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HAGERTY HIGH SCHOOL

3225 LOCKWOOD BLVD. OVIEDO, FL 32765

INDEX

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volume 10, issue 5

News............................... 2-5 Lifestyles......................... 6-9 Concussions................10-11 Student Connections.... 12-13 Opinions......................14-15 Reviews....................... 16-17 Sports......................... 18-20

April 7, 2015

SILENT HEROES Interpreters maximize potential of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing story on page 8

Photo by Peyton Whittington

Five­ things to see on hagertyjourn.com w CHORUS EXCELS AT MPA wCUPCAKE HISTORY Earning Superiors at the district Music Performance Assessment, Voices of Hagerty and Chorus Choir qualify for States.

Cupcake Friday made its debut in 2008. Learn about the origins behind everyone’s favorite day of the month.

w MOURN’S DEBUT ALBUM WORK OF ART Combining teenage angst with mature songwriting, Mourn delivers with self-titled album.

w CABARET FUNDRAISER w HUMANITY’S LAST HOPE A SUCCESS Theater teacher Trevor Southworth and wife Becca earn $300 for Theater Booster club with Cabaret performance.

A LET-DOWN With a messy plot, unnecessary explosions and poor execution, Chappie’s disorder leaves audiences disappointed and confused.

Find the dog: Whenever you see the above HJO logo, scan the page with the Aurasma app to see extra content. You must follow hagertyjourn for it to work.


2 Double duty lead mixes up musical Courtney Dziewior

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Photo by Angelica Norris

SO LONG, SOLOS. Seniors Alexa Johnson and Jessie Whittemore practice their music together for “Hello, Dolly!” The two were surprised to both be cast for the lead role in December.

Staff Reporter

xpectant eyes widen in excitement as she reads her name next to the lead role, before doing a double-take and looking again. Theater teacher Trevor Southworth sparked change for the spring musical “Hello, Dolly!” by casting seniors Alexa Johnson and Jessie Whittemore both in the lead role of Dolly Levi. “We were both really excited because we wanted each other to get the part and it got to the point that we were like, ‘I really don’t care who gets it as long as one of us does,’” Whittemore said. Whittemore was shocked at seeing both names listed for Dolly, wondering if one was the understudy. After talking to stage manager Heidi Winters, she discovered that the role was double cast and that they would each perform two shows by splitting

news Casting for “Hello, Dolly!” strays from the norm

up the traditional four. Both girls were capable of playing the part for different reasons. “They both could sing it, and they both could act it, but each of them brought something different to it, and neither of them, up to this point, had had a starring role and we wanted to make sure they got focused,” Southworth said. Due to having two people for one role, all rehearsals were slightly modified. Music rehearsal involved the two trading off on some songs and singing together on others, but blocking involved one on stage while the other was writing notes in her script. Choreography proved to be the most challenging for the two Dollys because only one could be dancing at a time in partner dances, so the other had to learn by watching. “It is [hard] because we both are doing different characters for the same role so it can get a little confusing on what the directors want since we will both take it differently,”

Johnson said. Whittemore has found it fun to get into such a big character, a change from never having a lead role. Dolly is a force-of-nature character, but with a sweet and nostalgic side, which allows a large range to play around with. “Each of the girls brings something different. Alexa has a very strong personality. She is a born leader, she takes command and she has that aspect of Dolly down pat,” Southworth said. “Jessi is more of a nurturing, softer side, and what’s good about having the two of them is they bring out the other aspect of each other.” Johnson and Whittemore have been able to bond over the character and the amount of work necessary to pull off the role of Dolly. By sharing notes, advice and costumes, they have found a common point to sculpt their growing friendship. “I wouldn’t want to share Dolly with anyone else,” Whittemore said.

School receives A-rating after state appeal process Jeannie Williams

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Floater Editor

n a proud moment for principal Mary Williams, it was officially announced at the Feb. 25 Seminole County School Board meeting that Hagerty High School received an A rating for the 20132014 school year. After a mix-up with the scoring process, the school went through an appeal, under the guidance of Williams, and won the right to earn an A. In June, points were counted for standardized test scores and college entrance exam scores, placing the school second among the eight big high schools in the district. When teachers and staff returned to work in August, it was announced that the scores the school had received put them on track to receiving an A. Grades are based on a point system which draws from standardized test scores, college entrance exam scores, participation and performance in Advanced Placement and Dual Enrollment classes and graduation

rates. Schools receive the previous year’s math, reading, writing, science and U.S. History standardized test scores including the proficiency, or pass rate. While schools were receiving the first half of their scores, the state was still calculating graduation rates. Graduation rates are given in two parts: the overall rate and the rate for lower quartile students. Schools are given their data in October and are given time to find evidence to correct any incorrect data. Overall, the school earned a 92 percent graduation rate and, for lower quartile students, a 63 percent graduation rate. The minimum lower quartile graduation rate for the school to still receive an A is 65 percent. Williams, assistant principal Jesse Walker and other staff members spent two weeks researching students who had left Hagerty the previous year. Students who went to another learning institution did not affect the graduation rate, but students who dropped out hurt the rate. “When kids leave a school, the

withdraw code that goes with them is very important to what your statistics eventually end up being for your high school. You want it to be as accurate as you can get,” Williams said. During the research period, Walker discovered that a student who was placed in the lower quartile should not have been included. Without the student, the graduation rate increased two percentage points, enough to earn the school an A. After contacting the county office and the state, it was concluded that an error had been made and the school had permission to remove the student from the calculations. The data was turned in, and the school was left to wait for the A-rating. However, Williams received a phone call from district high school administrator Dr. Michael Blasewitz at the end of the first semester informing her that the school had received a B, due to the 63 percent graduation rate. Seminole High School and Hagerty were the only high schools to receive Bs. “[Seminole’s] principal probably

prepared her staff back in October [for the B-rating]. I didn’t tell my staff we weren’t going to make it because I thought we made it. We did make it,” Williams said. Williams insisted it was a mistake, and Blasewitz assured her that the county office would assist in the appeal process. On the day before the county went on vacation, the day after the school received the grade, the appeal was sent to the state with graduation rate information supplied by Williams and Walker.

After a two month waiting period, Williams received a call from Blasewitz informing her that the school had received an A. And this time, with all points totaled, the school earned the highest overall score in the county. “We’re in one of the topperforming districts, and we are the top performing school. That’s what an A is: top performing,” Williams said. “It just would not have been right [to not receive an A] because a detail was not taken care of.”


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news

FEA flies through Kids’ Night Winnie Meyer

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Reviews Editor

n Friday, March 6, the Future Educators of America took the pajama-clad attendees of their dual-annual Kids’ Night on a safari adventure. In the spring and fall, FEA holds a Kids’ Night open to all children of the community between ages 4 and 8. Parents were able to leave their children to a night full of fun, activities and crafts, all centered around a safari theme. This entailed paper bag and paper plate lions and giraffes, as well as safari outfits including hats, vests and binoculars. “I liked seeing the kids interacting with each other,” senior Conner Berdine said. “It was a great time for the teachers, as in us, to connect and spend time with the kids.” FEA is centered around these

types of experiences, which give members insight into teaching and child care, specifically in the public school system. “I wanted to learn more about what it means to be a teacher,” senior Katerina Bourova said. “This was a perfect opportunity to get a chance to get an inside look of the job and ask any questions I had.” Not only do FEA members run Kids’ Night, they are also given the opportunity to shadow teachers three times a year, once on the elementary, middle and high school levels. “I want to be a second grade teacher, so getting to see exactly what a second grade teacher does, and working with the children of that age is helpful,” senior Amber Courtney said. Members are assigned a teacher to follow around all day, ask questions about the profession and understand

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BAND MEMBERS SHINE AT STATE EVENT After excelling at the district event, freshman Molly Kaplan, sophomores Jason Donnelly and Ernesto Martinez and seniors Robert Burke and Daniella Parcell earned Superior ratings on their solo performances at the state band Solo and Ensemble festival on Monday, March 30. Burke and seniors Vasilios Diatzikis, Matthew Pieper, Britton Kran and Craig Stuart also saw success with a Superior on their trumpet quintet. SCPS HOSTS INTERNSHIP EXPO ePathways and the SCPS Internship Taskforce will host their Internship Expo on Thursday, April 9 from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. at the Orlando Marriott in Lake Mary. Rising juniors and seniors are invited to attend the event, where local employers will be recruiting new interns in construction, engineering, accounting and marketing fields. SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS NIGHT HONORS SENIORS Scholarship Awards Night will be held on Tuesday, April 28 to recognize seniors who have received scholarships for their future educations. Students who wish to participate should fill out an information form, found on the school’s website, and turn it in to Upper House Guidance by Tuesday, April 7. The ceremony will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium. THEATER DEPARTMENT TRIUMPHS AT STATES On Wednesday, March 25, senior Abiezer Santiago and sophomore Madison Barrett’s duet “In Whatever Time We Have” earned a Superior, the highest rating possible, at the 2015 Florida State Thespian Festival in Tampa. The theater department’s One Act entitled “You’re Gonna Love Tomorrow” was also successful, earning a score of Excellent.

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the day-to-day work and life lessons that go into being a teacher. “I’ve learned that there are many different approaches to teaching and that one way might not work for all children, and that it must be modified accordingly,” Bourova said. Members have already completed their elementary and middle school shadow days, and only have their high school day left for the spring. However, this does not mean that their experiences and knowledge with the club will end. Several additional meetings will be held before the year closes out. “[The goal] is mainly to help expand the ways of education,” Bourova said. “And to help educate individuals to grow to become better teachers.” Students may apply to join the club at the beginning of next year. Applications are available online.

Photo provided by Lauren Hamilton

JUBILANT JUNGLE. Baylor Hamilton and Mila Joe Malkovich play in their new safari gear at Kids’ Night on Friday, March 6. FEA built all of the night’s crafts and games around a safari theme.

Making prom a golden ticket experience Madison Garr Business Manager

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f you have seen Willie Wonka, you know the story of a man who creates a mysterious chocolate factory alongside his oompa loompas. The school’s Willie Wonka is senior Rodney Shaw, and his oompa loompas are the members of the senior student government, who have been working to organize prom at the Marriott World Center in Orlando on Saturday, April 11, from 6:30 to 11 p.m. The theme will be Willie Wonka. Attached to this theme are decorations and props including chocolate fountains, as seen in the movie. SGA has also been incorporating Willie Wonka into events leading up to prom, such as selling Hershey bars with golden tickets inside, which could be traded in for a free prom ticket. With Shaw as the main man alongside senior class sponsor Lauren Bachand, SGA members split into five committees: tickets and invitations, favors, decorations and centerpieces, DJ and entertainment and advertising. Each committee has

a different job, a list of responsibilities and budget to work with; all planned out by Shaw. Meetings were arranged along with PowerPoint presentations to help plan prom. However, there have been difficulties for some committees. For example, the entertainment committee planned and paid for oompa loompas, but had to abandon the idea after getting negative feedback. SGA must now come up with new entertainment with the remaining committee budget. Not only has the entertainment aspect been stressful for Shaw and the committees, but the amount of work in such little time has proved a troublesome aspect as well. “I spend hours after school daily, and many times before school too between ticket sales, event coordination, and then decorations,” senior class president Christian Rosa said. “It’s a lot. It has been stressful but we are finally getting work done.” Shaw and Rosa share a great deal of the load with planning prom and have even had to pull multiple all-nighters in order to get the committees’ duties and projects planned out on time.

Although the amount of work has been difficult for Shaw, the hardest part of planning prom is trusting others to help him. “Accepting that I cannot do it all has been difficult,” Shaw said. Shaw is used to planning big events due to being involved with leadership and SGA in the past. However, some of the committee members are seniors who are in SGA for the first time, and are having a tougher time with planning such a large, important event. “Although it is challenging, I would plan prom again if I could,” Shaw said. “I’m good at planning and it is fun to be good at something.” Rosa also agreed that planning prom is rewarding, though it is stressful. With a short time remaining until prom, SGA is working to finish arranging the final touches, including an act for entertainment and finalizing seating arrangements. Senior SGA, along with five other selected SGA members, will show up to the Marriot at 10:15 a.m. to help set up and prepare all day for the evening. The event will officially begin at 6:30 p.m.

4/2/2015 2:38:30 PM


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Scott exempts juniors from FSAs

Big sister is watching

Kallie Delis

Lay off the education, Scott Jessica Jeffers

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Opinions Editor

idterm elections have passed and with the elections came the reinstatement of Rick Scott, the now two-term governor of Florida. With ads such as “Say yes to Rick Scott,” his intentions on education, budgets, jobs and tuition are clear. But recently in the headlines, we have seen education and testing becoming Scott’s number one focus. With the states adoption of common core and EOC testing, and with the FSA test crashing in many counties including Seminole, Scott seems a little frazzled. With Florida now 28th in America for public school education, dropping out of the top 10 and 20 like previous years, the blood is showing on his hands. Right now Scott is acting cool about all that is going on, such as the crash and the rankings, but it is clear he is sweating quite a bit. The week before the crash, he canceled a test designed for high school juniors in language arts, to be imposed this year around the spring testing time. This was canceled in the midst of the crisis to try and make it seem like he has all the pieces together. He called the testing both “irrelevant” and “unnecessary,” and made a promise to cut down on student testing in the state. This cut from testing would impart less stress on both the state and the students, so instead of relieving the stress and caring about the students, he’s trying to wash his hands from what he imposed at the beginning of his term in 2013. Scott is probably cutting the testing to cover his tracks, which might have been one of the reasons we fell in public school rankings. Something else he imposed - the ability for parents to vote a public school into becoming a charter school, which is still being passed around within the state legislature. All things for sure, Rick Scott and the state legislatures should stay consistent with their plan for Florida education. All the changes are just making students and the state look bad. Maybe it’s time to lay off the education, Scott.

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Staff Reporter

t the start of the year, all students were under the impression that they would be partaking in the newly established Florida Standards Assessments. However, in the middle of February, juniors discovered they would be exempt. This change was prompted by a standardized test investigation conducted by Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart. She recommended that grade 11 FSA tests be suspended until their ultimate elimination is put into action. High school juniors readily welcomed the news. “Rick Scott not making us take the FSA is one of the few good decisions he has made in his career,” junior Maliha Qureshi said. “I’m happy we’re no longer taking it because the amount of testing we are being put through is outrageous and unnecessary.” Gov. Rick Scott agreed that there are too many tests, thus explaining the decision to remove the FSA from juniors’ testing schedules. However, there is not just one FSA exam.

There are three different categories that the FSA encompasses, including English Language Arts, Mathematics and End-of-Course exams. Each deals with separate subjects, but only the ELA and EOC assessments apply to juniors. The FSA ELA is one of the tests that Scott intends to remove for grade 11. As for the FSA EOC assessments, only juniors who are currently enrolled in Algebra I, Geometry or Algebra II will be taking exams in this category. “Mind that it is incorrect to say that there is not an assessment for juniors,” Public Information Officer of the Department of Education Claudia Claussen said. The mandatory EOCs at the end of each course remain in effect. Sophomores still require FSA testing, though. They have not been exempt from the FSA and, as they previously did this year, will continue taking the exams. “I think that it’s okay because they just made the test this year and we don’t have to take the FCAT Writes,” sophomore Bailey Carroll said. “It makes sense.” Juniors believe it to be a fair deal as well.

“Sophomores also don’t have the amount of AP courses offered junior year, thus giving them ample time to take irrelevant tests,” junior Bryson Hollen said. Carroll has recently faced the assessment and can vouch that it “is a lot more challenging than the FCAT.” Though seen as tedious by students like Carroll, many see the FSA as a positive change. Before, the FCAT was aimed toward average level students. The FSA has been amped up and provides higher standards to be met. “From the standpoint of rigor, I definitely think it’s going to work,” English teacher Helen Reed said. “But I use this analogy: it’s like going from crawling to running a marathon.” While it has been proven to be a more suitable assessment for students, there has been talk of the FSA going the way of the FCAT because of serious distribution issues in larger counties, like Dade County. “I don’t even know what tests I’m taking any more,” junior Samantha Galczak said. “I just show up for whatever new test they come up with to throw at us.”

Senior elections no contest Taylor Ferraro

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Twitter Editor

lthough election time is typically filled with heartfelt speeches and colorful posters, this year it was characterized by muffled complaints and little competition. Nine candidates in the senior class and executive board ran unopposed, and only one position which two people running. “Isn’t the whole point of student government to have a democracy and vote for who we want to represent us?” junior Brianna Baez said. Although not juniors enjoyed going to the polls to check one box, the candidates warmed up to the idea. Some were even relieved that they did not have to go through tough competition and campaigning to receive the position that they wanted. Future senior class president Mackenna Tobey was one of those people. Tobey experienced the constant competition last year, when six people ran for the junior class president position. “I am grateful for the fact that I did not have to run against others this year,” Tobey said. “It was better this way so I could focus on the other things that we have to get done.” Along with the abnormal senior class campaigns, the executive board campaigns were not the status quo either. Many leadership students feared being some of the people not

returning to Mrs. Miller’s classroom next school year after finding out that many would be cut from the leadership program. So in result a lot of students started to run for the executive board positions to save their spot next year. In order to save their spot in the leadership class, students ran for the executive board in order to hold onto their spot in the class. However, not everyone was able to run for the positions due to teacher recommendations, attendance issues or other school issues. Another big difference between the past years’ elections and this year’s election was that the executive board president position is now being shared by juniors Madeline Kemper and Haley Parlette. This is the first time in the history of leadership that the president position has ever been shared by two people. This happened when the candidate running for vice president was ineligible and Kemper and Parlette took over the presidency to become equals. They are both in charge of communicating with other schools and about what is going on at Hagerty as well as being in charge of all of the student governments. Nothing about their responsibility changes even though there are two co-presidents now. “I think it will be better now that we are copresidents because we both work well together and all the duties of a president will be shared,” Parlette said.

4/2/2015 3:59:29 PM


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Experimental research students see state success Madeline Kemper

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Lifestyles Editor

arthquakes in Florida? This question prompted junior Lauren Neldner to further research seismic activity. Other students in the experimental research class taught by Sarah Evans also found their interests while they pursued scientific excellence, competed at high levels and gained national attention. The regional competition was held on Valentine’s Day at the Seminole Towne Center, where students presented their projects to judges as well as the general public. The four students who moved on to states, which was held March 31 through April 2, included junior Lauren Neldner and senior Jack Romero, who both received first place as well as special awards, and juniors Libby Smith and Niha Maity, who placed second. Students who did not make it to the state level had the opportunity to enter the Google Science Fair, which is an online competition for anyone ages 13 to 18. Most students who participate in the science fair are enrolled in the experimental research class. The 11 students spend the first half of the year making their projects, and have found that it is a big commitment as well as a

very rewarding experience. “[The class] teaches you how to constantly be on your toes, be flexible and work with what you have,” Neldner said. Students find that coming up with the topic is the most difficult part of the process, as it has to be original and interesting. For example, when sophomore Tess Marvin glanced over a website with potential topics, antimicrobial caught her eye. After she read lab reports, she saw what research still needed to be done, and then had the opportunity to conduct her experiment in a lab at UCF under the supervision of a professor, who helped her come up with the specifics of the projects. She tested copper and how it killed E. Coli through the different periods of time. Her inspiration was how applicable the topic is to real life. “Copper is a really great surface, because it kills bacteria within a couple of minutes,” Marvin said. “Door handles and other surfaces should be made out of it.” Sophomore Samatha Bates has used her science fair project to improve aspects of her own life. She tested how the growth of coral was affected based off of different types of vitamins. “Since I own my own reef tank, I know improved ways to grow coral,” Bates said. She competed in the zoology category and

earned an award from the Orlando Reef Divers. Some students even stick to a topic they are passionate about. Neldner, who lived in California until she was 7, has dedicated the past five years to researching earthquakes. This year, her research and analysis on the San Francisco Bay Area helped her determine why some types of buildings perform better during earthquakes. Researching coastal areas in Florida was a great experience for senior Yasamin Sharifi, who studied a species of seagrass for her project. Seagrass is very important in the environment for water filtration, erosion control, feeding and breeding grounds; however, it is on the decline. She researched how this decline could be affected by copper contamination in the environment. ”It’s crucial to develop a better understanding of the damage [seagrass] may be facing because of this pollution,” Sharifi said. Sharifi feels she will benefit from this in college as she has gained research experience. Aside from the benefits in high school, students feel the skill set they have gained will translate to college and throughout their lives. “I never thought when I entered the class I would ever do so well on my project,” Smith said. “It’s changed my perspective on the power of determination and hard work.”

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Photo by Jake Arthur

ION THE PRIZE. Junior Libby Smith explains her project to a judge at the Regional Science Fair. Smith studied how fluently a person speaks through the use of priming.

Band anticipates Dublin in 2016 St. Patrick’s Day Parade Daniella Parcell

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News Editor

or the annual homecoming parade, band members march for a mile in the October heat, playing simple songs for small crowds and taking in the expected applause from Carillon Elementary’s fifth graders. Upon turning into the stadium, they hear a few respectful cheers from some overenthusiastic students, while sighing with relief as they turn the final corner. Though typical parades are pretty routine for the band, in March 2016, members will travel across the world for a more unique experience: the Dublin St. Patrick’s Day Parade. In late September, directors Brad and Brian Kuperman submitted an application for the parade, which included audio recordings and recommendations from musicians across the state. After being accepted, 77 members signed up to take part in the Irish tradition. “It’s one of the largest celebrations of St. Patrick’s Day, especially since we’re in the country that it comes from,” junior Travis Lowry said.

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While the band usually performs for an audience of 2000 teenagers, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade is expected to yield 500,000 viewers, making this the largest crowd the program has ever seen. According to Lowry, however, the excitement to perform in a foreign country outweighs the pressure of a vast audience. “You don’t really have to think of it as a large audience,” Lowry said. “Playing to 10 people is the same as playing to 10,000 people.” Along with the parade, the band will tour the country for the entire week, spending two nights in Dublin before visiting the castles of Kilkenny, the scenic Cliffs of Moher and the small town of Dingle. “It’ll be cool to see all the old architecture. We don’t have that here,” Brian said. “All of the old castles that were built, they’re actual castles where people lived way back. The oldest thing that we have here is St. Augustine.” As the costs of tours, hotels, meals and transportation add up to nearly $3000 per person, the directors have provided opportunities for students to fundraise for a more reasonable price. Members currently work concessions at the school’s athletic games and UCF events,

and will be able to participate in car washes and gain business sponsorships in the future. Although the price stands high, according to junior John McHale, the trip will be a unique experience for the band, allowing students to discover the culture overseas while exploring music outside of the classroom. “It’s an interesting experience to see culture outside of the United States, and we get to play music at the same time,” McHale said. “It’ll get

[students] excited to play their instruments.” With St. Patrick’s Day being one of Ireland’s biggest holidays, the band looks forward to joining in on the celebrations and learning of the country’s culture next year. “We get to play music in a foreign land, and we get to see how they celebrate things,” McHale said. “We have our Macy’s [Thanksgiving] Parade, but they have their St. Patrick’s Day Parade.”

4/2/2015 3:10:21 PM


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lifestyles

WOOF TV promos continue to evolve with new classes Jessica Ritchie

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Staff Reporter

rom Teacher Spotlight to Husky Cribs, TV Production has to deal with constant changes with incoming and outgoing students. As the students in charge of WOOF TV change with each graduating class, the promotions must change as well. Promotions that were once loved by the student population, such as Teacher Spotlight, have to be replaced with new ones. “Promos always take the shape of the student’s personalities that are enrolled in the class at that time,” TV production teacher Donna Parker said. Because the promos are all student made, there is a lot of personality that goes into the class and its products, changing the persona year to year. “Some years I might have a group of very dynamic students who rise above the standards,

while other years it might be more low key,” Parker said. Everyone has their own personality that goes into their promos. In 2014, Brian Henken used his loud and flamboyant personality to grab the audience’s attention. “Brian Henken would just yell and scream and that got everyone’s attention. One of his ‘go to the talent show’ kind of promos was hilarious because he was just asking rhetorical questions,” senior Kelly Broderick said. When the new school year started, people wondered why Magic Monday had to leave, but that was because Sebastian Midtvaage left. The same goes for Teacher Spotlight when Erik Marshall graduated. “We had to let Teacher Spotlight go because we could not uphold the standard that Erik brought every promo that he did,” senior Brianna Barret said. The current year is filled with charismatic personas that strive to make every promo as

unique as their personality. These include senior Al Griffith and senior Johan Guasp-Mojica. “I just try my best to add the funniest improv to the information that I can, so I can to do what is best for the news,” Guasp-Mojica said. Guasp-Mojica goes over what he has to say before he is able to get into the mood of the promo, so he is able to go out and focus on being funny. Hosted by Griffith, Husky Cribs was a way to highlight creative teachers while still keeping the student body entertained. The reason that Husky Cribs was well received was partially due to the cast members’ enthusiasm and Griffith’s banter with teachers. “I like that I can be myself and be a super energetic individual so when people watch they feed off my frantic energy which is why I think they enjoy it a lot,” senior Bronson Reano said. The opening and transition graphics change frequently, which helps change the atmosphere of the promos. By changing graphics, WOOF

TV is kept interesting so students can stay focused long enough to get the important information that they need. Technology has changed the quality of the promos as well. In past years the students used the program Final Cut, but then moved to Premiere Pro, a software with greater versatility. “It was hard to come back from the summer and find a new type software because everything was completely moved around,” Barret said. However, the technology cannot get all of the credit. The students spend a lot of time to make sure that every promo is in perfect shape for presentation. “Technology is certainly a key factor in the TV Production program, however, it does take a highly skilled and talented student to produce contest winning videos,” Parker said. Over the years, there have been low key promos and enthusiastic promos, but, no matter what, the promos reflect the student’s attitude and hard work.

College a major decision Taylor Ferraro Twitter Editor lthough some people make college decisions based on parties or proximity to the beach, there is a lot more involved in picking a college. One factor that does not get recognition though might be the prestige of a selected major. Senior Alex Georgiopoulos, however, considered this a top priority when he chose the University of Central Florida for his major, computer science. “I was considering a lot of different universities, but UCF stuck out to me the most because I know they have an incredible computer science program,” Georgiopoulos said. “When it comes to my future, I really don’t want to have any regrets.” Every college has specific majors they are known for; whether it is John Hopkins for medical school, Harvard for law school, or the University of Central Florida for any major dealing with technology, they all have their specialties. And although the number of Starbucks on their campus and how good their football team is might be important considerations, education should take priority. This is exactly what senior Isaac Sprang had to consider when it came down to making his commitment to the University of South Florida for its nursing program. “The university has such an amazing nursing program that I know will prepare me for

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my future in this field,” Sprang said. “That was really the determining factor in which school I wanted to go to.” The quality of education also includes the internships and opportunities after college. College is supposed to prepare people for the future, and where internships are a big factor in determining future jobs, helping to build the skills to become successful in a chosen profession. Without internships, future employers will not seriously consider a candidate, and it might hinder one from any future in that field. Senior Christian Rosa chose the University of Florida for the biomedical engineering program, largely because of opportunities within the on-campus teaching hospital. “The University of Florida’s biomedical engineering major would give me the opportunity to get into a lot of neurobiological research and I could potentially intern at Shand’s Children’s Hospital,” Rosa said. Although different factors contribute to the final college decision, from Greek life to how many Greek restaurants there are, the prestige of a student’s chosen major should be the main factor. The purpose of college is to educate, so why not make a college’s reputation for success a top priority? “College is an incredible experience and if the education is sub-par then it won’t help prepare me for my future,” Georgiopoulos said. “Education is where it matters.”

4/2/2015 3:14:57 PM


lifestyles

HUMANS OF HAGERTY

Jessica Jeffers Opinions Editor an I take your picture?” Those five words are what brought Chicago resident Brandon Stanton to New York, where he started the Humans of New York blog. This blog started in November 2010, with a collection of pictures, each with a quote or story attached from the conversation between Stanton and the photographed person the day of the photograph. Although the blog started off small in 2010, it now has over 8 million followers on

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social media sites. The quotes on the site are the most popular, either funny or serious. “The best one I have seen was this one guy laying on a bench and the caption said ‘I’m just waiting for summer,’ when I saw it, it made my day,” freshman Morgan Dorn said. But on the more serious side, the quotes can have anything to do with people’s family life, struggles and addictions. “There was this one that related to me a lot that was about shyness, it really went deep. It was a guy just standing there smiling at the camera,” junior Nat Lozada said. The blog actually was not Stanton’s original

vision; originally he strove to take thousands of photos of New Yorkers and place those pictures on a map to show who lives in that area and that area’s demographics. But the blog he created to this day is still the buzz of many students. People and fans have made different versions and adaptations to fit their own areas, like Hagerty Journalism has Humans of Hagerty which started in October 2014 and gives students a chance to share a wide range of topics. The first Human of Hagerty was Dr. Craig Johnson who spoke about what he wanted to leave students with, but many of the other

7

Humans of Hagerty talked about bullying and their inspirations for the things they do including track (Andrew Stivers). What catches most people’s attention about Humans is the quote that comes with each picture, which can sometimes shock the reader. For instance, Dorn was shocked when she saw her favorite Human’s quote. Humans stand for people and their individuality, which can be used in an artistic form. Humans of Hagerty has its own tab on the Hagerty Journ website (HagertyJourn.com) where it showcases the individuals and staff around campus.

(9th) Emily Bogdany: “I remember lots of people moving their mouths when they were talking and I thought it was strange because I couldn’t hear them.” (11th) Elena Fotiadis and Devin Kareem: “On our first date we went to Universal and as we were walking over to Mummy it got cold for a second and then I was fine. Devin saw me and was like ‘Oh are you hands cold?’ and I was ‘Eh not really.’ He was like ‘Oh really? Let me see,’ and like grabbed my hand, felt it for a second and kinda slapped his hand into mine so he could hold it while we waited in line for the ride.”

(12th) Bryan Goins: “Well I’ve wanted to be a chef ever since I was in fifth grade. My mom was pregnant with my little brother. She was having complications and was put on bedrest for multiple months each pregnancy. So I was basically cooking dinner every night for my entire family.” Want to read more Humans of Hagerty? Go to Hagertyjourn.com.

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(12th) Annie Raby: “Well going through a surgery like that definitely changed me. Nobody really understands what I went through before and after and then all the work I put in before the surgery to prepare me so that I wouldn’t lose everything from my game. It was a lot of mental stress and worrying about how things would turn out. But when I did get back to tennis, being away from the court that long almost revitalized my game. I spent so much energy worrying and recovering and building back my endurance, that by the time I could play, I didn’t have any more worrying and stress left.”

4/2/2015 3:16:19 PM


8

Lent sparks unorthodox sacrifices

Surviving Suburbia

Maddie Garr

Parents prolong objects’ “usefulness” pre-college

I

Winnie Meyer

I

Reviews Editor

f not for tape, my life would fall apart. Literally. I use duct-tape to keep my desk chair from tumbling over like a startled cow. Packing tape is the remedy behind all of my slowly combusting storage boxes. And even with its collection of electrical tape, my laptop is on the brink of exploding. However, despite these potential tragedies, I am denied an upgrade of any kind. “College is just around the corner, we can wait until then,” has become a bothersome and twisted song on continual replay around the house. I understand my parents wanting to buy new things closer to college, but this should not mean dealing with appliances that, much like my life, have a tendency to fall to pieces. It would be one thing if people didn’t notice my outdatedness. They stare and snicker. Now I deal with the looks and smug grins at my Nemo-sticker covered laptop I got in the eighth grade. I’m sure my exasperated sighing after it has frozen for the third time in 10 minutes is a bit of a turnoff as well. And just because something appears to work, does not mean it actually works. My best friend’s car for example, drives. It does not drive well. The ceiling cloth is falling in, the entire window control panels are gone and whenever the AC or radio are turned on, a dead rodent smell flows through the car. When it is this obvious something needs fixing, why not get it done while you can? In the long run, wouldn’t it be smart to begin college prep in small increments rather than nose-diving into the heavy monetary loss of college? I am attending LSU in the fall, and tuition costs more than my house. Unfortunately, it is impossible to fund every single little thing we want. I can tell what can wait a few years, and what must be fixed as soon as possible. I also know that if the outlet in my wall sends sparks flying whenever I plug in a charger or light bulb, something should be done. My life needs an update, and it needs one soon. ....and Mom, Dad, in 2015, taping up the back of my cracked phone is not really considered an update.

8-Lifestyles.indd 1

Business Manager

magine not being able to sleep in your own bed for 40 days, no more after school naps or crawling under the covers after a long day. This is what junior Steven Marvin, a dedicated Catholic, took on last year for Lent. “Sharing in the Lent tradition of sacrificing or ‘giving up’ something as essential as a bed is a real learning experience,” Marvin said. Although Marvin said that the task of giving up his bed was hard, he said it is something he would do again. This year he has taken on a new challenge for lent: no more soda. He has yet to cheat on his commitment. Even though he said it is hard, it is not as hard as giving up his bed. Lent is the 40 days and 40 nights leading up to Easter in which people give something up as a sacrifice in reflection of their religion. Most people give up things they use commonly or every day, such as food, which is what makes

the task so difficult. Some people even give up non tangible things such as spreading rumors or judging people. What someone gives up is entirely at their discretion. Junior Christine Cole gave up white bread and white rice for Lent this year. “The main reason it is so challenging is because it is used in a lot of common meals,” Cole said. Others have also been straining through Lent and occasionally cheating. Refraining from cheating is what makes Lent so challenging. Some people struggle greatly because they almost rely on what they gave up. Junior Elizabeth Smith gave up sweets for Lent and recently gave in to her taste buds. “I ordered a chocolate coolata from Dunkin Donuts and I don’t know if that is cheating, but it was delicious,” Smith said. Smith explained that sweets was one of the hardest things to give up, but that non-tangible things would be much harder, such as refraining from gossiping or sarcasm. She has yet to give

up anything non tangible. While Smith struggles with sweets, junior Lauren Basen is struggling with not one, but three things she gave up. Basen gave up coffee, ice cream and soda and she has yet to cheat, even on Sundays, which some Catholics see as a day to use whatever they are giving up. “It’s hard because I rely on coffee to give me a boost in the morning, because I have to stay up late doing schoolwork after games and practices,” Basen said. However, some people accidently cheat on what they gave up because they are so used to using it. “I accidently bought Italian five grain bread and didn’t know it was white. So I ate it because I didn’t want to be wasteful. I also have had a burger with bread by accident,” Cole said. Although it is difficult for Marvin, Smith, Basen and Cole, they all believe Lent, and its tradition of growing from sacrifice, is worth it, and they will continue to give up a new thing each year, challenging their every day habits.

Interpreters bridge communication gap for Deaf Peyton Whittington

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Staff Reporter

rom trigonometric functions to swear words, from Robert Frost poems to the kid farting in the back of the classroom, it is an interpreter’s job to communicate everything going on in their surroundings to the deaf or hard of hearing student they interpret for. These are just a few examples of what interpreters Stephanie Tucker and Kelly Henriques have interpreted. Tucker, who interprets for senior Dalymar ZayasBoccheciamp, and Henriques, who interprets for senior Kayla Watson, interpret the day’s lectures and conversations for their students. “No matter which interpreter that you ask, our role is to facilitate communication and be that point of access for the deaf person so that they can be empowered to participate as much as they do or do not want,” Tucker said. Although this is the professional standard, the methods of interpretation vary from one interpreter to the next. One on end of the interpreting spectrum is American Sign Language, which has its own structure and grammar independent of English. On the other end is Signing Exact English, which is entirely English-based, and in the middle is trans-literation, which uses ASL hand gestures but English is mouthed. Henriques uses transliteration to communicate with Watson, and Tucker alternates between trans-literation and ASL to communicate with Zayas-Boccheciamp.

“Every single client that we have, as interpreters we have to decide how we’re going to sign within a few minutes of talking to them,” Henriques said. “We have to pick what’s going to be best, whether they’re 5 years old or 55 years old.” For the hearing population, it can be easy to misunderstand an interpreter’s role in a deaf or hard of hearing student’s daily life. Interpreters are not expected to assist the student in school work or act as a tutor; they are simply tasked with bridging the student’s gap in communication. “People don’t understand that my interpreter signs everything you say,” Zayas-Boccheciamp said. “My interpreter is my ear.” However, just because interpreters assume a professional role in the life of a deaf or hard of hearing student, this does not mean interpreters avoid friendly relationships with their students. “[Our relationship] is more than studentteacher; sometimes we tell each other things and swap jokes during class,” Watson said. Another common misconception that hearing people make is asking an interpreter to sign something to a deaf or hard of hearing person instead of speaking to them directly. “In that situation, I sign, ‘She wants me to tell you…’ exactly like that so they know the hearing person isn’t talking directly to them. That empowers them to say, ‘I’m sorry, you can talk directly to me. My interpreter will just interpret what you’re saying,’” Tucker said. “That gives the students the chance to speak up for themselves.”

Social conventions and etiquette aside, research has shown that the level of brain activity that interpreters experience on a daily basis is extraordinary. “We hear the spoken message coming in and our brains, have to sort through all of that content, figure out the key points of it, retain the information as it’s coming in, formulate how we would put that into ASL and then get it out onto our hands, all in a nanosecond,” Tucker said. According to Tucker, interpretation is one of the only professions that uses both sides of the brain simultaneously. Because of this constant, spontaneous brain activity, interpreters have complex cognitive skills and perform neural functions beyond the average human. “There is a big difference between being fluent in ASL and being able to interpret it,” Henriques said. “Someone could know ASL more than a deaf person and not be able to interpret it.” This is why educational interpreters are in high demand. Though it is part of their code of ethics to remain discreet, educational interpreters play a key role in the academic lives of the deaf community. “It’s my responsibility to make sure my student has access to the education that’s being presented. That means prepping before class, meeting with the teachers if I need to meet with them [or adjusting] my placement in the classroom,” Tucker said. “Whatever I need to do to make sure I’m providing her with access to that education is my responsibility.”

4/2/2015 3:17:44 PM


9

lifestyles

Classrooms showcase senior art Lauren Lee

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Graphics Editor

rom springtime cherry blossom trees in AP Environmental to a man with a TV as a head in AP Literature, many classrooms have spiced up their ceilings and walls with paintings made by students before they graduate. “I still look up and find new things on the ceiling,” 2D art teacher Mary Marinel said. “It’s inspirational and good for conversation.” Some of the ceiling tiles have been there since the school’s first year, handed down from teacher to teacher. “Dr. Diane Harper made me promise only AP Lit students could paint the tiles, and if I leave I hope to do the same,” AP Literature teacher Vicki Browne said. More than half of the ceiling in the 7-102 2D art room is covered with ceiling paintings, varying from abstract patterns to full portraits of animals, such as a giraffe painted by Taylor Jennings or a wolf painted by

Maureen Fleitas. Other paintings include handprints done in the style of Andy Warhol, a 3D upside down pyramid, the grumpy cat and a girl whose hair disintegrates into birds. However, in Browne’s classroom, it is another story; the tiles, such as a painting of Hamlet featuring a quill writing one of Hamlet’s quotes, all relate back to literature books that students have read during the year. Much like AP Lit, Theater features plays, but instead of painting the ceiling tiles, the theater workshop has painted every play they have performed onto a brick. These feature plays such as The Wizard of Oz and To Kill a Mockingbird. AP Environmental teacher Yvette Pigott decided to have students paint and sign the blank wooden cabinets. Painting the cabinets or ceiling tiles and signing them is a rite of passage after taking the AP exam for AP Lit, APES and AP Art. However, in the 2D art room, AP Art students can paint the ceiling tiles at any point throughout the year.

Many of the individual painters paint the tiles before they graduate and then leave them like former AP Art student Sylvia Owens, who painted a ceiling tile of her own characters in the art room, and a wall that is broken and looks into a beach on the wall in Rutledge’s old room. “I wanted to leave something behind at the school, and since it is the sign of the school and represents freedom, I painted a wolf,” senior Maureen Fleitas said. For both Browne’s AP Lit class and AP 2D Art, students have to submit a plan and an idea before they start to paint. The tiles are taken from spare stores or closet tiles and then replaced with one in the classroom, once the painted tile gets placed. Not only do the tiles offer slight distraction, but they help students feel more at home rather than just sitting in a gray-walled classroom. “If you are a blank wall, students don’t come to you. [Having painted tiles] opens up a door and creates a community and an area of trust,” Browne said.

Photo by Jake Arthur

ARCHITECTURAL ART The art room is covered in ceiling designs created by graduating seniors. Tiles range from detailed wolves to abstract patterns.

Long distance love: Klein finds joy in running marathons Katie Curley Online Managing Editor

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he song of hundreds of feet pounding the ground filled the ears of every runner, arms pumping and breath gasping with minds set on the finish line. For senior Haley Klein, 16 weeks of training led up to this: 26 miles of running. Four hours and 28 minutes of grueling movement, all for the medal, the t-shirt and the glory. On Jan. 25, Klein traveled with her aunt, Jessica Sims, to New Orleans to participate in the Rock and Roll Marathon. Her aunt ran the half marathon so she could see her niece cross the finish line after her first full marathon. “I never stopped, not once,” Klein said. “It was really fun until I got to mile 18, and then it was just straight out and back so it sucked. It was really just boring and mentally made you want to give up.” Although it was difficult to keep

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going, Klein was motivated by Sims. As a huge marathon runner who has run many races including the Boston Marathon, Sims has served as an inspiration to Klein. Many other factors kept Klein strong mentally and physically too. To keep her strength up, she carried chews and other snacks to keep her busy and pass the time. Moreover, the embarrassment of wearing a shirt she had not earned encouraged Klein to keep her feet moving. “Honestly, I am really big with race t-shirts and I can’t wear the shirt if I didn’t finish,” Klein said. Running was not always Klein’s thing, however. It was not until the summer of her junior year that she found her passion. “Usually in high school there aren’t many sports that you can do that you didn’t start when you were younger or playing club for, except for running,” Klein said. “When I first started doing cross country, I was pretty horrible.”

When she ran her first half marathon, it came as a surprise. In January of her junior year, Klein’s aunt called her up three days before the Tavares half marathon, informing her that her friend had just backed out of the race and asked if Klein wanted to run with her. Surprisingly, it was her easiest half marathon since it was in the middle of track season, so her body was in top shape. “I just ran the half-marathon and I loved it; it was just the best feeling ever,” Klein said. For many reasons, running has become one of her favorite activities. Whether it be the happy endorphins released by exercise or the company of others, Klein enjoys running and pushing herself to the limit. Since discovering the joys of running, Klein has run two other half marathons, the Orlando Utilities Commission and Clermont half marathons, over the past year and a half. The Clermont half marathon proved to be the hardest since the

course spanned over hills. And since cross country and track are always in season, except over the summer, Klein has never trained for a half marathon as she is always prepared for a big run. But even though track helps big races, big races do not necessarily help with track. Although this has been Klein’s best season in the 4x8, one mile and two mile events, track coach Jay Getty believes that marathons at a young age hurt more than they help. “We’ve had two kids in two years [who ran half and full marathons],” Getty said. “One kid did it and was hurt for most of the track season because it is not a normal distance. These are things you should do later in your life.” However this does not phase Klein. She is already signed up for another marathon in Chicago to help her qualify for the Boston Marathon. In order to qualify, one must run a full marathon in three and a half hours or under.

“I haven’t started training yet, but for Christmas I asked my dad to get me a trainer for my big present, so I can have a trainer to get me to Boston,” Klein said. Her other goals for running include getting on the Track Shack team. This is possible by speaking with a representative and voicing interest in the team; they then say what marathons or half marathons to sign up for. The Track Shack team then looks and compares times for those trying to qualify. Those interested in the team have to do individual research on times of people already on the team and either do better or as good as them. Next year, Klein will start running with them to earn a position on the team. In the meantime, Klein will continue her last track season, although she prefers longer, stress-free races. “For all of the half marathons I never stress for them,” Klein said. “That’s what makes it easy, I am just running to enjoy it.”

4/2/2015 3:24:34 PM


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IIM MPPA AC CTT

10 CONCUSSIONS 10 CONCUSSIONS

INITIAL IMPACT

Concussions are traumatic brain injuries where the head moves rapidly and then abruptly discontinues motion. Whether the head stops due to an impact with a hard surface or a sudden halt in spinning or shaking, after the skull ceases movement, the brain, suspended in cerebrospinal fluid, continues to move and may collide with the interior skull wall. This internal roller-coaster of violent trauma causes brain cells to flood the nervous tissue with chemicals, deadening receptors that are associated with learning and memory.

WITH LASTING CONSEQUENCES,

CONCUSSIONS CONCUSSIONS

11 11

RESULTING IMPACT

No physical swelling or bleeding is seen as a direct result of a concussion, however, the internal jostling causes extensive damage which varies drastically between people, and can range from minor focusing issues to accelerated aging. Different symptoms are commonly split up into three groups; cognitive, emotional and physical. • Cognitive effects are commonly recognized by difficulties in concentration, organization, memorization, communication, and processing information. • Emotional changes due to chemical imbalances in the brain include mood swings, depression, and anxiety. An exaggerated personality, increased impulsivity and stunted social skills also occur. • Physical hindrances include the inability to exercise, accelerated aging, and loss of the senses, balance, coordination, and flexibility. Pain, such as headaches or nausea, is also common.

CONCUSSION AWARENESS IS A NEEDED TOOL IN HELPING STUDENTS UNDERSTAND THE SEVERITY OF BRAIN TRAUMA. Story by Sophie Hill, Online Editor-in-chief Design by Jeannie Williams, Courtney Dziewior, Christine Cole and Sophie Hill

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ive months after taking a hit on the soccer field and landing in the hospital with a moderately severe concussion, sophomore Bethany Salas wakes up for school at noon. She no longer attends classes on campus since her headaches and inability to focus are too intense, and as she sits down for breakfast, her hands still shake from the trauma inflicted to her brain in early November. “I lost three months of my life,” Salas said. “I don’t remember anything from having a concussion. I’m behind in school and I can’t play the sport I love, and I’m not sure when I’ll recover.”

When you get hurt doing something you love, it makes you question everything.” - Grace Revak

Salas was told her recovery process would take around four weeks, but she was also informed that concussions differs between people in their short and long term effects. Like many students, Salas was unaware of just how lasting the damage of a concussion can be, and how drastically recovery time can vary between people. “Anyone can get a concussion. You can be the star football player or a pedestrian on the side of the road,” sophomore Antonio Esposito, who suffered from a concussion two years ago while messing around with his brother, said. “Concussions are underrated when they should be taken more seriously

concussion-middle.indd All Pages

because your head is the most important part of you, and you have to protect it.” Esposito says, while his concussion took him nearly eight weeks to recover, he does not feel any lasting effects aside from a new perspective on his peers, who did little to help him through his difficult and frustrating recovery. Although almost everyone on campus has either suffered from a concussion or knows someone who has, Esposito and sophomore Grace Revak, who has sustained two concussions since November, say many do not seem to know how to act surrounding such a traumatic event. “I was running one second, the next I’m on the ground,” sophomore Grace Revak said. “It was really scary. You don’t know what’s happening. You’re confused and in pain and everything is fuzzy. You’re emotional and you can’t figure out why.” Revak, like many contact-sport student athletes, says concussions are just a normal part of the play. She has no plans to halt her athletic career following back-to-back brain injuries, and is determined to play lacrosse in college. Senior Joe Simone decided to not pursue collegiate sports in lieu of the risks following his three concussions. “Having a concussion was one of the hardest times in my life,” Simone said. “There’s no escape. You’re not allowed to run it out, or do activities that you normally do to relieve stress. I never want to go through that again” During the Pink’d game in 2013, Simone received such a violent blow to the head that the game was halted and an ambulance was required to transport him to the hospital. The student section united in the stands to send him off with well wishes and chants as he raised a shaky thumbs-up from the gurney before spending

LASTING IMPACT

Long-term symptoms caused by concussions fall under post-concussive syndrome and can last anywhere from a few weeks to a few decades. Because those with PCS have damaged white matter in their brain, problems with memory, moods, inhibition, organization, and problem solving arise. Studies also show that brain wave activity and motor pathways remain abnormal for years afterwords, and correlations to brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s and dementia, are under speculation.

Having a concussion was one of the hardest times in my life. There’s no escape.” - Joe Simone

the rest of the season injured. He admits that although only he was only officially diagnosed with three concussions, he probably sustained almost a half dozen throughout his high school football career, increasing the likelihood for debilitating long term effects, including an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, memory problems, language impairments and difficulties concentrating organizing, or planning. “I can tell my memory has weakened a little bit,” Simone said. “I’m not on the balls of my feet anymore. In school it takes me a little longer to get things done. It’s scary.” Concussions have been devastating to students, forcing them to reevaluate how the rest of their life will go, and whether or not continuing competitive athletics is worth the risks. Although Revak believes firmly in continuing lacrosse for as long as possible, she says she might have to consider the idea of halting play if her concussions become more severe. “You plan your life out when you’re younger. You imagine it and picture it a certain way in your head,” Revak said. “But when you get a concussion, it just tears your dream down. When you get hurt doing something you love, it makes you question everything.”

SECONDARY IMPACT

Sometimes, before someone has recovered from their first concussion, they sustain a second one. This can lead to Second Impact Syndrome, where massive swelling of the brain causes pressure inside the skull to choke off the flow of fresh blood, leading to irreparable brain damage or death.

4/2/2015 3:29:30 PM


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IIM MPPA AC CTT

10 CONCUSSIONS 10 CONCUSSIONS

INITIAL IMPACT

Concussions are traumatic brain injuries where the head moves rapidly and then abruptly discontinues motion. Whether the head stops due to an impact with a hard surface or a sudden halt in spinning or shaking, after the skull ceases movement, the brain, suspended in cerebrospinal fluid, continues to move and may collide with the interior skull wall. This internal roller-coaster of violent trauma causes brain cells to flood the nervous tissue with chemicals, deadening receptors that are associated with learning and memory.

WITH LASTING CONSEQUENCES,

CONCUSSIONS CONCUSSIONS

11 11

RESULTING IMPACT

No physical swelling or bleeding is seen as a direct result of a concussion, however, the internal jostling causes extensive damage which varies drastically between people, and can range from minor focusing issues to accelerated aging. Different symptoms are commonly split up into three groups; cognitive, emotional and physical. • Cognitive effects are commonly recognized by difficulties in concentration, organization, memorization, communication, and processing information. • Emotional changes due to chemical imbalances in the brain include mood swings, depression, and anxiety. An exaggerated personality, increased impulsivity and stunted social skills also occur. • Physical hindrances include the inability to exercise, accelerated aging, and loss of the senses, balance, coordination, and flexibility. Pain, such as headaches or nausea, is also common.

CONCUSSION AWARENESS IS A NEEDED TOOL IN HELPING STUDENTS UNDERSTAND THE SEVERITY OF BRAIN TRAUMA. Story by Sophie Hill, Online Editor-in-chief Design by Jeannie Williams, Courtney Dziewior, Christine Cole and Sophie Hill

F

ive months after taking a hit on the soccer field and landing in the hospital with a moderately severe concussion, sophomore Bethany Salas wakes up for school at noon. She no longer attends classes on campus since her headaches and inability to focus are too intense, and as she sits down for breakfast, her hands still shake from the trauma inflicted to her brain in early November. “I lost three months of my life,” Salas said. “I don’t remember anything from having a concussion. I’m behind in school and I can’t play the sport I love, and I’m not sure when I’ll recover.”

When you get hurt doing something you love, it makes you question everything.” - Grace Revak

Salas was told her recovery process would take around four weeks, but she was also informed that concussions differs between people in their short and long term effects. Like many students, Salas was unaware of just how lasting the damage of a concussion can be, and how drastically recovery time can vary between people. “Anyone can get a concussion. You can be the star football player or a pedestrian on the side of the road,” sophomore Antonio Esposito, who suffered from a concussion two years ago while messing around with his brother, said. “Concussions are underrated when they should be taken more seriously

concussion-middle.indd All Pages

because your head is the most important part of you, and you have to protect it.” Esposito says, while his concussion took him nearly eight weeks to recover, he does not feel any lasting effects aside from a new perspective on his peers, who did little to help him through his difficult and frustrating recovery. Although almost everyone on campus has either suffered from a concussion or knows someone who has, Esposito and sophomore Grace Revak, who has sustained two concussions since November, say many do not seem to know how to act surrounding such a traumatic event. “I was running one second, the next I’m on the ground,” sophomore Grace Revak said. “It was really scary. You don’t know what’s happening. You’re confused and in pain and everything is fuzzy. You’re emotional and you can’t figure out why.” Revak, like many contact-sport student athletes, says concussions are just a normal part of the play. She has no plans to halt her athletic career following back-to-back brain injuries, and is determined to play lacrosse in college. Senior Joe Simone decided to not pursue collegiate sports in lieu of the risks following his three concussions. “Having a concussion was one of the hardest times in my life,” Simone said. “There’s no escape. You’re not allowed to run it out, or do activities that you normally do to relieve stress. I never want to go through that again” During the Pink’d game in 2013, Simone received such a violent blow to the head that the game was halted and an ambulance was required to transport him to the hospital. The student section united in the stands to send him off with well wishes and chants as he raised a shaky thumbs-up from the gurney before spending

LASTING IMPACT

Long-term symptoms caused by concussions fall under post-concussive syndrome and can last anywhere from a few weeks to a few decades. Because those with PCS have damaged white matter in their brain, problems with memory, moods, inhibition, organization, and problem solving arise. Studies also show that brain wave activity and motor pathways remain abnormal for years afterwords, and correlations to brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s and dementia, are under speculation.

Having a concussion was one of the hardest times in my life. There’s no escape.” - Joe Simone

the rest of the season injured. He admits that although only he was only officially diagnosed with three concussions, he probably sustained almost a half dozen throughout his high school football career, increasing the likelihood for debilitating long term effects, including an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, memory problems, language impairments and difficulties concentrating organizing, or planning. “I can tell my memory has weakened a little bit,” Simone said. “I’m not on the balls of my feet anymore. In school it takes me a little longer to get things done. It’s scary.” Concussions have been devastating to students, forcing them to reevaluate how the rest of their life will go, and whether or not continuing competitive athletics is worth the risks. Although Revak believes firmly in continuing lacrosse for as long as possible, she says she might have to consider the idea of halting play if her concussions become more severe. “You plan your life out when you’re younger. You imagine it and picture it a certain way in your head,” Revak said. “But when you get a concussion, it just tears your dream down. When you get hurt doing something you love, it makes you question everything.”

SECONDARY IMPACT

Sometimes, before someone has recovered from their first concussion, they sustain a second one. This can lead to Second Impact Syndrome, where massive swelling of the brain causes pressure inside the skull to choke off the flow of fresh blood, leading to irreparable brain damage or death.

4/2/2015 3:29:30 PM


12

POLL

What would you rather see at Prom?

student connection

Twitter Feed College around the corner “Officially committed to play football at Ohio Dominican next year!” senior James Flannery (@jflannery2) “Just wanna be at FAU already” senior Julianna Hilbert (@HilbertJules)

Lady Gaga’s meat dress

18%

No rest for Daylight Savings Duct tape dress

Dress made of candy

20%

Left shark

51%

100 people surveyed

11%

Instagram Highlights

“Am not feeling today at all.. I havent been able to sleep in two nights now. I’m sooooo tired” senior Ané Jonigan (@AneJonigan) “Don’t wanna get out of bed” senior Amanda Moberg (@Amanda_ Mobergg)

Prom stressers “Where’s the best place to get a mullet before prom?” senior Christopher Carpenter (@Thecarpenter_11) “Prom dress shopping is going so good #DecisonsDecisons” senior Kelly Walter (@KellyWalterrr)

@music4life124 Senior Cara Petrullo takes a homework break with a bite to eat and a Netflix session.

@harper_xoxo_ The girls softball team celebrates their new title as Kissimmee Classic champs.

@jillianderson_ Sophomore Jillian Anderson turns a simple doodle into a bona fide masterpiece.

Basketball love “So proud of the Hagerty Basketball team! So much heart! You have made the entire community proud! #TeamKohn” (@HagHSBaseball) “Insane amount of respect to those men out there. Hearts were on those courts and the Husky family couldn’t be any more proud” senior Rhiana Raymundo (@rhiana_xo)

@lyndseynicolel Senior Lyndsey Lewis takes a quick selfie with Viner Thomas Sanders at theater state competition.

@rhianaa_ Senior Rhiana Raymundo recalls dominating long jumps during track and field season.

@perrydlily Sophomores Lillian Perry and Chloe Garver take a step toward their future as NTHS members.

“Denzel Mahoney is one of the most underrated basketball players in the state of Florida” senior Austin Ekern (@AustinEkern)


student connection

EXPRESSIONS

Poetry Glory Road Faria Sal, 9

Life is hard when you are young . . . Everywhere I go People show their expression of stress But happiness tries to fill their hearts to a new road. . . Everywhere I go I do not see a place where people Practice their new road Of determination with beauty, peace, or passion For the most part

Back in their past a light still shines. A glory road will come Upon them one day We followed, learned, and practiced Our hearts and dignity became inspired To keep what one has learned The present teachings will be washed away for most As if nobody was their host

Erika Grasso, 10 “As an artist, I’m into making organic, flowing shapes. The hair of the horse inspired me to incorporate the hair of the woman.”

PRIDE

Excerpts from paragraphs written by students in response to the prompt “What does character mean to you?” See full responses at hagertyjourn.com.

Taylor Rover, 10 Doing the right thing in private is not enough to qualify as having good character. Good character is doing the right thing, for the right reasons. Celeb Getty, 10 The cliché phrase “champions are made where no one is watching” has been around the sports world for centuries. But this has now transformed to a more substantial trait; character. Ella Plasse,9 Respect may take a lot of work and effort, but in the long run it will pay off…give a little to get a little. Emily Hurtado, 10 Being respectful to others requires listening to them and showing care for their feelings. To be respectful, one must keep peace among others.

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McKenzie Fitzgerald, 10 “We did a self-portrait project , but we had to add something to it that spoke to us. I really like the sci-fi genre, so I used that in my self-portrait.”

13 Double Take It takes two to shop Adeline Davis Student Connection Editor

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he wide eyes, flushed cheeks and sweaty forehead is the look of any dad who has to take his daughter prom dress shopping. Imagine the look of my dad when he realized he had to take two. Luckily for him, having twins cuts the shopping time in half. The average singleton would experience anxiety if she was given a one hour time limit for shopping. Savannah and I, however, stayed pretty calm. We had a game plan. I tackled one side of the store while she took the other. Within 10 minutes we had compiled a huge heap of dresses, which we split up to try on. While my dad snoozed in a chair, the intense hunt began for the perfect prom dress. Throughout this whole process, we had signals for each other. High pitched squeals meant “this could be the one,” yelps meant “this is nice,” and a groan or horrified gasp meant “don’t look at me.” When squeals were sounded from both of our dressing rooms, we ran out to look, but ended up being dismayed. The dresses were the exact same color. I was determined to keep my dress, but when Savannah puts on her sad face, it’s like looking at pictures of Dylan O’Brien and his girlfriend; completely heartbreaking. After five minutes of her pleading, I caved. My dad remained clueless to the tensions building as I tried to find a second dress. Fifty horrified gasps and groans later, I was slumped against a wall and Savannah was covered in my rejected dresses pile. Annoyingly enough, the overly helpful sales lady kept rapping on my door asking if I needed assistance. In an act of desperation, I made Savannah go out as “me” while I stayed on the floor. With only 10 minutes to go, the sales lady helped Savannah pick out three dresses, which Savannah gave me to try on. Thankfully, I found one that was completely different from her’s. The added bonus was seeing the look of shock on the sales lady’s face when we both walked out. See this column’s twin by Kallie Delis online.

4/2/2015 3:33:35 PM


Lifters need love, too Adeline Davis Student Connection Editor

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hen all five feet of Olivia Albano walked into the weightlifting room, people assumed she was not real competition. However, when Albano managed to bench a whopping 145, she went from disregarded to jaw dropping, earning her spot as second in the state. Despite Albano’s tremendous achievement at state competition, the student section consisted of about 10 people, more than half of whom had her same last name. This is drastically different from the student section at the basketball state competition. When basketball placed as state runner up, Twitter blew up with a multitude of supportive tweets. Albano’s Twitter stayed silent. If students are truly #HuskyFam, band’s 2011 state win and bowling’s state titles should have received more support. Albano still encounters students who remain oblivious to her state level accomplishment. “When people ask me what I do, they are surprised when the five- foot tall girly girl with a bow in her hair says ‘weightlifting,’” Albano said. Albano is not alone in her lack of recognition. In 2011, band made school history as the first state win. However, the Monday after their win, derogatory comments were posted on Twitter stating how pathetic it was that band secured the first state win. The majority of Twitter tough love is caused by common

misconceptions. Albano constantly deals with stereotypes that weightlifters are “manly,” while band students deal with assumptions that playing in the band relies solely on brains when, according to calorielab. com, the average band student burns 200 calories for every hour they march. Clearly, band requires just as much brawn as brains, making the performances they used to win their 2011 state title more impressive. Everyone deserves to be acknowledged, no matter how popular their sport may be. Senior Megan Fernander has been on the girl’s golf team since freshman year but still hears statements like “We have a golf team?” “Everyone thinks golf is a sport for old white men,” Fernander said. “People still don’t know we went to states this past year.” Similar pain was seen in the bowling alley, when zero students showed up to see bowling place in the top three at states. If students spread love to more than just sports involving filled stadiums, they would find that their presence positively impacts the performance of their peers. Our school does not have to turn into a peppy version of High School Musical, but the All-in-this-Together state of mind would establish respect among the student body. Tweeting out positive encouragement, and going to the occasional concert or golf game would be a good start. Hopefully next year when Albano benches another 50 pounds, the audience will have more fans than family members.

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A BITE to how students receive school information. During elections, WOOF TV did not play all of the speeches, causing confusion. Afternoon announcements are also sometimes missed because students talk over it and teachers want to finish their lesson. Organizations should work together to get information spread.

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A BARK to the student section at the basketball state championship on Feb. 28. Approximately 200 students traveled hours on end, all the way to Lakeland to cheer the team on until the end of the close of the game. Students were very supportive, even after a heartbreaking loss, chanting “Let’s go Huskies” as the players were awarded runner up.

opinions Hagerty High School

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The BluePrint is a student-produced newspaper in which the student editors make all content decisions. The newspaper belongs to the Columbia Scholastic Press Association, the National Scholastic Press Association and the Florida Scholastic Press Association. Opinions expressed within the newspaper do not represent the staff’s views as a whole (except for the Our Take), the views of Seminole County Public Schools, or Hagerty High School’s administration and staff. For information about advertising in the paper, please contact us via one of the above methods. We reserve the right to reject any advertisement.

3225 Lockwood Blvd. Oviedo, FL 32765 Email: hagertyjourn@blueprint.com Phone: (407) 871-0750 Fax: (407) 871-0817

Editor-in-Chief Spencer Thompson

Lifestyles Editor Madeline Kemper

Floater Editor Jeannie Williams

Managing Editor Haley Gaeser

Reviews Editor Winnie Meyer

Online Editor-in-Chief Sophie Hill

Opinions Editor Jessica Jeffers

Online Managing Ed Katie Curley

Student Connection Adeline Davis

Photographer Jake Arthur

Graphics Editor Lauren Lee

Business Manager Maddie Garr

News Editor Daniella Parcell

Sports Editor Ben Clyatt

Design Editor Ben Sorkin

Twitter Editor Taylor Ferraro Staff Reporters Justin Baronoff Kallie Delis Courtney Dziewior Sarah Gibson Alex Grace Nathaniel Kauffman Jessica Ritchie Peyton Whittington Adviser Brit Taylor Principal Dr. Mary Williams

OUR TAKE::Sleep loss nothing to yawn about

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fter his first night in New York City, Buddy the Elf was asked how he slept. “Great! I got a full 40 minutes,” Buddy replied. Today, many of us have adopted Buddy as a sleep-habit role model. As the third nine weeks has come to close, and end-of-the-year testing is looming, we clearly believe that sleep is just a waste of time that limits how much homework we can get done. While school is obviously important, our health should always come before grades. As the pressure of school and college grows each year, so does the amount of stress we experience. According to the American Psychological Association, 45 percent of teens claim that school causes the most stress in their life. Add this stress onto a lack of

A BITE to the Florida A BARK to the county Standard Assessment for offering Microsoft testing. It has been a 365 to all students. very rocky transition The school website from FCAT, as standards has instructions on and glitches are still setting up an email being worked out. that allows for better Multiple cancellations communication. have been issued due Students have access to technical difficulties, to Microsoft programs such as slow log in time. such as Word, Excel, The outdated laptops Powerpoint, Outlook prove challenging to and OneNote. This is use and foreshadow beneficial for students problems for testing who can not afford the later in the year. program for schoolwork.

sleep and it makes for a dangerous combination. Parents and teachers remind us that sleep is vital, but getting enough is not always possible. When the average student has school until 2:20, then an extracurricular activity, and then homework, and has to show on time the next day, it is near impossible to get a good night’s sleep. According to the Center for Advancing Health, the average high school student gets five to six hours of sleep, but they need eight to nine. While we know that sleep is necessary, it is not always popular. “Everyone has 24 hours in a day, why can’t you get your homework done?” is something we’ve all heard, and we tend to fill more time with school. All-nighters become common and we even plan our days around them. Eventually, we run ourselves down.

Of course, we can avoid allnighters by cutting down on our schedules. Participating in eight honor societies and five AP classes is great, but not when it threatens our sanity. We can also make better decisions early in the day. If we start our homework until 10 p.m., we might not look like zombies in the morning. The simple fix for this whole problem is sleep. Grades are important, as is school, but health comes first. So when you’re crying at 3 in the morning over an APUSH assignment that you know you’re not going to finish even if you stay up another hour, just go to bed. When you’re not understanding a math assignment, studying for it all night isn’t going to help, as odds are you’ll crash during the actual test.

Back of the pack A comic by Peyton Whittington

4/2/2015 3:44:08 PM


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If I diet young: How not to get bikini season ready Haley Gaeser

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Managing Editor

Graphic by Peyton Whittington

he new formula for weight loss was just released. In fact, you have already heard of it, and it has even been rated the number one way to promote a healthy lifestyle by doctors worldwide. No, it is not some expensive “super pill” or an unhealthy 500 calorie diet - and with only two steps, it is not hard to accomplish. Eating healthy and exercising are the only ways to effectively lose weight while also maintaining a healthy lifestyle. At times picking the most health-conscious food or drink option may seem unbearable, or getting off the couch to go for a run may seem impossible, but without them, you can kiss any chance of looking good during bikini season goodbye. Fad diets that appear too good to be true usually are. Most of them do

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not even work and the companies and celebrities who promote them are not endorsing anything substantial. The promise of easy weight loss is just not as easy as the fads say it is, but in case you are still not convinced, here are some examples: The Baby Food diet, used by celebrities like Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon, weighs in as one of the most nauseating fad diets. By swapping your daily meals with 14 jars of baby food (900 to 1000 calories, generally) you are able to lose a few pounds. There are only a few problems with that. While it may come in a variety of flavors, it lacks in the nutrient balances that people need. Baby food is not meant to be eaten by anyone other than babies, well maybe Britney Spears. A diet with even less nutrition than baby food is the lemonade diet, a liquid-only diet consisting of three things: a lemonade-like beverage, a salt-water drink and an

herbal laxative tea. It claims you can drop 20 pounds in 10 days and cleanse your body of harmful toxins. However, you may experience what themastercleanse.com calls “detox diet symptoms,” such as cravings, fatigue, aches, pains, nausea and vomiting, but then again, when you do not eat any substantial food for 10 days, what do you expect? A healthier option than baby food or lemonade that mails you prepackaged food is Nutrisystem. It claims to help you lose weight, but in order to do so, you cannot cook, eat out or have a tight food budget. At around $300 a month, this plan is not cheap. It would be much cheaper to buy food from the grocery store as all Nutrisystem provides is portion control. Anyone can lose weight on a 1500 calorie diet Dietsinreview. com even reported multiple accounts of consumers disliking multiple food items, so much so that could not continue with the diet. If spending a

“Many teachers are known to make assumptions about students, sometimes even biased towards them, causing tension and even fear for kids…” -Rhiana Raymundo, 12 “I hate the school parking lot. We need a bigger parking lot so people don’t run into my truck.” -Austin Tone Jones, 11 “The building 2 and 3 bathroom situation is deplorable.” -Maliha Qureshi, 10 “Students don’t take responsibility for themselves any more!” -Carla Baird, Faculty

Barking Mad is a collection of short submissions about things that tick students off around school. If something at school ticks you off, go to hagertyjourn.com and submit your entry to Ask the Editor, and it may be featured here.

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“I hate how some teachers let students get away with so much.” -Alexa Schmidt, 12 “The temperature fluctuates too much in classrooms.” -Casey Crawford, 12

lot of money on overpriced junk is worth it, then this diet is for you. If you still want to give fad diets a test run, try the Paleo diet. Compared to most diets, it does not involve eating strange food or spending excess funds. You are essentially eating like a caveman, which means nothing processed or refined. Lean meats, fish, fruits and vegetables are allowed, whereas dairy, potatoes and sugars are not. According to doctoroz.com, you can still get the benefits of the Paleo diet by following it 85 percent of the time, which is why the plan allows room for some cheat meals. As great as fad diets appear to be, they never last and as soon as you get off of them, prepare to relapse faster than celebrity nudes on the Internet. Nothing in life is easy, so why would you expect weight loss to be? Eat healthy and go to the gym regularly and you will be bikini season ready within a couple of months.

“There weren’t enough pep rallies this year.” -Briana Bryant, 12 “The school is always out of BBQ chips.” -Skylar Bealmear, 11 “The food is nasty. They only have diet soda and they took away buffalo chicken wraps. What am I supposed to eat, a salad?” -Kayla Beachem, 11 “We should be allowed to listen to music whenever we want.” -Curtis Duren, 11 “We’re taught just to pass tests and get a grade but then we forget it all.” -Lindsay Robillard, 11 “I try my hardest not to go to the bathrooms at this school due to the lack of maintenance they seem to get. I think if the faculty had to share the bathrooms, they’d understand and would actually do something about it.” -Chevelle Garcia, 12

4/2/2015 3:31:35 PM


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Vega-Meter Toojays Tokyo Tapas

With a menu that has everything from breakfast omelets to quesadillas, Tokyo Tapas could be considered a spin-off of Kyoto. this gourmet deli has quite the selection, and that The restaurant offers hibachi includes plenty of choices and sushi as well as multiple for vegetarians. Toojays tapas like edamame or seaweed salad, and vegetarian offers veggie wraps and sandwiches, salads, pasta and selections are available. The crispy tofu hibachi is the only more, not to mention their vegetarian hibachi option, but extensive breakfast menu. The Mediterranean veggie it is flavorful and the portion wrap consists of Hummus size is very good. It comes and tabbouleh combined with steamed veggies, white with fresh greens and garden sauce and noodles or rice, vegetables in a soft tortilla, but substitution of noodles a sure favorite of hummus or rice for extra veggies is lovers. If you are in a salad also available. If you are in mood, the roasted vegetable a sushi mood, rest assured salad is a veggie lover’s that seven sushi rolls are dream. With a fresh medley vegetarian friendly. While of oven-roasted asparagus, the basic California roll is an mushrooms, broccoli, red option, original rolls like the peppers, carrots, cucumber, Mexican Magic with spicy red onion and tomatoes, it fried potatoes and stuffed jalapeño or the Smiling Sumo could not get more veggiewith fried green plantains are packed. Prices average between $6 to $10. also available. With a price Waterford Lakes Town range of $4 to $9, you can get good vegetarian Asian cuisine Center, 715 N Alafaya Trail, Orlando, FL 32828 without spending an absurd amount of money. 1813 E Broadway St, Oviedo, FL 32765

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Maoz Vegetarian When it comes to vegetarian restaurants, Maoz is the place to be with a full-fledged vegetarian menu. Located in the food court of the Mall of Millenia, you begin by choosing either a salad of lettuce, spinach or kale, or a sandwich on either white or whole wheat pita bread. Yummy gluten free falafel or vegan shawarma are available for both salads and sandwiches with hummus, egg or eggplant are also available for sandwiches. Then top your creation with all that the Maoz salad bar has to offer and premium toppings for an extra fee of $1. You can choose to make it a meal, which comes with one side like sweet potato fries or soup and then either a soda or juice: apple, carrot or orange; or the Super Fit premium juice with apple, kale, celery and lemon. Prices vary but spending over $15 is common. A little pricey, but worth every penny. The Mall at Millenia, 4200 Conroy Rd, Orlando, FL 32839

In a world plagued by meat and dairy, vegetarians and vegans struggle to find a niche of their own. Below, two vegetarians have compiled a list of saving graces, one side for the mild vegetarian and another for the full vegan. Reviews by Daniella Parcell and Haley Gaeser; Graphic by Lauren Lee

Dandelion Communitea Café

Every option on Dandelion Communitea Café’s menu is vegetarian, and, with the exception of the grilled cheese, all meals that contain cheese or other dairy products can be ordered with vegan substitutes. Though it does not boast elaborate vegan burgers or dairy-free milkshakes, the café brings a fresh and summer-like taste to its organic salads, quinoa and burritos, with prices rarely exceeding $10. The café is set in an old house, allowing customers to eat in whichever room they choose and giving the dining area a comfortable and laid-back feel. With fresh food, a rustic atmosphere and live music on Fridays and Saturdays, Dandelion Communitea Café is a cozy and refreshing find for both vegans and vegetarians. 618 N Thornton Ave, Orlando, FL 32803

Raphsodic Cooperative Company Bakery Offering everything from cupcakes to cinnamon rolls, Raphsodic Bakery specializes in vegan desserts and pastries, with prices ranging from $1 for a single cookie to $30 for a 9-inch cheesecake. Though they lack dairy and eggs, the shop’s brownies taste better than anything sold at Publix or baked with grandma’s special recipe, and are offered with an array of toppings such as coconut and lavender. The bakery also holds shelves of cookie and scone mixes, giving customers a chance to recreate the shop’s treats. Whether taking their food to go or eating in the small dining area, even nonvegans will enjoy Raphsodic Bakery’s uniquely satisfying desserts. 710 N Mills Ave, Orlando, FL 32803

Ethos Vegan Kitchen At first glance, Ethos Vegan Kitchen, located in Winter Park, has a menu similar to Outback or Chili’s, except that every option, from the pizza to the meatball sub, is vegan. Whether they crave a milkshake or a garden salad, vegans can find a wide variety of delicious food and desserts for prices from $3 to $10. The chickpea salad sandwich, served with chips and salsa rather than the traditional side of fries, is just one of the restaurant’s fresh and hearty options, acting as a standout on the extensively satisfying menu. Ethos Vegan Kitchen offers multiple pages of meals, appetizers and desserts that are both healthy and fulfilling, making the restaurant a rare, yet necessary find for vegan eaters. 601 S New York Ave, Winter Park, FL 32789

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4/2/2015 3:36:59 PM


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Sus Hi deserves five ninja stars Peyton Whittington Staff Reporter

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Photo by Peyton Whittington

NOM NOM NOM Sus Hi’s helpful ninja staff fosters a fun-loving environment and assists customers in creating their perfect sushi masterpiece.

he typical Western response to sushi usually goes along the lines of, “I don’t like sushi because I don’t eat raw fish.” This is a sure sign of a person deprived of the many sushi possibilities out there, namely those offered at Sus Hi Eatstation, a favorite of UCF locals and those looking to master their ninja style. Sus Hi, also called “The Dojo” by regulars, is located on Alafaya Trail and is open every day from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sus Hi has succeeded in introducing the wonders of sushi to the people of Central Florida through their Subway/Chipotle, à la carte concept of giving customers full reign over what goes into their meal. The Sus Hi formula is simple: each customer picks from three sushi creation options: roll, bowl or tortilla wrap. Each order gets two proteins

Hummus House a has-been Alex Grace

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Staff Reporter

ith locally made pitas wrapped with homemade hummus and customizable local ingredients, Hummus House tries to put a new spin on classic hummus. These fresh and local ingredients are used to make the basic meals that encompass Hummus House’s healthier Greek cuisine. Hummus House makes hummus fast and affordable for its customers. Although the Cafe has some issues, one of the menu options is a make-it-yourself pita, constituted of the customer’s choices of meats, fish and veggies as well as an assortment of toppings. One of the six homemade hummuses can also be chosen. The best was the guacamole flavor which took the best of both the Mexican and Greek worlds by combining a classic dip with a Greek spread. Another great topping for your make-it-yourself pita was the fried cauliflower which had a creamy and garlic taste. The safest bet on Hummus

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House’s menu is any of their wraps, since customers are allowed to customize them. On a healthy note, all of the items that are fried at Hummus House avoid heavy oils, allowing food to have a unique texture compared to food fried in vegetable oil. Hummus House also expanded their menu to offer gluten-free and vegan options. The prices were pretty good, usually ranging between $6 and $8, making the restaurant more desirable. Despite these draws to Hummus House, this Cafe is burdened with setbacks. Although you would expect a restaurant to have good desserts, this one only offers two. These desserts include stale cookies and a not-so-impressive baklava. Their items failed to create authenticity and flavor, which left me dissatisfied and disheartened. It is understandable that the restaurant would try avoid unhealthy treats, but at the same time, Hummus House should include more “Greek themed” desserts on its menu. Also, Hummus House’s salads lack creativity and fresh ingredients. One might think that a Greek

restaurant would have a killer Greek salad, however that is not the case at Hummus House. The lettuce was warm and the toppings tasted like they were canned. While there are a wide variety of toppings to choose from, many of them had additional charges which was a huge disappointment. Also, the falafel was overcooked and brittle. In addition to these issues, there is only one size for each menu item, making it difficult to choose what to eat. And while the portions were large, the food’s flavor was very bland. The menu did not lack options but rather lacked the full amount of flavor that Greek food usually has. The majority of Hummus House’s menu was not very impressive to my surprise because of the tasteless food and unappealing salads. Overall, the concept of Hummus House was great, but the establishment was not able to follow through. Even though the restaurant is good to try, Hummus House another visit is not worth another visit.

Hummus House

(vegans never fear, tofu is here) and endless toppings from a wide selection of delectable additions, including mango, tempura crisps, rice crispies, raisins and sweet potato flakes. The Eatstation’s specialty sauces also include white, sweet soy and spicy mayo sauce, all available for purchase at checkout. As for drinks, The Dojo has the standard soda fountain, but also carries specialty Japanese beverages such as Ramuné, the refreshing marble soda, and Aloe Vera Juice. For mature customers, specialty beer and traditional Japanese sake is available for purchase. In addition to their tempting meal selections, Sus Hi’s staff is knowledgeable, friendly and energetic. Each staff member has their own unique “ninja” name that reflects an aspect of their personality, such as Ninja Sparkles or Ninja Rhythm. If a customer asks for the blowtorch to be used to melt cheese onto their creation, the entire ninja

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staff shouts “Fire!” in unison, adding to the festive atmosphere. Sus Hi also offers sweet ninja merchandise, including t-shirts, pins, and free stickers and ninja trading cards with every meal. The Eatstation offers a plethora of appealing add-ons, such as volcano topping or tempura frying the entire meal, which can run up the bill if careless. However, customers can escape with a sizeable white rice roll and a Ramuné for under $10, which is reasonable pricing for a quality meal. Unfortunately, The Dojo is quite popular with UCF locals, so be sure to get there before the lunchtime rush to ensure a couple free tables and a modest queue. A trip to Sus Hi is an excellent way to branch out from the usual hamburger and fries when eating out. Its appetizing selection and amiable environment guarantees Sus Hi Eatstation a black belt in delicious.

Sus Hi

Nathaniel Kauffman Staff Reporter

MOVIE TO WATCH - The Interview

As far as quality of film and storyline go, the 52 percent score from Rotten Tomatoes may be accurate, however the entertainment factor far exceeds the rating. Actors Seth Rogan and James Franco lead the way in a comedy filled with political satire, anti-North Korean sentiments and fifth grade fart jokes. The movie is not to be taken seriously, but it’s worth the two hour view and may just be worth it on the premise that someone across the globe may be upset that you’re watching.

MOVIE TO AVOID - Earth to Echo

The Blair Witch Project introduced the “found footage” category to movie making, Earth to Echo may very well have ended it. Something about a few 12 year-olds with a camera and a little robot just doesn’t translate into a quality production. This group basically finds this small robot, Echo, and they are tasked with helping it rebuild its spacecraft. They all have to lie to their parents, creating some “drama,” but as in all good kids movies, everything works out in the end. SERIES TO GET HOOKED ON - House of Cards House of Cards uses an interesting type of filming. Main character Francis Underwood, played by Kevin Spacey, breaks through the fourth wall and talks to viewers to explain what’s going on. Spacey’s character is a corrupt politician who uses lies and trickery to work up the totem pole. Underwood is very good at manipulating situations so that they work out his way. The storyline is unique and although episodes don’t end on complete cliffhangers, they certainly hook you into watching more.

4/2/2015 4:05:33 PM


18 Softball seeks state title Spencer Thompson Editor-in-Chief

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hen the varsity softball team boarded the bus home from Vero Beach last season, there was only one thing on their minds; returning to the state finals. After ending last season with a 3-2 loss to Bloomingdale, the girls have shown nothing but determination this season. “Our team is confident right now, but definitely not satisfied,” head coach David Stone said. “They have extremely high expectations, so to say that they are satisfied with our start may be a bit of a stretch. They are always looking to do better.” The team is 21-3, handing out several humiliating defeats, such as a 13-1 victory over Spruce Creek, a 15-0 win against Deland and a 13-6 win over Lake Howell. One of the team’s two blemishes came in a 12-2 loss against University Orange City, ranked first in the district. However,

the team bounced back and beat them 5-2 two weeks later. Part of their success comes from experience. The team only lost two seniors from last year’s state runnerup team, leaving behind a group of motivated players. These include pitcher Samantha Worrell who has 10 home runs and 30 RBIs, outfielder Sarah Harrison who has 10 RBIs and third baseman Alicia Tomberlin, who has 13 RBIs. “We have a good mindset and we have a great chemistry on the team,” Harrison said. “We all have that one goal of making it to states so we’re all moving in the same direction.” While the girls are striving for a return to states with a different result than last year, their motto this year is “one game at a time.” “We always want to go back there, but we can’t look ahead,” Worrell said. “We don’t want to be arrogant or anything. Just because we made it last year doesn’t mean we can make it again.”

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TRACK FINISHES THIRD IN NTC CLERMONT INVITATIONAL On Saturday, March 28, the boys and girls track teams competed in the NTC Clermont Invitational. The girls placed second overall, with juniors Tia Menna finishing second in the 200 meter, Sarah Gibson, finishing second in triple jump and Paige Peterson, finishing third in the 100 meter hurdle, as well as senior Savannah Courtney, finishing third in high jump leading the way. Seniors Caleb Enot finished third in shock put and Nate Buckhalter finished fourth in the 400 meter dash and junior Andrew Stivers finished third in the 1600 meter led the boys to a sixth place finish. Buckhalter secured his third school record in the 200M dash with a time of 22.38. The school finished third overall. GIRLS VARSITY LACROSSE BEATS WEST SPRINGFIELD The girls varsity lacrosse team came out on top against West Springfield, 12-4, on Tuesday, March 31. Middle Grace Humbert scored four goals and goalie Jenny Anderson Collins had six saves in the win. VARSITY BOYS BASEBALL GETS PAST SEMINOLE On Friday, March, 27, the varsity baseball team beat Seminole, 3-0. Pitcher Travis Hosterman pitched all nine innings with only one hit allowed. Catcher Anthony George hit a double for an RBI in the win. This was the teams first meeting with Seminole after the original first game on Tuesday, Feb. 24, was cancelled due to weather.

Ranking first amongst 85 teams in their division, the team is looking to make a return to Vero Beach. The girls have already faced tough challenges this season, including winning the Kissimmee Klassic. They became the first team from Central Florida to win the tournament in 20 years. Along with the success of the last two seasons, the program looks to have a promising future. Despite a larger varsity team of 16 players, only four are seniors. The team has five underclassmen, including freshman Ashley Worrell, sister of pitcher Sam Worrell. Ashley is already turning heads this season with an earned run average of only 1.24, as well as two home runs and 19 RBIs. Returners next year also include Harrison and Tomberlin as well as junior Jordan Miller, who has 12 RBIs and one run. “I think we have years of success to come,” Tomberlin said. “We have a lot of underclassmen with a lot of talent, so I definitely expect good things to come.”

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Photo by Jake Arthur

PLAYING THE FIELD. Outfielder Sarah Harrison runs to first base against University Orange City. The team went on to win 5-2.

Volleyball sets sights on top four Nathaniel Kauffman Staff Reporter

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fter a huge block by senior Austin Ekern on a Crooms outside hitter, the player falls and Ekern screams with excitement while staring him down. Although this kind of moment has not come often for the team, they do pride themselves on their passion in the game; they are just waiting for that passion to start translating into wins. After a rough start, the boys volleyball team wants to rebound in the second half of the season. The team has eight seniors and is led by the girls varsity volleyball coach, Juanita Hitt, who is now the new head coach of the team. “To have this many seniors makes it a lot more fun because they know the level of competition,” sophomore captain Tanner Buis said. “But it does cause worry for next year because of the lack of returners.” Buis is one of six returners from varsity last season. He is not only a captain, but also the leader in kills,

with just under 100 kills for the season. “I’ve had to tell people a lot of what to do and where to go, so a lot of responsibility and pressure has been placed on me as a returner and captain,” Buis said. Hitt has had a lot to deal with too, whether it be players who need a push or others who need to be taught basic fundamentals. She has asked that her players learn her system and compete at all times. “I think our players bought into the system the first week of practice when they found out they have a coach that is knowledgeable about the game and enthusiastic toward them,” Hitt said. “Once they realize I am thinking of them and in their best interest, we will succeed as a program.” Some of the new players include senior football players Ekern and Michael Beaudry. Because they were finished with football, they both wanted one more shot at high school athletics. They started out without much background, but throughout

the season have gained experience. “My coach and teammates have helped me so much. Honestly, without them, there is no way I’d even have a chance at playing this sport,” Beaudry said. Although the players are coming along, some opponents have still proven too tough to overcome. One of the four losses came against Lyman, the reigning district champ who beat them 25-13, 25-11, and 25-13. The team is now 3-4 and with five more games to play before potentially playoffs, the team has high hopes but realistic expectations. Only the top four teams make districts, so they would need to be near perfect from here on. “We need to have the mindset of not letting the ball hit the ground on the court, and that we have to have a desire to touch every ball and get it in the air again,” Buis said. “I want to make it to districts and I think we can, but we need to improve our players that have never played before and fix some other in-game issues in order to succeed.”


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Boys lacrosse push for playoffs Ben Clyatt

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Sports Editor

fter finishing last season as district champions and making it to the Elite Eight the season before that, the boys lacrosse team looks to continue with their postseason success. “Now it’s time for us to show up in the postseason, which is what this program has done for the past two years,” boys lacrosse head coach Francis Kurtz said. With Kurtz, who spent last season as the head coach at Oviedo, the team thinks they can meet his desire for postseason success. As of April 1, the team is 8-7, with two games left in the season. They will play Trinity Prep in the first round of the district playoffs on Tuesday, April 7. The team clinched the second seed in their district after a 17-3 win against Lake Howell on March 26. Team captain and attack Chris Carpenter scored three goals to go with four assists in that game. The Trinity Prep game will be a rematch from earlier in the season, when the team won 14-4. “That was probably one of the best games that we played,” attack Jordan Collins said. “We started off very well, and we got on top of them quickly.” If the team beats Trinity Prep, they will play Oviedo on Thursday, April 9. The team has played Oviedo just once this season.

“Basically, everything that could go wrong, went wrong. It’s my job as head coach to make sure that doesn’t happen again,” Kurtz said. “The way that we played during that game is not the way that we play lacrosse.” The common theme has been blowouts, whether wins or losses. They have had their fair share of blowout wins, like a 22-2 win over International Community, a 16-3 win against Lyman, and a 19-8 win versus Winter Springs. However, they also have experienced some big losses, including a 16-3 loss to Seminole, a 13-4 loss to Oviedo, and a 20-7 loss against defending-back-to-back state champions Lake Highland Prep. “Timber Creek was pretty close until the end,” attack Chris Carpenter said. “I think that was the closest [game this season].” The team beat Timber Creek 10-6. The discrepancy in scores has been one of the results of having a largely inexperienced team. Although just about half of the team is made up of seniors, many of them did not start playing lacrosse until they were already in high school. “It’s hard [for them] to make adjustments, I would say. A lot of kids don’t know how to adjust [in games],” midfielder and senior captain Cory Schulte said, who has been on varsity since his freshman year. Schulte is one of the leading scorers for the team this season. As the new coach, Kurtz has focused on

A deflating loss Ben Clyatt

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Staff Reporter

rom starting 2-3 to clinching the second seed in the district playoffs, girls water polo has overcome a lot of adversity throughout the season. The team’s record is 6-10. They started with an 18-1 loss to Lake Mary on Wednesday, Feb. 25 and a 19-1 loss to Lake Nona the following day. However, halfway through the season, they got stronger and went on a 5-3 run, led by senior whole defender Jessica Dehn and head coach, Zac Yarbrough. “Those games in the beginning were definitely a wake-up call,” goalie Jasmine Morris said. “Since then, we’ve played very physical and learned from past mistakes.” With a shifted focus, the team started playing better than previous games, including a 12-5 win against Winter Springs on March 4. Also playing a big role in the turnaround was Dehn, the team’s leading scorer, who is averaging six goals per game.

“I feel that when I’m playing a good game everyone else is playing a good game too,” Dehn said. After a loss to Oviedo, 13-11, on March 27, the team was guaranteed the number two spot in the play in round of the state playoffs. Dehn scored five goals in the loss. Originally, this game was supposed to be senior night, but due to weather, senior night was moved to April 24, the team banquet. “I felt like as a team we really came together for that game,” Dehn said. “We made some mistakes and it would’ve been nice to win, but […] it was just another game.” Besides Yarbrough, other additions to the coaching staff included two alumni, Derek Daugherty and Kaley Shaouni, who helped the girls both in and out of the water as assistant coaches. “They both have made an immediate impact on the team,” Yarbrough said. “I would describe them as the best young rising coaches in water polo by the way they slow the game down for our girls and teach the fundamentals.”

Sports Editor f you recall the first Ben vs, I say, “I’m the best in just about every sport… Join me as I embarrass this school’s ‘top competition.’” Things haven’t quite turned out as I hoped. Whatever. That’s behind me. With another Ben vs left, I have to save face. To get my first win, I took on varsity outside-hitter Tanner Buis in volleyball. However, it’s tricky playing one-on-one volleyball, so I called in help and put JV player and fellow newspaper staffer Nathaniel Kauffman on my team, while Buis got JV player Corey Bergeron on his team. As always, I received a handicap to make things fair. Buis and Bergeron only got two hits, instead of three, so they had to be efficient. Due to time restraints, we only played one match instead of the traditional bestthree-out-of-five, and we only played to 11 points instead of 25. I didn’t have time to warm up and get in a flow. I had to be great from the opening serve. I was not. My “inconsequential” JV teammate, however, was. Star journalist and JV captain Kauffman played like he was trying to replace Buis as varsity’s go-to leader. Kauffman led us to a 3-1 lead. However, as a wise man once said, nothing gold can stay. The lead quickly evaporated. As they realized I was the weak link, the 3-1 lead became a 5-3 deficit, which then ballooned to 8-3. Things were getting bad. Their strategy was simple: Buis would hit it over the net to Kauffman, which would force Kauffman to pass it to me. Once the ball came to me, it was all over. The ball ended up anywhere but in bounds. When I made a good decision and set my teammate, we still failed due to my poor setting. Honestly, it was over before it even began. We lost, 11-5. However, I have suspicions it was rigged. At one point, after I hit the ball 20 feet to the right of the court, JV player Hudson Kauffman retrieved the ball, pointing out, “Hey guys, this ball is deflated.” Deflategate 2.0? I never thought I would say this, but I’m with you, Colts fans. They had an unfair advantage, and I’m calling shenanigans. Hopefully our investigation team is better than Roger Goodell’s. Record: 0-5

I Photo by Jake Arthur

PASS IT ON Attack Jordan Collins passes against International Community. The team won 22-2.

building respect, emphasizing sportsmanship and holding players accountable. “When we’re able to do things selflessly, we’re fine, but when we start worrying about our individual stats, then we start screwing up,” Kurtz said. “It’s when people aren’t selfish, when they’re passing the ball around, and they’re really more concerned with the Great Scoreboard in the Sky rather than their individual stats, we succeed.”

Girls water polo looks to sink Oviedo Justin Baronoff

Ben vs.

However, a couple games into the season Shaouni left the team due to personal reasons. “It was a very complicated issue for us at first, but we’re past that now and everyone does what they need to do,” set Marissa Ellerbe said. The focus has transitioned to the playoffs, where the first game will come against either Lake Howell or Winter Springs on Monday, April 6. The team has beaten both teams already this season and feel confident they can again. “Since we’ve played them before and won, it gives us the advantage,” Ellerbe said. The team will then hopefully face Oviedo in the district finals, the following day, which serves as a play-in game for the state playoffs, every year for the past several years and has never been able to beat them. “Oviedo has always been on my mind,” wing Andrea Vanegas said. “Our goal is to get past Oviedo to finally win districts, and this team definitely has the potential to do so.” Updated scores and other information of the remaining games can be viewed at www. hagertyjourn.com.


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Tennis teams take third at districts Sarah Gibson

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Staff Reporter

ast year, the tennis team faced challenges as a group of mostly underclassmen took the court. The team has since made a comeback. The veteran team, made up of mostly returners, has worked together to earn a record of 8-3 for the boys, and 4-7 for the girls. With improved team chemistry and experience, both teams finished third at districts. “Chemistry is a big factor in the team’s success. When somebody is playing you’ll have five, six or seven people outside the fence watching and cheering them on,” head coach Josh Kohn said. “They spend a lot of time together both on and off the court, and their comaraderie is really good.” With a year of experience together, both teams have bonded and show an immense amount of support during matches. “This season has been a lot more enjoyable than previous years,” senior Andrew Matyko said. “Overall, the team this year is a lot stronger both together and as individuals.”

Putting the exceptional chemistry aside, both the players and Kohn agreed the team could have improved decision making on the court and add smarter moves. To improve their skills, the team practiced Monday through Friday, as well as many Saturday mornings. They often played matches against teammates of similar skill to strengthen their experience. “I was worried at the beginning of the year. I’m a senior, and my doubles partner, Juliana, is a freshman, but it worked out great,” senior Emily Robinson said. “It’s easier to improve and understand my partner now that we have a more consistent set lineup.” Robinson and freshman Juliana Manfredi were seeded first in doubles and lost to Winter Park 6-4 in the district finals. Added practice and chemistry boosted the men’s side to success at districts as well. Matyko finished the regular season first in singles and lost in the district championship. Fourth seed freshman Chris Minear and fifth seed junior Surya Sankar also made it to the district championship. The two were able to do

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this with the help of Matyko who encouarged them throughout the tournament and even gave them pep talks explaining what they needed to do to win. Minear finished 10-2 overall and Sankar finished 9-2 overall. “I just told them what would be good, what would be bad, who you’re playing against and what you need to do. I think it really helped them out,” Matyko said. “I definetely tried to play more of a leadership role this year. Kohn was impressed with the team’s overall performance and saw the team continue to play hard throughout the season, only adding more experience every week. Their hard work showed in both team’s performances at the district playoffs. “What a great run by both teams,” Kohn said. “It was cool to play with Boone and Winter Park and some of the favorites and come up with some wins.” Overall, the team encouraged and cheered one another all throughout the tournament. “The blue and black and all the kids cheering up against the fence-it was a fun tournament,” Kohn said. “Hagerty was represented well.”

Photo by Jake Arthur TOUGH LOVE. Junior Cameron Yap practices his serves during team warmups. The boys team finished the regular season 8-3.

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The BluePrint - Volume 10, Issue 5  

The BluePrint - Volume 10, Issue 5  

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