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blueprint Hagerty High School

Vol. 16, Issue 2

Nov. 13, 2020

Oviedo, Florida

BALLOT BATTLES

After a week of counting ballots nationwide, several sources have declared Joe Biden the president-elect. To read more about the election and how students got involved, check out pages 6 and 7. photo illustration by Sarena Wilkerson and Conor Daly

Mega FOR OVIEDO MAYOR

rivalry week

ARE PARKS SAFE?

boyS bowling

To raise excitement for the football game against Oviedo, student government and leadership organized a week of activities from Oct. 26-30. Students enjoyed it despite safety restrictions.

Despite the coronavirus pandemic, amusement parks across Florida open back up with new safety policies. Safety measures might not be enough for all parkgoers, however.

The boys bowling team placed 12th in FHSAA state championships on Thursday, Nov. 5. Senior Jake Daleandro led the team and placed in the top 16 individually.

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News

Pep is back for football season

Skyler Glenn

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Assistant News Editor

ith cheering students and clouds of baby powder, the marching band plays “Seven Nation Army” and chants encouragement to the football team at Friday night games. However, with a mask mandate and recommended social distancing for all school events, marching band was inevitably cancelled, leaving football games feeling a little lifeless for students. To compensate for the cancellation, administration allowed a small groups of musicians to perform at home football games. “I frankly didn’t believe we would get to play at all this season because of the virus,” percussionist Jackson Kaplan said. “I’m happy about it, even though it’s not the ideal scenario.” Band students received news of marching band’s fate over the summer, with the cancellation of the annual week-long band camp and announcement that the band would not have a halftime show or be able to perform in the stands, all due to safety concerns. “When I heard that marching band was cancelled, I was so disappointed,” trombonist Trevor Thompson said. “It really was my favorite part of school.” Despite this, there was a light at the end of the coronavirus tunnel for band students: pep bands. Groups of 30 students were selected through auditions submitted earlier in the year to provide motivation and music to the football team, dancers, and cheerleaders. Band teacher Brian Kuperman was enthusiastic to provide this experience, since many consider band an essential part of a fun football game. “The school asked us to create small pep

MASKED AND MUSICAL Senior Nick Rodriguez plays his trumpet at the Oviedo game on Oct. 30. Pep bands stand in place of marching season for the 2020 season. photo by Faith Marino

bands to perform at home games,” Kuperman said. “We are really excited that students will have the opportunity to play.” Both students and teachers had safety concerns about how pep bands will be able to play their instruments while simultaneously limiting the spread of germs. To combat this, wind instruments have filters over the bell and students are required to social distance to the best of their ability. Additionally, the playing area will be vacated once every 30 minutes to allow for air circulation. “Our biggest concern is the safety of our students. We haven’t had this many people play in a group yet,” Kuperman said. “We felt apprehensive to announce pep bands until we knew how we could make it happen safely.” To prepare for the addition of pep bands, students rehearse two days a week after school prior to each home game. Pep band members

felt that these rehearsals were tough — but not as tough as marching band rehearsals. “Pep band rehearsals are exhausting, but I bet marching band is a lot harder,” tubist Anthony Acevedo said. “I’m glad I’m able to get a taste of what full marching band will be like, since my freshman year is very different.” At the football game against Colonial on Oct. 16, only drumline was permitted to perform because of many uncertainties, such as how large the crowd would be and how cautious people were, according to Kuperman. “We were trying to determine logistics for larger groups and how we could keep everyone safe and healthy,” Kuperman said. Now, full pep bands are able to play at home games, following CDC and school guidelines. Normality has returned in the hearts of band students, as they are able to spend time doing what they love: playing music.

students who donated during the blood drive. San Miguel personally tried to ensure that everyone knew the benefits of donating blood for those fighting COVID-19 and other diseases in the hospital, which he believes is the greatest motivation to donate blood. Although they believe the event was a success, there were a lot of complications behind the scenes. They were unable to promote the blood drive as much as before, because of less contact with students than usual. In addition to these issues, the blood drive company only sent two buses, which was not enough compared to the number of sign ups, which also made things take longer. The donation process also took much longer since donation precautions are greater during the pandemic, and the number of people who showed up outnumbered the amount of available stations. This caused some students to wait as much as four hours and in some cases, not donate at all, such as senior Katie McClean. McClean was unable to participate due to needle complications, but looks forward to

attending the next time the event is held. “Although this was my first time I would most likely do it again. I found out I have blood type O- which is most needed in hospitals,” junior Lindsey Engel said. “It felt good knowing I was saving people’s lives. I did have some complications during the process such as dizziness and nausea.” Next time, San Miguel wants to personally see to it that they will have enough buses for the next blood drive so the number of donations can be optimized. Regardless of how long the pandemic lasts, the need for blood donations will continue to go on. “Besides assisting those suffering from COVID-19, we organize these blood drives for those who may be suffering from rare or severe diseases or may have experienced traumatic and life-threatening incidents that require a blood transfusion to save their life,” San Miguel noted. JROTC is planning to host the next blood drive in January after winter break, then another two months after in either late March or April.

“I have loved band ever since I started,” Thompson said. “It’s one of the most fun things I get to do all throughout the year.” The band celebrated senior night at the game against Flagler Palm Coast on Nov. 6. Friends, family and section members all chipped in to making posters for the seniors. Senior Beth Logston said that the experience was unforgettable and felt almost like a traditional senior night. “I’m going to cherish my poster forever,” Logston said. “I wish all of my friends could have been there, but it was still a great night.” Band students are overwhelmingly grateful for the opportunity to experience a degree of what marching season was like, although it will remain unmatched. “I’m just so excited to be in pep band with all of my friends,” Kaplan said. “I feel relaxed and comfortable, all while having a great time.”

JROTC organizes first of four blood drives

Alexis Madlang

O

Lifestyles Editor

neBlood’s big red buses came to campus for student donations on Tuesday, Oct. 27. JROTC’s battalion commander of highest ranking cadet, Jonah San Miguel took on the responsibility to direct and oversee the blood drive, such as managing sign-ups and advertisement. As battalion commander, he will organize all four quarterly blood drives. San Miguel has never overseen an event like this before, so he relied on what he learned from previous battalion commanders and his own knowledge. He did not have a straightforward experience though, considering the extra safety regulations that had to be put in place. “The idea to continue this project amidst a pandemic sounds better to me than under normal circumstances,” San Miguel said. “It provides those eligible to donate an opportunity to help actively fight the pandemic instead of being neutral and just sticking to masks and social distancing.” JROTC leaders were satisfied with the 47


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news

NEWS BRIEFS ‘

Rivalry week still sparks school spirit

‘Nunsense’ play in production

In October, the theater department began their production, “Nunsense,” a musical comedy surrounding five members of a one-time missionary who raise money to fund the funerals of their recently deceased sisters by hosting a talent show. During the three weeks of rehearsal before the performance, the cast has been practicing for two hours after school every day to learn the choreography and music for the production. Rehearsal time has been shortened compared to past Hagerty productions. Performances will run from Dec. 3 to Dec. 5, and tickets will be priced at around $7.

New options for third quarter

With the second quarter in full swing, students currently enrolled in Connect, Save-my-Seat, and Hybrid learning options had the choice to either make the transition to Face-To-Face or stay with their current learning option. The deadline to make the decision was Monday, Nov. 9 at 11 p.m., so that administration could work out preparations for next semester. Last quarter’s transition saw approximately 176 students transition from Seminole Connect to Face-To-Face, and the estimated number of students returning for the second semester is expected to be even more.

CHEER UP The cheerleading teams performs chants and songs for the Husky Huddle. They helped plan the activity with administration. photo by Shannon Hahn

Lukas Goodwin

I

Print Editor

n spite of an atypical school year, student leadership and government planned ways to maintain pep preceding the hometown rivalry game against Oviedo High School. Following the tradition of dedicating an entire week to the event, activities were organized from Monday, Oct. 26 to the day of the football game on Friday, Oct. 30.

A celebration of seniors

Rivalry week started with an early morning devoted to the senior class. On Monday, Oct. 26, seniors were invited on the football field from 6:30 a.m. to 7:15 a.m. to watch the sunrise. Although it was too early to see an actual sunrise, hundreds of seniors still gathered with their friends and some blankets to socialize and have fun. Dunkin’ Donuts Munchkins, bananas, water and coffee were donated by parents. “I’m glad I went,” senior Olivia Schultz said. “Being with my friends was fun and it was nice to do a senior activity.” Many seniors wished they could have seen the full sunrise instead of being cut short by first period, but regardless, they gave a consensus of appreciation for student government and administration’s attempts at raising school spirit. With options presently limited, even small gatherings on Monday mornings go a long way for boosting enthusiasm. “Due to not really having closure from last year, [my] senior spirit isn’t that apparent,” senior Sabrine DeSilva said. “Despite this, I think it’s imperative to make memories… while we still can.”

Haunted movie night

In lieu of a Halloween celebration, since the Oviedo game was the night before the holiday, a drive-in movie played in the student parking lot on Tuesday, Oct. 27 at 7 p.m. Those who attended had the option of paying $9 for a car, or $3 for individual chairs; each ticket came with a complimentary water bottle and bag of candy. Prior to the movie, a poll on the class eCampus pages offered a variety of spookythemed films to choose from, including “Ghostbusters,” “Hocus Pocus” and “Halloweentown.” “Ghostbusters” won by a landslide with over 200 votes. “I voted for ‘Ghostbusters,’” senior Trey

Caldwell said. “It’s an all-time classic, how could I not?” The event was a success, selling with a nearly full parking lot. Senior Josh Hobbs, who helped organize the evening, was satisfied with its outcome. “First-time events are always the hardest to plan… Luckily, [we were] able to work very hard to make sure this event ran smoothly,” Hobbs said. “It stuck out as a way to achieve both safety and excitement at school.”

Band students qualify for All-State On Monday Nov. 9, nine members of the music department were chosen for the All-State band, which has a total of 3,000 statewide members. Six students will perform in the symphonic band, two in the symphonic orchestra, and one in the jazz band. The Florida Band Association hosted the auditions according to COVID-19 guidelines, in which students submitted their audition tapes virtually. Students will be sent the music to practice individually no later than Dec. 1. The performance will be held in late January at the Florida Music Education Association (FMEA) conference.

The big day

To top off the week, the typical pep rally in the gym was substituted with an outdoor Husky Huddle. It ran during an extended 30 minute break on Friday, Oct. 30. Prepared by the cheer team and administration, it not only hyped up the varsity football team for the game, but also honored girls’ volleyball, boys’ cross country, and boys’ bowling for moving into state championships. To maintain some familiarity reminiscent of past pep rallies, the cheerleaders involved onlookers with classic chants, principal Robert Frasca waved around the Spirit Stick and the administrators competed in a tricycle race as entertainment. “When Frasca did the Spirit Stick… it wasn’t as hyped up as usual,” sophomore Corbin Whitlow said. “[But] I don’t think much needs to change regarding pep rallies or Husky Huddles, because I think they are always going to be fun.” The night concluded with the home game against Oviedo, where varsity lost 20-14. Sophomore quarterback Anthony Benzija felt confident going into the game, following their three consecutive wins against Winter Springs, Colonial and University High Schools. Such a close game proved to be overwhelming once on the field, however. “I played against Oviedo twice last year as a freshman, and [those games] felt normal,” Benzija said. “But the game on Friday was a whole different atmosphere. It felt unreal.” Despite the loss, Benzija and the rest of the team are determined to finish off the rest of the season strong, and enjoyed the overflow of school spirit all week. The rest of the student body seems to agree that the week went well overall. “I thought it was fun,” DeSilva said. “I think that they did the most they could have, honestly.”

UPCOMING EVENTS NOV 13 NOV 13 NOV 16 DEC 8

RETURN OF CUPCAKE FRIDAY

Cupcake Friday will return on Friday, Nov. 13. Cupcakes will be sold at both lunches for $1 each. Store-bought cupcake donations can be dropped off at the front office until 10 a.m. that Friday, and all proceeds will go to the senior class.

CULTURAL APPRECIATION CLUB

On Friday, Nov. 13, the Cultural Appreciation Club will hold its first meeting of the year. Officers will go over the club’s purpose and have icebreaker activities. Each meeting will be centered around a different holiday, and guest speakers will be featured. The meeting will take place on WebEx at 3:30 p.m.

HOLIDAY POINSETTIAS FINAL ORDER

Through Monday, Nov. 16, holiday poinsettias will be sold to benefit the athletics department and Athletics Booster Club. The group will sell 6” to 10” pots from $10-20 through the hhsabc.org website. All poinsettias will be available for pickup Thursday, Dec. 3 and Saturday, Dec. 5 at the rear entrance of the football stadium.

CHORUS WINTER CONCERT

On Tuesday, Dec. 8, the chorus department will hold its winter concert in the auditorium. Each class will play a video showing what they have worked on so far, and will perform one Christmas song. Space is limited and is closed off to the general public, as each student can only bring up to two guests.


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opinions DRAWN OUT Freaky long lines for fries

OUR TAKE

Take a break from the pressure to focus on mental health

W

atching your grade drop after failing to turn in the English analysis due yesterday makes it painfully obvious what is going on. You have fallen victim to procrastination, a trap many of us have been caught in. Despite being a running joke known to everyone, procrastination is still frowned upon by parents, professors and bosses. There are videos and pretty social media posts telling us how to start our day earlier or make the weekend productive. Yet, feeling discouraged is completely valid, especially as life can be hectic. The senior class has been busy with college applications, people must reevaluate their travel plans as COVID-19 continues into November, and the nation is waiting for the results of the presidential election. Know this: it is okay to stop and take a break. It is important to complete assignments and pass tests, but it is also important not to get overwhelmed. While binging all eight seasons of The Vampire Diaries on Netflix is not a good idea, watching one or two episodes will not hurt. TV shows and movies are a great way to clear your mind of the environment going on around you, as they provide a distraction from the real world. You should not have to feel guilty for not subscribing to the “grind” culture often pushed upon us. For some, happiness comes from working, but for others, the pressure of always being productive is cause for concern. Sometimes, refusing to watch the news or saving the laundry for Sunday is for the best. It is good to be informed and to stay ahead, but it is not everything. Prioritize your wellbeing first. Dropping a few classes or switching to a different level may seem difficult, but if your grades are consistently falling or you can’t handle the workload, then it may be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong with feeling overwhelmed as long as you find a solution to rid the stress. It is still necessary to stay on track. Meeting daily life demands, schoolwork and your job is crucial for success. If you feel as if you are falling behind, think about contacting your teacher or explaining the situation to the boss. Get help and keep up. Finding a balance can be the key to peace. This means setting a schedule, both for homework and for down time. Use checklists in your phone or your planner; the simple act of crossing things off a list can be a breath of fresh air, and it shows that things are not as overwhelming as they seem. However, it is true that there are problems that can not be solved by bubble baths or eating chocolate. Mental health issues are very real, and it is necessary to take the proper steps to prevent its deterioration. Pay attention to the mental health videos shown in class. They are meant to help you; they are not your enemy. It might be scary at first, but seeing a therapist could also help those who feel like they need more help. Don’t hesitate to talk to trusted adults or friends as well. For those who feel that they do not have anyone, there are forums and Internet places to vent to. Life moves fast and there will always be new things to worry about. Step back and reassess what makes you happy.

the

blueprint Hagerty High School 3225 Lockwood Blvd. Oviedo, FL 32765 hagertyjourn@blueprint.com Phone: (407) 871-0750 Fax: (407) 871-0817

by Alexis Madlang

Third-party voting is key to democracy Andrea Izaguirre

D

Social Media Editor

espite misconceptions, the ever-evolving political spectrum that both unites and divides our country offers more than just Democrat and Republican ideals. Given our current political environment, our country seems to be experiencing an inevitable shift in perspective when it comes to “settling” for a candidate because of their party affiliation. Going forward, to further combat the rigid binary presented by the two-party system that led us to this destructive political climate in the first place, we should work to normalize third-party voting. It’s time we shamelessly voted for people and ideas that represent our values in full instead of simply siding with either red or blue. People should ultimately want a candidate or party that tailors to their specific values without having to compromise on numerous key issues. This is not inherently selfish, but rather the very ideology of striving for the best that keeps American democracy alive. The stigma surrounding third-party participation tells voters that to waste their support on a candidate who will never gain enough popularity in the polls is worse than not voting at all. However, a recent poll regarding this past election conducted and published in 31 states by the Washington Post finds that people are realizing the damaging nature of this mindset and are acting accordingly. In 2020, Independents accounted for 29.09% of national voters within the states surveyed compared to 28.87% for Republicans– for the first time in history, well since the Republican party was founded, there were less registered Republicans than Independents. If all those voters registered as independents, where exactly did their votes go? To put it simply, they were channeled or rather coerced back to feed the same two-party system. Of course this excludes the primaries as Independents cannot even participate in those elections. While the underlying shame accompanied with third-party voting is still prevalent, people have started the journey to debunking the stigma.

Editor-in-Chief Zoey Young The BluePrint is a student-produced newspaper in Print Editor which the student editors make allLukas content decisions. Goodwin The newspaper belongs to the Columbia Scholastic Online EditorPress Association, the National Scholastic Press Association Charlotte Mansur and the Florida Scholastic Press Association. Opinions expressed within the newspaper do not represent the staff’s views as a whole (except for Our Take), the views of Seminole County Public Schools or Hagerty High’s administration and staff. For information about advertising in the paper, please contact us via e-mail or phone. We reserve the right to reject any advertisement.

For example, Jo Jorgensen, the presidential candidate for the Libertarian Party in this past election received over 1,500,000 votes, the second-best showing for an LP presidential candidate ever. Over 1% of all votes went to her. While this victory for the Libertarian Party may seem insignificant, it remains the second best third-party turnout since the Reform Party – founded by Ross Perot –paved the way in the 1996 presidential election against Clinton (D) and Dole (R) by securing approximately 8.4% of the total votes. Due in part to Perot’s fairly strong third-party performance, Clinton did not win a majority of the popular vote despite winning the overall election with 379 electoral votes. Moving forward, we can take inspiration from ambitious third-party candidates like Jorgenson and Perot when deciding who is worthy of our political support. While no politician or party will ever come close to perfection, taking the time to do research on third party options without the fear of wasting a vote is the next step in ensuring that the people’s values continue to be represented in government as accurately as possible. Most third-party candidates operate independent websites which offer information on both the candidate as well as the party they represent, compensating for the lack of media coverage and overall exposure. While researching third-party options arguably takes more time and effort, the result of potentially finding a party that fits one’s lifestyle and priorities is undeniably valuable. Acknowledging people’s hesitation toward voting third-party is an important step in dismantling the stigma, but we cannot continue to complain about the nature of our current political scene while still engaging in the cycle of settlement, mass division and disappointment that we are all handling now. By gradually breaking the cycle of just voting “red or blue,” we are ensuring a wider range of options for future generations to put their faith into. In light of this past election, the shift in opinion for thirdparty voting is still in the works. We’re not where we need to be, but the road to true political freedom continues to evolve daily, furthering American values of democracy and independence with every step.

Editor-in-Chief Zoey Young Print Editor Lukas Goodwin

Sports Editor Hayden Turner

Online Editor Charlotte Mansur News Editor Sharika Khondaker

Photo Editor Peyton Sutch

Politics Editor Laura Shaw

Lifestyles Editor Alexis Madlang

Social Media Editor Andrea Izaguirre Adviser Brit Taylor

Opinions Editor Sophie Woodburn

Principal Robert Frasca

Staff Reporters Skyler Glenn Bethany Barker Chanson Cadet Karson Cuozzo Matthew Dearolph Skyler Glenn Gabriella Herrera Julia Sumpter


opinions

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The safest theme park on the planet

Gabriella Herrera

A

Staff Reporter

ny true Floridian loves their theme parks, and they also know that the coronavirus has shut them down for the first half of 2020. Despite a continued increase in COVID-19 cases across the country, Walt Disney World, Universal Orlando, and Seaworld have all decided to open their doors with new guest policies to help prevent the spread of coronavirus and effectively keep guests and employees safe. Upon visiting any Florida theme park, guests are greeted by a temperature check to ensure they do not have a temperature over 100.4 degrees. From there, they are required to wear masks that fully cover the mouth and nose and do not contain any mesh or filters. Although things appear to be running smoothly at Disney’s Magic Kingdom, the park has its own fair share of problems. Though they put spots on the ground so guests can stay six feet apart in attraction queues, they were poorly placed and often under or significantly over six feet apart, resulting in confusing lines and long waits. Magic Kingdom is also known for its near hourly parades. To keep crowds to a minimum, the parades are now very small and fastmoving. Still, each parade resulted in large gatherings where people did not distance.

A few bumps in the road are inevitable, and despite the challenges of controlling the crowd, Disney still handles most guidelines fairly competently. Cast members are quick to politely call out tourists violating the mask policy, and rightfully so. It is ridiculous for guests to put themselves and others at risk just because their face is hot. If tourists truly cannot handle walking around in the heat while wearing their mask, then the best choice for them is to not come at all. Universal Orlando and Islands of Adventure address this problem with their unique “U-Rest” areas in which people can take off their masks, provided they socially distance. While this may make some more comfortable, it could also lead to a centralized spread of the coronavirus if guests are not careful and workers are not watching. Unless there are not a lot of people using the area, anyone with coronavirus concerns should avoid these areas. Meanwhile, Seaworld has quietly been handling the coronavirus with new policies similar to the other two. One new idea that has been executed well are the new lines guests must use to go see each animal exhibit, instead of allowing guests straight in like before. Understandably, critics feel these theme parks are being opened too early, but it is important to note that each of these companies has thousands of employees who will be out of a job unless the parks reopen. The longer companies wait, the more employee cuts occur.

When these parks close more employees are furloughed or even laid off. Overall, Florida’s tourism must begin to reopen, unless the state is ready to deal with even greater unemployment. For the average person, as long as they are being safe, there is no reason not to enjoy the theme parks. If you are serious about quarantining, however, it is probably best that you stay home and live vicariously through Instagram.

human affairs, or tarot cards, a pack of cards used to predict the future or gain insight on an event or question. Divination and manifestation are the easiest ways to connect to spirits, because they can reveal things that you may be neglecting or show you what the next step is. But this is not the only reason they are so popular — these practices are fun, too. Devoting an entire afternoon to your newest spiritual project like creating an ancestral altar or designing your own scripting journal is the best part, and worth the effort. For a novice, starting with tarot or crystals is the best course of action. However, manifestation and divination are not the only things being discussed. Reality shifting, crystals and spells have also become increasingly popular. Manifestation and divination are perfected through practice and will-power, like a sport, and many are just now getting into them with their abundance of free time. TikTok is a good place to start, and although YouTube has many videos concerning these topics, a 60-second video explaining multiple topics is better than a 15 minute explaining one. TikTok will

teach you how to do something that would take you months of research in no time at all, and touches on every concept imaginable. There is much to learn, and TikTok allows you to absorb endless information like a sponge. Despite the pros, using TikTok’s platform to get your voice out there has a few cons. Not fully grasping the precursors such as research, cleansing or protection can be potentially damaging to a beginner, and although TikTok has helped to spread information about tarot and manifestation, witchtok has further westernized and sugar-coated spiritually. Making things seem easy or feeding into a false narrative can lead to disappointment in the future if your manifestation does not pan out the way you anticipated or if your “love spell” fails, which is why it is important to do your own research and follow credible creators. Educating yourself and doing research into history or practicalities is the most crucial aspect to spirituality, and should always be the first step in starting something new. Recognize where your beliefs stem from, and give credit where credit is due. If you are looking to get into spirituality, TikTok is a good place to start.

T

Opinions Editor

ikTok brings people from different walks of life to connect and reach new audiences with little judgement. From straight TikTok to frog TikTok, a new version has sprung:“witchtok.” A combination of global strife and an almost year-long pandemic has created an abundance of free time, and has sparked a surge of interest in the ways of the universe. There are endless preconceived notions about witchcraft, but despite societal constraints telling us right from wrong, westernized manifestation, divination, and other occult practices have landed on our TikTok “For You” pages. Manifestation is the ability to attract whatever our mind desires through thinking and speaking it into existence. You can do this by scripting or the 3, 6, 9 method. Divination is the practice of determining the hidden significance of something or foretelling the future, and is a personal favorite. Examples of divination include astrology, the study of the relative positions of stars and its effect on

Barking Mad Barking Mad is a collection of short submissions about things that tick students off around school. If something at school makes you mad, e-mail us at hagertyjourn@gmail.com and it may be featured here.

“Kids on Connect often miss out on stuff that happens outside of class like Husky huddles.” -Ava Manieri, 10 “I don’t like that if you’re on campus and going to your class in the morning (like from your car) you will still be late.” -Brandi Heckle, 10 “The dress codes address political items.” -Megan Zimmerman, 10 “We can’t have P.E. lockers this year.” -Lindsey Engel, 11

You are your bagel choice

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OPEN FOR BUSINESS While Universal opened on June 5, and Seaworld on June 11, Walt Disney World waited until July 11-15 to open their parks. photo by Gabriella Herrera

I manifested you would read this story today

Sophie Woodburn

CHAR-CASM

“Some assignments that teachers assign are so long and it’s due that night at midnight while they should be assigned a couple days before.” -Emma Duffendack, 10 “The dress code is specifically directed at females rather than males.” -Jesse Hoffman, 10 “Sometimes the teachers cater to the face-to-face students, forgetting the Connect students are there too.” -Lia Vickers, 11

Charlotte Mansur

othing beats the smell of a freshly toasted bagel. The aroma is enough to risk burnt fingertips while trying to safely extract the golden ring out of a smoking toaster. It is worth it for a perfectly crisp on the outside, soft and chewy on the inside bagel. There is no better breakfast than a good bagel, but like any good food, there are various flavors that can make or break the treat. You can tell a person’s personality based on their bagel preferences, and some are better than others. If you order an everything bagel, for example, odds are you are a pretty cool person. People who can handle that many flavors all at once have to be able to handle a lot of different situations, and are often the peacemakers of every friend group. They stand out of a crowd, but are just basic enough for almost everyone to love them. The same can not be said for those who find themselves reaching for a cinnamon raisin. I’m going to put this gently, because I don’t think cinnamon-raisin lovers realize the harmful effect they have on society. They are the type of people to stake out at a crowded Starbucks on a Saturday with six textbooks and a laptop, scowling at anyone who even dares to talk within a six-foot radius. Cinnamon raisin bagels, and those who eat them, are pretentious and lack any flavor or quality to back up their behavior. This is not to slander regular cinnamon bagels, I can respect a person who gets a cinnamon crunch bagel. Even though they may have the maturity of an 8-year-old, these people are usually pretty fun and add life to any party. Bagels are probably not their go-to breakfast, they would much rather be snacking on leftover halloween candy. There is a good chance you will find them nursing an iced latte with 20 pumps of sweetener and a caramel drizzle. Those who order plain bagels do not get the credit they deserve. These people are down to earth, and good at almost anything they do. They may not be a main character personality, but they are definitely the reliable best friend. On the flip side, however, they tend to be indecisive. These people are the ones to spend 40 minutes deciding what they want at a restaurant, just to order their regular meal. The next time you find yourself at a Panera Bread, choose wisely. Your choice reveals the very essence of your character, and is not something that should be taken lightly.

“Hagerty lacks school spirit..” -Sabrina Valentin, 10 “Sometimes the workload can be a lot and the teachers go kind of fast.” -Jacob Ellmyer, 9 “The food could be better.” -Ava Varghese, 11 “The dividers, we have to get rid of those.” -Makenna Flatten, 12 “I think that they should let us paint our parking spots.” -Tatum Trainor, 12

“Lanyards are annoying because nobody sees the point in them any more.” -Sierra Nieres, 12 ““I hate the parking lot because whoever designed it doesn’t know how to design a parking lot.” -Cole Andrews, 12 “I don’t like fat-free lunches” -Zack Nelson, 12 “I dislike the sleep schedule and how early we have to get up for school.” -Justine Valentine, 9


The political divide

Pictured left to right: junior Sebastian Fernandez, senior Faith Hammock and junior Reagan Eastlick. photo illustration by Sarena Wilkerson and Conor Daly

Students get directly involved in politics for Election Day Lukas Goodwin

B

Print Editor

efore this year, high school students most likely avoided political conversations with family at the dinner table that sparked either boredom or controversy. But now, with the 2020 elections, many have become more outspoken even though they may not be old enough to vote. There are other ways, as they have found, to partake in politics. “I’d say it’s an important civic duty to pay attention to local, state and national races and get read up on the issues of the time to be an informed citizen,” junior Sebastian Fernandez said. “If you really believe that a person could make a serious difference in your community, it’s a good idea to get involved and help out.” Fernandez started to get more active this year by interning for the Patricia Sigman campaign. Sigman is a Democrat who ran for Florida State Senate, District 9, against Republican candidate Jason Brodeur. As an intern, Fernandez promoted public awareness through activities such as phone banking and sign waving. Although they lost, he thoroughly enjoyed the experience. “I believe we ran a good campaign and pushed Brodeur for everything he’s got,” Fernandez said. Senior Tai Markman also volunteered weekly with the Seminole County Democratic Party. Markman found the opportunity through her own research, and thought it was a “great opportunity” to stay engaged. A lot of students found that gaining enthusiasm for particular candidates helped to improve advocacy overall; sharing views with a prominent figure can motivate more people to show their support. At events such as political rallies, for example, people get a chance to listen directly to what the candidate has to say and form a better opinion on them. President Donald Trump is known for hosting rallies nationwide. In 2016, senior CJ Ellis attended one of Trump’s rallies at the CFE

“I knew, especially because of the coming election, that I wanted to help the Democratic Party in any way possible.” - Tai Markman, 12

Arena in UCF, mostly out of curiosity. “Although [he] wasn’t my ideal candidate, the energy there was incredible,” Ellis said. “I could really tell people were enthusiastic about voting for Trump. It was almost like a party.” The public reception for both presidential candidates, both positive and negative, has grown to be overwhelming in students’ eyes. Most can attest to the “Trump 2020” or “Biden 2020” masks, car magnets and lawn signs seen everywhere, symbolizing the prominence this election has taken for everyone. Senior Blake Watts was conscious of the increasing tension between Trump and Biden supporters even after the election, and it has affected how much he is willing to express about his thoughts on the candidates — even going to discourage him from attending the Trump rally in Sanford on Oct. 12. “I was swayed against going because of the risk of potentially dangerous situations… Trump rallies typically attract both positive and negative attention,” Watts said. In spite of the hype surrounding the presidential race, Markman felt that it overshadowed local elections. She believes the best way to remain politically engaged is to stay as informed as possible on all levels. “People underestimate the impact local candidates have on our everyday lives,” Markman said. “By being aware of what is going on, this motivates me to do whatever I can to help fight injustice and fight for equality.” The rise in involvement in this year alone has gone to show how the minimum age for voting does not hinder students. Though not yet able to legally register for a party, Ellis considers himself an Independent. He is fascinated by politics and emphasizes the importance of all people educating themselves as much as they can. “At some point, I will be old enough to vote… so I’d like to be informed now to prepare me for the future,” Ellis said. “Being able to express your voice in this country and contribute to a cause is a privilege that I don’t want to squander.”

“[I was]

apprehensive the entire week, checking the AP’s tally repeatedly,

wargaming it out on paper.” - Reagan Eastlick, 11

“I feel relieved that... a sense of decency has returned to the United States. I am glad that democracy has shown its true colors.” - Aidan Donaghy, 11

Social media provides a platform for students to partake in political discourse Gabriella Herrera

W

Staff Reporter

hen youthful exuberance, a wifi connection and a desire to change the country come together, it creates a passionate political climate. In the past, many students have been hesitant to align themselves with certain beliefs, but this election year transformed the political scene among teenagers. Teens are more enthusiastic than ever to pronounce their own positions, as well as sway undecided individuals. Crucial to this process is social media. Amid the many targeted ads, students interact with their peers and connections, who often share their opinions. Junior Julia Squitteri uses Instagram to encourage the people around her to volunteer with the Florida Democratic Party, as well as to share information about the politicians she backs, especially presidential candidate Joe Biden. “I think it is important to advocate, but [also] to inform rather than to solely talk about one’s political opinion,” Squitteri said. “So many people vote for candidates who work against their interests due to the spread of misinformation, so it’s more important than ever to educate.” Social media accounts are guilty of spreading such “fake news,” even by accident. In a study done by Statistica in 2019, 52% of

people have shared false information online. This statistic is one junior Reagan Eastlick understands the importance of. “I try to educate myself on everything that I say before I say it. Everyone has a right to speak, but it would be better if people spoke about what they knew, and if they don’t know about it, if they learned,” Eastlick said. Eastlick, however, knows the price of sharing this information online. The Pew Research Center reports as of 2017 four out of 10 Americans experience some form of online harassment, and Eastlick falls into that demographic. He has received countless threats since he began expressing his conservative views more openly. As a firm Republican Trump supporter, they do not seem to be going away. “I would get terrible threats against myself and my family,” Eastlick said. Junior Joshua Nemery is a staunch Biden supporter and knows this feeling well. Participating in online debates have contributed to Nemery’s political experience. “Whenever someone does disagree with me I try to hear them out,” Nemery said. “When things devolve into absurdity I start to ignore them.” Nemery got into an argument over the right to abortion in his direct messages on Instagram.

“I felt kind of disappointed. I went through all that effort to explain to him my viewpoint, and he wouldn’t even consider it. He just said ‘no’ and nothing else,” Nemery said. Nemery makes frequent political tweets covering all sorts of topics, one of the most prominent being his disdain for injustice in the current political system. “For too long, lots of people have been… completely ignored by our government. These deep-seeded discrepancies trace back to the roots of how the system works,” Nemery said. Junior Olivia Tulloch has also received pushback when defending her views on social inequality. When adding her own commentary to Instagram posts, Tulloch is not afraid to deal with the backlash. “I mostly post things against racism, sexism and homophobia. If you want to flood my DM’s with threats… against those things, that says more about you than it does me.” Of course, political activism is not for everyone, and the majority of students will not be able to vote for a president until the 2024 election. In the meantime, people will likely continue sharing their views online until the internet itself dies out. “I just personally [share] because it’s a part of who I am and it’s something I’m interested in, but people don’t have to,” Tulloch said. “However, if you are silent on your morals, that’s a lack of character. Politics is one thing, basic human decency is another.”


The political divide

Pictured left to right: junior Sebastian Fernandez, senior Faith Hammock and junior Reagan Eastlick. photo illustration by Sarena Wilkerson and Conor Daly

Students get directly involved in politics for Election Day Lukas Goodwin

B

Print Editor

efore this year, high school students most likely avoided political conversations with family at the dinner table that sparked either boredom or controversy. But now, with the 2020 elections, many have become more outspoken even though they may not be old enough to vote. There are other ways, as they have found, to partake in politics. “I’d say it’s an important civic duty to pay attention to local, state and national races and get read up on the issues of the time to be an informed citizen,” junior Sebastian Fernandez said. “If you really believe that a person could make a serious difference in your community, it’s a good idea to get involved and help out.” Fernandez started to get more active this year by interning for the Patricia Sigman campaign. Sigman is a Democrat who ran for Florida State Senate, District 9, against Republican candidate Jason Brodeur. As an intern, Fernandez promoted public awareness through activities such as phone banking and sign waving. Although they lost, he thoroughly enjoyed the experience. “I believe we ran a good campaign and pushed Brodeur for everything he’s got,” Fernandez said. Senior Tai Markman also volunteered weekly with the Seminole County Democratic Party. Markman found the opportunity through her own research, and thought it was a “great opportunity” to stay engaged. A lot of students found that gaining enthusiasm for particular candidates helped to improve advocacy overall; sharing views with a prominent figure can motivate more people to show their support. At events such as political rallies, for example, people get a chance to listen directly to what the candidate has to say and form a better opinion on them. President Donald Trump is known for hosting rallies nationwide. In 2016, senior CJ Ellis attended one of Trump’s rallies at the CFE

“I knew, especially because of the coming election, that I wanted to help the Democratic Party in any way possible.” - Tai Markman, 12

Arena in UCF, mostly out of curiosity. “Although [he] wasn’t my ideal candidate, the energy there was incredible,” Ellis said. “I could really tell people were enthusiastic about voting for Trump. It was almost like a party.” The public reception for both presidential candidates, both positive and negative, has grown to be overwhelming in students’ eyes. Most can attest to the “Trump 2020” or “Biden 2020” masks, car magnets and lawn signs seen everywhere, symbolizing the prominence this election has taken for everyone. Senior Blake Watts was conscious of the increasing tension between Trump and Biden supporters even after the election, and it has affected how much he is willing to express about his thoughts on the candidates — even going to discourage him from attending the Trump rally in Sanford on Oct. 12. “I was swayed against going because of the risk of potentially dangerous situations… Trump rallies typically attract both positive and negative attention,” Watts said. In spite of the hype surrounding the presidential race, Markman felt that it overshadowed local elections. She believes the best way to remain politically engaged is to stay as informed as possible on all levels. “People underestimate the impact local candidates have on our everyday lives,” Markman said. “By being aware of what is going on, this motivates me to do whatever I can to help fight injustice and fight for equality.” The rise in involvement in this year alone has gone to show how the minimum age for voting does not hinder students. Though not yet able to legally register for a party, Ellis considers himself an Independent. He is fascinated by politics and emphasizes the importance of all people educating themselves as much as they can. “At some point, I will be old enough to vote… so I’d like to be informed now to prepare me for the future,” Ellis said. “Being able to express your voice in this country and contribute to a cause is a privilege that I don’t want to squander.”

“[I was]

apprehensive the entire week, checking the AP’s tally repeatedly,

wargaming it out on paper.” - Reagan Eastlick, 11

“I feel relieved that... a sense of decency has returned to the United States. I am glad that democracy has shown its true colors.” - Aidan Donaghy, 11

Social media provides a platform for students to partake in political discourse Gabriella Herrera

W

Staff Reporter

hen youthful exuberance, a wifi connection and a desire to change the country come together, it creates a passionate political climate. In the past, many students have been hesitant to align themselves with certain beliefs, but this election year transformed the political scene among teenagers. Teens are more enthusiastic than ever to pronounce their own positions, as well as sway undecided individuals. Crucial to this process is social media. Amid the many targeted ads, students interact with their peers and connections, who often share their opinions. Junior Julia Squitteri uses Instagram to encourage the people around her to volunteer with the Florida Democratic Party, as well as to share information about the politicians she backs, especially presidential candidate Joe Biden. “I think it is important to advocate, but [also] to inform rather than to solely talk about one’s political opinion,” Squitteri said. “So many people vote for candidates who work against their interests due to the spread of misinformation, so it’s more important than ever to educate.” Social media accounts are guilty of spreading such “fake news,” even by accident. In a study done by Statistica in 2019, 52% of

people have shared false information online. This statistic is one junior Reagan Eastlick understands the importance of. “I try to educate myself on everything that I say before I say it. Everyone has a right to speak, but it would be better if people spoke about what they knew, and if they don’t know about it, if they learned,” Eastlick said. Eastlick, however, knows the price of sharing this information online. The Pew Research Center reports as of 2017 four out of 10 Americans experience some form of online harassment, and Eastlick falls into that demographic. He has received countless threats since he began expressing his conservative views more openly. As a firm Republican Trump supporter, they do not seem to be going away. “I would get terrible threats against myself and my family,” Eastlick said. Junior Joshua Nemery is a staunch Biden supporter and knows this feeling well. Participating in online debates have contributed to Nemery’s political experience. “Whenever someone does disagree with me I try to hear them out,” Nemery said. “When things devolve into absurdity I start to ignore them.” Nemery got into an argument over the right to abortion in his direct messages on Instagram.

“I felt kind of disappointed. I went through all that effort to explain to him my viewpoint, and he wouldn’t even consider it. He just said ‘no’ and nothing else,” Nemery said. Nemery makes frequent political tweets covering all sorts of topics, one of the most prominent being his disdain for injustice in the current political system. “For too long, lots of people have been… completely ignored by our government. These deep-seeded discrepancies trace back to the roots of how the system works,” Nemery said. Junior Olivia Tulloch has also received pushback when defending her views on social inequality. When adding her own commentary to Instagram posts, Tulloch is not afraid to deal with the backlash. “I mostly post things against racism, sexism and homophobia. If you want to flood my DM’s with threats… against those things, that says more about you than it does me.” Of course, political activism is not for everyone, and the majority of students will not be able to vote for a president until the 2024 election. In the meantime, people will likely continue sharing their views online until the internet itself dies out. “I just personally [share] because it’s a part of who I am and it’s something I’m interested in, but people don’t have to,” Tulloch said. “However, if you are silent on your morals, that’s a lack of character. Politics is one thing, basic human decency is another.”


8

entertainment “The Trial of The Chicago 7” (Netflix)

Netflix film “The Trial of the Chicago 7” is based on the infamous 1969 trial of seven defendants charged by the federal government on various charges for “inciting a riot.” Arising from the protests against the Vietnam War at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, the trial engrossed the nation and sparked intense conversation on previous controversies. Despite the lack of a solid beginning, “The Trail of the Chicago 7” was beautifully executed. If you have two hours to spare and favor historically relevant movies, “The Trial of the Chicago 7” is for you.

R E V I E W B O X

- Sophie Woodburn

“The Album” by Blackpink

One of the most successful Korean-Pop music groups, Blackpink, released their newest album “The Album” on Oct. 2. “The Album” is a beautiful collection of music that has made history for Blackpink, making them the highest-charting Korean girl group, a well-deserved victory. The songs are very fun and fast-paced, with the signature pop-EDM style Blackpink has become known for. The memorable lyrics and beat makes anyone who listens want to get up and dance, and allows everything to blend together nicely. Overall, “The Album” is worth a listen. - Gabriella Herrera

“What You See Ain’t Always What You Get” by Luke Combs

“Holidate” (Netflix)

After being harassed by family and friends for being single on Christmas Day, Sloane (Emma Roberts) meets playboy Jackson (Luke Bracey) while returning unappealing Christmas gifts in a small town mall. The two become each other’s “Holidates,” only associating with one another on special occasions like holidays. Although it may sound like a light-hearted Christmas movie, “Holidate” is a predictable, unprofound film with disgusting dialogue and subpar acting. The narrow-mindedness of the movie is shocking and is shameful in the shadow of holiday favorites like “Elf” and “Home Alone.” - Skyler Glenn

“Enola Holmes” (Netflix)

Released Sept. 23, “Enola Holmes” follows the sister of Sherlock Holmes, Enola (Millie Bobby Brown), on her search to find her missing mother. Along the way, she meets Tewkesbury (Louis Partridge), with problems of his own that interfere with Enola’s search. The movie was full of action and mystery, and as the story went on the audience was able to decode the disappearance of her mother, Eudoria, alongside Enola. All actors, especially with Brown as the strong female lead, provided captivating performances with no dull moments, and fans are already expecting a sequel.

- Julia Sumpter

“Phasmophobia”

What you see is not always what you get, but with Luke Combs, that is not the case. It was no surprise that his newest deluxe album, “What You See Ain’t Always What You Get,” was fantastic. Combs is one of the only country artists in 2020 who does not sway into the pop genre, evident in his most recent five songs released Oct. 23. Staying true to country, Combs sticks to the normal topics: love, trucks and beer. “Forever After All” is the best, with “Cold As You,” “My Kinda Folk” and “Without You,” following close behind.

After playing your go-to game for months, leaving your comfort zone can be difficult. Still, Kinetic Games’ “Phasmophobia” is the multiplayer horror game we have been waiting for, as it is both incredibly innovative and suspenseful. The player can work with up to three others to unveil the ghost out for blood. The voice chat feature makes the experience feel much more real and personal, while simultaneously amping up the fright. Although, the voice chat tends to cut out and the animation is a bit rough. Overall, if you have two friends and $14 on hand, check it out.

- Julia Sumpter

- Gabriella Herrera

Faceless celebs - the Hannah Montanas of modern media Chanson Cadet

C

Staff Reporter

LICK! The lights of the paparazzi blind your vision as you try to leave your local restaurant after what was supposed to be a relaxing afternoon. Questions over your relationship status are shouted at you as pictures are being taken of your bad side. Now you realize why Hannah Montana disguised her identity before getting famous. As social media has become more prominent in everyone’s lives, sharing every aspect of one’s day-to-day is an expectation, especially for celebrities. Things that were once considered intimate and private, like pregnancies and relationships, have become entertainment for the public and a way for public faces to make bank. It is not a bad trade-off – you share with the fans the personal details of your life, and they d e d i c a t e their time and money towards supporting you. However, an uprise of faceless celebrities has subverted this expectation.

Faceless celebrities are people that have gotten famous without showing their faces or sharing their lives on social media. Their fame comes instead from an appreciation of their amazing personalities, voices or creativity. DJ Marshmello is a prime example, wearing a giant white helmet when performing his concerts. He has stated that he hides his identity out of the lack of desire for fame. Singer and songwriter Sia has produced musical hits like “Titanium” and “Chandelier,” but her face is a mystery to the public, covered by a giant wig and bow, as is her personal life. They both claim a lack of desire for fame but entered a career in which fame is the highest achievement. It may seem hypocritical but it works. They have managed to maintain a calmer lifestyle than most celebrities. No one can blame them for wanting to keep aspects of their life private. As long as they produce quality music, they will continue to live a lavish lifestyle away from the public eye.

Other performance celebrities who do not share their identities like Daft Punk and the Blue Man Group do so as an artistic choice to add to the appeal of their shows. The Blue Man Group is iconic for having people painted entirely blue. With about 70 members anyone at your local grocery could potentially be one of the iconic Blue Men. Their claim to fame is only found in their job position and has nothing to do with recognisability but if your neighbor told you they were one of the Blue Men you would undoubtedly ask for an autograph. The hype surrounding faceless celebrities like Sia and Marshmello has created a new subgenre of faceless celebrities in the form of Youtube Personalities. Famous YouTubers such as Minecraft streamer Dream and storyteller Corpse Husband have become a widespread topic as their fanbase has been dying to know what they look like. Both have

teased certain aspects of their appearance, with Dream sharing his eye color and Corpse posting photos of his hands and torso. Their likability is based solely on their personalities and content, however, Corpse Husband has recently had a massive surge in subscribers because of his low voice. Without a single photo of his face, thousands of fans have deemed him attractive, and rightfully so. Celebrities are often criticized for their looks but both Dream and Corpse Husband have been able to prove themselves to be fame worthy without them. Celebrities that hide their appearance definitely seem like they have somehow cheated the system to fame. Yet, they still have to deal with public scrutiny. Although fans may be dying for a face reveal, the mystery behind these personalities keeps them interesting.


Lifestyles

9

Going green to combat climate change Sophia Canabal

Staff Reporter

W

orldwide, the impending sense of doom concerning global warming his growing. The gradual rise of global temperatures has been an underlying issue with limited publicity for decades. However, interest in climate change spiked when scientists began to theorize that the damage greenhouse gasses have done would become irreversible by the year 2030. However, its publicity has led to discrepancies within popular opinion, and the extent of division has caused disputes ranging from how to best combat global warming to debating if extensive economic investment will reap any benefit. On a local scale, every student has been affected differently by of global warming. While some struggle to put sustainability on their list of priorities, others find themselves making an effort to maintain sustainable practice. “My family and I started a farm, partly because we knew how bad the farming industry was affecting the climate,” sophomore Abigail Miller said. “Having our own garden is kind of a relief, because no matter what, I know that we’re doing our part.” For Miller, the effects of global warming have already become prominent to her, and the well-being of her family’s farm is now threatened by rising temperatures. Although Miller has been working to produce a variety of fruits and herbs for over a year, her success has been hindered by the increasing temperatures. Despite being a global issue, climate change has failed to prove relevant for some students. Its prominence is often reduced by the lack of immediate, visible consequences that students don’t regularly observe in their

community. “It’s hard to see how climate change affects me, mostly because of our location,” sophomore Nick Pryor said. “It just feels unrealistic to deal with it now too.” Like many others, Pryor’s view on preventing global warming is similar to putting off an assignment; because dealing with it doesn’t seem important until the night before the due date. On the other hand, some are simply not able to reduce their carbon footprint, either because of their financial situation or lack of spare time. “Half of the struggle is just how convenient being sustainable is,” sophomore Cameron Jorgensen said. “Not everyone has time to stop using plastic or take care of a compost pile.” Although sustainably-sourced brands, plant-based alternatives, and organic produce are increasingly common, their prices remain higher than average products. On average, a carton of organic milk is marked up to $2 more than standard milk, and on average, organic fruits and vegetables cost at least 20% more than standard produce. This common upscale in price ultimately makes sustainable investments harder for many teens. Those who can not afford the high costs are left with little options for sustainable food, and often revert to the cheapest alternative that provide no environmental benefits or relief. Despite the global rise in climate awareness, Pryor thinks that local change won’t do much to alter the course of global warming. “If one person does something, it won’t stop climate change. It takes a whole community effort.” As students struggle to do their part in spite of the obstacles, the prominence of climate change remains, whether it be seen as a shortlived topic of interest or the downfall of life as the world knows it.

Plants’ roots absorb what they come in contact with, including chemicals and heavy metals in the soils and groundwater, making an overall healthier ground.

Composting reduces methane emissions from landfills and lowers your carbon footprint.

US Green Technology 2020

EPA 2015

In the U.S., about 70 million tons of pollution are released into the air each year. CBS 2012

Diverting 87.2 million tons of materials from landfills prevented the release of approximately 186 million metric tons of carbon dioxide into the air. National Reycling Coalition 2013

Americans produced about 258 million tons of solid waste in 2014. EPA 2016

Putting language in a different perspective Language Learning Tips Apps like Duolingo and Memrise help lay the foundation for the language. Each offers 36 and 22 courses for English speakers, respectively, with vocab and grammar Watch movies and TV shows, read books, and listen to music in a target langauge to increase fluency from constant exposure. Reach out to native speakers from neighbors to users on apps like HelloTalk. A conversation with natives can greatly boost conversational skills. Carry a dictionary when speaking in a new language; one can quickly reference a word when it is necessary in a conversation, improving vocabulary.

Sharika Khondaker

T

News Editor

ry forming a sentence without saying “the.” It might be easy once, but a whole conversation without “the” is a little more difficult. Yet, in Mandarin, this is normal, and dialogue flows naturally for native speakers, like senior Alex Tao’s parents. In fact, Tao once held an hour-long conversation with his dad in English without ever using the word “the,” inspiring him to pursue new languages. Tao is currently studying Mandarin, Spanish and French using Duolingo for 30 minutes a day. “I [hope] to catch a glimpse of how millions of immigrants like my parents experience the world,” Tao said. Language learning is a widely shared experience, with people all around the world turning to Rosetta Stone and Memrise to strike up a conversation with their local Portuguese cashier or on their newest work venture in India. According to the Washington Post, at least half of the world’s population is bilingual. For senior Lainey Butler and her boyfriend, senior Lukas Schoenfeld, language is about the connection to family. They began learning Polish last summer, in an attempt to fit in with Schoenfeld’s Polish-speaking relatives at

family gatherings. “We wanted to be a part of the conversation, especially when we heard our names in the discussion,” Butler said. Getting comfortable with a different language takes time and effort, from all the different dialects, writing characters and alphabets. According to the BBC, there are four tiers of difficulty in foreign languages for native English speakers; tier one contains languages like French and Spanish, tier two contians German and Indonesian, three holds Thai and Hebrew, and four includes Japanese and Arabic. To reach basic fluency, it takes around 480 to 720 hours of dedication. Over the summer, senior Jacob Carlson started learning Arabic to expand his worldview. Arabic is a group four language and it takes around 2,200 hours to gain proficiency. While English is written from left to right, Arabic is written from right to left, something Carlson found a struggle. “It was difficult to keep up with,” Carlson said. “I struggled greatly with learning a whole new system of reading and writing, and ended up stopping once school started.” Although some choose to practice on their own, others attend formal schools to study their language. Sophomore Kathlynn Nguyen has been learning Vietnamese at a virtual language school for the past three years to

better communicate with her family. “Talking in Vietnamese is so different from just reading and writing. Since Vietnamese cooperates different intonitions and grammar placement, it took some time to get used to,” Nguyen said. Whether someone is taking a class or teaching themself, language learning apps, YouTube videos and textbooks are the key to success. Changing phone settings to the target language and interacting with it by reading books, watching movies and TV shows can help increase fluency. Nguyen likes to do this by reciting what she learned for 10 minutes a day and listening to Vietnamese stories. “Staying consistent really helps. It is difficult to stay persistent and motivated, but it pays off,” Nguyen said. Experts say the best way to enhance learning is to talk with someone who is already fluent in that foreign language. This can mean neighbors, family or friends; even apps like HelloTalk can help a learner chat with native speakers from around the world. Tao enjoys connecting with others by using what he has learned, and even helped a woman find bikes for her children at his local community center by talking in Spanish. “I will never forget how her face lit up when I spoke to her in her native language,” Tao said.


10

Lifestyles CHAY’S CLOSET

Zoey Young

S

Editor-in-Chief

ince the ‘70s, rap music has proven to be the bane of many parents’ existence. The loud, explicit lyrics have appealed to many worldwide — especially teenagers. The genre is scoffed at by adults for being too vulgar and for having a bad influence on teens. Impact of hip hop culture

Without a doubt, rap has had a clear impact on youth; the music has resulted in the creation of hip hop culture, an art movement originating with African-American and Latinx teens in the Bronx in the 1970s. The effects can be seen in style, dance and language. Students “flex” their Gucci wallets and newest pair of “J’s” while performing viral dance challenges on TikTok, mirroring their favorite artist’s social media uploads or music videos. Senior Gio Piloto wears brands such as Bape and Dolce & Gabbana, inspired by the clothing worn by his favorite rappers, XXXTentacion and J. Cole. Discovering these rappers through SoundCloud, Piloto values more than just their clothing. “I followed up with J. Cole ever since I heard how inspirational his music was,” Piloto said. Cole’s work in albums such as “4 Your Eyez Only” and “2014 Forest Hills Drive” centers around his childhood experiences, especially being raised in the ghetto as an African-American.

Drip at the risk of drowning: The downside of flashy designer brands

IT

Meaning behind the lyrics

Narrative-driven rap such as J. Cole’s resonates with many students who feel that the genre goes beyond the bling and flash. “For me, a lot of rap is more than music; there’s storytelling and deeper meanings to a lot of it,” senior Caleb Touchstone said. Touchstone identifies with the mental struggles portrayed in various hip hop releases, especially those in Childish Gambino and Kanye West’s music. Piloto identifies with music on a different level. His connection remains with songs about the hardships of both romantic and self love. “They talk about how you can’t never learn anyone until you love yourself, and how you should be thankful for the things you have. Life is a struggle and you should be thankful for what you got,” Piloto said. Love is a more universal topic across all music genres, yet students feel that rap is still able to stand out.

been a mood-booster and a way to make memories with friends. Rather than lyrics, he prizes the overall sound of the song. Others take the violence more seriously, finding figments of reality within the piece. Senior Noah Rieckmann finds them necessary; he sees the explicit lyrics as a depiction of certain lifestyles. “There are people all over the globe making a living by selling drugs, and the gangs are real; it is nothing to play around with,” Rieckmann said. Raised by parents who were avid hip hop fans, Rieckmann has been listening to rap since he was born. After listening to a variety of artists and beats “ranging from the West Coast to New York,” he believes songs are an outlet for rappers to vent, but also a way to show people how to “make it in life.” Character matters Musicians such as YNW Melly make specific references to crime and “Most rappers have more personality than Justin Bieber or Ed weapons in songs such as, “Murder on My Mind.” Tracks like these are Sheeran could ever really provide in their songs,” Martinez said. alienating towards many, who find it uncomfortable to listen to. He describes this “personality” as something authentic. Some find “I think it is just a front to make people look hard,” Piloto said. “I do this appeal to be more prevalent in older acts rather than the current rap not find it necessary.” trends. “Rappers in the past were more unique; they were sort of inventing Women in rap and refining the craft,” junior Zakaria Zeini said. Hip hop music is also heavily criticized for its lyrics about women, Zeini applauds those who come from “humble beginnings.” He with female rappers and musicians Janelle Monae and Nicki Minaj enjoys listening to Tupac Shakur, who was deemed one of the greatest calling out the industry for its misogyny. artists of all time by Rolling Stone Magazine in 2010. Lyrics containing descriptions of sexual assault and derogative terms Shakur was a famous pioneer of “gangsta rap,” a style that are problematic in the eyes of Foster, who feels that they translate to highlighted violence and poverty in inner cities. Despite his death in situations in the real world. 1996, he continues to have a strong fan base. “Boys nowadays follow up everything they see, so the songs “Tupac hit home for me, because Tupac never stood down for objectifying, sexualizing and dehumanizing females make it seem like anybody. He always made sure to make his point clear, even if it was it is okay, when it is not...[T]hey want to be just like them,” Foster said. not in the most popular way. He was a legend and set the bar for many Foster proudly calls herself a Cardi B stan and a “Barb,” the name of rappers now,” sophomore Platinum Foster said. Minaj’s followers. She also believes that she could listen to female rap Shakur was killed in a drive-by shooting, devastating fans. His artist Megan Thee Stallion “all day long.” passing is synonymous with other rappers, including modern artists like All three have made contributions to female-led hip hop, gaining XXXTentacion, Juice Wrld, Mac Miller and Pop Smoke. significant attention. Recently, Megan Thee Stallion has topped charts, These artists left an imprint on the hip hop community, forming bonds with her single “WAP,” which featured Cardi B. It received heavy with thousands of devoted listeners. Mere hours after the assassination scrutiny for being too sexual, with critics taking issue with the suggestive of XXXTentacion, many took to social media to express their grievances scenes in the video. of the late rapper. “I was affected when X died, because I really enjoyed [his] music and A genre for everyone I listened to [him] everyday. It is sad that they all died so early in their Rap music has continuously been plagued with complaints about lives,” senior Kobe Herrera said. inappropriate lyrics and sending out the wrong messages. Students disagree, finding that some rappers are not an accurate Reason for violence representation of the entire industry. They believe hip hop music is not The shootings and drugs are a common theme in rap; there are many limited to one certain style. differing opinions surrounding the use of such topics that students have. “The most important part of hip hop is finding the flow that goes with Herrera, who has been a rap fan since 7th grade, does not mind the you,” said. “That is what is great about rap. It ranges so there is no way violent lyrics, instead just appreciating the music. For Herrera, rap has you won’t find something you like.”

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Chanson Cadet

alking into your first-period class you pass a gaggle of wild teen boys standing in a circle, all wearing different variations of the same brown Michael Kors belt. The one that seems to be the leader is holding a small black device you recognize as a diamond tester. The boy wearing a lime-green pair of Adidas track pants and Gucci asks for his chunky diamond chain to be tested, obviously prepared to impress his friends. The idea of “drip” has been a dark cloud over the fashion community. When used in reference to clothing, drip is the so-called swag or great fashion sense gained from an “outfit” consisting of layers of brand name clothing. To give props where props are due, having expensive clothing is cool. Buying that Gucci belt after a month of saving is understandable; of course, you would want to show it off. It becomes an issue, however, when that is all you wear. In an effort to show off all their drip at once, people end up looking stupid. You would think that anyone with a fashion sense would avoid trying to pair a red Supreme hoodie with a blue Polo Ralph Lauren top, but they do, and will match it all with a pair of green Adidas track pants. The names itself are not what make an outfit look good, and it never will. What “hypebeasts”, those that claim to have drip, really wish they had, was style, or the ability to put pieces together in a unique and creative way. Having a sense of style is something that is personal to you but can take influence from others. Labels and brands are never shown, forcing the outfit to be solely reliant on how well someone wears the clothes. There have been many male fashion influencers with amazing style that do not force brands and labels into their outfits. A prime example of this is Wisdom Kaye. He definitely collects expensive items from various brands, with outfits costing thousands of dollars. However, his style outweighs his drip, with his looks always being cohesive and original. Fashion is another aspect; it is what you take directly from runways and magazines. Being fashionable in itself does not require any real work, as the brand has decided the look for you. The issue is that people mislabel themselves and take away from people that have worked hard to build their own style. After I spend an hour every day crafting the perfect outfit, I have to walk into school and see someone in a tracksuit and chain talk about how much his “fire” fit costs. We get it, your mom bought you new clothes for your birthday, but the fit? Not it.

SCAN THIS CODE

View a Pinterest board with sweater vests that will deter you from the trend.


sports

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Boys bowling places 12th at states Sophia Canabal

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Staff Reporter

n Nov. 5, the boys bowling team placed 12th in the FHSAA 3A state championships, falling 21 points short to Eau Gallie High School. The team made it to 6th place out of 22 teams during the qualifying rounds, with junior Jacob Daleandro leading with an individual score of 888 pins. Their top performers included Daleandro, placing 16th, and junior Dalton Taylor placing 58th. “During the entirety of our morning qualifying, we were really hopeful, ” Taylor said. Aside from the team competition, Daleandro captured 16th place in the first fourway tie in the FHSAA championships. He was also the only bowler from Seminole County to place in the championships. “It was really exciting for me,” Daleandro said. “I wasn’t expecting to bowl that well going into it and ended up doing really well.” However, as the day progressed, their momentum slowed during the second round of the team bracket, resulting in a loss to East River. While the bowlers were able to defeat Tampa Bay during the consolation bracket, they were eliminated by Eau Gallie High School, falling 21 pins short. “The most disheartening part of states was during our last Baker,” Taylor said. “We had a chance but lost it.” Nonetheless, the match represented the team’s efforts through the season despite unavoidable hurdles such as the availability of practice and shortage of players. “Even though we couldn’t have everybody

Crunching Numbers Boys Team Stats

ROLLING THROUGH OPPONENTS Senior Evan Kauffman bowling against Winter Springs during the regular season on Sept. 23. The team won2198-1777. Photo by Peyton Sutch

• 898 team average • 1044 team high • 18,587 scratch pins

State Success

• Senior Paige McCarthy placed 28th at girls individual championships • 723 pin total (186, 192, 152, 193) • Junior Jacob Daleandro placed 16th in the boys individual championships • 613 pin total (221, 191, 201)

there, we were prepared for the championships,” Taylor said. The pandemic had made it more difficult for members of the team to practice and attend games, but they were able to adapt to the circumstances and surpass their expectations. “At one point, we went up against Apopka High School and we weren’t expecting to beat them because they were six-time champs,” Daleandro said, “but we absolutely crushed them and it put us all in a great mindset.”

Leading up to the championships, the season had been a streak of victories against Lyman, Lake Brantley, Winter Springs, Crooms, Lake Howell and Seminole. The team ended with a 7-1 season record. Their winning streak was abruptly interrupted by a close loss to Oviedo during districts, ultimately placing second. Despite the loss, it proved to be the most memorable game of the season due to the history of the rivalry.

“Oviedo was an important match because we came pretty close and the team was having a lot of fun,” Taylor said. The season proved to be both a positive learning experience for the team, despite their losses. “It is easy to only focus on yourself, because bowling is a very individual sport,” said head Coach Jacob Colquhuon. “This season forced them to think about the team and put each other first.”

ATHLETE OF THE ISSUE who

Chelsea Nguyen

team

Girls Golf

date

Oct. 30-31

what

Placed 27th in the state

where

Las Colinas Course at Mission Inn Resort & Club Sophomore Chelsea Nguyen was the only golfer from Hagerty to advance to the FHSAA 3A Golf State Championships. She shot a 77 in the first round and a 79 in the second. “I’m not particularly happy with how I placed at states as my goal was to finish within the top 10,” Nguyen said. She finished 27th this year after placing 44th last year. “This gives me the assurance that my game is headed in the right direction, and I just have to keep working hard to get the results I want,” she said. Nguyen is also the second girl golfer in school history to make it to the state championships.


sports

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Girls soccer preps for regular season

we had a lot of them.” Not only has the offseason provided the Sports Editor time to practice individually, but returning ith the future of the girls soccer players like Canty and Smith have stepped season in question, the addition of up and continued to build team culture and four incoming freshmen players be leaders on and off the field, by leading in has been a welcome change, bringing much practice and in games. optimism to the program. After a 5-9-4 regular “The leadership is very strong this year and season record and a 3-1 first-round loss to the team is responding well to our philosophy,” Timber Creek in the district playoffs last year, head coach Angie Densberger said. uncertainty formed. Just like other programs, the season will Freshmen Aryana Rosenblum, Megan have a different feel due to the COVID-19 O’Donnell, Reagan Varvarigos and Skye protocols, with players wearing masks in Barnes are hoping to fill locker rooms, on the bench void of graduating seniors when not playing, and no “Players need to and plan on changing the handshakes before or after step up and play pattern of the season last the game. year. The workload they Athletes are more than positions they have will be tasked with will willing to follow these never played before.” protocols for the sake of not be small, and will be – Reagan Fitzgerald, protecting their season, substantially different than anything before. as many other schools 10 “With the seniors from have canceled seasons last year leaving, players need to step up and throughout the state. play positions they have never played before,” “The main goal I have for my team this year forward Reagan Fitzgerald said. is to have the most fun possible,” center back Over the offseason, players have worked on Addison Smith said. “I want us to win games, multiple things, the shooting, ball control and but in the end, it’s the experiences you are passing. This is a testament to their dominant going to remember.” 3-0 preseason win over Lake Howell on Nov. 3. The fun is just now starting for them, with Fitzgerald put up all three goals and got assists team chemistry as amazing as it has been, from Barnes and center forward Emma Canty. according to Canty, and she believes that this “We did well playing in midfield and will carry over into their season. playing combinations to get us forward,” “I can tell this season will be better than Fitzgerald said. “Our shots were very good and last year,” Canty said.

Hayden Turner

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SPORT SHORTS Football prepares for playoffs

As the football season winds down following the most anticipated game of the season, the Oviedo rivalry game, the football team is preparing for the playoffs. On Friday, Nov. 6 they played Flagler Palm Coast and lost 33-0. For the season, the team has 591 passing yards, 596 receiving yards and 1324 rushing yards. The team has also racked up 16 rushing touchdowns this year. “We believe we can make it through the playoff season,” senior Jeremy Frederick said. They play University at home on Friday, Nov. 13 in the FHSAA State Championship play-in match up.

Girls weightlifting beats Lake Howell

Girls weightlifting won 68-24 against Lake Howell in the first meet of the season on Wednesday, Nov. 4. The team had four girls place first in their weight class. Senior Olivia Lipari won the 129-lbs weight class with a 315 pound total, senior Karlie Marini won the 169-lbs weight class with a 350 pound total, senior Haleigh Diamico won the unlimited weight class totaling 295-lbs and senior Emma Ducharme won the 110-lbs weight class with a 220 pound total. “It was a really good first meet and start of the season... I’m really proud of the girls,” Marini said. The girls face Oviedo on Saturday, Nov. 21.

Boys soccer adjusts to new team

Varsity soccer went 0-2 in the preseason, losing to Winter Park and Cypress Creek 3-0 and 1-0 respectively. They have a young team with lots of new players, and team dynamic has changed significantly. “Despite losing both games, the team showed our depth. We played all our players which was good for a preseason game,” outside back Lukas Schoenfeld said. The seniors have been playing together for years and the team chemistry is different from previous years. They are “experimenting” with new players in different positions and seeing where they fit in the preseason games.

STARTING OFF Left wing Skye Barnes (top left) runs up to take a shot during practice. Right back Tori Hayward (top right) rounds up to start a play during practice drills with the team. Midfielders Addison Smith and Siara Youngblood (bottom) battle for control of the ball in a drill to practice for upcoming preseason games. photos by Peyton Sutch

Volleyball falls to Lake Brantley Karson Cuozzo

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Staff Reporter

n Saturday, Oct. 31 the girls volleyball team faced Lake Brantley in the Elite 8, FHSAA 7A Regional Semifinal. Hagerty won the first set 31-29, but couldn’t maintain momentum as Lake Brantley won the last three sets (25-20, 25-18, 25-10), eliminating us from the playoffs. “Our team felt confident going into the game on Saturday,” middle Madison Drewry said. “We had a lot of good energy and I think we were a bit too confident.” After the second set, the game took a turn, and the team lost energy. “After the third set, it looked like we didn’t even know how to play volleyball,” outside hitter Olivia Price said. The team went 15-6 on their shortened season, with many players developing and some even breaking records. Outside hitter Alina Carrillo broke the school record for kills in a game. The girls volleyball program is also the only program in the school’s history that has won districts the past six years in a row. The postseason was a success for the team, even though they did not go as far as they wanted to, head coach Juanita Hitt is proud.. “I am very proud of this team. I think a lot of people thought we weren’t going to be that good after losing seven seniors and five starters,” Hitt said. “This team carried on the great tradition and strength of our program and the future is bright.” On Wednesday, Oct. 28 prior to the Lake Brantley game, the team had a comeback victory against Winter Park to advance them to the FHSAA 7A Regional Semifinal.

The first two sets were not what the team expected, with back to back losses, 25-13 and 22-25. They came out flat, and Winter Park came out hungry and dominated them during the first half of the game. “We looked like we didn’t know what we were doing but after [coach Hitt] made the change to push one of our outsides to play second right side after the second set, and we really turned it around for the victory,” Price said. The things the team has accomplished this year say a lot about the program since they were able to overcome what looked to be an overbearing loss of players. “Our team has grown so much over the season and become closer,” said Drewry. “We have gotten so much stronger as a team, and I am proud of our progress.”

HITTING IT OFF Outside Hitter Alina Carrillo passes the ball after an attempted kill against Timber Creek. photo by Maggie Taylor


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