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Issue 3 Volume 10 Dec. 9, 2015 Hagerty High School

WOOF TV HOSTS H-FACTOR The TV Production class held its annual talent show fundraiser on Thursday Nov. 19. More than $700 was raised to purchase new equipment. PAGE 2 - Darrell Beausivoir

Administration attempts to solve bee infestation

Photo by Jake Arthur

HIVE FIVE Hamilton describes this bee infestation as more insidious than an infestation of other potentially harmful insects, as the location of the hive is unknown. “We have to be more proactive about finding the source in the future so we can get it done the professional way, the right way and the legal way,” Hamilton said.

Peyton Whittington

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CRASHING CARNEGIE photo by Jake Arthur

Freshman Jakob Schoenfeld to play percussion at Carnegie Hall in February Jeannie Williams Managing Editor nly the best of the best perform at Carnegie Hall. It is a time-honored tradition, one that is, for freshman Jakob Schoenfeld, a reality only months away as a result of years of practice. On Saturday, Oct. 31, when others were focused on Halloween and the annual Florida-Georgia game, Schoenfeld, a percussionist, received an email confirming his acceptance to the 2016 High School Honors Performance Series at Carnegie Hall for percussion had been approved. “I didn’t expect to make it,” Schoenfeld said. “At first, I was pretty excited, and then after a minute, I sort of accepted it.” The road to Carnegie Hall was long for Schoenfeld, whose band career began in a middle school Beginner Band class. Until middle school, he took drum set lessons and participated in music classes at his elementary school, but Schoenfeld credits Lawton Chiles band director Grace Kuperman with helping him learn to enjoy music. Schoenfeld began with snare and worked his way to bells and timpani, while using other auxiliary percussion instruments like tambourine and triangle. By the end of seventh grade, Schoenfeld began one of his favorite parts of percussion, four-mallet solos. Four-mallet pieces are typically played on mallet instruments like the xylophone or marimba with two mallets in each hand. They allow for more chords and notes to be played. “Once you learn how to play four-mallet, there’s a lot of cool things you can do with that and a lot of great pieces, too,” Schoenfeld said. Before he was in band, Schoenfeld (and his brothers, Lukas and Aleks) took piano lessons, which was helpful for mallet instruments, since they have different toned bars. Most percussionists prefer playing on drums, but Schoenfeld prefers marimba. “It can provoke so many emotions, and I have just fallen in love with the instrument really,” Schoenfeld said. Outside of school, Schoenfeld took lessons with music instructor Willie Rast, who used to assist with the band at Lawton Chiles, but had to stop when the schedule of marching band season got too hectic. He is also currently taking private lessons with Matt Albano, who assists percussionists in the school band. Schoenfeld learns the majority of his pieces at home, first learning the notes and rhythms, then self-recording and evaluating. He typically does a mock performance for his family and friends. Not all of the instruments are available to Schoenfeld at home, so he

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usually learns his marimba pieces on the piano first, then practices the technique at school. With snare, he uses a practice piece at home, which allows him to practice without the loud sound. Schoenfeld has had to balance marching band with his commitments to the soccer team earlier this year, often sacrificing one practice for the other. Now that marching season is over, Schoenfeld can focus on soccer, but still plays at home. “I feel like it’s given me something to do when I’m bored,” Schoenfeld said. “Sometimes I just need to drum or play piano and just forget about homework for a little while.” After playing in his middle school band for three years, Schoenfeld wanted more. He made all-county band in seventh grade and all-county and all-state in eighth. “I realized there’s more than just those things locally. I can try out for more stuff, and I’m good enough to make some of the honor bands,” Schoenfeld said. Through Accepted, an online program where students can submit applications for schools and programs, Schoenfeld was invited to apply to Honors Performance Series after they were notified he had viewed their page. Seeing that the pieces “weren’t too bad,” Schoenfeld set to work, learning the songs and borrowing recording equipment to create an audition video over the summer. In late August, Schoenfeld submitted his application and waited until Oct. 31, when he heard he was accepted. Fellow band member Jason Donnelly was impressed by Schoenfeld’s acceptance. “He’s a great person. He’s an even better musician,” Donnelly said. “Carnegie Hall, is one of the most respected concert halls in the world. Getting an experience in such a large and acoustically sound environment would certainly be a great experience.” Schoenfeld was one of 750 selected to perform in the performance series at Carnegie Hall out of over 18,000 national applicants. In addition to this program, Schoenfeld, along with Donnelly, applied for Honor Band of America, which will take place at a music festival in Indianapolis in March, but results have not yet been sent out. Additionally, Schoenfeld will soon be recording an audition video for NYO2, run by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute. For now, Schoenfeld is focused on Feb. 4-6, which he will spend studying and performing music in New York City. “Being selected to the Honors Performance Series is something each finalist should be extremely proud of accomplishing,” program director Morgan Smith said in a press release. “Working with these conductors and performing at Carnegie Hall is a once-in-a-lifetime experience that these musicians never forget.”

Online Editor-in-Chief his year, as with last September, it is not an uncommon sight to walk past a trash can on campus and see 10-15 bees feasting on the garbage inside. These bees are honeybees, known for their pollination of flowers and production and storage of honey. They are attracted to the sugary drinks consumed by students, which means they usually only swarm trash cans during lunch hours. Dean Brett Hamilton, who is in charge of facilities, has taken considerable measures to secure campus safety. As suggested by county administration, Hamilton had the garbage cans pressure washed, removed them from student eating areas and ensured the daily disposal of garbage can liners. He also described the situation to Seminole County Animal Services, who reportedly offered little other help than the precautions above. “I went online and Googled home remedies, and I put cinnamon and cayenne pepper in all the trash cans because that’s supposed to keep them away, but that didn’t work,” Hamilton said. “I did everything I possibly could to keep our school and our students safe.” Bees are not yet a protected species, but they are dwindling, which is why both Hamilton and Dr. Mary Williams favored the possibility of calling a professional beekeeper as opposed to an exterminator. Most bee complaints, however, have come from students with bee allergies and their parents. “If you’re allergic to bees and you don’t want to be in the vicinity of them, you definitely need to be eating lunch inside,” Williams said. “That being said, I personally haven’t heard of one person being stung.” Despite this, there are still students who are unsatisfied with the current bee situation. “I get hit in the face with them every two seconds,” junior Jessica Vasquez said. “They moved all the trash cans away from the tables, but that won’t get rid of them.” As for students’ role in de-escalating the situation, administration advises students to make sure their trash is thrown away at the end of the lunch period. “The bees are not here to attack you, they’re here for what’s in the garbage,” Hamilton said. “If you’re attacking them, they will want to retaliate and fend for themselves.”

See more on hagertyjourn.com Alumni Arroyo’s Army Success Marcos Arroyo, 2014 graduate, has had a far from normal college experience. Arroyo, who committed to West Point to play soccer, traded Greek life for grenades and learned to adapt to the Army lifestyle. For more about his first two years of college visit Hagertyjourn. com.

Deals and discounts: Lockwood, Alafaya and University

For those on a budget, eating out is usually a last priority, yet seems to always be on the top of friends’ to-do lists. When push comes to shove and self-control loses, check out a detailed list of great, local deals on Hagertyjourn.com so you can treat yourself, yet stretch your dollar.


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Voting registration on campus

photo by Jake Arthur TAKE ACTION. Seminole County’s Supervisor of Elections, Mike Ertel, presents a rousing speach about the importance of voting in young adults in the upcoming elections. Ertel then allowed students to share their own thoughts on today’s laws, politics and school system.

Courtney Dziewior

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Online Managing Editor oting is an important part of the American democracy, but often there is little participation from young adults due to their belief that one vote will not matter. American Government teacher Matt Malkovich set about changing that by promoting voter registration. On Wednesday, Nov. 18, members from Seminole County’s Supervisor of Elections department arrived in the auditorium to facilitate voter registration with seniors in their government and economics classes. Malkovich, alongside social studies teachers William Bordelon, Isiah Cabal and Adam

Stansbury, coordinated the event with Supervisor of Elections Mike Ertel. This event began five years ago under the guidance of the school’s current social studies teachers and has become an anticipated, annual event. “We wanted a way to engage civic responsibility,” Malkovich said. “Now, students don’t have the excuse ‘I’m not registered to vote.’” Registration was arranged by coordinating Ertel’s schedule with the campus schedule to make sure the maximum number of students would be available, barring other complications. Traditionally, it is organized in a semester where the Supervisor of Elections department

news you need to know

COLORADO PLANNED PARENTHOOD CLINIC ATTACKED On Nov. 27, a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs, Colo., was the scene of an attack by shooter Robert Lewis Dear, who killed three people, a mother, a police officer and an Iraq war veteran, and injured nine others. The shooter positioned himself inside the Planned Parenthood clinic and held a several-hour long standoff with police, trapping people inside. The standoff ended when Dear announced to police he was ready to surrender and placed his weapon down, allowing police to arrest him. The shooter reportedly told a police officer “no more baby parts” after his arrest. RACIAL TENSIONS ESCALATE IN THE U.S. Colleges and universities across the country have become the battleground for many young activists, starting at the University of Missouri. At these schools, students have protested for increased diversity and cultural centers, among other things. So far, 72 student bodies of colleges and universities have made their own list of demands. However, this has not been met with receptiveness everywhere, as many schools have had to shut down temporarily due to threats of violence as a response to the protests. Tensions are rising outside of college campuses, too. In October of 2014, Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke shot 17-year-old Laquan McDonald 16 times over 15 seconds. The police had received reports of a man with a knife, and when they arrived, Van Dyke was the only one to fire, jumping out of his car and shooting at McDonald, and continued as he lay on the ground. The city of Chicago refused to release the dashcam video until they were ordered by a judge to do so 13 months later. Hours before the video’s release, Van Dyke was charged with murder, and since then, the police chief of Chicago has resigned. The police department has taken flack since the release of the video and for the events that transpired after the shooting. A Burger King surveillance camera captured what happened, but after the shooting, police went inside and deleted all the footage. The dashcam video release has sparked protests, and the Department of Justice announced it will investigate the Chicago Police Department. WORLD LEADERS MEET IN PARIS FOR CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE With 195 countries represented, the UN climate change conference in Paris, France from Nov. 30 to Dec. 11 aims to find a long term goal for every country to cut down on their carbon emissions beyond 2020. The countries in attendance make up nearly 100 percent of the world’s emissions, and the conference is to make world leaders come together to make a concrete plan on how to reduce climate change and hold each other accountable. There have been other climate conferences in the past, but all only include plans that do not extend past 2020 and involve only a few countries. So far, over 170 countries have submitted climate pledges to the U.N. TERRORIST ATTACK IN SAN BERNARDINO On Dec. 2, an armed couple attacked a social services center in San Bernardino, Calif., killing 14 and injuring 21. The attackers were Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik. Malik had pledged allegiance to ISIS in a Facebook post around the same time as the attack, and because of this, the F.B.I. has announced it is treating the attack as an act of terrorism. Both attackers died in a shootout with police hours after the massacre began. This marks the deadliest ISIS-inspired attack on U.S. soil, taking place shortly after the Nov. 13 ISIS attack in Paris, France that killed 130 people and left 368 injured. President Obama delivered an address in response to the attack on Dec. 6, in which he called for airstrikes against the Islamic State and asked Americans to not give in to fear mongering by politicians and to recognize that Muslims condemn the acts of ISIS.

is not as busy. In the upcoming spring, there are the primaries, an election where each party’s candidate is selected, and then in the fall, there will be the presidential election. “I was really excited because finally what I think now has a say and I can change our community and our world,” senior Morgan Snoap said. Upon arrival in the auditorium, students were handed a pamphlet to fill out with information such as driver license number, birth-date and party affiliation. Students under 18 were able to pre-register, which would automatically them on their 18th birthday. “It was great that Hagerty took the initiative to bring [out] Seminole County elections so we could all register,” senior James Neal said. With the upcoming presidential elections, there has been a rise of interest in politics among students. “[More students] actually watch the debates because they know that, even though they are electoral colleges and it’s not a direct vote, their vote still matters,” senior Hannah Vanburen said. One of the issues discussed was participation. Traditionally, there is a lack of voter participation from young adults. “If we want to change that, then we need to do something,” Neal said. Seniors were also invited to share their own view-point on current laws they believe should be changed, as well as other current events within the school district and system. “It’s interesting to see what students think around this time of their lives,” Malkovich said. Then, through a phone call, seniors received the chance to talk and ask school board chairman Tina Calderone questions about the school district. “If we want to change anything, things need to start locally and once they start locally, they can spread nationally,” Neal said. The next voter registration will occur in spring of 2017, after the 2016 presidential elections.

news WoofTV hosts H-Factor Jeannie Williams Managing Editor On Thursday, Nov. 19, video production hosted the annual talent show, H-Factor, to raise money for the class to replace old equipment and to provide students an opportunity to showcase their talents. Senior Brett Hagerman took first photo by Aliyah Rackley place for his musical comedy performance of “Repeat Stuff,” senior Kautia Matyko placed second for Baton Twirling and senior Bria McCray took third place for her singing of “Slow Motion.” Audition forms were due Monday, Nov. 2, and auditions were held Nov. 3 and 4. A mandatory rehearsal was help Wednesday, Nov. 18. The show featured a variety of acts, opening with senior Tori Haun’s self-composed song “Sweet Release” and ranging from pantomiming to senior Faro Makuto’s dance to “Dark Times.” The first act concluded with a military salute consisting of senior Saldler Lindsay singing “I Know Where You’ve Been” and presentation of the JROTC. Things took a humorous turn when Hagerman had to present his comedy piece while holding his puppy after getting stuck in traffic leaving the vet’s office. The shoow ended with a performance by students from Elevate Studios in Longwood and then the announcement of the winners by judges Concetta Duren, Madison Gomez and Kaleigh Barry.


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opinions Mental illnesses aren’t cute quirks

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hen students insist their upcoming test has caused a massive “anxiety attack,” when students caption photos with how “depressed” they are about doing homework or when students feel the perpetual need to remain quirky by exclaiming aloud how aggravating it is that the white board has not been cleaned properly in the name of their “OCD,” they trivialize the mentally ill. OCD, which stands for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, is a diagnosed anxiety disorder where the brain suffers from the unwanted need to perform certain rituals, sometimes for hours on end, in an attempt to ease anxiety. OCD, like depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, insomnia, schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder (ADD), attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), anorexia, psychosis and hypochondria is a real mental illness that, without proper treatment or support, has potentially devastating effects. Your ex may seem crazy, but their “schizophrenic episodes” will pale in comparison to the symptoms, medically diagnosed psychotic disorders suffer from. As you claim to stay awake from insomnia in late night tweets because you cannot put down your phone or because you constantly procrastinate your work, students struggle to get through the day because of their long-term sleep deprivation from an inability to sleep that sometimes cannot even be treated with medication. In our weird attempts to one-up each other with how bad our week is going, we are quick to jump to drastic diagnoses. Self-diagnosing serious medical conditions to get attention, to seem “special” or to gain sympathy is not only offensive, but damaging. By associating everyday adjectives with mental illnesses, people come to associate cute quirks with medical issues. This trivialization, in many cases, can cause people who need help to be deterred from seeking the support and treatment they need. And while not everyone is doing it to be malicious, the lack of awareness surrounding mental disorders needs to change. Using anxiety attacks, bipolar disorders or OCD as adjectives reflects the illegitimacy with which many people regard mental illnesses. After all, if people do not believe in the severity of a mental illness, whether they have been educated about it or not, they are more likely to write it off as a choice of mood or a descriptor for otherwise healthy, if uncomfortable, emotions. Panic attacks aren’t a quick tweet and a little cry. Hypochondria isn’t sneezing and thinking it’s the flu or surfing WebMD for fun. Anorexia doesn’t plague every skinny boy or girl you see walking down the hallway. And while someone’s mental illness will never define them, it should never be belittled as an excuse or cute quirk. Remember to be respectful and aware of others. Instead of bragging about your “anxiety attack” the night before, confide in a counselor or teacher about how anxious or stressed you’ve been feeling. Instead of exaggerating your “depression,” talk about how overwhelmed or sad you are. Instead of making a big deal about your lunch being arranged in a certain way because of your “OCD,” embrace your desire for organization. Seek comfort and support without alienating people who know the strength and resolve it takes to cope with a disease you can’t see.

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OUR TAKE

The BluePrint is a student-produced newspaper Editor-in-Chief Business Manger Staff Reporters in which the student editors make all content Sophie Hill Madeline Kemper Justin Baronoff decisions. The newspaper belongs to the Columbia Scholastic Press Association, the National Scholastic Bailey Fisher Managing Editor Opinions Editor Press Association and the Florida Scholastic Press Jeannie Williams Sarah Gibson Malcolm Robinson Association. Victoria Tomeo Online Editor-in-Chief News Editor Opinions expressed within the newspaper do not Peyton Whittington Madeline Kemper Adviser Hagerty High School represent the staff’s views as a whole (except for Our Brit Taylor Online Managing Ed Twitter Editor 3225 Lockwood Blvd. Take), the views of Seminole County Public Schools Courtney Dziewior Nathaniel Kauffman Principal Oviedo, FL 32765 or Hagerty High’s administration and staff. Dr. Mary Williams Sports Editor Photographers hagertyjourn@gmail.com For information about advertising in the paper, Ben Clyatt Jake Arthur Phone: (407) 871-0750 please contact us via email or phone. We reserve the Bailey Fisher Fax: (407) 871-0817 right to reject any advertisement.

The myth of the apathetic teen Peyton Whittington

Online Editor-in-Chief

The typical teen: a lazy, boring, altogether disrespectful creature with their eyes constantly fixed on a screen and never on their goals. Right? We’ve all heard the complaints from parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, teachers and employers. We “kids” are always backtalking our elders and never showing determination to do anything other than scroll through Twitter. But of course, this is nothing new. Every new generation is regarded as apathetic by previous generations. So we are presented with two options: either teens have always been this way, or something has gone horribly wrong in the forging of social connections between teens and adults. Of course, teens will be teens. It is in our very chemical makeup to be slightly more irritated or quick to rash behavior than fully developed human beings. Within every stereotype, there is an inkling of truth, but this inkling is simply not enough to account for the broad generalization of teens as, essentially, a breed of aggressive sloth. The explanation of the problem’s source lies in season two, episode nine of Rick and Morty, “Look Who’s Purging Now.” The episode features the concept of verbal hostage taking, which, though presented in a humorous manner, is incredibly telling about our society and the established relationships between teens and adults. Any teen has probably been in the situation where an adult has asked a pointless question in a failed attempt to make conversation, such as “Oh, watcha doing, just playing on your phone?” The teen then has no other option than to bark a “yes”

and come off as the angry, defensive person many adults make the average teen out to be. It’s not conversation. It’s backing someone into a conversational corner. This contributes a great deal to that ever-present generality about the teenage temperament. We have no meaningful conversations with adults because, many times, we aren’t set in a position to make meaningful conversation. And this doesn’t just apply to teenage stereotypes. Verbal hostage-taking runs rampant in debates about gender equality, abortion, presidential elections, gun control and any other major political or social debate. Ever wonder why you have prepared the best argument in a discussion with someone of opposing views, yet you still come off as the loser? Your opponent has, most likely, taken you as a verbal hostage. For example, if your pro-life opinion is countered with “So you don’t care about women’s rights?” you are now a verbal hostage. This practice is the telltale sign of someone who either has a weak argument or who is attempting to make subpar conversation. Of course, not everyone participating in this phenomenon has malicious intent. Some adults really have no idea how to converse on a deeper level with youth, and this is just happens to be their best shot at it. However, this is no excuse. Adults striving to talk with younger people should look to ask open-ended questions as conversation starters instead of asking questions based on the answers they want to receive. Instead of “Just playing on your phone?” adults could offer a simple “How’s it going?” Adults often make conversation harder than it needs to be, and should know that asking how teens are in general isn’t an outdated concept. Worthwhile discussion is possible, but both parties must pull their conversational weight in order to be successful.

Back of the Pack

A comic by Peyton Whittington

WHAT IS SAID

WHAT IS MEANT

Leaders should lead (and other groundbreaking ideas) simply because he was a part of a cheerleading team. Yet these Honorary Staff Reporter same people who condemn any lack of school spirit (“if you don’t attend the game tonight, you’re irrelevant to life”) have been s a senior, I’ve witnessed the transformation of our leaving games early (when we’re winning, c’mon that’s when you school’s student section. Former student Drew Sullivan, get the rowdiest), not cheering, or even not attending at all. Patterns of attendance are both confusing and nonsensical. class of 2014, began the section’s evolution, bringing organization to our school. He led the way for other equally great Some of the largest turnouts of the year were during the beginning spirit leaders such as Bradley Ballew and Chris Carpenter. During of the year when the football team was losing most of their games. this time, the student section had a new, fun atmosphere better Yet once the team began actually winning games, attendance dropped. than any I have ever expected. And when the spirit leaders do decide to show up, they Then this year began. While the beginning of this season saw the greatest spirit, game turnout has plummeted, despite having continually cross the line between rowdy and rude. They make fun the best football record in the school’s history. of looks (a disturbingly common trend during girls’ volleyball), Yet with the seniors leading the school’s “spirit,” can anyone yell out obscenities (there are families at the games too, you be blamed? Instead of encouraging school spirit and unity, as most know) and for some reason believe that offensive and racist chants spirit leaders should, this year’s seniors have actually caused an (“where’s your dad?”) don’t apply to their black friends sitting right next to them. even greater divide. This is our last year of high school and we’re on top: this Their “reign” has been riddled with hypocrisy. Any student who dares to speak badly – even jokingly – about their school or is the year we should be our most spirited. Instead, we’re not their team is immediately attacked by those in charge. Even the participating in powder puff cheer, we start petty arguments with student section Twitter account berates its classmates and even juniors and underclassmen, and we’re leaving homecoming early students from other schools, going so far as to make fun of a boy to go to parties instead. The most recent pep rally served as a Kenzie Helmick

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I hate it when you’re trying to go somewhere and people go super slow in a huge line you can’t go around. - Mallory Ferguson, 10

BARKING MAD

The classroom temperature sucks because it’s either really cold or hot. - Haley Parlette, 12 It’s annoying how the trash cans everywhere are now infested with bees and nothing is being done about it. - Chase Garick, 10

remarkable indicator of just how lame we are. Despite the fact it was a surprise pep rally to celebrate our football team going to districts, only half of our senior class showed up. Our bleachersusually packed with a sea of black and festive crowns- were halffilled and downright pitiful. Even more depressing, during the competition for the spirit stick, our senior class decided not to participate and turned their backs to principal Mary Williams. The demonstration, protesting a cancelled senior lunch (which was going to be rescheduled), resulted in the forfeiting of the spirit stick and loss of our senior skip day. But it’s not too late to change our ways. There are six months left of the school year, and we can use this time to transform our student section to something even bigger and better. Change needs to be made not only to make our last year more enjoyable, but to pave the way for following years. The current senior spirit leaders have turned off the masses from even attending sporting events, and the more we cause underclassmen to dislike the student section, the more we discourage them from having their own student section. In the three years leading up to my senior year, I couldn’t wait to become a part of the student section simply because we had spirit leaders who were fun and inspiring. I’ve always considered supporting my school as a critical high

Some teachers have no leniency on tardiness in the mornings even though the car ramp is backed and there’s nothing you can do about it. - Ricardo Valle-Gonzales, 11 Why do seniors date freshman? It shouldn’t happen because the age difference is gross and freshmen will try to act like adults and then be like, ‘Oh, let me ask my mom.’ - Josh Brozzo, 10

The police blocked off the quicker way to get out of the parking lot and now it takes forever to leave. - Claudia Shaw, 11 Applying to colleges is really stressful, especially since I don’t know whether or not I’ll be accepted. Some more support would be nice. - Jacob Guessetto, 12 The sophomores are the worst. - Sam Wainman, 12


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STar wars 5

star wars

Star wars for wookies why non-fans should care

The Music •

Gift ideas for any Star Wars fan

by Victoria Tomeo

R2-D2 20 oz lidded mug

The score of the series was composed by John Williams and is credited with reviving grand symphonic scores in the 1970s Throughout the film, Williams used a technique called leitmotif, which is a phrase or melodic cell that signifies a character, place, plot element, mood, idea, relationship or other specific moment. This prevailed past the series and is now present in almost all modern films.

The effects •

Not only is there a removable lid, but it’s only $19.99 on thinkgeek. com. This is the best Star Wars gift if you need to give your little brother or sister something to hold their blue milk.

The series utilizes “Dykstraflex,” a computer-controlled, motion picture camera system that allows seven different axes of motion. This system computer-controlled system was created specifically for the series’ complex special effects. The special effects paved the way for later movies Alien, The Terminator, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Jurassic Park, Titanic, Avatar and more.

The costumes

Death star Bluetooth Speaker

This iHome, one-touch connectivity speaker is applicable to any Bluetooth device. It lights up and lasts for up to eight hours. The best place to get this is at Toys R Us for $49.99.

The costumes were heavily influenced by cultures from around the world. For example, Han Solo’s design is based on the outlaw stars of old westerns and the Jedi’s robes are based on Buddhist monks of the Eastern world. The costumes were designed to give insight to the characters’ personality and traits. Information gathered by Courtney Dziewior

Darth vader Helmet car charger All you need for this gift is a charging cord, a power socket and a car. It can get up to 2.1 amps of charge to your phone and is $19.99 on thinkgeek.com

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still working with the team, the biggest names from the original cast will appear in the new film, an emotional trigger for those who have seen the original films. Actors Mark Hamill, who played Luke Skywalker, Carrie Fisher, who played Leia, and Harrison Ford, who played Han Solo, will be reprising their roles 38 years later as older versions of the beloved Star Wars characters. Sophomore Roman Brock-Edgar has been a huge Star Wars fan since he was 7, even collecting action figures from the Clone Wars TV show and from Episode III. “All of my friends and I are really excited for it and I am going to see it as soon as possible,” Brock-Edgar said. On Oct. 18, Star Wars tickets became available for advance purchase, and within a month, the movie made $50 million in pre-sales. Tickets began to sell out almost instantly. First showings were sold out within the hour and servers crashed as thousands of people flooded sites to buy their tickets online. With the final trailers out and only a week left until the premier, fans cannot wait. For some, getting into theaters may be difficult at first, but there is no doubt that students will make their way into those theaters as soon as possible. “I am light years beyond ecstatic. It really feels like history, since it’s a new Star Wars movie coming out in theaters when I’m actually conscious of my complete devotion to it.” Star Wars The Force Awakens comes out in theaters everywhere Friday, Dec. 18.

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long time ago in a galaxy not so far away, the hit film Star Wars came out. After its release in 1977, the film became a cultural phenomenon and is still being recognized as the pinnacle of sci-fi movies. Whether kids are carrying around R2-D2 lunch boxes or wearing Chewbacca fur jackets, Star Wars gear can be seen everywhere, and with the Dec. 18 release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, the hype is reaching galactic proportions. While the seventh installment in the series promises to bring a host of new fans, those most excited have known Star Wars culture since they were Ewok-size. Seniors Emma and Kallie Delis grew up with a huge love for the Star Wars movies. Their room has always been decorated from corner to corner with Star Wars-themed items. “When Kal and I were little, even our family told us we’d outgrow it in middle school,” Emma said. Not only have they refused to outgrow it, but the Delis twins have continued to embrace Star Wars, and they already have tickets for the midnight premier. While both are a little agitated with bandwagon fans, they also agree it is nice to see other girls expressing their love for the movies such as they did when they were younger. “I’m glad girls don’t have to be ashamed of being a fan anymore,” Emma said. “They can incorporate either style

whether they’re girly or tomboy-ish.” Old and new fans have discussed everything Star Wars leading up to the release date, but one of the biggest topics is how the saga has been handed over to Disney, and some fans fear what that might mean for the new film. “Disney’s either going to do a great job with the franchise or they’re going to kill it,” junior Noah Clarke said. Clarke, like many others, grew up with the old films. Seeing it come back excites him; however, with a lot of new things being incorporated into this movie, there was the question of whether it would be the same Star Wars he’d grown up to know and love. Along with a new owner, the movie also features director JJ Abrams, who also directed the most recent Star Trek movies, -Star Trek and Star Trek: Into Darkness. Abrams directed and co-wrote The Force Awakens with three other writers, including the writer/director from the 1977 film, George Lucas. Trailers have featured Abrams’ action rich, visually engaging style and have done much to fuel the hype. “About a month back I saw the new trailer for the first time,” junior Salim Mouloua said. “I was so excited that I watched it in class with my friends the day it came out.” Mouloua has been a Star Wars fan since 2005 and has seen all the films as well as some of the animated shows. “I made sure to watch the originals first and then the prequels in the order they came out, all on DVD,” Mouloua said. Not everything has changed, though. Along with Lucas

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This is the best and most popular gift when it’s cold outside. It’s $24.99 at Target and comes with a hood and cross-body, built-in utility belt that is famously worn by Chewy himself.

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Chewbacca onesie

12/7/2015 8:11:30 PM


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STar wars 5

star wars

Star wars for wookies why non-fans should care

The Music •

Gift ideas for any Star Wars fan

by Victoria Tomeo

R2-D2 20 oz lidded mug

The score of the series was composed by John Williams and is credited with reviving grand symphonic scores in the 1970s Throughout the film, Williams used a technique called leitmotif, which is a phrase or melodic cell that signifies a character, place, plot element, mood, idea, relationship or other specific moment. This prevailed past the series and is now present in almost all modern films.

The effects •

Not only is there a removable lid, but it’s only $19.99 on thinkgeek. com. This is the best Star Wars gift if you need to give your little brother or sister something to hold their blue milk.

The series utilizes “Dykstraflex,” a computer-controlled, motion picture camera system that allows seven different axes of motion. This system computer-controlled system was created specifically for the series’ complex special effects. The special effects paved the way for later movies Alien, The Terminator, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Jurassic Park, Titanic, Avatar and more.

The costumes

Death star Bluetooth Speaker

This iHome, one-touch connectivity speaker is applicable to any Bluetooth device. It lights up and lasts for up to eight hours. The best place to get this is at Toys R Us for $49.99.

The costumes were heavily influenced by cultures from around the world. For example, Han Solo’s design is based on the outlaw stars of old westerns and the Jedi’s robes are based on Buddhist monks of the Eastern world. The costumes were designed to give insight to the characters’ personality and traits. Information gathered by Courtney Dziewior

Darth vader Helmet car charger All you need for this gift is a charging cord, a power socket and a car. It can get up to 2.1 amps of charge to your phone and is $19.99 on thinkgeek.com

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still working with the team, the biggest names from the original cast will appear in the new film, an emotional trigger for those who have seen the original films. Actors Mark Hamill, who played Luke Skywalker, Carrie Fisher, who played Leia, and Harrison Ford, who played Han Solo, will be reprising their roles 38 years later as older versions of the beloved Star Wars characters. Sophomore Roman Brock-Edgar has been a huge Star Wars fan since he was 7, even collecting action figures from the Clone Wars TV show and from Episode III. “All of my friends and I are really excited for it and I am going to see it as soon as possible,” Brock-Edgar said. On Oct. 18, Star Wars tickets became available for advance purchase, and within a month, the movie made $50 million in pre-sales. Tickets began to sell out almost instantly. First showings were sold out within the hour and servers crashed as thousands of people flooded sites to buy their tickets online. With the final trailers out and only a week left until the premier, fans cannot wait. For some, getting into theaters may be difficult at first, but there is no doubt that students will make their way into those theaters as soon as possible. “I am light years beyond ecstatic. It really feels like history, since it’s a new Star Wars movie coming out in theaters when I’m actually conscious of my complete devotion to it.” Star Wars The Force Awakens comes out in theaters everywhere Friday, Dec. 18.

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long time ago in a galaxy not so far away, the hit film Star Wars came out. After its release in 1977, the film became a cultural phenomenon and is still being recognized as the pinnacle of sci-fi movies. Whether kids are carrying around R2-D2 lunch boxes or wearing Chewbacca fur jackets, Star Wars gear can be seen everywhere, and with the Dec. 18 release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, the hype is reaching galactic proportions. While the seventh installment in the series promises to bring a host of new fans, those most excited have known Star Wars culture since they were Ewok-size. Seniors Emma and Kallie Delis grew up with a huge love for the Star Wars movies. Their room has always been decorated from corner to corner with Star Wars-themed items. “When Kal and I were little, even our family told us we’d outgrow it in middle school,” Emma said. Not only have they refused to outgrow it, but the Delis twins have continued to embrace Star Wars, and they already have tickets for the midnight premier. While both are a little agitated with bandwagon fans, they also agree it is nice to see other girls expressing their love for the movies such as they did when they were younger. “I’m glad girls don’t have to be ashamed of being a fan anymore,” Emma said. “They can incorporate either style

whether they’re girly or tomboy-ish.” Old and new fans have discussed everything Star Wars leading up to the release date, but one of the biggest topics is how the saga has been handed over to Disney, and some fans fear what that might mean for the new film. “Disney’s either going to do a great job with the franchise or they’re going to kill it,” junior Noah Clarke said. Clarke, like many others, grew up with the old films. Seeing it come back excites him; however, with a lot of new things being incorporated into this movie, there was the question of whether it would be the same Star Wars he’d grown up to know and love. Along with a new owner, the movie also features director JJ Abrams, who also directed the most recent Star Trek movies, -Star Trek and Star Trek: Into Darkness. Abrams directed and co-wrote The Force Awakens with three other writers, including the writer/director from the 1977 film, George Lucas. Trailers have featured Abrams’ action rich, visually engaging style and have done much to fuel the hype. “About a month back I saw the new trailer for the first time,” junior Salim Mouloua said. “I was so excited that I watched it in class with my friends the day it came out.” Mouloua has been a Star Wars fan since 2005 and has seen all the films as well as some of the animated shows. “I made sure to watch the originals first and then the prequels in the order they came out, all on DVD,” Mouloua said. Not everything has changed, though. Along with Lucas

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This is the best and most popular gift when it’s cold outside. It’s $24.99 at Target and comes with a hood and cross-body, built-in utility belt that is famously worn by Chewy himself.

rs

Chewbacca onesie

12/7/2015 8:11:30 PM


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lifestyles

Sarah Gibson

“W

Opinions Editor

HAT ARE THOSE?” Six years ago, senior Caroline Garrison bought a pair of Chaco sandals for summer camp and time outdoors. Now Crocs, Birkenstocks, Chacos and Tevas can be seen walking down any hallway on campus. Favored by everyone from camp counselors to cheerleaders, these notoriously “ugly” shoes have popped back into the world of fashion with innovative designs and more updated looks. Ugly shoes are becoming a sort of fashion statement, and the days of sacrificing comfort for looks are over. The original two-strapped “Arizona” Birkenstock sandal sells for $99.95, and with many of the more stylish spin-offs like pink, metallic or even snake-skin costing up to $160, it can be a hefty price to pay for a shoe many people deem hideous. However, the price does not seem to waiver potential buyers. “I love my Birkenstocks because they are super comfy,” senior Aliza Eubanks said. “They also look great with some outfits.” Another member in the clog family are Crocs, retailing at $34.99. Made of foam rubber, these durable clogs with holes for breathability provide the comfort factor at a lower cost than Birkenstocks, if one is able to get past the appearance. “I like my Crocs mostly because people make fun of me for them; That’s not going to stop me from wearing them,” junior Francesca Spadaro said. “What’s even better is when the people who used to make fun of me for wearing Crocs, buy them later on; I see them all throughout school.” Not just for gardening anymore, Crocs now make sandals, flats, leather boots and yes, even heels. Also made from their trademark foam rubber, these fashionable finds redefine the brand of Crocs, and many of the styles appear far more appealing than the original clog. For some, Crocs have become a staple for school, work and athletic events. Popular among employees at Beef O Brady’s and Jeremiah’s Italian Ice, Crocs provide comfort for people who are constantly on their feet. Cheerleaders especially, along with other athletic teams, have made Crocs their footwear of choice for before practice and competitions: a way to bond as a team,

Tune trade

which likely influences other students to wear these otherwise unattractive kicks. “[Crocs] are so comfortable and great to wear on long days,” varsity cheerleader Savannah Hobbs said. “We had to dress up during school the day before our competition, and my friend changed from her heels into Crocs.” Apart from clogs, ugly sandals have left the boundaries of summer camp to be worn year-round. No longer for “nature freaks” and avid adventurers, Tevas and Chacos market a variety of styles attractive to people regardless if they are hiking a mountain or hiking to class. “I honestly don’t care if people don’t like my Chacos because I think they are so fun, and they have taken me on so many adventures,” Garrison said. These strappy sandals come in almost any color and can even be customized, if the $130 price tag is not a deterrent. Chacos, which are aimed toward outdoor function, come in multiple grips depending on the desired turf; however, the concrete slabs on campus will work with either. This brand, though mainly focused on durability, released a Grateful Dead line of sandals, and frequently switches up their patterns to continue drawing potential buyers. “I chose to buy Chacos instead of Tevas because I think they are much cuter, plus they have more durability during camp,” Garrison said. Rival sandal company Tevas arguably matches their ugly factor, however their cheaper $40-70 “Original Universal” sandals are taking on Birkenstock’s similar fashionably unattractive approach. Featuring straps with metallic leather, animal prints and pastels, these fashion forward ugly sandals are versatile and can be dressed up easier than their counterpart, Chacos. “I don’t understand the hype behind Chacos; They’re hideous,” senior Caitlyn Zibell said. “Maybe I’d get a pair of Crocs because they’re comfy, but I’d rather just stick with running shoes.” Though there are still people who refuse to partake in this fad, people are continuing to redefine fashion with these eye-catching kicks. Function is becoming fashionable, while comfort and style are merging to give consumers the best of both worlds. “[These shoes] make me feel like I’m walking on clouds,” senior Haley Parlette said. “The haters don’t phase me, because if they had a pair, they’d understand.”

Over 130 people responded to a survey posted on Twitter

Song recommendations based on the jams you already know and love

“New Americana” by “Flesh Without Halsey Blood” by Grimes Fans of Halsey’s dark pop debut record Badlands should check out the eclectic synthpop dream that is Grimes.

“Lean On” by Major Lazer “Revolusion” by and DJ Snake feat. MØ Elliphant Killer dance club beats married with the intriguing vocals of foreign artists are what make these tracks so addicting.

recommendations by Peyton Whittington

“Stressed Out” by “Flagpole Sitta” by Twenty One Pilots Harvey Danger Throw it back to the ‘90s with this cynical anthem if you favor Twenty One Pilots’ poetry-based indiepop sound.

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12/7/2015 8:23:19 PM


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sports

Basketball eyes states return Justin Baronoff

A

Staff Reporter

fter losing 57-56 to Wellington on a last second free throw in the 8A state championship game last season, the boys varsity basketball team tipped off the 2015-2016 regular season on Saturday, Nov. 21, hoping to return with a different outcome. While the team has faced obstacles, they remain positive. “Last season, it was fun to watch the team get that far, and I know this year, they want to have another run at it for sure,” head coach Josh Kohn said. This season, the team is currently 2-3, beating both Timber Creek (67-63) and district opponent Viera (58-54), but losing to Apopka (70-64) to open the regular season in the Kalyn High Tournament, Harmony (67-63) and Oviedo (74-49). Last season, the team finished 22-9. They did not beat Oviedo either time, but every game was close. The team plays Oviedo again on Jan. 15. The team will host the annual Hoops for Heart game on Dec. 12, and their first home game against Windermere Prep on Dec. 17. The team will also play Lake Brantley on Jan. 26, who has the ninth best player in the state, John Mooney, committed to Notre Dame. Contributing to the teams’ early struggles was the change from class 8A to 7A after dropping a division due to a population decrease. This includes Viera, Harmony, St. Cloud, Lake Nona and Melbourne, which lost in the regional semifinals last season. Over the five games played, forward Will Faulk has led the team in points, averaging 18 points per game. However, for Faulk, it does not mean much. “It means nothing to me if we don’t win, it’s as simple as that,” Faulk said. “Putting up points and not winning is like having a car with no gas.” Forward Denzel Mahoney led the team in points last season, averaging 23 points per game, but is out this season after suffering a torn ACL

injury this past summer with his annual summer team in Las Vegas. Despite the five games played without him so far, Mahoney is still confident the team can get back on track, as he will be on the sidelines for moral support and helping Kohn. “I’ve seen what this team can do without me,” Mahoney said. “I know they’ve had some tough losses so far, but I think the team is still going to be really good regardless of me not playing.” The team has five active returning players from last season: guard Alex Keel, Faulk, center Zen Goodridge, forward Rocco Corvo, and guard Grant Greene. However, the team added depth from the junior varsity team last season, including small forward Jordan Cox, guard Vecarie Pettis and center Joe Conley, who all start for the team. “I wasn’t surprised at all to already be named into the starting lineup,” Cox said. “I have felt prepared since the end of the JV season last year, but there’s still a lot of work that needs to be done.” After not playing basketball since his freshman year, guard Matt Whipple joined the team, pairing with Keel as one of two active seniors. “Basketball has always been my sport and nothing feels better than scoring a basket,” Whipple said. “I know that we haven’t been as great as we were expected to be, but we are what we make the season to be.” In the offseason, the team’s main focus was improving team chemistry, as it was an issue for most of last season, such as lack of communication on the court. Over the summer, the team would play three on three, go to the gym together, and even sleep over at each other’s houses to sharpen their skills on and off the court. “We have to think of ourselves as a brotherhood rather than just a team,” Goodridge said. “All of us now understand what we have to do to follow in the footsteps bring another ring to this school.” Before the season started, on Tuesday,

Ben and Nate Honey, I shrunk the pins Ben Clyatt and Nathaniel Kauffman Sports Editor and Twitter Editor Nate: After decisively taking down Ben in FootGolf and Boing dodgeball, I agreed to something a little more suitable to Ben’s skillset. This sport was mini-bowling and we found it inside Waterford Lakes’ Firkin and Kegler. Firkin and Kegler is a grown-up version of Chuck E. Cheese’s. It has a full arcade, bowling alley, bar and restaurant.

Photo by Trent Daniel

BLOCK PARTY. Forward Zen Goodridge goes up to contest a shot in the game against Oviedo. The team lost 74-49, despite forward Will Faulk’s 18 points. The team is currently 2-3.

Oct. 13, Keel and Mahoney both committed to play college basketball. Despite not playing this season, Mahoney committed to Southeast Missouri State University and Keel committed to Union University. However, Keel is still committed to returning this year’s team to the state championship. “I committed early so I could focus on the season instead of committing in the late signing period,” Keel said. “Everyone, including myself, knows what we have to do to win games.” The team’s next game will be against Celebration on Thursday, Dec. 10, “With some inexperience this year, it will take some time to grow,” Kohn said. “We all want to have another run at the [state championship], but we still have a lot to improve on.”

Weightlifting earns victory over Seminole Madeline Kemper

O

News Editor

n Wednesday, Nov. 2 the girls weightlifting team beat Seminole in a home meet, 60-30. Although the girls did not feel it was their strongest meet overall, small victories, such as freshman Cheyenne Ducharme’s personal record of 100 pounds on the clean and jerk, and the addition of senior Faro Makuto helped lead the team to victory. The current record is now 5-0. Adding to the stress of the meet was the fact that Seminole was late due to transportation issues, meaning that Hagerty had to complete bench presses without Seminole and they arrived shortly before the clean and jerks. “We lifted against ourselves, which kind of stinks, but on the other hand you have to just adapt to the changes,” head coach Matt Malkovich said. Several lifters led their individual weight classes: senior Kendal Haitt at 205 lbs, senior Tia Menna at 275 lbs, junior Francesca Sparado at 280 lbs and junior Kellan Marini at 325 lbs. Captain Olivia Albano, who placed second at states last year, was able to total at 305 lbs, benching 150 lbs and clean and jerking 155 lbs. “Seminole is probably our biggest competitor we’ve had thus far,” Albano said. “They have a fair amount of girls on their team, and it’s definitely not a breeze to compete against them.” Malkovich, however, is focused on what lies ahead. “Everyone needs to relax,” Malkovich said. “No need to peak versus Seminole. We will when the time is right at conference and regionals.” Malkovich also explained that the team is still focused on the training aspect and that at the moment the team is not focused on lifting their absolute best. The team will train during winter break, and then look forward to defending their district championship title when they compete again on Jan. 13.

Ben: Mini-bowling is nothing like you would imagine it to be. Picture a bowling alley, and then shrink it. That’s mini-bowling. The lane was about 30 feet long, the pins were noticeably smaller, and a skee ball was used in the place of a bowling ball. Nate: With the small ball, the bowls tend to be extremely fast, so keeping it on target is key. With the short alley, there is zero room for error. Just ask Ben (who had a frame with legit zero points). Ben: I will admit that there was a learning curve at the beginning of the game where I had to adjust to the changed dimensions, but I caught on fast and was the first in our group to get a strike. I was the Steph Curry of minibowling. Nate: Ben, the only thing that you and Steph Curry have in common is that you both celebrated Thanksgiving. Plus, I would have to pay $60 to see Curry play. A game of mini bowling was only $3, and watching you lose was free. And although I did struggle at the start, I made it close in the middle frames. At one point I went spare, strike, spare, leaving us almost dead even going into the last few frames. Ben: The only problem with me going up by 20 on Nate so early was that I got cocky and played the rest of the game like I still held an insurmountable lead. Even on the ninth frame I was trying to hit a trick shot, which only led to my demise as I finished the final frame up by only five points, with Nate still to roll his final frame. Nate: And in a scenario where all I needed was six measly pins, I decided to add some insult to Ben’s injury, gassing a strike followed by a sixpin shot leaving me with a two-two split and 97 points. With Ben’s constant disrespect fueling my roll I grazed the outside pin on the right split, sending it flying into another two, giving me three more points, and more importantly a 100-86 win over Ben. Ben: As demoralizing as it may have been, I put it past me as we checked out the full arcade there. Because we went on a weeknight, the place was pretty empty and we had the whole mini-bowling alley and arcade to ourselves. We could use all four mini-bowling lanes, and though we didn’t spend too much time at the arcade, we were able to play a couple rounds of pop-a-shot, and Nate even got to hop on the Dance Dance Revolution machine for a little bit. You get tickets for playing each game, and at the end we got to trade our tickets in for some candy. Nate: Getting roasted is a little less painful when your wallet doesn’t also have to take a beating. Also I did obliterate that pop-a-shot machine, beating two of the high scores. Ben: The greatest part about Firkin and Kegler was how cheap it was. We went with two other people, and the four of us only spent a combined $33 for three hours of mini-bowling and arcade, a ridiculous $2.75 an hour per person. They have a regular bowling alley too, with giant-screen TVs above the lanes where you can watch the real Steph Curry play. Nate: As it was easily our most fun outing, I would highly recommend checking it out no matter what sports or activities you are into. Ben: I couldn’t agree more. I had fun doing our other stuff too, but this easily took the title of most fun Ben and Nate of 2015. I cannot wait until we go back.


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sports

Girls basketball rebounds Sophie Hill Editor in Chief

A

fter finishing last year with a 4-21 record last year, the girls basketball team looked forward to a change. Not only did they get a change in their district, but their record of 7-4 is a fresh change for the new season. And although four new members are on the team and the bus rides have more than doubled to get to games, the team has been able to overcome its with high hopes. “We’re already doing better in the first month than we did all year last year,” forward Victoria Morales said. “But that means there’s a lot of expectations on my part, being one of the seniors and having a lot of my younger teammates look up to me.” The team’s record has been bolstered by its leading scorer and team captain, Morales. She not only scored double digits in nine games, but has led the team to a 41-37 win against Viera Beach on Dec. 3 with 17 points, a 56-22 win against Lyman with 18 points and a 55-24 win over Lake Howell with 22 points. Morales also finished the game against Celebration with 26 points and a triple double, putting up 10 or more points, rebounds and steals. Junior Tori Munro scored 12 points against Lake Howell, leading to a 55-24 win, and freshman Megan Reilly rallied the team in its 49-39 loss to Oviedo with 16 points. “It feels good knowing that all the effort I, and the rest of the team, put into the games shows,” Morales said. Like football, volleyball and boys basketball, the girls basketball team competes in a new district this year. After the school did not have enough students to qualify for the 8A district, the team now plays in 7A; competing against teams such as Celebration, Harmony and Liberty. “We’re doing really well this season, even though our new district means we have to go on super long bus rides before the games,” Morales said. “It hasn’t disrupted our play, but it can be tiring.” If anything, the extended travel time has helped to unite the team. Although they mostly sleep and do homework, their time on the road forges close relationships on the road that extend to the court. “It’s difficult sometimes to balance being a student athlete,”

sports shorts

GIRLS SOCCER SHUTS OUT LAKE MINNEOLA

On Tuesday, Dec. 1, the girls soccer team defeated Lake Minneola 2-0. Midfielder Julia England scored both goals in the win to improve the team’s record to 4-3-4 overall. This was the first time the team played Lake Minneola in school history. This is the third shutout for the team this season, as they beat Seminole 4-0 in the first game on Oct. 27 and Lyman 3-0 on Nov. 17. “It’s actually a pretty big accomplishment to be the first girls soccer team here to beat them,” center back Meaghan Lee said. “It was a huge confidence booster, but we should have scored higher as a team.”

BOYS SOCCER KICKS LAKE BRANTLEY

Photo by Jake Arthur

VICTORIOUS. Forward Victoria Morales drives the ball against Lake Howell in the team’s season opener. Morales finished with 22 points in the team’s 55-24 win.

Munro said. “The longer bus rides can be hard, but we try to do our homework while we can.” In addition to a close group, even with four new team members, the team has surpassed its expectations and set high goals for the rest of the season. While all of their games in January are away with, the exception of Lake Mary at home on Jan. 12, the rest of their December games are home. The team plays Masters Academy on Dec. 18 and St. Cloud on Dec. 12. Their next game will be a rematch against Celebration High School at home on Dec. 10.

The boys soccer team beat Lake Brantley, 3-0, on Friday, Dec. 4. Striker Felipe Correra, striker Jordan Snoap and defender Ian Katz each scored a goal in the win, while goalkeeper Chris Hagglund recorded nine saves. Since 2013, the team has not had a clear win against Lake Brantley, as they tied with them last season, 0-0. This is the fifth shutout for the team this season, passing the last year’s four shutouts. “It felt good to keep a clean sheet,” Hagglund said. “Not only was that great, but we managed to get the win away, which is always difficult to do.”

WRESTLING FINISHES FIFTH IN CLASH OF THE TITANS TOURNAMENT On Friday, Dec. 4 and Saturday, Dec. 5, the wrestling team finished fifth in the Clash of the Titans tournament. Junior Ethan Kaufman finished second in the 220 weight class, junior Seth Carter finished fourth in the 152 weight class, and senior Curtis Duren finished fourth in the 182 weight class to lead the team. Last season, the team placed seventh overall in the tournament. This was head coach Scotty Diaz’s first tournament with the team, as Diaz took over for former head coach Isiah Cabal.

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The BluePrint - Volume 11, Issue 3  

The BluePrint - Volume 11, Issue 3  

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