com, join now and start collecting OpenExperience Points. You can redeem these points for discounts on hotels, resorts, restaurants, and attractions.”

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Haiti is gaining popularity as a tourist destination, and if you are considering taking a summer vacation to this little gem in the Caribbean, here are some tips and tricks that will make your trip smooth and stress-free.

. Budget your activities. If you already know which

attractions you’ll be visiting, you can check out their prices and opening hours in advance. If you can’t find the info online, contact your hotel or resort and they can usually help you out. If there are activities that you want to participate in, you may book in advance as sometimes you can get a better rate if you pre-book them. In addition, if you plan to use your credit cards on your trip, make sure that they are accepted.

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. Charge your electronic devices. If you plan to travel with

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your electronic devices, including your cell phone, tablet, laptop computer, or camera, charge them beforehand. If you have an extra battery for your camera, bring it.

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. Share your plan. Share your travel plan to Haiti with someone at home and make sure that they have a way to contact you in case of emergency.

GETTING THERE

. Arrange for transportation. If you’ve never been to Haiti before and don’t speak the language, it is best for you to arrange for airport pickup. Most resorts and hotels in Haiti can pick you up at the airport for a fee. If you are a bit more adventurous and would like to have your own transportation while you are in Haiti, you can rent a car at the airport. You can find car rental companies such as Hertz, Avis and Budget at the airport. Don’t forget to provide the car rental company with your OpenExperience Points

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.Wait in the airport. If your hotel is picking you up at the airport, wait at the designated area in the airport until your driver arrives.

WHILE YOU ARE THERE

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. Check in at the hotel. When you check in at the hotel, ask about additional fees on top of your room rate. Some hotels may charge extra for amenities such as Wi-Fi, telephone calls, bottled water, and snacks. Make sure that you know about all the fees or you may be surprised when you receive your bill. You may be able to negotiate with the hotel to waive some of the fees if you stay for multiple nights. Check the hotel’s loyalty program, and you can use your OpenExperience Points vouchers for discounts.

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. Check in with people at home. Once you have checked in at your hotel, it’s time to check in with your friends and family at home. Let them know that you are safe.

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. Exchange for local currency. It’s always handy to have local currency with you, and most hotels offer currency exchange service. It’s also a good idea to ask your hotel about places where you can exchange money safely in case you run out of local currency while you’re out.

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. Tip like a pro. When people provide you with good services, don’t forget to tip them. A simple gesture of appreciation can make someone’s day.

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. Enjoy your stay. Go ahead and enjoy your activities as planned. If you want to take part in an unplanned activity, check with your hotel to make sure that it is safe. Also, let your family back home know about the change in itinerary.

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. Review. Leave reviews on HaitiOpen.com. Your reviews will help other travelers have a better experience when visiting Haiti.

“Enjoy your stay. Go ahead and enjoy your activities as planned”

Photo by Jashua Dwain

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voucher from your HaitiOpen.com for discounts.

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HAITI GOTTEN SAFER FOR TRAVELERS? See Why It’s one of the Safest Countries in the Americas to Travel By Megan Collier

According to the UNODC study that took place in 2012, Haiti is home to one of the lowest violence and crime rates throughout all of the Americas. And Haiti has gotten only better. With a homicide rate of 6.9 out of every 100,000 Haitians, Haiti carries the same exact rate as Long Beach in California, USA. This is all thanks to the consistently strong focus on the strengthening and modernization of the country’s security forces.

“With a homicide rate of 6.9 out of every 100,000 Haitians, Haiti carries the same exact rate as Long Beach in California, USA.” HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

“Compared to several other countries and nations throughout Latin America, Haiti is among the top safest ones…” With more law enforcers throughout the country, there has been a dramatic decrease in the violence and crime rates, making the country as a whole much more safe for both residents and tourists alike.

Compared to several other countries and nations throughout Latin America, Haiti is among the top safest ones with very little corruption and inefficiencies. In fact, a recent poll that was conducted locally within Haiti brought about the fact that Haitians are generally much more concerned with economic issues such as the cost of living, than with any crime issues taking place.

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Connect Card

« www.hra-intl.org

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« Photo by Renee Kaiser

Experiencing Haiti by

Jet Ski By Vladimir Milojevic and Megan Collier

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f you have yet to ride a Jet Ski in Haiti, then you are missing out on a serious adventure of a lifetime. Imagine zooming through the waters of the Caribbean and breathing in that salty ocean air while the rest of the world passes you by.

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Organized or individual exploring of the natural beauty of Haiti and the Haitian coast is a unique experience that tourists love to “take home”. Trips to Montrouis, hidden beaches, caves, the natural beauty of the Haitian coast, have never been easier to visit. In Haiti there are countless

“Trips to Montrouis, hidden beaches, caves, the natural beauty of the Haitian coast, have never been easier to visit.”

agencies and organizers of various excursions and water activities. Over time, driving Jet Ski really stood out as something the visitors of Haiti, especially ones that came to Montrouis, often singled out as a favorite activity.

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“Montrouis is a city in the western part of Haiti and is located right on the coast. It is only some 70 km from capital, Port-au-Prince, so those who are already visiting the capital can easily get to this there.”

Recently, a company called ‘Jet Ski Haiti’ has taken over and now offers Jet Ski rentals through all of the major resorts you will find along the coast of La Côte des Arcadins. With the latest and greatest Jet Ski models, you will find yourself cruising through the waters solo or with a partner in no time at all. All that you need to do is choose from one of the many vibrant and colorful Jet Skis of your choice and decide how much time you want to

” [Jet Ski]… gives you a chance to get away from the crowds and simply take in all that Haiti and its beautiful waters have to offer. “ HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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“For adventure, thrill and a unique feeling of excitement, don’t miss out on your opportunity to Jet Ski through the stunning waters just off the shores of beautiful Haiti.”

spend out on the waters and get to cruising!

For most travelers that make their way to Haiti, they want to do something that is out of their typical routine back home and something that will get their blood pumping, heart racing and put a huge smile on their face. If this is you, then there

really is no better way to get that accomplished than hopping on a Jet Ski and having the time of your life. It gives you a chance to get away from the crowds and simply take in all that Haiti and its beautiful waters have to offer.

For those vacationers who are traveling with kids, this is a great way to ensure they also have an exciting and memorable experience during their time in Haiti. As a parent or older sibling, you can take hold of the controls and steering while they sit behind you and hold on tight. You can almost guarantee they won’t want to head back to shore anytime soon!

If you are in Haiti with a large group, why not rent out a whole line of Jet Skis and head out to the waters together? This is an excellent way to make sure everyone is having a great time and a special way to create memories that no one will soon forget. OpenExperience Tips:

Best Place to Jet Ski: La Côte des Arcadins, Ile La Gonâve Available Discounts: Use your OpenExperience Points

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« Photo: Mango market in Les Gonaïves

VISITI

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W

hile tourists are familiar with Haiti for its architecture and pristine beaches, many may not realize that Haiti is also renowned for its mangoes. Summertime is mango season and with the unique varieties and delicious flavors, a trip dedicated to these beauties is well worth the journey.

Aside from their taste, mangoes are a fruit that everyone could use a little more of within their diet. According to nutritional and scientific studies, this fruit possess properties that help fight cancer, keep off excess weight, aid in alkalizing the body,

ING HAITI

“[Mango Fransisque] … is the primary type shipped globally and although other countries have tried to grow them, they all have been largely unsuccessful.” The peak season for Haitian mangoes is from May until July and the Francis variety as well as many others can be found all over the country. During this time, street vendors can be found lining the road ways with these juicy fruits for sale. Most of them can be found in the central and northern regions of the country, especially in Leogane and Gros Moine. It is here that the soil

FOR MANGO SEASON

By Shannon Bullman

clear up skin, control diabetes and helps with digestion. According to studies, one cup of mangoes holds vitamins C, A, B6 and also healthy percentages of copper, potassium and magnesium.

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If you love mangoes and want to taste them from the source, head to Haiti during the summer season to eat your weight in these juicy and delicious fruits. OpenExperience Tips:

is said to be ideal for the plant’s growth and the trees can be seen in abundance.

Best places to find Mango Fransique: Léogâne and Gros Moine Peak season: May through July

Haiti has many varieties of mangoes but the most well known and loved is the Francisque, also called Francis or Francine. This type is the primary variety shipped globally and although other countries have tried to grow them, they all have been largely unsuccessful. The flavor of the Francis mango can be described as spicy, sweet and rich with a juicy, soft and fibrous texture. They are bright yellow with green tones and can be gently squeezed to determine if they are ripe enough to eat. HaitiOpen.com HaitiOpen.com | Summer | Spring 2016 2015

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Fresco “Snow Cones” in the summer By Megan Collier If there is one thing that rings true throughout nearly the entire year in Haiti, it is that the sunshine is both very hot and very intense. Although there are plenty of options on ice-cold refreshing beverages near almost every beach and hotel property at bars and restaurants, there is one that seems to set itself apart from the rest. That beverage would be the icey and ohso-delightful Fresco, also commonly referred to by many as a “snow cone”. If you find yourself a bit parched while out exploring beautiful Haiti and want to switch up your drink preference to something non-alcoholic and just as tasty as your favorite cocktail or soda, be sure to give Fresco a try. It has become a long-time favorite amongst both locals and travelers where the entire group of friends or family full of thirsty little ones can head out and enjoy!

You may very well find that many of the Frescos you see along the streets in carts come with peanuts served on top and although it may seem like a rather strange combination at first, dig right in! If you end up loving the Frescos like so many tend to do, you can even make them back home with a combination of shaved ice, grenadine or your favorite syrup topped with a handful of grilled peanuts! HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

If you end up loving the Frescos like so many tend to do, you can even make them back home with a combination of shaved ice, grenadine or your favorite syrup topped with a handful of grilled peanuts!

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Discovering Bassin-Bleu PARADISE ON EARTH IN JACMEL By Megan Collier and Raluca Velker If Bassin Bleu is yet to be added to your top world destination bucket list, then it is highly suggested that you soon revise your list with this place being towards the top. Imagine journeying through by Jeep making your way past lush jungles, trees that you never knew HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

existed and unspoilt lands while at last you reach what is known to be one of Haiti’s most precious gems. A place that you may have only believed to exist in movies and those Discovery Channel shows that make it seem near impossible to get to.

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“Imagine journeying through by Jeep making your way past lush jungles, trees that you never knew existed and unspoilt lands while at last you reach what is known to be one of Haiti’s most precious gems.”

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A PICTURE PERFECT PLACE WAITING TO BE EXPLORED

Well, luckily for you this place is absolutely reachable and somewhere you will be thanking your lucky stars that you decided to take the long journey to get to it. Bassin Bleu consists of a series of bright turquoise colored wading pools all made of fresh water that is perfect for cooling off after a long day in that hot Haitian sun. The first stop is Bassin Cheval where visitors will find themselves surrounded by a combination of gorgeous pools and shallow falls all calling their names. You will find it near the city of Jacmel, in the South East part of Haiti. But don’t expect to find it in downtown, as it is a beautiful natural gem that awaits hidden in the forests uphill to the city. So your journey to the Bassin will be a perfect opportunity to witness the incredible natural sceneries, flora and fauna of Haiti; a relaxing hiking activity in the middle of nature. And once you hit the spot, you will know you are there.

MAKE LIKE TARZAN & GRAB A ROPE

Having a guide alongside you, next is quite possibly the most adventurous and fun of it all where you will be told to remove your shoes and proceed to propel down a rock using a rope. Once you’ve got your heart thumping, you’ll soon forget the slight panic you felt gripping onto the rope as you look up and feast your eyes upon one of Haiti’s most breathtaking sceneries. A series of three different pools all 4-8 feet deep are there for you to explore, bathe in and for the brave ones, even jump right into. “A series of three different pools all 4-8 feet deep are there for you to explore, bathe in and for the brave ones, even jump right into.”

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“Join the small list of lucky travelers who can say they’ve swam and explored one of the most beautiful places in all of Haiti.” A PLACE YOU WILL SURELY NEVER FORGET Being able to experience such pure and unspoilt natural beauty in such an up close and personal way is something that you will surely not soon forget. Though many visitors to Haiti believe the journey alone is reason not to visit this incredible wonder, you can be certain that if you do decide to make the journey up with the help of a local guide, it will be an experience and adventure of a lifetime that many cannot say they have ever experience. Join the small list of lucky travelers who can say they’ve swam and explored one of the most beautiful places in all of Haiti. OpenExperience Tips:

#1 attraction in Jacmel with 4.5 stars on TripAdvisor, and received the coveted “Certificate of Excellence” as an excellent thing to do Visit HaitiOpen.com for more details on Bassin Blue

HaitiOpen.com HaitiOpen.com | Summer | Spring 2015 2016

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Refreshing Kokoye “Coconut” on the Spot By Megan Collier If shaved ice with syrup and peanuts you find is really not your thing, consider exploring the other popular and still just as refreshing drink of Kokoye. You may find that this word seems to appear everywhere in Haiti, with even a beach named Kokoye Beach along with several restaurants and bars. The meaning of the word is in fact, ‘coconut’ and therefore, when you hear a man or a woman selling icecold Kokoye, they mean ice-cold coconuts! Picked right from the tree most likely that same morning, you can sip on the very sweet, tasty and refreshing coconut juice straight from the coconut itself. Ordering them is half the fun as you will see the man or woman selling the Kokoye with a rather large machete-looking knife they use to chop away three different angles of the coconut making a hole in which you can then drink out of.

If you are hoping for an adult beverage, you may get lucky enough to find the combination of the two with a Kokeye and its juice mixed with some alcohol inside, providing you with a tasty alternative. No matter how you decide to drink your Kokeye, it is a true treat and something you will not want to pass up while spending time in beautiful Haiti.

Picked right from the tree most likely that same morning, you can sip on the very sweet, tasty and refreshing coconut juice straight from the coconut itself.

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…courtesy shuttles or taxis provided by hotels or resorts… are probably the most convenient types of transportation for you as a first time visitor…

Transportation What Are Your Options for Getting in-and-around when in Haiti?

A

By Raluca Velker and Jean Alfred Delva

vailability and convenience of transportation plays a big part of any travel destination. And Haiti’s transportation system could seem as peculiar, if one does not plan ahead. If it’s your first time visiting Haiti, we’d suggest starting with transportation option #1 and option #2 on second or third visits, until you can graduate to getting in-and-around Haiti on your own. Option #1 will be the courtesy shuttles or taxis provided by hotels or resorts. These are probably the most convenient types of transportation for you as a first time

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

visitor. Call your chosen hotel/resort in advance to request courtesy transportation from the airport; preferably when making your reservation or at least a day or two before your visit.

If you are the more adventurous type and wish to get the pulse of the area where you’re spending your time, then don’t hesitate to use public transport, option #2. Buses are a great option that will not harm your vacation budget. But do be prepared, as buses in Haiti function by a different set of rules than you might have been accustomed to. If you’ll choose to use the buses to get to your destination, you need to do a little research and see what bus, and in which station, will take you there. Also, buses here do not work following a particular schedule, as the driver will wait for the vehicle to be full before leaving. Thus, you should be prepared to hang on a little. Still, it is a very picturesque way to get around and enjoy a time without measurement. And finally, there is the car rental option #3. This is probably the most expensive transportation version in Haiti, and probably in any country. A valid driver’s license for this form of transportation is mandatory, and you’ll need to meet a few requirements and conditions set by the car rental companies: Avis, Hertz and Budget.

Catching a Tap Tap in Port-au-Prince

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La Coquille Restaurant, in Pétionville By Ron Stern

The place: La Coquille Restaurant is situated at 10, Rue Rebecca in Pétionville, one of the wealthier suburbs of Port-au-Prince. The restaurant takes both Visa and Mastercard. For reservations, call 011 509 29 42 5225.

The location: La Coquille is open every day, but its hours vary. From Tuesday throughout Friday it serves breakfast from 7 am to 10:30, and then opens again from noon to 4:45 for its signature lunch buffet. On Sunday it is open from 8 until noon. Guests can take advantage of both street parking as well as a parking lot, or walk from the nearby hotels Royal Oasis and El Rancho. “The atmosphere of La Coquille is festive and befits its name of “the Rooster.”

Atmosphere: The atmosphere of La Coquille is festive and befits its name of “the Rooster.” The entry arch is incandescent yellow, and the chairs ranged around the tables are bright red. The walls are lined with art. Outdoor seating is equally as colorful, with tables and chairs underneath a wooden awning to protect from the sun. Culture: La Coquille serves a buffet style lunch. Guests enjoy the easyHaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

going, colorful atmosphere which is ideal for families. This is a great opportunity for foodies to try a wide variety of authentic Haitian dishes. Their specialties include spicy chicken wings, and for dessert, coconut dous.

“This is a great opportunity for foodies to try a wide variety of authentic Haitian dishes. Their specialties include spicy chicken wings, and for dessert, coconut dous.”

Their specialties include spicy chicken wings, and for dessert, coconut dous.

People: As with any successful restaurant, the service staff is one

of the key ingredients. Friendly, knowledgeable waiters are an essential part of the experience to ensure that guests enjoy their food and leave knowing that they will return the next time they are in the area.

Reviews: La Coquille Restaurant has a positive ranking on TripAdvisor, with guests commenting on the quality and variety of the dishes and the friendly service. OpenExperience Tips: #10 ranked Restaurant in Pétionville with 4 Stars on TripAdvisor Visit HaitiOpen.com for more details on La Coquille

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HAITIAN BUSINESS PIONEERS DR. JULES A CADET

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Photo by Julie Cadet

ESTABLISHED SINCE 1975 BROUGHT A LOT OF OTHER DOCTORS INTO THE HAITIAN COMMUNITY STILL SEEING PATIENTS

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HAITIAN BUSINESS PIONEERS DR. FRANKLIN CASTHELY

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Photo by Jean Alfred Delva

ESTABLISHED SINCE 1980 FORMER HARVARD PROFESSOR AND ALUMNI STILL SEEING PATIENTS


48 Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism

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HAITIAN BUSINESS PIONEERS MR. JAN MAPOU

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Photo by Jean Alfred Delva

ESTABLISHED SINCE 1990 A PIONEER OF THE HAITIAN CREOLE LANGUAGE SINCE 1965 STILL PROMOTING CREOLE

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016


Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 49 «

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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50 Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism

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Dr. Rudolph Moise Inspirational Sto

On Becoming a Doctor, Lawyer, Pilot, Actor, an Getting an MBA By Sarah Brutus

Q: WHERE WERE YOU BORN?

A: I was born in Port Au Prince, Haiti. I grew up in

Haiti until the age of 17. Then I came to the United States and lived in Chicago, where I went to college and medical school.

Q: WHERE DID YOU GO TO SCHOOL?

A: I went to college at the University of Illinois in

Chicago, where I received my Bachelors degree. Then I applied and got into medical school in Chicago as well. Going to medical school was very expensive. My parents didn’t have any money. So I got a scholarship from the US government that would pay my schooling if after I was done I would work in an underserved area. When they asked me where I wanted to go, I suggested Miami. At the time a lot of refugees were coming in, and since I spoke the language I would be the most helpful there. So I was placed to work at the Borinquen Clinic, and I worked there for 4 years.

Q: WHAT EFFECT DID THAT EXPERIENCE HAVE ON YOU?

A: Working there allowed me to really start getting

involved in the community and different organizations that focused on Haitian culture and advancement. In Chicago we didn’t have that, so it was a very exciting experience. After my 4 years of service, I was asked if I wanted to return to Chicago, and I decided to stay in Miami.

“When they asked me where I wanted to go, I suggested Miami. At the time a lot of refugees were coming in and since I spoke the language I would be the most helpful there.” HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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ory

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 51 « Q: WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST JOB?

A:

When I was in college, I worked in a nursing home in the kitchen, doing dishes and mopping floors and I did it very well. I always tell people it’s not the kind of job that you, do but making sure that you do it well. They promoted me into taking care of the patients. That is how I developed passion for my patients. My second job was working in a shoe store. I used to do that during the summer. I did everything. Q: HOW DID YOU START YOUR MEDICAL PRACTICE?

A: The original office was a small

part of a shopping center. The doctor

who owned it was retiring and I told him I was interested in purchasing the office from him. I came up with a down-payment and he financed the rest for me. The practice kept growing and growing, and eventually I bought the entire shopping center to expand my practice.

Q: WHERE DO YOU SEE THE FUTURE OF YOUR MEDICAL PRACTICE?

A: I am actually in the process of building a 12,000-square-foot facility where I am going to move my current practice. I will use my current building as a multipurpose facility that will have dental, eye exams and so on. That way this will be a one-stop shop for patients. I really enjoy seeing my patients and I want to continue to do that for as long as I can. Q: WHAT HAS BEEN AN AIDING FACTOR IN YOUR SUCCESS?

A:

The community has really supported me over the years. If it wasn’t for them, I would not be so successful in my practice. I also think every time someone told me I couldn’t do something, they created a driving force for me to prove them wrong and that I was able to do it. Q: TELL US ABOUT OTHER DEGREES THAT YOU HOLD.

“When I was in college, I worked in a nursing home in the kitchen doing dishes and mopping floors, and I did it very well.”

“The community has really supported me over the years. If it wasn’t for them, I would not be so successful in my practice.”

A: After I opened my practice, I a

doctor friend of mine told me that he was taking classes for an MBA at the University of Miami. I decided to take some classes as well, because medical school doesn’t teach you anything about running the business of a clinic. While I was in my MBA program, I took a health law class and found it to be very interesting. I was single at the time, so I decided to invest my time into getting another degree. So I also completed my law degree. It took me about three years. I would practice as a doctor during the day and go to school at night until I completed my law degree. I don’t practice fully, but occasionally I will be called in as an expert witness to give testimony in court.

Q: TELL US ABOUT YOUR TIME IN THE MILITARY.

A:

Since this country has been so good to me, I decided the best way to give back was to join the military as a reservist. I joined the Air Force. I retired 2 years ago. I was a flight surgeon. It’s a physician pilot and we would fly F-16 planes. I would take over the plane if something happened to the main pilot. I served on the homestead base. I became a colonel as well. Q: DESCRIBE YOUR INTEREST IN POLITICS.

A: I ran for the US Congress twice. I got very close to winning the seat. I may decide to go back into politics

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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52 Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism

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“As a professional you can make a decent living, but that does not automatically make you rich. However, you can take the income you make and invest it into meaningful projects that can help you grow your finances.”

in the future. I’m not sure, but I love my community and would like to serve the community in any capacity that I can. I’m not doing it for myself. But serving community is a calling. There’s a lot of problems in the community. I believe that I can make a significant contribution to change the direction the community is going in.

Q: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE SOMEONE WHO WOULD LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY?

A: There are a lot of great

organizations out there that are doing amazing things. Choose one that you really like and that you are passionate about, and join it and participate. Choose one where you can make a difference. One where you can give your time and do it in a significant way.

Q: HOW DID YOU GET STARTED IN MOVIES?

A: Growing up, I loved to watch

movies with Elvis Presley and Johnny Holiday. I used to stare in the mirror and act by myself, and my family used to think I was crazy. I did a few commercials. Then one day this gentleman came to me and said he was doing a movie and he was looking for someone with my profile. I thought he was kidding. I went to the casting. I was cast. It was a great movie – Wind of Desire. People always recognize me from that movie. I get more recognition from that than being a physician, and I have been a physician all my life. I went on and produced some of my own movies. I have done a total of 5 movies. I also did American movies.

them are very smart. We are raising and guiding them to be productive members of society. My son wants to go into finance. My daughter wants to be a veterinarian. Q: WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE TO A YOUNG PERSON TRYING TO GROW THEIR WEALTH?

A:

As a professional you can make a decent living, but that does not automatically make you rich. However, you can take the income you make and invest it into meaningful projects that can help you grow your finances. You have to choose the right project. I only invest in projects where I know the people personally. Sometimes you lose, but there a lot of opportunities to gain. Invest in something you know and something you have done your research on.  Q: WHAT IS THE BEST ADVICE YOU WOULD GIVE TO A YOUNG PERSON WHO LOOKS UP TO YOU?

A: That’s a great question. I always

try to participate and speak at school fairs so I can speak to the children. I tell them that they should at least make the effort and get 1 degree – at least one – because education is really power. People can take things from you, but they cannot take your knowledge. Also, everyone needs a great role model. I mentor and help a lot of students with recommendation letters. Also, respect your parents and teachers. Don’t take them for granted. They are there for you and want the best for you.

Q: TELL US ABOUT YOUR FAMILY.

A:

I’m married. I met my wife here are my office. She’s a very smart lady, a nurse. I’ve been married now for 16 years. I have 2 wonderful children. My daughter, Mya, is 11 and my son, Rudy Jr., is 14. Both of HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

“People can take things from you, but they cannot take your knowledge.”

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 53 «

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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54 Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism

Junior “DJ 5 Etwal” Belizaire

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THE HAITIAN NIGHTLIFE KING OF SOUTH FLORIDA By Sarah Brutus

From Delivering Pizza to Delivering Hit Music that Keeps the Gouyad Going, All Night Long Q: WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

A: Port Au Prince, Haiti. I came to the United States in 1994 and started high school at Miami Edison Sr. High. Q: WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST JOB?

A: My first job was working at this place called Pizza Palace as a pizza-maker and delivery boy. After a while, because I was such a good worker, I became the manager. I worked there for about 4 years. Q: HOW DID YOU GET INTO DJING?

A: I used to party a lot during my high school years, and after I graduated we had a little network of friends that would just find house parties and crash them. One day at a party, someone came up to me and was like, “You’re at every party and you love music, you should become a DJ.” So at the time, I went to the owner of the pizza place where I was working and told him about my plan to become a DJ. I told him I needed his help to get the equipment, and he agreed and advanced me $1000.00. From there I played around with the equipment. I’m a self-taught DJ. Q: WHAT MAKES YOU DIFFERENT AS A DJ?

A: I would say my style is unique. It’s something I created on my own. I just learned. Most of my success came when the computer

“My first job was working at this place called Pizza Palace as a pizza maker and delivery boy.” HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 55 « age of DJing became popular. When I discovered mixing software, it set me apart. When I first started using a computer to DJ, people would look at me weird and ask me what I was doing. They used to laugh at me and say I’m not a real DJ.

Q: HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE NAME DJ 5ETWAL?

A: The reason I have this name is because I told myself if I’m going to be a DJ, I’m not going to sell myself short. My name means 5 star, which is the highest rating. I would say there’s the influence of the Barbancourt drink as well. Q: HOW DID YOU GET YOUR NAME OUT THERE?

A: I used to DJ at a restaurant on 163rd in North Miami Beach. That’s the place that really put me on the map. In this little restaurant we used to do 200-300 people weekly. Back then, house parties were more popular, so to bring those numbers of people out was significant. We drew people in through word of mouth. There was no real social media when I started. WHAT DO YOU THINK HAS MADE YOU SUCCESSFUL?

For me, the thing that has made me the most successful is the vibe I create. I could walk into a party and see what song I should play to get everyone dancing. There are a lot of DJ’s out there. They are good, but they don’t try and feel the crowd. I can play one song after another and make a bigger impact, and I know

when to drop each song. Q: WHAT IS BMG?

A: BMG throws events, and manages DJ’s and manages 5 Lan. We strictly focus on throwing the most amazing parties. Q: HOW WAS 5LAN CREATED?

A: I transformed a track, and people really loved it. I decided to put a band together. It was really hard finding musicians at first. People didn’t understand my concept – but look at us now!

that works. Possibly we’ll own our own club.

Q: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO A YOUNG UP AND COMING DJ?

A: Be different in a positive way. Separate yourself and be positive. As long as you’re doing something positive, there’s no way you won’t be successful.

Q: WHERE DO YOU SEE BMG IN THE NEXT 10 YEARS?

A: I see us still throwing amazing parties, and not just in Florida. Hiring more DJ’s and still keeping the same vibe. That’s the formula

“Be different in a positive way. As long as you’re doing something positive, there’s no way you won’t be successful.” HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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56 Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism

By Sarah Brutus

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WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

I’m from Jacmel, Haiti. I used to vacation in the United States with my family. Because of political instability, I would also spend more time in the United States, and when things got better I would go back to Haiti. I started living here permanently in 1995. Tell me about some of the jobs you had before owning your business.

When I was 18, I worked in a deli in Manhattan. John F. Kennedy Junior used to always come in there, so that was nice. When I moved back to Haiti, I worked in an import-export business that my family owned. I also was a life insurance agent, and I did some work as a timeshare sales person. After that I became a court interpreter. That’s what really got me started in the Haitian community. I was the official interpreter for the City of Miami. When it comes to interpreting, I’ve done it all. WHAT DID YOU DO AFTER YOUR CAREER AS AN INTERPRETER?

LEADING RADIO HOST

GUYLENE BERRY’S VERSATILE PROFESSIONS

From Import and Export, Insurance Agent, Interpreter, Consultant, to Becoming a Painting Contractor HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

I was the community outreach advisor to the North Miami CRA. I was also the communication assistant to the City of Miami. I held those two jobs as a consultant. Following that, I started the radio show. As a consultant I saw a lot of information and resources that weren’t reaching the Haitian community. So I started the radio show to fill that gap. WHAT WAS THE HARDEST PART ABOUT DOING THE RADIO SHOW?

As a woman, it was difficult because it was a predominantly male industry. It was difficult finding sponsors, and people didn’t understand the concept because my show was geared toward helping the community. Most of the topics I

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 57 « discuss on the show have to do with parenting, legal issues, health and social issues that the community is dealing with, as well as current events. The show started on Sundays for one hour, and within a year the show became an everyday show. What other businesses do you have?

I have worked on many things, but in 2009 I became a painting contractor. My company paints the interiors and exteriors of homes for the construction industry. I allow people to live life in full color, as I like to say. WHAT CHALLENGES HAVE YOU FACED WITH YOUR BUSINESSES?

In my painting business I work with all kinds of people, and they are all men. So sometimes it can be challenging.

“When working in the community, we have to learn to work together and help each other.”

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO A YOUNG PERSON LOOKING TO START A BUSINESS?

My advice to them is to know your craft. Apply yourself. Know that when you’re just starting out, no one will have pity on you. Just keep going. Keep your integrity at all costs, because the money is not worth your integrity. When it comes to competition, compete with yourself, because you will never go out of style. DID YOU EVER EXPECT YOUR RADIO SHOW TO BE SUCCESSFUL IN ONE YEAR?

One thing about me is that when I start something, I play it day by day. I work to make it successful, but I’m not looking toward the end. I take it step by step. One thing I have learned on radio is to use the challenges that I have faced to grow. Starting out it was very difficult

to find sponsors, which led me to start Sak Pase Media. This created the opportunity for me to find advertising and help others find advertising also. So I was able to open doors – not just for me, but for others as well. ARE YOU ASSOCIATED WITH ANY NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS?

I’ve learned through different trainings and experiences that everything you learn or have you can share with other people. I started Positive Impact Foundation, and I found that, when you have an organization, not many people will give back to your dream. So I changed the organization to Alliance for Progress. I am a master trainer for the Fatherhood Initiative. I’ve also worked with a program called “I Need My Dad”. ANY FINAL WORDS FOR THE READER?

“My advice is to know your craft. Apply yourself. Know that when you’re just starting out, no one will have pity on you. Just keep going.”

Yes. When working in the community, we have to learn to work together and help each other. We need to respect each other, especially when it comes to business. If anyone needs more information about me, they can go to sakpasemedia.com. I also have a TV show called Sak Pase TV Show. HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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58 Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism

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WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

I am the sixth of seven children born to Rosemond & Nelta Auguste Blemur, in Cap-Haitien, Haiti. I came to the United States at the age of 19, in search of higher education and economic stability. WHERE DID YOU ATTEND SCHOOL?

Upon leaving College Notre Dame du Perpetuel Secours High School, where I earned my Baccalaureate I and II, from Cap-Haitien, I immediately enrolled at Miami Dade Community College, where I earned an Associate’s Degree in Business Administration. With great enthusiasm, I continued to invest in myself by pursuing a Bachelor in Business Administration with a concentration in Finance, from Florida International University. In pursuit of my dream to establish the “AB” brand, I later obtained a Master of Business Administration (MBA), with a concentration in accounting, from Barry University. I’m currently working on a Phd in Business Management, with a specialty in accounting at Capella University, while actively studying for my Florida CPA license. DO YOU HAVE ANY PHILANTHROPY WORK THAT YOU ARE ASSOCIATED WITH?

Yes, I strongly believe in giving back to my community. I have been a youth minister throughout my adulthood. I’ve played a mentoring role for singles, married couples’ and incarcerate males, both juvenile and adults.

I’ve also spearheaded my own efforts through ABI – Anis Blemur Institute, Inc., a not-for-profit educational institution, whose purpose is to promote financial literacy. Through our computer labs, individuals of all ages are able to become computer literate by taking basic classes for free. HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

A BALANCED LIFE AUTHOR

ANIS BLEMUR BELIEVES

HE CAN DO MORE FOR THE COMMUNITY AS THE FIRST HAITIAN-AMERICAN SENATOR By Sarah Brutus

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 59 « Through the airwaves, I’ve hosted a weekly show, for the past eight years - “La Gestion des Affaires, How to Manage your Finance, How to Manage your Business,” a commercial-free radio show dedicated to inform and educate creole speaking listeners on accounting and finance for small business owners and entrepreneurs, with the purpose to sustain nascent businesses. In 2015, my wife and I joined hand to establish a Balanced Life Ministry, a not- for-profit endeavor, with a mission to educate our audiences on a new concept called - A Balanced Life. This initiative will empower individuals on how to balance their spiritual, emotional, financial & educational lives, a fundamental cause to mental poverty and depraved wealth. WHAT WAS YOUR REASON(S) FOR ENTERING INTO POLITICS?

My reason for entering politics is two fold. Through my research over the years, I’ve discovered an enormous amount of government funds and programs that exist; however, they are not reaching our communities. These resources are not making it to our local schools, businesses or our households. As a State Senator, I will fight to ensure that there is a proper allocation, of all available resources, throughout our district. Secondly, I entered politics to expose and eradicate “ghost leadership” within our community. Our constituents

“As a State Senator, I will fight to ensure that there is a proper allocation, of all available resources, throughout our district.”

deserve capable, hands-on leaders with a vision.

Lastly please tell us what is your favorite food?

I have consistently served my community for more than 25 years. As an accountant, educator, and a life & financial coach I am connected to the issues that plague our communities. A leader and a servant, I am confident that my experiences have prepared me to answer to the needs of the community with fervor and the conviction necessary, to get them results.

“My advice to a young person is never give up: losses & failures are nothing but road bumps down the path of success.”

WHAT DO YOU THINK WILL ALLOW YOU TO BE SUCCESSFUL IF ELECTED INTO OFFICE?

I like good fish, raw or cooked.

Moreover, I am committed to serving the people with a clear vision and an effective plan to grow our economy, provide meaningful support to our small business owners, mentor and develop our youths, provide better care and housing for our seniors, and adequately defend our veterans. With a direct focus on the needs of the people, I know, I am the best person or the job! WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE A YOUNG PERSON LOOKING TO GET INTO BUSINESS OR POLITICS?

My advice to a young person is never give up: losses & failures are nothing but road bumps down the path of success. I myself had to recover from substantial investment losses in the past, but I did not allow it to get me off course. I am proof, if you stay the course, success will undoubtedly be yours. HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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EVELYNE BOBO DEGLACE “LADY OF FIRE”

From a Nursing Degree to Buying and Selling Properties Throughout South Florida “I worked as a nurse for several years, but I didn’t like the fact that I wasn’t able to make my own schedule and was restricted to the job.” WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

Port Au Prince, Haiti. I moved to Miami when I was 11 years old.

WHAT SCHOOLS DID YOU ATTEND?

I went to Horace Mann for middle school. I then went to Miami Edison for high school. After that I attended the University of Miami, where I graduated with a Bachelor in Nursing. WHAT DID YOU DO AFTER GRADUATING?

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

I worked as a nurse for several years, but I didn’t like the fact that I wasn’t able to make my own schedule and was restricted to the job. I then decided to open my first business, which was doing income tax. It was a suggestion from my brother. HOW DID YOU BUILD YOUR CLIENTELE STARTING OUT?

I had no clients. I went to businesses door to door, letting people know that I was now doing taxes. From there it grew from one hole-in-thewall tax office to three tax offices.

My first year was a bit scary, but I multiplied my income by three the first year I was in business. I knew I didn’t want to go back to nursing, and that I wasn’t going to fail. The first year I did about 539 clients. Today I have a client database of about 6,000 people. DO YOU HAVE ANY OTHER BUSINESSES?

Yes, I have several other businesses. I do real estate, where I buy and flip

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 61 « properties. I also have a non-profit organization that uses proceeds from my companies to help feed the homeless in the community. TELL US MORE ABOUT YOUR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION.

It’s called the True Angels

Foundation. We feed the homeless in Miami. I had one of my offices down on Flagler, and I would always see homeless people on the street and wonder how they were eating. I made some calls to local community organizations, and many of them stated that in order for the homeless to get food, they had to have ID.

We then started to donate food or money to shelters that didn’t have these strict requirements to feed the homeless. HOW DID YOU GET INTO REAL ESTATE?

I wanted to find something new that would challenge me. I’m always looking for things that will make me think and challenge me to find a solution. Taxes became easy for me. I took a course, and it was the best investment I ever made. I also realized that a lot of people were losing their homes and not knowing what other options they had, so I wanted to be a go-to person who could either help them stay in their home, or help them sell it. I really love the real-estate business.  DO YOU SEE YOURSELF DOING ANY OTHER BUSINESSES?

I’m a thinker. I’m a creator. If I see something where there is a need and a challenge, then I will take it on. WHAT ADVICE DO YOU WISH SOMEONE WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU WHEN YOU WERE STARTING OUT?

Read a lot of books. Get a mentor. I had a lot of things that I had to learn on my own by trial and error. Some succeeded, and some of them failed. Having someone to teach you the ropes and coach you is very important. I’ve been very lucky to have a few key people around me that have been very supportive of me. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE WHO’S LOOKING TO START THEIR OWN BUSINESS?

Don’t listen to that little voice in your head that’s telling you you can’t do it. Tune it out, and just take action. The minute the thought comes to mind, just do it. A lot of people didn’t think I could do it, and I had to shut them off and do what I had to do to make my business work. HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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MR. MAX JOSEPH

THE MAN BEHIND XPERT SIGNS & PRINTING The Only Black-Owned Signs and Printing Company in the Community By Sarah Brutus

Where are you from?

I was born in Port Au Prince, Haiti. But I can strongly say that I am a product of the North since I was raised and grew up there, and had the opportunity to complete my secondary education in Cap Haitian. What made you get into the printing business?

The truth about the printing business is I started by helping my father out when I first reached the U.S. in 2000. I quickly developed such an interest in graphics that I could not stop myself from taking classes in that field of study. Furthermore, as an ambitious young man, I was promoting myself by offering two types of businesses – signs and printing – even when I had little knowledge of both.

What has been your biggest inspiration in business so far? At first the sign and printing businesses were just a way to get me to where I wanted to be, but as a quick learner it did not take me long to realize how much I admired both fields. In addition to that, I started getting inspired by the growth of that HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 63 « small investment, which in a very short time transformed into a major brand with the name of Xpert Signs & Printing, X-Investment & many branches yet to come. Where do you see your company within the next 10 years?

The Xpert brand was created in 2004, after acquiring A American Signs with assets of less than $5,000. Eleven years after, we are the only black-owned signs and printing company, with little debt and, from our knowledge, the most selfequipped company operating in our community. With the available space we’ve just added, we are planning to double our resources by bringing more equipment and growing our sales. What has been the most challenging part of business?

Choosing to acquire a sign company alone was very challenging. When we first began, graphics and arts were not too popular amongst the African or Haitian American communities. It was very challenging to meet everyday business projections when clients, during that period did not understand the value of being creative. We conquered those challenges by educating our clients, becoming competitive, surrounding the company with knowledgeable personnel and the latest tools and software. Do you go to Haiti often? If so, when was the last time you were there? Haiti has been forefront of my projected expansion of the Xpert brand. The last time I visited was this year, between April 22 and the 26th.

Do you have any business mentors? How have they helped you in growing your business?

When I first started the business, I was young and inexperienced, but helping out my father was a perfect way for me to know what I wanted to establish. So definitely he was my first mentor. The second is a spiritual man that I had met not too long after acquiring the shop. He is a pastor, a client, a source of blessing and now a close friend. Meeting him helped me realize that I could build the company and network that I have right now. What advice would you give a young person just starting out? As much as I was young and inexperienced, I was ambitious to learn and willing to experience new things. You need to have a sense of “day dreaming” as I call it, in other words, dream it with eyes wide open and you will definitely see it accomplished.

“Lately Haiti has been forefront of my projected expansion of the Xpert brand.”

“…my goal has always been to be able to compete at every level with small and big businesses that service the same field.”

What do you think has made you successful in your business?

In my business, we use “Creative minds at work”. That means everything needs to be well done. Furthermore, as a black Haitian entrepreneur, my goal has always been to be able to compete at every level with small and big businesses that service the same field. That’s when it becomes challenging and inspiring to do better business. What is your favorite food?

As a Haitian man, I like to have a nice plate of goat with rice and black beans. I also enjoy international cuisine when dining. My favorite is a tasty plate of pasta with Alfredo sauce. What are your hobbies?

Jogging, bicycling, swimming and building/installing signs are my favorite hobbies.

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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64 Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism

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DR. FLORE LINDOR-LATORTUE Is Using Her Doctorate to Enhance Lives via Her Radio-TV Show By Sarah Brutus WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

I was born in Port Au Prince, Haiti. I then went to Puerto Rico to do my undergrad degree. I’ve been living in Miami for the past 25 years. WHAT DID YOU DO AFTER YOU COMPLETED YOUR DEGREE IN PUERTO RICO?

I then went on to complete my Masters and Doctorate at Barry University. I actually completed two Bachelor degrees – one in Psychology and the other in Education. My Masters degree is in Health Services Administration and my Doctorate is in Higher Education, with a specialization in leadership. WERE YOU ALWAYS PASSIONATE ABOUT EDUCATION?

Yes, I have always been passionate about education. I’ve been teaching since I was 5 years old. Teaching my siblings in Haiti, starting my own school. I have always been an orator. Speaking is my virtue. TELL US ABOUT YOUR RADIO AND T.V. SHOW.

I learned from a very young age that the key to radio is to transform people’s lives with your message. The message is essential. I did radio for fun for ten years, especially promoting Haitian music. Haitian jazz. I

“In the next ten years I see myself taking [my] concept and combining it with other ethnic groups.” HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 65 « furthered myself to make radio a part of my consulting tools. I have been consulting for the last 5 years and I find that there are people who are on both radio and television, but I am the first ESPN girl. I saw that I could use my radio skills and enhance them on television with my philosophy of “Gade Tet Ou”. I’m actually writing a book about it. My show airs from New York to the Bahamas and worldwide. It is giving people the opportunity to experience the show. WHAT IS DIFFERENT ABOUT YOUR MEDIA WORK?

I think that I make a difference in that my movement is to not just be in media, but to inspire people.

I make the difference. This is how I am non-traditional. I also coach families in something that I call pre-funeral protocol arrangement. I also do conferences in professional development and organizational culture and the inner workings of the company. TELL US ABOUT THE BOOK YOU ARE WORKING ON.

This book I’m working on is called Gade Tet Ou. In the book, I start from toddlerhood and evolve to become a self-sufficient accomplished woman. I’m sharing my philosophy to the world with a focus on inner self. It is for all readers and professions. I have been writing it since 2007.

It serves as a way to tell people to never leave anything in life incomplete.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST OBSTACLE YOU HAVE FACED IN BUSINESS?

I’m a creator. Sometimes people will try to discredit your creation or dream. You have to be able to continue and let the competition catch up to you later. You have to keep creating to inspire those who can appreciate it.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF AND YOUR BUSINESS VENTURES IN THE NEXT 10 YEARS?

I see myself taking the concept and combining it with other ethnic groups. I am very fluent in Spanish. I want to do joint ventures with other ethnic groups. I want to cross over. WHAT KIND OF CLIENTS DO YOU HAVE FOR YOUR CONSULTING BUSINESS?

My clientele consists of people and businesses. I coach them and give them the skills to succeed and enhance their dreams. HOW DID YOU GET INTO COACHING?

The coaching I do is non-traditional. I enhance the lives of women business owners – for example, in flea markets. I was fortunate to have been a manager at Victoria’s Secret. If I can help a small business to present their merchandise and business like Victoria’s Secret, I have done my job. You will be amazed at where they start and how I bring them to their full potential. That is where I believe

“I’m a creator. You have to keep creating to inspire those who can appreciate it.”

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LEGENDARY PROMOTER

Rodney Noel 18 YEARS LATER, COMPAS FESTIVAL IS STILL GOING STRONG By Sarah Brutus

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 67 « Q: WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

A: I was born in Haiti.

Q: WHAT HAS BEEN THE MOST CHALLENGING PART OF STARTING YOUR BUSINESS?

A: There have been a lot of difficult

aspects. You consistently have to be thinking and changing things up. You have to be different from everyone else. If not, you will not make it in this business. It’s hard work. This is not an easy industry to work in.

Q: WHAT DO YOU THINK SETS YOU APART AS A PROMOTER?

A: I understood very early that promotion is very important. Over the years, thorough promoting parties and Compas Fest, I have always believed in heavy promotion. I know it has made the difference and made sure we brought out the crowd. Q: WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO START AN EVENT LIKE COMPAS FEST?

A:

My partner and I wanted to bring change to the Haitian music industry. There was nothing big happening in the industry, especially in Miami. We thought it would be a great idea to start an event that would celebrate our music. Then we also wanted to celebrate our flag, and Compas Fest has been able to do both. Q: DID YOU EVER THINK COMPAS FEST WOULD BECOME SUCH A MAJOR EVENT?

A:

Whenever I put my mind to something, it has to get done. Once we came up with the concept, there was no turning back. I knew that eventually the community would see the vision and how important Compas Fest is to our culture.

“Our community and culture needs the recognition and exposure that Compas Fest brings to the world.”

A: Compas Fest will continue to exist and grow. Every year we try to come up with ways and options to make the show better. Me and my staff work all year to ensure that we put on a bigger and better show every year. Our community and culture needs the recognition and exposure that Compas Fest brings to the world. Q: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE STARTING OUT IN THE BUSINESS?

A:

This is a tough business to be in. You have to be patient and understand the process. You have to be able to think out of the box and bring new ideas to the business. You have to know what kind of crowd you’re trying to attract, and you have to stay on top of your promotion and make sure that you work smart. Not every single event is going to be successful, but don’t let that discourage you. Q: WHAT DO YOU WISH SOMEONE HAD TOLD YOU WHEN YOU WERE STARTING OUT?

A:

I wish someone would have told me about all the stress and pressure that comes with promoting parties and starting a festival. But even if they’d told me, I would have still done it. I love what I do and I believe I make a positive contribution to the community and the music industry.

“I understood very early that promotion is very important.“

Q: WHERE DO YOU SEE COMPAS FEST IN THE NEXT 10 YEARS?

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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THE INCREDIBLE DETERMINATION OF

MR. CELESTIN ODILON From Working on a Chicken Farm to Owning One of the Biggest Haitian Restaurants (O’King Créole) in South Florida By Sarah Brutus Q: WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

A:

An area close to CapHaitien, Haiti. I moved to the Bahamas in 1998. I came to the United States in 2001. Q: WHAT DID YOU DO WHEN YOU GOT TO THE UNITED STATES?

A: I was in Miami for about

a week. I then moved to Maryland, where I worked on a chicken farm. I was only there for a little while, because I couldn’t stand the cold weather. When I came back to Miami I started working in a restaurant as a dishwasher. After that I worked with a company, cutting grass. Then went to work at a bakery. I also did a vocational program at

”One day I saw this flyer that said ‘No Credit, No Experience’ and you get a loan. I qualified for four thousand dollars. With that I bought a mixer and an oven and started it.” HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 69 « Dorce in construction. I also washed cars on the weekends. I worked in the bakery for almost 2 years. After that, I opened my own bakery. Q: HOW DID YOU GET STARTED WITH YOUR OWN BAKERY?

A: I saw there was an opportunity

to open a bakery, but I didn’t have the money to get it started. I rented a place and was able to do construction and renovations on the bakery by myself. I saved some money from my job and used that to get a place. I didn’t realize how much money it would take to open the bakery, and halfway through I got stuck. One day I saw this flyer that said, ‘No Credit, No Experience’ and you get a loan. I qualified for four thousand dollars. With that I bought a mixer and an oven, and started it.

Q: WHAT WAS IT LIKE AT FIRST? DID YOU HAVE EMPLOYEES?

A:

At this time I didn’t have any employees. I just had 2 guys that I offered to partner with me in the bakery. They didn’t want to. They preferred to just work for me. That first year we sold $140,000 worth of goods. I also packaged the bread. I got a car and would take the bread to all the supermarkets and put it on their shelves for free. That’s how I got it into the supermarkets. After that, they started to buy the bread all over. I also started making other products, including pickles, peanut butter and jelly, and bottling them.

“I got a car and would take the bread to all the supermarkets and put it on their shelves for free. That’s how I got it into the supermarkets.”

Q: HOW DID YOU GET INTO THE RESTAURANT?

A:

People started to ask me to serve breakfast at the bakery. I did that, but the bakery was becoming too small. So I bought a building for the restaurant. My goal is to do a fastfood creole franchise like American fast food. We have great food and we need to sell it and market it to the public. I opened the restaurant in 2014. Q: WHEN YOU LEFT HAITI, DID YOU KNOW YOU WOULD GET INTO THE RESTAURANT BUSINESS?

A: No, I always liked lawyers. I don’t like seeing people get mistreated. My dad was always into business and said that, no matter what you do, learn something that will allow you to be your own boss. I saw a big demand and big opportunity to have a restaurant.

because I know what I’m working on and I know what I’m doing. I like to show all those people that I can do it, even when they don’t believe in me.

“A: Use your brain. Work hard. Do the best you can do. Take control of your own life. Don’t listen to someone who says you can’t do it. Life is not easy. You just have to do it.”

Q: IN THE NEXT 10 YEARS, WHERE DO YOU SEE YOUR BUSINESS GOING?

A:

I see having 20-25 restaurants, if not more, by then. Q: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE SOMEONE WANTING TO GET INTO THE BUSINESS?

“A: Use your brain. Work hard. Do the best you can do. Take control of your own life. Don’t listen to someone who says you can’t do it. Life is not easy. You just have to do it.” Q: WHAT IS ONE OF THE CHALLENGES YOU HAVE FACED?

A:

People saying that I can’t do it. People saying that I’m crazy and that my franchise concept won’t work. It doesn’t discourage me. It actually makes me laugh, HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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“My first radio station was terrible…. Every time I would turn the microphone on I had to time it because there was a donkey nearby making noise.”

WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

I was born in Jeremie, Haiti.

WHERE DID YOU GO TO SCHOOL AND WHAT WAS YOUR MAJOR?

I went to the University of Maine, where I studied communications. After that I returned to Haiti. DID YOU ALWAYS KNOW YOU WANTED TO BE A JOURNALIST?

HOW MR. ALEX SAINT SURIN TURNED HIS 5-YEAR-OLD DREAM INTO AN EMPIRE Miserably Fired from his First Radio Job, he Now Owns Six Radio Stations By Sarah Brutus

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

Yes, from day one. I always wanted to go into journalism. I remember when I was 4 or 5 years old, I was so passionate about radio that I asked my mom, “How come there are so many bands inside this small radio receiver?” I also remember watching my brothers playing soccer, and they would always invite me to come and play, but instead I would go to the top of the balcony and pretend to be a sports announcer and go back and forth during the game. I’ve always loved it. TELL US ABOUT YOUR FIRST JOB AS A JOURNALIST.

I worked for Radio Metropole. At that time, there were only 4-5 major radio stations in Haiti. I remember I was

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 71 « at the radio station and they hadn’t done payroll in two months. One day I was waiting for the accountant to come, and when they finally came they noticed me waiting and had me come into the office. He went in his drawer and took out twenty dollars in Haitian money. Because the money was so dirty, he handed it to me with his fingertips. Before I could say thank you, he rushed me out and told me to get out of his office. I remember that day I went home and cried and cried. I kept it and never spent it. I have it somewhere. The twenty bucks changed my life and point of view. I knew I had to do something positive. I turned that negative into a positive. From then on, whenever I was in trouble or had a problem, I would tell myself, “You know what, you’re going to succeed you’re going to be okay.” That twenty dollars served as my diploma. WHAT WAS YOUR EXPERIENCE STARTING YOUR FIRST RADIO STATION?

My first radio station was terrible. It was a lease from another company. My first station was radio and TV station called L’arc En Ciel, which translates into “rainbow”. When I first started I had the transmitter, but I didn’t have the studio for about 3 months. I used to go to this sort of waste-management area with my transmitter. You can imagine the horrible smells. But that s where I operated for 2-3 months, because I couldn’t afford the studio. Every time I would turn the microphone on I had to time it, because there was a donkey nearby making noise. In the end I finally got some money to get the studio. On my first day in the studio, I called my wife to tell her I was not coming home. She asked me why. In fact, I didn’t have enough money to put gas in my car. The first day, I remember I took a piece of cardboard and I put it in the studio and I fell asleep. I woke the next morning and took a cup and washed

up in the bathroom. It was terrible.

Later I moved to the U.S. and started Radio Carnival with Dr. Moise. I later went on and created Radio Mega. I have been operating it for the last 13 years.

“Be passionate about what you do. There are times when you will be disappointed about the situation, but keep focused.”

WHAT STATIONS DO YOU HAVE TODAY?

I have six stations in Haiti. One each in Cap Haitien, Gonaives, Jeremie, Les Cayes, Port Au Prince and Port de Paix. The show focuses on Haitians living abroad. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE SOMEONE WHO IS STARTING OUT?

There are lots of distractions. Be very professional. It’s a plus. If you want to make money and stay around, try to be as professional as possible. Tell the truth as much as possible. Try to keep your integrity. Have discipline. Always try to learn something new every day.

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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“I realized that it was a lot more fulfilling because I’m treating people from my hometown.”

DR. EDWIN SMITH

From Ivy League Columbia University to His Father’s (Dr. Pierre-Michel Smith) Dental Practice of 30 Years to Continue the Family Practice

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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By Sarah Brutus Q: WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

A: I was born in Montreal, but I

have lived in Miami practically all my life.

Q: WHAT SCHOOLS DID YOU ATTEND?

A:

I went to Chamanade Madonna for high school. I then went to Florida International University for undergrad. I then went up to Columbia University for dental school.

Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 73 « Q: DID YOU ALWAYS WANT TO BE A DENTIST?

A:

I’ve always been around the practice. My dad is a dentist and I used to spend a lot of time in his office growing up. It was always something that I was familiar with. I liked the idea of service and healthcare so why not. Q: WHAT CHALLENGES HAVE YOU FACED SCHOOLING AND CAREER WISE?

A: Well anyone can tell you dental school is pretty tough. But you get through it and move on.

Q: HOW DID YOU GET STARTED WITH YOUR PRACTICE AFTER COMPLETING SCHOOL?

A: After I graduated I had a couple

of opportunities lined up. I was thinking I would come back to Miami and work with my family and give back to my community for a little bit then go back up north. I realized that it was a lot more fulfilling because I’m treating people from my hometown. I rented a space from my dad and everything started to grow really rapidly.

Q: HOW DID YOU START GETTING CLIENTS?

A:

First we started with a few walk ins. Usually people with emergencies. Then we had people who liked us and would come back and referred others to us as well. At the same time I think whenever people are trying to find success in something basically you have to think to yourself what problems can I help solve in this area? It can be in your community or work. We noticed that there was a large segment of the community that wasn’t receiving care. We found ways to provide them care and get them access to care. We are actually providing care to people who really need it and not just making up

treatments. From there we started pushing heavy and advertising hard to grow our little niche. To get the database of clients that we have usually takes about ten years but it has taken us two and a half years. We’re getting ready to open a second office also. Q: WHY DO YOU THINK IT HAS TAKEN YOU LESS TIME THAN OTHERS TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS SO RAPIDLY?

A:

I think it’s because we focused on people who need access to care and we found ways to get them access to care. We started providing transportation for those who needed it. We were able to fulfill that need and it has made a tremendous difference for our patients. You also have to be relentless at it. You have to put in the work. Early on we were easily working 60 hours a week. Q: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE A YOUNG PERSON?

A: Find something that is needed.

Find something is not being done and grow from there. Think big picture. Think “what can I do to solve a problem in the community”? Once you do find that answer you will need to be a hard worker and have some skills. The key is that you should always be learning. Apply your skills and work really hard.

Q: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE FOOD?

A:

Anything my wife cooks. Probably lasagna, it’s a great go to.

“The key is that you should always be learning. Apply your skills and work really hard.” HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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ANASATAGIA PIERRE MODELS for DKLYPSE Swimwear Collections

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© DKLYPSE Swimwear

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©DKLYPSE Swimwear

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©DKLYPSE Swimwear

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MEET BRIANA ROY

HAITIAN-AMERICAN SAG ACTRESS & MODEL FROM THE MOVIE “RECLAIM” By Christine Winters

L

et’s be honest: we love talented children. Whether they’re singers, actors, or even scientists, we find them almost too incredible to fathom. Is it because we’ve grown up in a culture where everything is so easy that nothing is expected from youth? Or is it that we

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

appreciate rare talent – true talent – and therefore enjoy it? Or that we find this talent to be so amazing that it needs to be nurtured?

Take, for instance, young Briana Roy. Born in Hollywood, Florida in 2005, this young actress is not only a gifted

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 79 «

“In her spare time, she enjoys writing poetry and is an avid animal lover.”

We talk about how we’ll do accomplish big things in our lives. We eventually learn that a small step forward leads to larger steps, and perhaps to leaps and bounds. But we seem to forget it when it comes to our children and others. Nobody can say they started large. Young Briana is not only an accomplished student, but a multilingual one: her parents taught her both French and Creole. That’s impressive – but consider what else she’s done is such a short time: commercials for Old Navy, Wal-Mart and Disney. Her other TV commercials include Peek-A-Boo, Jacket Pack It Pets, Popemz, Kmart BlueLight Member Special Dance Party, Comcast Xfinity, Tide, and Pumpkin Spice.

From commercials for KFC, Avis Budget and Toys R Us, she has become a natural powerhouse by taking those small steps we encourage in our children. Her precocious nature has landed her an opportunity to make a video with rapper Jay Miller called “Collide” and a central part in Usher’s video “Crush”. All these small roles have given her a chance to star in television and movies. In 2014, she acted in a film called RECLAIM with actors John Cusack, Ryan Phillippe, Rachelle Lefevre, Jacki Weaver & Luis Guzman. The Haitian earthquake of 2010 played a big role in this movie Having a child so young that hangs around celebrated stars like Cusack, Phillipe and Guzman is enough to give any parent a big head, so to speak. And why not? They know their child is not only a talented model, but an actress, too.

Briana Roy with Luis Guzman

“From commercials by KFC, Avis Budget and Toys R Us, she has become a natural powerhouse…”

student, but a young beauty who started modeling at the age of 5. Like many promising child actors, she started out relatively small, which is always a good thing for children.

But there’s even more to Briana. In her spare time, she enjoys writing poetry and is an avid animal lover. Not merely content being a gifted third-grader, she wants to be an ambassador to children, play a fierce WII and take awesome pictures. Family time includes hanging out with her sisters and developing a clothing line for later down the line. (She’s calling it the “JB Roy Collection”.) Having just finished a Nike fitness commercial and a short YouTube documentary, this little girl is taking small steps. And, we expect the large leaps will be coming soon.

Follow Briana Roy on: Instagram @BrianaRoy Twitter @Realbrianaroy Facebook Like Page @BrianaRoy Vine @Briana Roy Younow @RealBrianaRoy Also check out her IMDB page @Briana Roy For serious business inquires contact her manager @ Daniellepbfj@yahoo.com

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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« Source: Getty Jamie McCarthy

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HAITIAN-AMERICAN “ORGANGE IS THE NEW BLACK” STAR

VICKY JEUDY HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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Source: Getty Frazer Harrison

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VICKY JEUDY WEARING AN ELEGANT DIAMOND NECKLACE. HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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5 Years Later Haitian-Boxer Andre Berto Reclaims His Respect by Defeating Victor Ortiz in a Rematch By Christine Winters

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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A

cheering crowd waited in the stadium at StubHub Center in Carson, California on April 30th, 2016 for a muchanticipated rematch. The boxers taking the ring were Andre Berto versus Victor Ortiz, who last battled each other five years ago on April 16th, 2011. Victor Ortiz handed Andre Berto his first professional defeat in 2011, by a unanimous decision. Berto lost his 147-pound title on that day, and afterwards he worked hard to build

The first round was a match of might between the two boxers, with no significant gains by either one. The second round found Berto sitting on the ring floor from a flash knockdown by Ortiz. Berto regained his composure in the third round by increasing his activity in the ring, and he stole the momentum back from his opponent.

The fourth round was the turning point that allowed Berto to take home the win. He kept Ortiz dancing on the canvas until delivering a knockout punch that sent Ortiz to

“I didn’t see it coming,” Ortiz said of the Berto punch that dropped him. “The guy doesn’t hit soft.”

Photos by Stephanie Trapp; @trappfotos

“Both boxers are equally matched in their accomplishments, despite passing jabs at each other in the media for the past five years.”

his strength and momentum to reclaim the title.

the floor. Ortiz regained his footing before being counted out, but he was still wobbly on his feet and in poor shape when he got back up. Both boxers have performed at top speed during their professional lives and are well respected in the boxing world. This time around, Berto prevailed over Ortiz to persuade the judges that he was the winner.

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Mr. Alex “China” Garcia of Civilized Nations Apparel “FASHION CHOSE ME” By Sarah Brutus

“’I am civilized’ is a brand for the people by the people. It’s a brand that helps uplift the people, especially the youth.”

Q: WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

A:

I was born in Miami and raised in both Miami and New York. Q: WHERE DID YOU GRADUATE HIGH SCHOOL?

A: I graduated from North Miami Beach Sr. High. Q: WHAT DID YOU DO AFTER HIGH SCHOOL?

A:

I went to the Marines for a year and a half. When I got out of the Marines, I got involved in the music business and worked with some local artists. I got my first big break on the management team of Rick Ross and Pitbull. I was responsible for booking shows and bringing in sponsorship. I did that for about 5 years. I also promoted parties and clubs. HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 85 « Q: HOW DID YOU GET INTO FASHION?

Q: YOU RECENTLY WENT TO HAITI. TELL US ABOUT THAT.

A:

A: I went to Haiti because I am

Fashion chose me. I previously had a fashion line that catered to the Hispanic market with a partner. We parted ways, and I decided to start my own fashion line in Miami. The ideas were there, but I never really got it off the ground. After the earthquake I was trying to figure out how I was going to help my community and my country. My brother is a doctor, and he was able to go down and be on the ground and help with project Medishare and Unicef. I wasn’t a doctor, so I wasn’t able to make that same contribution. So I made t-shirts that said, “We Must, We Can, We Will Rebuild Haiti”. I went around to local stores, restaurants, events and barbershops selling the shirts and making sure that proceeds went to help the relief efforts of Haiti with Project Medishare. It took off from there. I would see people wearing the shirt, and I took that as a sign from God. I went on to make the “Bel Fanm” shirts which was another hit. Ladies loved them.

working on the future. Retailers are looking for the right turnaround times for the products they order. I was manufacturing in China and India, and it took a lot of time to get the product back. If I’m going to succeed, I need to have Haiti’s support in the long run. My cousin suggested that I work with a factory in Haiti. That was a year and a half ago. That was my first time going to Haiti. The factory is a sort of vocational school that teaches

and speak to my little brothers and sisters, it makes me feel complete. I’ve always done these projects with my own funding. I’ve told myself that if God wants me to do this, He will make a way. It has always been successful. I want to make my school tour worldwide and have it in arenas and stadiums.

Q: WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE TO YOUNG PEOPLE?

A: Take control of your life. Don’t listen to people who say you can’t do something. Everything is possible.

Q: WHAT DOES YOUR BRAND REPRESENT?

A:

‘I am civilized’ is a brand for the people, by the people. It’s a brand that helps uplift the people, especially the youth. It’s a brand that people can use as a stepping stone to find their true identity. By me being a club promoter and also working in the management field, I was trying to find my identity. I found that in fashion. Q: WHAT DO YOU THINK HAS HELPED YOUR BUSINESS TO GROW THE WAY IT HAS?

A: I believe there’s a right way

and a wrong way to do everything. The right way involves getting professionals and experts to do what they are good at. I pick the team, and I let them do what they do best.

earthquake victims the skills they need to be self-sufficient. Once they are done with the school, they can get a job with my brand. That’s what makes me most happy.

Q: TELL US ABOUT YOUR MENTORING AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT.

A: This is something I had to do.

This is my true calling in life. When I was growing up, I had no one to talk to. When I go into the schools

“If I’m going to succeed, I need to have Haiti’s support in the long run.”

CivilizedNations.com #iamcivilizedapparel @iamcivilized

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A WOMAN who never seems to give up because she is on a mission! Meet Fayola Delica

“sold Girl Scout cookies as her way of offering a helping hand”

H

er most vivid childhood memory is that of her Haitian immigrant parents working 14-hour days to successfully operate their small business in order to give their three children a piece of the American Dream. As a little girl inspired by her parents’ entrepreneurial spirit, Fayola sold Girl Scout cookies as her way of offering a helping hand (“men anpil, chay pa lou”). Her internal drive and compassion for people would continue to grow into her adulthood and later prove to be the core of her existence. A first-generation college graduate with multiple degrees in hand, at 24 years old, Fayola moved to the Charlotte suburbs of North Carolina where she built her dream home, practiced as a registered nurse, and served as an active member in her church and community meanwhile attending seminary school full-time. Unexpectedly, as it did for millions

of Americans, the 2007-08 Financial Crisis came and with the blink of an eye, Fayola lost everything. A forever-defining moment in her life, Fayola made it her personal mission to help others find their true purpose, just as she did hers – a journey of authenticity she refers to as “finding your hidden treasure.” Also the name of her online BlogTalkRadio show, which

airs live every Friday at 2pm ET, Fayola shares the personal accounts of herself, clients and notable guest speakers to empower listeners, discussing topics of entrepreneurship, community, politics, leadership, and Christianity in the marketplace. Previous notable guests include: • Gordon Tredgold, recognized by Inc. Magazine as one of the Top

Fayola Delica holds a B.S. in Health Science Education and a Minor in Community Health, cum laude from the University of Florida, and a B.S. in Nursing from the University of Miami. In addition to a Small Business Executive Business Certificate from Florida State University.

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Her third book, a co-authorship with twelve other powerful women around the country including Dr. Deana Murphy, Resilience: Living Life By Design was released in September 2015. All three books can be found on Amazon. com and BN.com for purchase. Next year Fayola plans to release two additional books: a self-help memoir to encourage young women and girls to live life on their own terms unapologetically; and a coauthorship with Tinu Peña detailing their experiences as they run for Florida State Representatives, also to inspire minority women to do the same.

• Jacques Wiesel, a Holocaust Survivor, Author, and Sales Trainer

• Laura Bishop, the former Executive Director of the National Christian Foundation (NCF) of South Florida • Sam Meader, the National Director of Business Education for the Company Corporation

Finding Your Hidden Treasure proved to be a powerful source of encouragement to Fayola and her listeners. She felt that her personal calling to be a philanthropist became more evident than ever, and in 2014, she expanded the radio show into a full-service life and business coaching agency to aid individuals connect their passion and purpose as they begin their entrepreneurship journey. Through Fayola Delica, LLC, Fayola takes a holistic approach to help clients start a purpose-driven business, aid in career decisions, write award-winning books, and ultimately leverage their talents as a vehicle to monetize their abilities.

After volunteering as a Fellow and iCon Consultant for Junior Achievement of South Florida, Fayola aspired to mentor and expose young people to the principles of a purpose-driven life as well. Through The 360 Evolution Academy, geared towards teenagers 11 to 17 years old, she exposes them to a world beyond their norm by inviting local role models and public figures to guide them in the areas of leadership, health and fitness, personal finance, spirituality, public speaking, personal branding, and educational and professional goalsetting. Corporate sponsors also present an enormous support to the academy. For example, Ruth Chris Steak House of Fort Lauderdale hosts the students for a “Night of Elegance” featuring an etiquette training dinner, and recent ceremony

graduations have been successful due to the support of Infiniti of Coconut Creek and Mary Kay.

To broaden her reach to people and clients alike, Fayola published her first e-book titled The Ultimate Speaker’s Manual: the “how to” in presenting a professional speaking business in October 2014, garnering 5 stars on Amazon.com. In May 2015, she published a second e-book, The Ultimate Life Coach’s Manual: the “how to” in presenting a professional life coaching business. The manuals are ideal for aspiring, novice and veteran speakers and life coaches looking to start or improve their business with a strong focus on branding. For her global audience, Fayola converted the manuals into 8-week online training courses.

Fayola is on a mission! Her tenacity and strong will to shine despite the odds is celebrated by her peers with notable recognition, including appointment to the City of North Miami Youth Opportunity Board by Mayor Dr. Smith Joseph, titles of Ms. Miami-Dade Plus America 2016, Ms. Fort Lauderdale 2016, and First Runner-up for Ms. Florida Plus America 2016, contestant for Ms. Corporate America Pageant 2016, and nominating Candidate for Woman of the Year 2016 of Leukemia and Lymphoma Society for the South Palm Beach County Chapter in honor of her late uncle Father Dr. Gerard Jean-Juste, an eminent Catholic priest and human rights activist who had leukemia.

Fayola’s current focus is her candidacy for FL State Representative House District 108 in Miami-Dade County, with primary election to take place on August 30, 2016. The spirit of her campaign is “the people’s voice matters” – a testament to her compassion for people and quest to offer a helping hand. Contact Info

Fayola is available by email at Fayola@ fayoladelica.com, or you can reach her at 954-562-7706. Please visit her website, www. fayoladelica.com and follow her on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr.

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cUTThrOaT KiTchen cheF aLain LeMaire

2015 WAS HIS BIGGEST YEAR YET By Jean Alfred Delva

Q: ON AUGUST 9TH, 2015, YOU COMPETED ON CUTTHROAT KITCHEN ON FOOD NETWORK. HOW DID YOU GET TO BE ON THE SHOW?

A: I was introduced to one of the

casting agents through a mutual friend, Chef Manoushcka Guerrier of Beverly Hills. She felt I would be a good fit for the show. I auditioned, as you know, and the rest is history.

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

Q: HOW WAS THE EXPERIENCE?

A:

The experience was surreal, and nothing like I expected. What you see on TV is just half of what really happens on set. The challenges are real, the sabotages, the clock, all real. I can tell you that I really felt a lot of pressure, since I had a country on my back. It was no longer about me.

“What you see on TV is just half of what really happens on set. The challenges are real, the sabotages, the clock, all real.”

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Haiti Open | People Culture Tourism 89 « Q: WHAT TYPE OF RESPONSES HAVE YOU RECEIVED FROM FANS, FRIENDS AND FAMILY?

A: I received positive feedback from everyone. It was very humbling and amazing to get messages, calls, posts, even from people I barely knew. I truly can say that it was a real blessing. The only downside to it all was that my dad didn’t get a chance to watch the show before he was taken away from us. Q: 3RD ANNUAL TASTE OF HAITI, MAY 2015. H OW WAS THE EVENT COMPARED TO 2013 AND 2014?

A: Being involved in Taste of Haiti for three years straight was challenging, but great. We wanted to give the community something to call their own, something that they could enjoy with the entire family. Taste of Haiti is a glimpse of Haiti, in the heart of Miami. Q: WHAT SHOULD PEOPLE EXPECT FOR 2016?

A: Unfortunately, I have to take a hiatus from the event to focus

on personal projects and help my companies in Florida and in Haiti grow. But as far as this year is concerned for myself, you can expect several pop-up dinner events in Florida, New York, Atlanta and other cities throughout the U.S. and in Haiti. You can expect other events, some cultural and some social later this year. I’m going in! Q: MIAMI GARDENS WINE AND FOOD EXPERIENCE NOVEMBER 2015 – WAS THAT YOUR FIRST YEAR AT THE FESTIVAL?

A: Yes, it was my first time, and I really enjoyed being involved. It was the inaugural event, and I along with 2 other chefs were the headliners.

Q: HOW DID THE OTHER CHEFS LOOK AT YOU, KNOWING THAT YOU’D BEEN ON CUTTHROAT KITCHEN?

A: To be honest, we filmed Le Chef TV Show’s first season right before I did Cutthroat Kitchen. So there were no pressures on any of the other chefs, nor did they look at me differently. As far as the 2nd season goes, being a co-producer of the show, I decided it would be best not to participate and focus more on creating something substantial and lively. Season 2 is about current, new and upcoming talents in Haiti. We used strictly local chefs, some amateurs and students from the culinary schools in Haiti.

Q: ANYTHING YOU’D LIKE TO SHARE ABOUT THIS PARTICULAR FESTIVAL?

A: It was a great event, featuring Omari Hardwick from the hit show Power. The highlight was seeing myself on a couple of billboards on 826 and I-95.

“The highlight was seeing myself on a couple of billboards on 826 and I-95.”

HaitiOpen.com | Spring 2016

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Photos by Johnny Red Light Photos @redlightphotos

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Profile for Haiti Open, Inc.

HAITI OPEN Spring 2016  

Cover: Dr. Rudolph Moise @dr_rudy_moise ~ Topics: Top 10 Haitian Business Leaders, Dr. Rudolph Moise, Haitian Business Pioneers, How to Spen...

HAITI OPEN Spring 2016  

Cover: Dr. Rudolph Moise @dr_rudy_moise ~ Topics: Top 10 Haitian Business Leaders, Dr. Rudolph Moise, Haitian Business Pioneers, How to Spen...

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