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HAGERTY HIGH SCHOOL

3225 LOCKWOOD BLVD. OVIEDO, FL 32765

INDEX

the

blueprint

NEWS.............................2 Opinions.............................3 Car Crashes.................... 4-5 Lifestyles.........................6-7 Sports.................................8

Nov. 6, 2015

volume 11, issue 2

Thompson spices up culinary curriculum Sarah Gibson

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Opinions Editor

ast year, students in the culinary program cooked three dishes in 36 weeks. By Nov. 1, this year’s students have already cooked 10 dishes, from spaghetti to soup. As a result of new instructor Matthew Thompson, culinary is undergoing a makeover and cooking up more fun. Replacing Janice Palmer after her retirement last year, Thompson never intended on being a culinary teacher. Majoring in journalism at UCF, he spent 15 years working in the professional worlds of both journalism and hospitality. “If you asked me 20 years ago, I would’ve expected myself to be working for the Wall Street Journal at this point,” Thompson said. Thompson was always interested in teaching, but he did not see how the salary could support his family. He recently left the hospitality industry and began working as a substitute teacher. When Palmer retired, the school offered him a temporary job for the fourth quarter, and because he was a good fit, the school offered him a permanent position teaching culinary this year. “I knew it was time to start teaching when I was miserable with my other job,” Thompson said. “Now [I’m] driving home with a smile on my face; This is the best job I could’ve asked for.” Because of his professional experience, Thompson has introduced multiple changes from curriculum to classroom design. In restaurants, atmosphere is key to the experience, and in the culinary lab the same holds true. Ditching the widespread gray color scheme of the older culinary lab, the new room incorporates decorative dishes, vases and seasonal decorations like pumpkins. The previous lab used multiple rows of desks throughout the center, which was renovated to feature dining tables instead. Warm colored decorative lamps add to the welcoming atmosphere. Not only has the classroom undergone a makeover, but Thompson has used his professional experiences to sharpen the relevancy of the course. In the past, students were lucky to cook three times a year, but students in the renovated course are in the lab cooking weekly. “I am also trying to incorporate more creative cooking,” Thompson said. “Yes, we will make basics such as pancakes and pasta, but I want to incorporate holidays into the mix. This year we will work on making a Thanksgiving dinner.” To get into the holiday spirit, students carved pumpkins from the varsity boys soccer pumpkin patch. After the pumpkins were carved, students hit the lab to prepare and cook the leftover seeds. “In Culinary II, we would go months without cooking,” junior Kaitlyn Gross said. “This year we’ve made more advanced meals

like pasta with homemade sauce and chicken stir-fry.” With all of the food cooked in the classroom, leftovers are not an uncommon sight. The culinary class places a menu outside the room whenever they work in the lab, and teachers and staff often swing by for a taste. “If you’re ever walking through the school and smell some delicious food, I guarantee you that’s us.” Thompson said. “I’ve been able to smell our cooking all the way at the front office. It’s a sure sign that the culinary lab is up and running.” Cooking weekly, the culinary program relies heavily on donations. However, students gladly donate when they see the ingredients put to use. “In the past, students would make donations and wind up only cooking a few times throughout the course,” Thompson said. “Now students are happy to contribute when they can see exactly where their donations are going.” Along with food preparation, students have one day of bookwork and one day of testing per week to increase their knowledge of kitchen tools and techniques for both cleaning and cooking. Students are exposed to all aspects of cooking; However, they have extensive time in the culinary lab producing dishes and gaining valuable experience. “When students signed up for the course, they assumed they would be cooking,” Thompson said. “Now the expectation is becoming a reality and the response is great.” The program has also increased freedom and trust between teacher and student. “In real life, you aren’t going to have someone hand you all of the right measurements for your dish, you are going to have to figure it out on your own,” Thompson said. Students now have open access to their ingredients and, in some instances, cook their own recipes. According to Thompson, this relaxed approach has worked, and he has had no discipline issues. Typically, only about half of the Culinary I classes continue into Culinary II. This year, Culinary III combined with Culinary IV because only four students enrolled in Culinary IV. Regardless of the previous lack of follow-through, Thompson expects to see a huge boost in student interest in the following years. “Students are getting super excited when they find out about all of the changes,” Thompson said. “I hear kids not even enrolled in the course raving about it after listening to their friends or seeing posts on social media of everyone cooking.” photo by Kacy Lach Thompson is expecting to see a peak in enrollment as word RECIPE FOR SUCCESS. Junior Trey Hogan serves casserole to fellow students after making it in class under Thomas’ instruction. travels and the newly redesigned course continues to turn heads.

Rumbling in their footsteps

photo by Jessie Burton Senior Angel Pagan rumbles with aspiring cheerleader.

Madeline Kemper

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News Editor

s Senior Julia green cheered during the homecoming parade, she spotted her pee wee cheerleaders waiving excitedly, and was taken back to when she went to Carillon Elementary and saw her high school cheer coaches in the parade. “It always seemed like high school was far away, but now that it’s a reality it makes me realize the mark left on those girls,” Green said. The Pop Warner Cheer and Football Program, dedicated to developing future athletes, is expanding in their relationship with the high school program. The cheer team has found ways to get involved through events, volunteer work and even on the sidelines. One of the earliest events of the year was Youth Camp held on June 1-4. The camp typically attracts girls from the pop warner program. “[Youth Camp is] before the Pop Warner’s season starts so that cheerleaders can come in and test the waters before they fully commit to a full year of Pop Warner,” junior coach Emily Sorace said.

The biggest event is the Pre-Comp hosted by cheerleaders on Oct. 7. Pop Warner teams could perform their routines before the first competition on Oct. 17. The high school team assisted in spotting and performed a routine. “When I perform in front of people I don’t ever get scared and I always feel happy to get a medal or a trophy,” second grade Pop Warner cheerleader Samantha Sweat said. Cheerleaders also have the opportunity to volunteer with the Pop Warner program as junior coaches. They assist in creating current routines. In addition, they act as role models. Senior Gabriella Grinstead coaches second and third graders this season. “[Second and third grade] was the perfect age, because they are just old enough to really take direction and are starting develop their own personality,” Grinstead said. “The bond I developed with them throughout the season made it all worth it.” Being a junior coach is a large time commitment, with three practices a week lasting over two hours. For Sorace, that means going to multiple practices and getting home at 8 p.m. Aside from events within the Pop Warner program, girls also have the opportunity to come out to the track to cheer with the varsity team. “We have the girls come out during the Husky rumble, the cheer that the crowd gets most involved in,” Grinstead said. “They get to cheer with their role models and experience the Friday night lights.” As the Pop Warner program looks forward to the regional competition on Friday, Nov. 27, they look to improve their routine to match the standards set by junior coaches and varsity cheerleaders. “I like doing things with older cheerleaders because they don’t drop me and they teach me how to do big girl stuff,” Sweat said. “I want to cheer in high school because I will probably be a flyer. My sister cheers and I want to be like her.””

See more on hagertyjourn.com Earned run Freshman Riley Greene committed to the University of Florida on Sept. 24, making him the first Florida commit to be offered for baseball during the fall of their freshman year. “Riley has all physical tools Freshman Riley Greene photo by Alan Greene you look for in a young player, which could make him a leader as his high school years continue.”- Head Coach Jered Goodwin Male fashion trends Teens have begun drawing upon subcultures and trends to diversify their wardrobe. “Whatever I wear I make urbanized in a more weird, street wear kind of way.” -sophomore Jeovani Overstreet

Sophomores Lazaro Gonzalez and Jeovani Overstreet photo by Malcolm Robinson

A lifetime of dedication Senior Claire Tendl has spent her life perfecting the art of singing and learning her favorite style, opera. “I love to [sing] and I want to continue to for the rest of my life. With singing, I can Senior Claire Tendl influence people and touch them with the music.”- senior Claire Tendl

photo by Jake Arthur


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news

Homecoming spends week in Rio Wednesday

Photo by Jake Arthur

Photo by Bailey Fisher

Freshmen Dierdre Meekins and Vangelli Tsompanidis

Juniors Matt Mero, Ben Ferringer and Luke Richmond

Tuesday

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omecoming spirit week started out with “Olympic Athlete Day” where students dressed up as athletes from sports such as cycling, ping pong and track. “Wearing the cycling outfit to school was probably the best thing I had for a last minute outfit,” junior Ben Ferringer, who won silver in the dress up contest, said. “My favorite part about wearing it was the positive feedback I got from most of my friends.” After a three-day weekend, students arrived donning their tennis and ping-pong gear, eager to take home the gold. The after-school activity of that day, the dodge ball tournament, was canceled due to lack of participation, as only five teams were registered. Students were notified about the cancellation during the afternoon announcements.

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Photo by Bailey Fisher Sophomores Veronica Heredia and Ashley Worrell

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n Wednesday the theme was Favorite Country to Support. Students arrived in outfits ranging from Brazilian soccer jerseys to full-on American flags, but most outfits were homemade and easy to find. “I got a red bandana, red, white and blue face paint and I dressed in red, white and blue according to what I had at home, so it was pretty inexpensive,” sophomore Veronica Heredia said. The day ended with the Powderpuff game, which raised $3,000 for the junior and senior classes. The seniors emerged with a 20-6 win. Despite senior dominance during the flag football game, only one senior cheerleader, Jake Arthur, showed up to cheer on his team. “[Juniors] didn’t win on the field, but at least we won on the sidelines and during halftime,” junior class president Sierra Hittel said.

news you need to know

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION FINDS LINK BETWEEN RED MEAT, CANCER The World Health Organization published a report on Monday, Oct. 26 citing a link between meat consumption, specifically red meat and processed meat, and certain types of cancer. Processed meat was listed as a Group 1 carcinogen in the report, while red meat was listed as a Group 2A carcinogen. The groups are denoted by how much evidence is available to suggest a link between the substance and cancer: a Group 1 label means there is enough evidence to conclude that the substance probably increases one’s risk of cancer, while a Group 2A label means there is strong evidence the substance can increase one’s risk of cancer, but the evidence is not conclusive. WHO estimated that 50 grams of processed meat a day could increase one’s risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent, and 100 grams of red meat a day could increase the risk of colorectal cancer by 17 percent. Many experts say cutting these types of foods out of your diet entirely is not necessary, but they should be eaten in moderation. OFFICER ASSAULTS STUDENT AT SOUTH CAROLINA HIGH SCHOOL On Monday, Oct. 26 a student at Spring Valley High School in South Carolina was brutalized by school resource officer Ben Fields. The student had her phone out in class, and when she refused to hand her phone to the teacher, a school administrator was called to remove her from the room. When she refused to leave, Fields was called in to remove her. While still seated in her desk, Fields flipped the student backwards, then dragged her and her desk while she was on her back before tossing the desk aside and throwing her across the room. The incident was caught on cell phone footage by at least three students, which then circulated on Twitter along with the hashtag #AssaultAtSpringValleyHigh. The student was arrested for disturbing the peace, as was another girl who told the officer he was using too much force. Fields was fired on Wednesday, Oct. 28, and the FBI, Department of Justice and the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division are each independently investigating the incident. Fields has faced several lawsuits in the past for allegations of excessive force and racial bias, and has been referred to at the high school as “Officer Slam.” The girl who was assaulted suffered injuries to her neck, back and head, according to her attorney. A GoFundMe page raised $35,200 in one day for the girl to help cover medical bills and other extraneous costs. The two students still face charges for disturbing the peace. TWO-DAY FLORIDA HUNT KILLS HUNDREDS OF BLACK BEARS Florida’s first bear hunt in 21 years was cut short on 9 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 25 by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission after 295 black bears were killed in a two day period. The FWC had originally planned for the hunt to last from Oct. 23 through Oct. 30, with a statewide limit of 320 bears. In the eastern panhandle, the quota in the 13-county area was set at 40 for the week, but 112 were killed in the first two days. In Central Florida, where the limit was set at 100 black bears, 139 were killed in the first two days. After one day statewide, 207 black bears were reported killed. The hunt was an effort by the FWC to reduce human-bear interactions in residential areas, which mainly include bears going through trashcans and dumpsters for food. Before the hunt, the bear population estimate in Florida was around 3,500, and the black bear had been on the endangered species list until 2012. However, there are no accurate reports on the current bear population, as the total population has not been tallied since 2002. A census of the bear population in Florida is scheduled for next year, and critics of the hunt called for the FWC to wait until its results came out to allow for more accurate population totals and quotas, but the FWC decided to proceed with the hunt.

THURSDAY

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elebrating Greek Day on Thursday, students dressed up as Greek gods, goddesses and mythological figures, plus the occasional sorority or fraternity member. In the evening, the cheer team hosted their second annual Husky Rumble, a glow-in-thedark pep rally featuring the football team doing the Whip and Cupid, the artist behind the famous dance hit “Cupid Shuffle.” “This is the first time that I’ve ever seen a school take part in an after school assembly to pump up for homecoming, so this was awesome,” Cupid said. However, compared to its debut last year, the Rumble saw a considerable drop in ticket sales, with final attendance around 260. Also, the cheer program lost an estimated $2,000 of its funding due to lack of attendance.

Photo by Bailey Fisher Freshman Alexa Hilston with a Lawton Chiles Middle cheerleader and Avalanche

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n the final day of the week, Spirit Day, students wore school colors and participated in the homecoming parade down Lockwood Boulevard. “I loved that everyone was willing to dress up,” freshman Alexa Hilston said. At 7 p.m., the varsity football team won against Lake Howell, 49-15. During halftime of the game, seniors John McHale and Claire Tendl were crowned homecoming king and queen. The week concluded with the homecoming dance, which was decorated according to the theme of the 2016 Rio Olympics. “I was there early in the morning to set up decorations for the dance itself,” junior leadership member Luke Richmond said. All of the events of the week were run primarily by Leadership.


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opinions Hallway harassment must stop

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h, look at you! Where you off to?” “Show me a smile.” “What’s your name, honey?” “Hey girl, turn around. Show me a little something.” “Don’t you dare walk away from me.” On campus, students find themselves cornered in stair wells, blockaded in hallways and made to feel uncomfortable by the words and threatening stances of their peers. The escalation from cat calls to verbal abuse to physical assault can be quick. What’s worse, the myriad of jeers and insulting comments won’t end in high school, but remains prevalent in society. Sixty-five percent of women and 25 percent of men in the United States reported being harassed by strangers in public last year, according to StopStreetHarassment.org. Street harassment is typically comprised of public, unwanted and unwarranted wolf-whistling, catcalling and comments, gestures or actions directed at someone, typically a woman, for their perceived or actual attraction. Street harassment stems from misogyny, a general contempt for women, and represents a major stepping stone for the feminist movement. Not only are women and large portions of the LGBTQ+ community discriminated against, they are targeted in public. Women are advised from a young age to watch what they wear, to be careful of what they say and to never walk alone, especially at night. In a study by StopStreetHarassment.org, nearly a quarter of the women surveyed experienced street harassment by the time they were 12. Catcalling is never a compliment. And yet, even in the halls of this school, students, especially females, are threatened by the wolf whistles and so-called compliments their peers cannot keep to themselves. It should not be news to students that catcalling is offensive and uncomfortable. The jeering yells to “show a smile” or to “just say hi” come across as invasions of personal space. Even how someone is dressed does not matter: sweat pants and t-shirts on tired students to class are reason enough for some to voice their crass opinions. Students can’t even get water without being harassed. However, there are ways to reduce catcalls and jeering comments. The first is acceptance. People must acknowledge the fact that street harassment is not a compliment, not the fault of the target and a form of bullying and sexual harassment. The second is education. “Boys will be boys” is outdated and sexist. Rebranding bullying as a crush teasing someone to get their attention makes violence, oppression and cruelty synonymous with love. It sets a precedent that a man who uses his fists to keep a woman in her place is a true “man.” It forces boys to abandon a strong connection with their emotions and limits girls to weak stereotypes. The third is action. Challenging established gender roles and teaching respect keeps people self-aware of how their actions affect the people around them and how to compliment others instead of threatening them. So next time you compliment someone attractive in the hallway, do so with respect. And next time you witness someone getting catcalled, stand up to the hallway harassers and help to make this school a safer place.

blue print

the

OUR TAKE

The BluePrint is a student-produced newspaper Editor-in-Chief Business Manger Staff Reporters in which the student editors make all content Sophie Hill Madeline Kemper Justin Baronoff decisions. The newspaper belongs to the Columbia Bailey Fisher Managing Editor Opinions Editor Scholastic Press Association, the National Scholastic Jeannie Williams Sarah Gibson Malcolm Robinson Press Association and the Florida Scholastic Press Victoria Tomeo Online Editor-in-Chief News Editor Association. Madeline Kemper Opinions expressed within the newspaper do not Peyton Whittington Adviser Hagerty High School Brit Taylor represent the staff’s views as a whole (except for Our Online Managing Ed Twitter Editor 3225 Lockwood Blvd. Take), the views of Seminole County Public Schools Courtney Dziewior Nathaniel Kauffman Principal Oviedo, FL 32765 or Hagerty High’s administration and staff. Dr. Mary Williams Sports Editor Photographers hagertyjourn@blueprint.com For information about advertising in the paper, Ben Clyatt Jake Arthur Phone: (407) 871-0750 please contact us via email or phone. We reserve the Bailey Fisher Fax: (407) 871-0817 right to reject any advertisement.

Why Twitter activism matters Ben Clyatt

Sports Editor ou can’t change anything. It’s just Twitter.” “Don’t take it so seriously. It’s just Twitter.” “Bro, what did you expect? It’s just Twitter.” It’s just Twitter. We’ve been conditioned to accept that Twitter is a muse for the unserious, for the petty, for those to say whatever they want without anyone really caring, because, after all, it’s just Twitter. Why would anyone take it seriously? With Vines and memes, Twitter is the least serious place on the Internet. Until it isn’t. The other realm of Twitter, away from all the fun, is the Twitter activist side. Though many use Twitter activist as a derogatory term or a joke, it should be taken seriously. While many of us scroll through Twitter to distract ourselves in the classroom, these Twitter activists are helping Twitter become the classroom. These people are working to educate their followers on issues such as feminism, body positivity, and the #BlackLivesMatter movement. At the most basic level, these accounts help raise awareness. They shine light on issues you don’t hear enough about in the news and offer fast facts and statistics to help their followers learn as much as they can. These accounts help people become “woke,” or aware of social issues. I was not woke until recently. I specifically remember making a transgender joke to my thengirlfriend sophomore year, and I’m pretty sure that’s why she hates me now. I remember making racist jokes, sexist jokes, jokes about all kinds of things that shouldn’t be joked about. I remember bashing women’s sports, blaming poor people for their economic status and blaming victims of rape. I remember slut-shaming, body-shaming and basically shaming anyone with a different opinion than me. I remember shaming those who took to social media to raise awareness on these issues. I figured since I didn’t know about problems other groups faced, they didn’t exist. I talk about myself not to congratulate myself on how far I’ve come, but to use myself as an example of the effect of Twitter

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Back of the Pack

A comic by Peyton Whittington

activism. I was honestly a pretty terrible person, ideologically speaking, until I started paying attention to accounts that speak on issues that we face today. Even if all they did was tweet, they would still be doing important work as far as raising awareness goes. But they still do more than just Tweet. One prominent account, @feministculture, started a campaign to make it mandatory to teach consent in sex ed courses across the country. The petition had nearly 10,000 signatures of the necessary 100,000 before it can be considered by the White House. Even though the goal was not reached, it started the conversation about teaching consent and has forced many to question why we aren’t already requiring this, and why so many teachers are skipping over this. Since the campaign launched, California became the first state to require consent to be taught in their sex ed classes. Another person who has used Twitter as a platform for their activism is Deray McKesson (@deray). Deray works to raise awareness for another seemingly obvious fight, that #BlackLivesMatter. Besides tweeting about protests and unarmed black citizens being shot or beaten by police, Deray has also met with Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton to further educate them on these issues and work with them to create meaningful policy plans. Deray and other organizers also started Campaign Zero, a comprehensive plan to end police brutality and unfair policing methods across America. There are many, many more people and accounts dedicated to ensuring equality for all groups and educating any who will listen. The problem is that many people still don’t want to listen. We want Twitter to be a mindless distraction, not a soapbox for activists to stand on. The truth can be uncomfortable, especially when it challenges us specifically. Ignorance is bliss. But sometimes, we have to confront harsh realities if we ever want change and equality.

Read the full story at hagertyjourn.com

BY DAY

BY NIGHT

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You do realize you’re buying 38 rolls of toilet paper at 2 a.m., right?

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Teacher-student respect necessary, lacking in classrom Jeannie Williams

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Managing Editor he young teacher who holds students at arm’s length to assert their authority. The junior who doesn’t want to seem like a teacher’s pet so they back-talk and ignore the advice offered by their instructor. A healthy student-teacher relationship, one based on respect of character and willingness to learn, is beneficial and necessary, yet so many students and teachers set out to poison or distance themselves from this relationship. This classroom relationship needs to be readdressed to facilitate better learning. A New York University psychological study determined that middle and high school students tend to meet their teachers’ expectations of them, whether they be low or high, explicit or

BARKING MAD

Barking Mad is a collection of short submissions about things that tick students off around school. If something at school ticks you off, go to hagertyjourn.com and submit your entry to Ask the Editor, and it may be featured here.

implicit. Harsh phrases such as “Can you not do that?” and “Can you just do that right?” suggest a low expectation of the student on the teacher’s part. Unfortunately, phrases like these can be heard in too many classrooms, and they have a detrimental effect on student performance. One unmotivated student should not fog a teacher’s view of their other students. It is generalizations like this that place a wedge between a teacher and student in the classroom. As a whole, teachers realize the importance of their job and foster academic growth, but those who don’t need to realize the impact they make. Verbal disparagement of students and indications that the instructor does not care whether or not a student passes or fails are unacceptable in a classroom setting. Snide comments and general disrespect from students, while

not acceptable, are expected, but teachers have degrees and certifications in how to reach and understand young people. People become teachers because they want to make a difference. Even teachers who have lost that intent need to realize that their actions and attitudes toward students still have an impact. Any student would agree the best teacher is one who teaches rather than babysits and goes out of their way to let their students know they are available for them. In the classroom, it is necessary for there to be someone looking out for a student’s best interests. That’s why the teacher is there. It is also imperative that the student demonstrate respect for the teacher who has dedicated their life to expanding minds. Only when these two things are present can effective learning and character development take place.

“Why did they [paint] the name of our school at the front campus in orange?” - Jordan Rhody, 12

“It takes forever to hear back from guidance or administration when you submit a request.” - Tess Cotler, 11

“The block schedule is so confusing this year with blue, black and silver and it keeps on changing.” - Meredith Garrett, 9

“Why does the administration have an inability to realize the needs of the students in their efforts to further their academic success at school?” - James Neal, 12

“The lack of support I see for the arts department in comparison to the sports is especially disappointing.” - Hannah Seuhle, 12

“Why do people feel the need to yell in the hallways?” - Taylor Whiteman, 10

“When people go up and down the wrong side of the stairs and go into the wrong side of the door, it’s so irritating.” - Jessica Vasquez, 11 “People always seem to walk so slow when going to class and it clogs up the hallways.” - Ajelet Perez, 10 “The extremely spirited kids are always talking so loud and making a bunch of noise.” - Anthony Gemmati, 12


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CAR CRASHES 5

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Junior Derek DiBernardo was also in the accident at the intersection of Twin Rivers road and County Road 419 and hit fellow senior Edward O’Dea. DiBernardo was adjusting his air conditioning when he hit O’Dea who was stopped at a red light. The system in his car automatically called the police and gave them his location, so help was able to arrive on site quickly. “Riding in the passenger seat, you really don’t have control over stopping,” DiBernardo said. “After the accident, it kind of freaked me out, but you’ll get over it.”

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Story and design by Sophie Hill Sidebars by Jeannie Williams and Sophie Hill

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Alafaya and McCulloch. Although he was distracted by his phone, the accident was the other car’s fault because it was turning right onto Alafaya and failed to give Plumtree right of way. “It was probably the craziest thing that has ever happened to me and I’ve been driving a lot safer since,” Plumtree said. “I could have died, and that’s horrifying.”

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Teenagers are at the greatest risk for accidents alongside drowsy, drunk and distracted drivers

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Junior Annemarie Cox was in the passenger seat of a car that was stopped at a light on Alafaya when they were hit from behind. The driver of the other car was texting and did not see the red light, so he rear-ended junior Hannah Stephens and Cox going 40 miles per hour. Both girls sustained injuries that required medical care and chiropractic sessions, but the other driver’s insurance took care of the cost. At his request, the police were not called. “It was a couple months ago and I still look in my rear-view mirror all the time because I feel like somebody’s going to hit me,” Cox said.

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4 CAR CRASHES

Senior Edward O’Dea was rear-ended at the intersection of Twin Rivers Road and CR 419 by junior Derek DiBernardo. His sister, sophomore Courtney O’Dea, was in the car and called their dad, who arrived shortly thereafter. When police arrived, both drivers were asked for their licenses, registration and a description of what happened. “I was mostly concerned to see if my sister was hurt or if anybody in the other car was hurt,” O’Dea said.

ne second, senior Mikey Reyenga was found it difficult to get back behind the wheel after the influence or following another car too closely. cruising down SR 434, eyeing the light for being in a car crash. “Both of my accidents happened because I the upcoming intersection. The next, he “I got in an accident the first day I had my rear-ended the car in front of me,” senior Olivia watched as a crash broke out a little further down license more than a month ago and I’m still scared Hawkins said. “I wasn’t really paying attention and on the road, leaving Reyenga with no other option to drive today,” Stephens said. “I was rear-ended at I regret it.” full speed because the guy [who] According to the than to slam into the accident unfolding before him. hit me was texting.” Florida Highway “You immediately freak out. You think ‘this “If you’re in a situation and Texting and driving has Patrol, the biggest wasn’t supposed to happen’ because you were just been a major cause of accidents, you don’t know what to do, causes for most teen jamming out to your favorite song and now you’re especially for younger drivers, it’s really scary. Someone’s driving accidents ruining your day and the days of the people around and accounted for nearly 25 include: failure to you,” Reyenga said. “It’s terrifying.” life could be on the line” wear a seatbelt, percent of crashes across the In Central Florida, teen drivers from local high country in 2013. Studies by inexperience, driving schools and UCF make up for a disproportionate - Olivia Hawkins, 12 National Highway Transportation drowsy, distracted or number of accidents in the area. In the United States, teens only make up 14 percent of the Safety Administration indicate that texting while drunk, the presence of other teenage passengers and population, yet they account for nearly 30 percent driving increases the likelihood of an accident 23 driving recklessly. of all car accidents. times over and is six times more likely to cause “It’s pretty simple: don’t be stupid,” Reyenga After the accident, Reyenga called 911 and an accident than being intoxicated. Contrary to said. “Safe driving is common sense.” watched as four more accidents took place as a popular belief, the majority of crashes occur in Measures to reduce teen driving accidents result of the crash he witnessed, backing up traffic daylight (66 percent), on a dry surface (84 percent), include more education and an increased focus for miles and causing a sense of frenzy. and in clear weather conditions (74 percent) while on accumulating experience behind the wheel. Reyenga and Stephens added that offering towing “Obviously the driver is distracted by a phone, services for teens to get home safely and further when you get in GPS, sound station or other “You immediately freak emphasis of the consequences of poor driving will a crash there’s a electronic device (42 percent). out. You think ‘this wasn’t help decrease car crashes for teenagers. lot of adrenaline “I used to check my phone “I don’t think people understand the power every once in a while, but you immediately supposed to happen.’ It’s and responsibility of driving,” Stephens said. have to put your phone away or in flowing through terrifying.” “Accidents are really scary and they can happen to your body,” the passenger seat because it’s just anyone. Nobody is invincible.” Reyenga said. “You never worth it,” Stephens said. - Mikey Reyenga, 12 Hawkins said taking her car for granted and have to remember to Teenagers are three times remain calm, don’t say anything incriminating. Call more likely to be in an accident than someone over not taking driving seriously caused her accident. the police and let them handle it.” the age of 20 and have the lowest reported seatbelt She said the increased awareness following her Although Reyenga has walked away unscathed use, with nearly half of all teens killed in crashes accidents will help prevent more in the future. from two separate accidents, he says they never last year failing to wear a seatbelt. Teenagers are “It’s not a game,” Hawkins said. If you’re in a become less terrifying. also more likely to take risks and underestimate the situation and you don’t know what to do, it’s really Junior Hannah Stephens, like Reyenga, also danger of a perilous situation, such as driving under scary. Someone’s life could be on the line.”

Information complied from eSurance, StateFarm, the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office and the Florida Highway Patrol

1 Check for injuries

So long as you are not seriously injured, try to get out of the way of incoming traffic and turn off the engine. If moving your car is impossible, turn on the hazard lights. Check in on the other people involved in the crash and make sure to remain near the scene. When in doubt, especially if you feel pain in the neck and back, remain in the car until medical professionals can help you out without worsening your injuries.

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Call the police

Even if the damage does not seem serious, call the police so they can file an accident report. These reports are important when filing an insurance claim to fix the car or when seeking medical help for any injuries sustained in the crash. Take photos of the damage for an insurance claim, and allow first responders to handle the situation. When interacting with law enforcement, refrain from blaming or admitting fault and allow the officer to objectively determine who, if anyone, is at fault.

“Always call the police. I didn’t and I regret it because the insurance process took twice as long and I ended up getting injured from [the] crash.” Hannah Stephens, 12

3 Remain Calm

Staying calm is crucial to proper medical attention and legal protection. By keeping a clear head, it will be easier to survey personal injuries, explain what happened, and assess damage to the car.

4 Call an emergency contact When possible, get in contact with your parents or other family members to assist you with maneuvering the legal and medical consequences of an accident.

“I called my dad right after my accident and it was the best thing I did because I was so freaked out and I would have done something stupid without him.” Michael Plumtree, 12

5 Follow up

Even a simple fender bender can have lasting consequences. After an accident, be sure to have a mechanic check out your car for misaligned tires, a damaged engine, or a faulty frame. Notify your car insurance’s policy holder of the accident so they, or you, can file a claim to repair the car and pay for medical bills. Also, see a doctor to rule out the possibility of a concussion, spinal trauma or any other injury that could surface anywhere from days to weeks after the accident.

6 Accident Prevention

Make sure to drive with your license, car insurance card, and car registration at all times. Try to keep a first aid kit, jumper cables, and a flashlight in the car. Keep your phone charged and make sure loose items sitting in the passenger seat or on the dashboard are secured or put away.

“I was on my phone and then I hit someone out of nowhere. It happened so fast. I could have died all because I was on my phone and that’s crazy.” Michael Plumtree, 12


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11

CAR CRASHES 5

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Junior Derek DiBernardo was also in the accident at the intersection of Twin Rivers road and County Road 419 and hit fellow senior Edward O’Dea. DiBernardo was adjusting his air conditioning when he hit O’Dea who was stopped at a red light. The system in his car automatically called the police and gave them his location, so help was able to arrive on site quickly. “Riding in the passenger seat, you really don’t have control over stopping,” DiBernardo said. “After the accident, it kind of freaked me out, but you’ll get over it.”

cox

Story and design by Sophie Hill Sidebars by Jeannie Williams and Sophie Hill

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Alafaya and McCulloch. Although he was distracted by his phone, the accident was the other car’s fault because it was turning right onto Alafaya and failed to give Plumtree right of way. “It was probably the craziest thing that has ever happened to me and I’ve been driving a lot safer since,” Plumtree said. “I could have died, and that’s horrifying.”

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Teenagers are at the greatest risk for accidents alongside drowsy, drunk and distracted drivers

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Junior Annemarie Cox was in the passenger seat of a car that was stopped at a light on Alafaya when they were hit from behind. The driver of the other car was texting and did not see the red light, so he rear-ended junior Hannah Stephens and Cox going 40 miles per hour. Both girls sustained injuries that required medical care and chiropractic sessions, but the other driver’s insurance took care of the cost. At his request, the police were not called. “It was a couple months ago and I still look in my rear-view mirror all the time because I feel like somebody’s going to hit me,” Cox said.

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4 CAR CRASHES

Senior Edward O’Dea was rear-ended at the intersection of Twin Rivers Road and CR 419 by junior Derek DiBernardo. His sister, sophomore Courtney O’Dea, was in the car and called their dad, who arrived shortly thereafter. When police arrived, both drivers were asked for their licenses, registration and a description of what happened. “I was mostly concerned to see if my sister was hurt or if anybody in the other car was hurt,” O’Dea said.

ne second, senior Mikey Reyenga was found it difficult to get back behind the wheel after the influence or following another car too closely. cruising down SR 434, eyeing the light for being in a car crash. “Both of my accidents happened because I the upcoming intersection. The next, he “I got in an accident the first day I had my rear-ended the car in front of me,” senior Olivia watched as a crash broke out a little further down license more than a month ago and I’m still scared Hawkins said. “I wasn’t really paying attention and on the road, leaving Reyenga with no other option to drive today,” Stephens said. “I was rear-ended at I regret it.” full speed because the guy [who] According to the than to slam into the accident unfolding before him. hit me was texting.” Florida Highway “You immediately freak out. You think ‘this “If you’re in a situation and Texting and driving has Patrol, the biggest wasn’t supposed to happen’ because you were just been a major cause of accidents, you don’t know what to do, causes for most teen jamming out to your favorite song and now you’re especially for younger drivers, it’s really scary. Someone’s driving accidents ruining your day and the days of the people around and accounted for nearly 25 include: failure to you,” Reyenga said. “It’s terrifying.” life could be on the line” wear a seatbelt, percent of crashes across the In Central Florida, teen drivers from local high country in 2013. Studies by inexperience, driving schools and UCF make up for a disproportionate - Olivia Hawkins, 12 National Highway Transportation drowsy, distracted or number of accidents in the area. In the United States, teens only make up 14 percent of the Safety Administration indicate that texting while drunk, the presence of other teenage passengers and population, yet they account for nearly 30 percent driving increases the likelihood of an accident 23 driving recklessly. of all car accidents. times over and is six times more likely to cause “It’s pretty simple: don’t be stupid,” Reyenga After the accident, Reyenga called 911 and an accident than being intoxicated. Contrary to said. “Safe driving is common sense.” watched as four more accidents took place as a popular belief, the majority of crashes occur in Measures to reduce teen driving accidents result of the crash he witnessed, backing up traffic daylight (66 percent), on a dry surface (84 percent), include more education and an increased focus for miles and causing a sense of frenzy. and in clear weather conditions (74 percent) while on accumulating experience behind the wheel. Reyenga and Stephens added that offering towing “Obviously the driver is distracted by a phone, services for teens to get home safely and further when you get in GPS, sound station or other “You immediately freak emphasis of the consequences of poor driving will a crash there’s a electronic device (42 percent). out. You think ‘this wasn’t help decrease car crashes for teenagers. lot of adrenaline “I used to check my phone “I don’t think people understand the power every once in a while, but you immediately supposed to happen.’ It’s and responsibility of driving,” Stephens said. have to put your phone away or in flowing through terrifying.” “Accidents are really scary and they can happen to your body,” the passenger seat because it’s just anyone. Nobody is invincible.” Reyenga said. “You never worth it,” Stephens said. - Mikey Reyenga, 12 Hawkins said taking her car for granted and have to remember to Teenagers are three times remain calm, don’t say anything incriminating. Call more likely to be in an accident than someone over not taking driving seriously caused her accident. the police and let them handle it.” the age of 20 and have the lowest reported seatbelt She said the increased awareness following her Although Reyenga has walked away unscathed use, with nearly half of all teens killed in crashes accidents will help prevent more in the future. from two separate accidents, he says they never last year failing to wear a seatbelt. Teenagers are “It’s not a game,” Hawkins said. If you’re in a become less terrifying. also more likely to take risks and underestimate the situation and you don’t know what to do, it’s really Junior Hannah Stephens, like Reyenga, also danger of a perilous situation, such as driving under scary. Someone’s life could be on the line.”

Information complied from eSurance, StateFarm, the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office and the Florida Highway Patrol

1 Check for injuries

So long as you are not seriously injured, try to get out of the way of incoming traffic and turn off the engine. If moving your car is impossible, turn on the hazard lights. Check in on the other people involved in the crash and make sure to remain near the scene. When in doubt, especially if you feel pain in the neck and back, remain in the car until medical professionals can help you out without worsening your injuries.

2

Call the police

Even if the damage does not seem serious, call the police so they can file an accident report. These reports are important when filing an insurance claim to fix the car or when seeking medical help for any injuries sustained in the crash. Take photos of the damage for an insurance claim, and allow first responders to handle the situation. When interacting with law enforcement, refrain from blaming or admitting fault and allow the officer to objectively determine who, if anyone, is at fault.

“Always call the police. I didn’t and I regret it because the insurance process took twice as long and I ended up getting injured from [the] crash.” Hannah Stephens, 12

3 Remain Calm

Staying calm is crucial to proper medical attention and legal protection. By keeping a clear head, it will be easier to survey personal injuries, explain what happened, and assess damage to the car.

4 Call an emergency contact When possible, get in contact with your parents or other family members to assist you with maneuvering the legal and medical consequences of an accident.

“I called my dad right after my accident and it was the best thing I did because I was so freaked out and I would have done something stupid without him.” Michael Plumtree, 12

5 Follow up

Even a simple fender bender can have lasting consequences. After an accident, be sure to have a mechanic check out your car for misaligned tires, a damaged engine, or a faulty frame. Notify your car insurance’s policy holder of the accident so they, or you, can file a claim to repair the car and pay for medical bills. Also, see a doctor to rule out the possibility of a concussion, spinal trauma or any other injury that could surface anywhere from days to weeks after the accident.

6 Accident Prevention

Make sure to drive with your license, car insurance card, and car registration at all times. Try to keep a first aid kit, jumper cables, and a flashlight in the car. Keep your phone charged and make sure loose items sitting in the passenger seat or on the dashboard are secured or put away.

“I was on my phone and then I hit someone out of nowhere. It happened so fast. I could have died all because I was on my phone and that’s crazy.” Michael Plumtree, 12


12.12%

6

4 AP classes

28.79%

3 AP classes

lifestyles

Honors Classes

Junior stress

A survey of 200 juniors in AP classes

Honors Classes

1-3

Juniors under pressure Victoria Tomeo

4-6

F

All

Staff Reporter

No Answer

more than 3

3 hours

2 hours

No NoAnswer Answer

more morethan than3 3

33hours hours

22hours hours

11hour hour

Juniors Juniors

Honors Classes Honors Classes

1 hour

Juniors

oreheads covered in sweat, hands shaking in exhaustion and cheeks flowing with seemingly endless tears — these are No Answer only a few of the symptoms AP students, especially juniors, show. For students like junior Zack Weishample, these symptoms 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40are not unusual. “[AP classes] really allow me to challenge myself,” Juniors Weishample said. With seven AP classes, four to five hours of homework every AP Classes Hours of Homework AP Classes night and daily early mornings, Weishample has impressively 4.55% maintained all A’s. 12.12% 1 AP class 4.55% 30 no answer “I believe that [AP classes] allow [students] to be more 12.12% 1 AP class no answer dedicated to their school work, which will lay the foundation for their senior year, which then leads them into college,” English 22.73% 20 teacher Samantha Richardson said. “However, I do feel that too 222.73% AP classes 2 AP classes many juniors take on too many [AP] classes.” 19.70% Not only are juniors expected to have an idea of what college 10than 5 more 19.70% to apply for and exactly what to study, but for the majority who AP classes more than 5 are taking AP classes, they are also expected to do well in those AP classes classes in order to obtain college credit. 0 Colleges such as Dartmouth, UCLA and NYU only accept a minimum score of 4 on AP exams, which adds more stress. Also, colleges largely focus on the grades of junior year because they 12.12% are the last complete set of grades seen when juniors apply. 12.12% 4 AP classes Hours of homework 28.79% “Honestly, I’d say I’ve cried about a minimum of four times 4 AP classes 28.79% 3 AP classes so far over AP classes,” junior Andrew Ballantyne said. 3 AP classes Teachers constantly remind students that the homework in AP Hours of Sleep classes, plus the enhanced study requirement for tests and quizzes, Honors Classes Honors Classes is essential to not only passing the class, but also understanding the 4.92% 13.11% less than 4 material. They also draw attention to the fact that falling behind no answer is not an option because the material is voluminous, and having 1-3 1-3 trouble in one area can affect learning the remaining material for the rest of the year. 27.87% 4-6 less than 5 Students participating in extracurricular activities and 4-6 sports have less time to complete homework and study for tests. All Regardless of how many AP classes a student is taking, a lack of All sleep appears to be the most common effect. No Answer “There are times, at least once a week, where I stay up until No Answer 3 a.m. doing homework for my AP classes,” junior Erika Grasso 0% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30more than 35 8 40 said. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Despite the rigorous level of homework in AP classes, some Juniors 54.10% Juniors juniors say that their grades in AP classes are better than in their about 6-7 honors classes. “I think some AP classes are much more rigorous than others. Hours of Homework Hours of Homework I think that the jump between some Honors and AP level classes is extremely larger than others as well,” junior Stephen Chapman 3+ 30 30 said. Another factor that students have to watch out for in order to do well in AP classes is their time on social media. Apps like 20 3 20 Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram can pose a distraction and have a negative impact on school work. However, they can also be no 2 10 helpful with clarifying, understanding and asking for help on answer 10 homework from fellow classmates. 1 “I think even if they didn’t exist, other distractors would be 0 there. Distractions are distractions in any form,” Richardson said. 0

Tune trade

photos by Kacy Lach STRESSED OUT. Junior Trinity Turlington (TOP) rests her head in her

hand as she stares down at her AP Physics classwork. Turlington is one of many juniors taking multiple AP classes this school year. OVERWHELMED. In class, junior Zachary Weishampel (BOTTOM) takes note of the homework, adding it to a long to-do list of assignments he balances with his position on the varsity boys soccer team.

Although AP classes can be stressful and overwhelming, they often well-prepare students for college. The heightened requirements challenge the ability of time management, understanding college-level courses and balancing a schedule, in which rigorous studying and hard work prove necessary.

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7

sports

Volleyball captures first district title Nathaniel Kauffman

I

Twitter Editor

n a historic season led by second year head coach Juanita Hitt, the girls volleyball team won the district championship for the first time and earned a win in their first ever regional home game. The road to a championship was anything but easy for the team. Going through district opponent Lake Nona for the district title was a true test. “We came into their district that they had just won,” senior middle Brianna Baez said. “They were out to protect their title, and all year we were the top two teams in the district.” The district finals did not start as planned, however. After a first set loss to Lake Nona (2520), the team not only was a set down, but were down a coach as well. Hitt was in the hospital during the district game, unable to coach the team. “That gave us motivation to win for coach. We wanted to get that district championship for her and make history for her,” senior libero Lauren Basen said. “Losing the first set just gave us even more motivation to win.” The team won back-to-back close sets, 26-24 and 25-21, followed by a 25-18 win to take the match 3-1. “The district win was very emotional for all of us; we faced a lot of adversity and we had several off-court issues that were going on,” Hitt said. “For us to win the district championship was one we will never forget. It was a huge win for every single one of us.” After the district finals, Hitt returned, and the team moved on to face Lake Minneola at home for the FHSAA regional quarterfinals. The team advanced rather easily, winning the match 3-1: 25-9, 25-16, 23-25 and 25-14. After that win, the team was rewarded with a second home game against Lake Nona again.

After winning the first set 25-20, the team dropped the next three sets to lose the match 3-1 (25-19, 25-22, 25-22). The loss ended the team’s season. “The loss obviously hurt and once it soaked in, it stung for a little while,” Basen said. “It wasn’t exactly how we wanted to the season to end.” Even with the final loss, the team is still proud of the season they had. They beat Oviedo twice this season, the first time in school history they had happened. That, along with the school’s first district title, regional win and the fact that it was the team’s first season in a new district (with a 7-0 record), and the season looks more groundbreaking than disappointing. However, for the seniors, the loss meant more than just the end of a season, it meant the end of their high school volleyball careers. “I was just sad, not so much because we lost, but because I realized I’m never going to play on this court again,” Baez said. “I think that was the hard part, because we have all grown up playing together, but it will never happen again.” On the flip side, the rest of the team still has time left, so they are already looking ahead. This includes talented freshman hitters Leandra Mangual and Morgan Romano, who were asked to play big roles in the team’s season, accounting for 133 and 130 kills on the season, respectively. “This year was a great start to my career. I have learned to be a team player, and I have learned a lot from the very talented players on our team,” Romano said. “I am extremely excited and looking forward to the next three years, and hopefully a state title before my senior year.” In just her second year as coach, Hitt has already made history, and to the team, it is no secret how. “She’s an outstanding coach, very competitive and is always out there to win. She also has such a good connection with us and is always understanding and willing to listen. She

sports shorts

JV FOOTBALL BEATS OVIEDO, FINISHES UNDEFEATED

Photo by Preston Saunders

UNTOUCHED. Running back Oliver Hart rushes down the sideline in the first game against Oviedo, which was a 31-0 win. The team won their second matchup against Oviedo, 47-6, to finish their season undefeated.

On Thursday, Oct. 15, the junior varsity football team finished their regular season undefeated at 8-0 with a 47-6 victory over Oviedo. This was the first time that the junior varsity team finished the season undefeated. Against Oviedo, the team was led by sophomore running backs Oliver Hart and Ethan Brewer, each with two touchdowns. The team also had three shutouts this season, including their first game against Oviedo (31-0), as well as games against Lake Mary (44-0) and Seminole (34-0). The team averaged nearly 35 points per game, while holding their opponents to only six points per game. The team handed Lake Brantley its only loss of the season, as Lake Brantley entered the game averaging 35 points per game, but were held to just 12 in the loss. “It felt good to go undefeated, as we made Hagerty history,” defensive back Dimitri Abraham said.

GIRLS SOCCER OPENS REGULAR SEASON WITH WIN The girls varsity soccer team opened their regular season with a 4-0 win against Seminole on Tuesday, Oct. 27. Four different players scored a goal in the win. “We’re hoping to make it pretty far this season,” center back Meghan Lee said. “The Seminole win was a good confidence booster and it really showed our team’s strengths and weaknesses.”

BOYS BOWLING TO STATES On Monday, Oct. 26, the boys bowling team competed in the district championships. The team was crowned as district 7 runnersup after dropping two Baker matches to Lyman, but advanced to the state finals on Nov. 4 and 5. Last year, the team lost to Apopka in the state championships. “It means everything to have a chance of redemption against Photo by Kacy Lach Apopka,” junior Ryan Sarcevic said. STRIKING STATES. Senior Anthony Maselli bowls during the FHSAA District Championship.

Photo by Jake Arthur

SET TO KILL. Junior Ashley Howard sets the ball in a game at Oviedo, which they won, 3-0. The team beat Oviedo again at home, 3-2, to sweep Oviedo in a season for the first time in school history.

does what’s best for the team,” junior opposite Annemarie Watson said. Hitt believes in the team they have moving forward, as her teams get better each year. “I couldn’t be happier with the underclassmen

this year. They really stepped into this program and contributed a ton. I am very confident, with our core players returning and new players that are coming in, to see some great things come out of this program,” Hitt said.


8

sports

Ben and Nate

Football wins first district title

Jumpman jumpman jumpman Ben Clyatt and Nathaniel Kauffman Sports Editor and Twitter Editor Ben: After dying in the heat with FootGolf, we decided that we wanted something airconditioned. After a very scientific study (a.k.a. brainstorming places nearby), we chose Boing. Nate: Yes, we’ve all been there as a kid for birthdays, but just how fun would this souped up bounce house be now that we’re grown up? Ben: To put this to the test, we took a group of our friends to Boing on a Wednesday. They don’t open until 4, which meant we showed up as soon as they opened, and we were only there for an hour, which cost $13. Nate: We mostly had the place to ourselves, which was nice because we didn’t have to wait in between games of dodge ball. And an hour was the perfect amount of time because I think we were all relatively gassed at that point. Ben: We started with a little warm-up of just bouncing around on the main trampolines, then headed off to the dodge ball arena. There were only four of us, which meant we could play two on two for pretty much as long as we wanted. Nate: That is until a boy in a green shirt showed up. This kid was, like, 10 but got Ben out at least four times (then again, who didn’t?). Ben: Who didn’t? I’m confident you didn’t. Nate: I know I did. But playing dodge ball in close-quarters is a mind game. Knowing which way to move when the ball is coming or if you should catch it is the hardest part. Add a trampoline and that makes it more fun. Ben: And I don’t know what makes those balls so much different than any other ball, but they are hard to catch. Nearly every time someone got out, it was because they tried to catch it but just couldn’t hold on to it. Nate: *Insert deflate gate joke here* Ben: As difficult as it was, it was really cool going when no one else was there. We never had to get off or wait in line, and we could switch the teams up whenever. We even put some weird rules in, like you could only throw and catch with your left hand, things like that. Nate: If you went on a weekend, you would spend more time waiting to play than actually playing. We need to go back, not just because it was fun, but because we need redemption for that loss at the end, which I blame Ben for. But at least we were able to witness the one-on-one match-up of our friend Tommy (a big boy) and green shirt’s teenage cousin (a big girl). Ben: That match-up was one to remember. And I know that in order for us to lose, you have to get out too, and you did every time, big dawg. Nate: Well all I know is that with the series tied 2-2, you got out within seconds of the game starting, leaving me to play one on two with not a single ball on our side, big dawg. Ben: The only reason we were tied 2-2 was because you got out when we were up 2-1, and I was forced to play two on one, BIG DAWG. Nate: But the only reason I ever got out was because I had to carry the team and your weak arm, BIGGEST DAWG. Ben: Here lies the body of Ben Clyatt. Born January 27, 1998. Deceased October 29, 2015. Nate: Either way, we hope for a better outcome next time. Boing was definitely just as fun as I remember, and I would recommend going whether you went as a kid or not, and definitely go on a weekday when it’s not crowded. Ben: Yeah, and if you get bored of the trampolines or dodge ball, there’s completely free arcade on weekdays. We had a little air hockey tournament, and there are also driving games, shooters, and one of those basketball pop-a-shot games (I nearly dropped 40 and then got kicked out because our hour was up). Nate: And if you weren’t a fan of the old ankle braces (that were worn by a million other sweaty kids), you will likely appreciate the new grip-socks that you now get to keep.

Photo Courtesy of the Orlando Sentinel, 2015

VICTORY BATH. Safety Addison Gray and defensive end Sam Ditmyer douse head coach Phil Ziglar after a district-clinching, 35-21 win over Edgewater on Oct. 30. It was the team’s first district title.

Justin Baronoff

O

Staff Reporter

n Friday, Oct. 30, the varsity football team defeated Edgewater, 35-21, to win their first Class 7A District championship and earn a spot in the regional quarterfinals. “This has been my goal ever since I got here and is exactly where you want to be as a program, head coach Phil Ziglar said.” During the game, running back Gabe Diaz rushed for a team high 244 yards and three touchdowns in the game, including one for 81 yards during the team’s third play of the game. “Throughout the season, I’ve done a lot of drills to better my vision of the field and because

of that, history was made for this school,” Diaz said. Wide receiver Curtis Duran caught an eightyard touchdown pass late in the second quarter, and running back Tristan Tucker added a 24-yard rushing touchdown late in the fourth quarter. In the fourth quarter this season, Edgewater has averaged 27 points, but were held to just seven in the fourth quarter in this game. “Before the game, we just knew they had some athletes,” defensive back Micah Young said. “We attacked with the same old plan and the team chemistry played a huge factor in the win.” Even though the team won, they still would have been awarded a playoff bid if they lost, after Ocoee beat Lake Minneola, 33-28.

“The way I look at it is if you win, you’re a legitimate district champion, and that’s what we did,” Ziglar said. As head coach of Boone High School for 23 seasons, Ziglar’s primary rival was Edgewater. Ziglar won his last district title in 2007 with Boone. In the month of October, the team went undefeated, outscoring their opponents 91-54 in the second half after being outscored 66-27 in the first part of the season. With an away game win against Ocoee on Oct. 2, the team won three straight home games against East Ridge, Colonial and Lake Howell. Against East Ridge, the team scored a school record 62 points, while Tucker scored six touchdowns of his own, also a school record for most touchdowns by a single player. Tucker was named Offensive Player of the Week by the Orlando Touchdown Club. “[Tristan] has done well with this offense, even though I wouldn’t consider him a quarterback,” Ziglar said. “Most schools would have folded because of injuries, but not us.” The team will make their first playoff appearance since 2010 against Bartram Trail on Nov. 13, and it will be the first time the team has hosted a playoff game. In 2010, the team lost in the regional quarterfinals to Lakeland, 56-35, despite 494 yards of offense from quarterback Jeff Driskel. “That team took second and got in the playoffs, but we took first and got a banner,” Duran said. However, before the team’s playoff matchup, they will play their final regular season game on Friday, Nov. 6 against non-district Timber Creek in the Senior Night game. “Our slogan since day one was to get better every day,” Ziglar said. “The kids bought into that and we’ll keep preparing for the rest of the season.”

Girls cross country returns to states Victoria Tomeo

B

Staff Reporter

oth the girls and the boys cross country team competed at Lake Nona High School for the regional championships on Saturday, Oct. 31, and the boys team finished ninth place, while the girls finished in sixth place, qualifying them for the state championship on Saturday, Nov. 7 at FSU. Senior Andrew Stivers came in fifth place for the boys, while junior Nicolette Worrell came in sixth place for the girls, with times of 16:07.90 and 18:55.25, respectively. Both will move on to the state championship as an individual. “Their jobs are to take care of themselves and the team follows suit,” head coach Jay Getty said. “They handle what they’re supposed to.” Injuries, such as sprained ankles and torn ligaments, affected the girls and the boys team throughout the season, however, and made it especially difficult to run the sudden turns and potholes that covered not only the Lake Nona course, but many of the courses during the season. Senior Kelcey Stivers experienced a foot injury during the UCF Meet on Sept. 20 while sophomore Maria Ball came away with some pain after the Astronaut Meet on Sept. 5. In order to prepare for the district and regional championships, the teams practiced in miniature training cycles, which were crucial during the middle of the season, when the teams trained the hardest. These cycles focused on endurance with drills such as partner 400s and hard runs for six minutes, four minutes and two minutes with breaks in-between. For six weeks, the teams started out practicing longer distances, but as the championship rolled around, shorter distances were integrated into the speed workouts in order to get everybody’s legs in shape and ready to race. The district meet, which took place in Deland on Oct. 24, was successful for both teams, as they each finished fourth. While districts were difficult, regionals were even tougher, since the field included so many of the top teams in the state. “It was a very hard race because our particular region that our school is in is considered the ‘Region of Death,’” Worrell said. “So many people who race in it are just so fast.” The region includes sophomore Rafaella

Gibbons, who runs for the Winter Park girls cross country team, ranked second in the state. Gibbons was only a freshman when she led Winter Park to the 2014 state championships, and she came in first for every race this season except one. Senior Joshua Jacques, who runs for Lyman’s cross country team, tenth in the state, came in first for three out of the six meets this season. Between injuries and a difficult district

and region, the path to states has been that much tougher. However, this should pay off in Saturday’s state meet as the girls, and Stivers as an individual, have already been tested. “Had we been anywhere else, we probably would have been guaranteed a place in states,” Worrell said. “But since we are who we are and we are where we are, it just makes us have to work that much harder.”

Profile for Hagerty Journalism

The BluePrint - Volume 11, Issue 2  

The BluePrint - Volume 11, Issue 2  

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