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THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP

YEAR IN REVIEW

2017


CONTENTS

2 Leadership Letters

14

Impact 2017: Hadassah in Action

National President Ellen Hershkin Executive Director/CEO Dr. Janice Weinman Hadassah Medical Organization Director General Prof. Zeev Rotstein

5

16 The Power of Advocacy Kindra Cooper & Susan Adler

Hadassah Medical Organization Highlights

6 The Power of Healing Dr. Radgonde Amer

8

The Power of Caring Nurse Ruven Gelfond

THE POWER OF

LEADERSHIP

2017 10 2017 in Review On-the-Ground Impact

12

18

19

The Power of Women’s Philanthropy Across the Generations Linda S. Goldstein & Esther Panitch

A Powerful Force for Public Health Rita Lourie-Galena

National Board/ Assembly Members Management Team THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP 3


HADASSAH NATIONAL PRESIDENT ELLEN HERSHKIN At Hadassah, we share an unwavering faith in the Power of Women Who Do. We owe our impact to women powered by their values—and by the support of the men who stand by our sides—all deeply committed to empowering women to effect change. That’s what we do in hundreds of communities around the country, providing more than 300,000 members, male Associates and donors with tools to make an impact. As the late Prime Minister Shimon Peres once said: “Hadassah is the greatest of women’s institutions. You have shown that when women get together they can change the world.” Every day at Hadassah, our work makes a positive impact in the US, Israel, and around the world. In the United States, we met the year’s challenges head-on and with heart. We passed timely new policy statements on women’s health equity, racial justice, and refugees and immigration. We led civil public conversations on feminism and Zionism and convened our first Women’s Health Empowerment Summit with the Coalition for Women’s Health Equity, founded by Hadassah in 2016. In Israel, we commemorated the 50th anniversary of the reunification of Jerusalem—and of Hadassah Hospitals’ campuses at Ein Kerem and Mount Scopus. The Hadassah Medical Organization (HMO) has earned global 4 2017 A YEAR IN REVIEW

recognition as a leader in medical innovation and as a model for building bridges to peace in the Middle East. Dr. Ahmed Eid of Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus, one of Israel’s top surgeons and an Israeli Arab, proudly represented HMO as one of 12 exemplary individuals to light torches at the official Israel Independence Day ceremony. In 2017, HMO was there to help the victims of crises—from terrorist attacks in Israel and hurricanes in the United States to the earthquake in Mexico, where Dr. Esti Galili-Weisstub, director of HMO’s Jerusalem Crisis Intervention Center and global expert on teen post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), was able to assist Mexican health officials in formulating the nation’s response to psychological after-effects, particularly on children. Hadassah has played an active role in helping to shape policy in the Jewish/ Zionist world by virtue of its inclusion in prominent national and global bodies, including the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, Jewish Agency for Israel, World Zionist Organization, American Zionist Movement, and Jewish National Fund. Our privileged status at the United Nations as an NGO allows us to advance women’s health and gender equity as part of the UN Commission on the Status of Women.

At HMO in 2017, our groundbreaking medical care included the world’s first dual-robot-assisted spinal surgery and the launch of Israel’s first and only Pediatric Palliative Care Center. We attracted top talent and world leaders, including a visit by US First Lady Melania Trump and Sara Netanyahu. Prof. Dina Ben-Yehuda became the first woman to serve as Dean of the Hadassah-Hebrew University Faculty of Medicine, and Dr. Tamar Elram took the helm at Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus. Always looking to the future, we began the planning phase to reinvent and modernize the iconic Round Building of the Hadassah Ein Kerem campus, to keep it at the cutting-edge of medical innovation and world-class care. “I don’t think there’s any bigger and better partner with Jerusalem than the Hadassah Medical Organization,” said Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat. I’m honored to share some of these Hadassah highlights with you in the pages ahead. None of this would be possible without the generous support of donors like you. Let us continue to go from strength to strength, together.


HADASSAH EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR/CEO DR. JANICE WEINMAN Every day in 2017, Hadassah, The Women’s Zionist Organization of America, Inc. (HWZOA) made a positive impact, saving lives, bridging divides, empowering women, advancing Israel, and showing what it means to live our values. This is the Power of Women Who Do, fueled by Hadassah’s unparalleled fleet of 300,000 volunteers, members, male Associates, and supporters around the country in more than 700 Hadassah chapters, who work in tandem with the national staff. Around the country in 2017, we rolled out new Hadassah programs to engage and expand our communities and cultivate the next generation of leaders, who find in Hadassah a meaningful expression of purpose within a Jewish framework. As an organization known for multigenerational memberships, Hadassah has an eye to the future. We embrace emerging technologies to engage our grassroots and new audiences, launching our first podcast series, “Hadassah On Call: New Frontiers in Medicine.” This series takes listeners behind the headlines of the Hadassah Medical Organization (HMO) through testimonies of doctors and nurses. In 2017, we laid the groundwork for our second podcast (launching in summer 2018), which shares real-life stories about Jews and Arabs in Israel making connections and working together.

A fundamental part of our success has been through local, national and global collaborations. In 2017, for example, a new partnership with the Jewish Women’s Renaissance Project brought a cohort of young mothers to Israel, providing an immersive Israel experience (including first-person accounts of medical marvels at the Hadassah Medical Organization), and then a year-long curriculum that provides tools to change the world through Jewish values.

As the nation’s largest Jewish women’s organization, we face the same challenges as other volunteer organizations and nonprofits. Yet HWZOA remains a formidable institution with a broad mandate.

In 2017, we had 172 health and wellness events that reached over 20,000 inperson attendees, a number boosted by our deepening ties to the JCC Association, which brought Hadassah programs to 20 JCC communities.

We understand how important it is to create the kind of organization that attracts outstanding professionals in our sector. In 2017, we began the process of bringing in new top talent to help our leadership team—volunteers and staff —strengthen our organization and impact. We instituted a new staff development process with a focus on better understanding each person’s background and an updated evaluation process to help our professionals build their strengths. We created and filled a new position—Chief Human Resources Officer—and began what proved to be extremely successful searches for a Chief Development Officer and a Chief Financial and Operations Officer.

Hadassah takes an active role in shaping and lifting up important conversations. In 16 communities, our volunteer leaders are teaching classes on Jewish Values & the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, a topic many younger Jews are grappling with. (Our teachers were trained by our partners at the Shalom Hartman Institute.) And Hadassah’s Defining Zionism in the 21st Century series brought timely public dialogue to new audiences through live events, online videos and opportunities to view via Facebook live, with diverse speakers exploring feminism and Zionism, intersectionality, interfaith initiatives, and more.

Today, there are 76,000 professionals working to improve the world at Jewish organizations. According to Leading Edge’s 2017 report, a followup to “Cultivating the Next Generation of Leaders for Jewish Nonprofits,” most are struggling to maintain and attract talent.

Our power comes from the people who share our vision. We hope we can count on you as our continued partner.

THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP 5


HADASSAH M 3-D mammography—that can raise breast cancer detection by up to 30%. We also have installed contrastenhanced digital mammography that enables physicians to diagnose the extent of the disease in a quick, simple procedure.

HADASSAH MEDICAL ORGANIZATON DIRECTOR GENERAL PROF. ZEEV ROTSTEIN The Hebrew word for “renewal” is hit’hadshut, which speaks of the healthy and ongoing process of innovation and ingenuity that keeps an institution at the top of its performance. That’s the theme I’ve chosen that best represents our current mood at Hadassah Medical Organization (HMO). In this fast-evolving world of technology in which obsolescence chases us, we’ve upgraded much of our technology. For example, we’ve increased our MRIs from two to four— with higher sophistication. We have a new PET-CT scanner—the first based on digital technology to arrive in Israel. It’s more precise, can identify problems at much earlier stages, is more comfortable for patients, and is much faster—and it also serves our research needs. In a bunker, we have not one but two cyclotrons—these lead the development and production of PET radiopharmaceuticals in Israel. We are opening BIOHOUSE—HMO’s inhouse center for biomedical research and development start-ups, to crossfertilize ideas with our research and clinical experts. In our new Women’s Health Center on Mount Scopus we’re using digital breast tomosynthesis— 6 2017 A YEAR IN REVIEW

For our fast-growing Israeli population—talking about hit’hadshut—we are renovating our busy Delivery Department on Mount Scopus. We have also broken ground on a new Rehabilitation Center there, so that we never have to turn away soldiers and civilians who need our help. We’ve also opened an HMO clinic in Ramat Gan. Of course, buildings and equipment are only part of what a hospital needs to excel. The internationally recognized, gifted staff of doctors, nurses and paramedical staff are the heart of the hospital. And speaking of hearts, The Irma and Paul Milstein Heart Center is moving into its rightful place in the Sarah Wetsman Davidson Hospital Tower. In Mexico, coordinated by Hadassah International, pediatric psychiatrist Dr. Esti Galili-Weisstub taught local therapists to cope with the traumas of children after the earthquakes, while two Mexican doctors trained in plastic surgery fixed cleft palates. HMO’s medical team carried out complex spine surgery on children in Ethiopia. Cardiologists and pediatric cardiothoracic surgeons are treating Syrian children at Hadassah Ein Kerem. Remember that image of holding hands around the world? That’s how I feel about our newest endeavor, transforming the historic Round Building into a futuristic complex. Those of us in Israel and those in the Diaspora, are joining hands in 360 degrees of healing.

2017 HIGHLIGHTS EACH YEAR, THE HADASSAH MEDICAL ORGANIZATION (HMO) TREATS 1 MILLION PATIENTS, REGARDLESS OF RACE, RELIGION OR NATIONALITY, STRIVING TO BUILD BRIDGES TO PEACE THROUGH MEDICINE WHILE UPHOLDING ITS COMMITMENT TO COMPASSION AND INNOVATION IN RESEARCH AND CARE. AT THE CUTTING-EDGE OF CARE: INNOVATIONS & BREAKTHROUGHS • Three Hours. Two Robots. One WorldFirst Surgery A dual robotic surgery—the first of its kind­—helped repair Aharon Schwartz’s severe spinal fracture after the factory worker was pinned to the ground by a wall of steel, fracturing his leg and breaking six spinal vertebrae. • Rehab, NASA-Style Hadassah Mount Scopus becomes the only Jerusalem hospital equipped to give terror victims and wounded soldiers and civilians a boost of NASAlevel technology during rehabilitation therapy, thanks to its AlterG® AntiGravity Treadmill. • Lymphoma: Risk Factors by Population In the first large-scale study of its kind, Hadassah researchers uncover environmental and lifestyle risk factors among Palestinians and Jews for B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. • Neuroscience Breakthrough New findings on a severe form of brain inflammation by Dr. Shahar Arzy of the HMO Computational


H MEDICAL ORGANIZATION Neuropsychiatry Lab—published in The Lancet Psychiatry—advance our understanding of brain networks. Dr. Arzy and his team are also making waves for their sophisticated new diagnostic tools for Alzheimer’s disease. • In-Utero Surgical Success In a risky in-utero procedure performed for the first time in Israel, an interdisciplinary HMO team saved a 28-week-old fetus with a severe heart defect. Dr. Yuval Gielchinsky appears on the cover of Forbes Israel Magazine in recognition of HMO’s lifesaving interventions with babies in utero.

HUMANITARIAN HIGHLIGHTS • Gaza Children Hear for the First Time Mohamed, a 4-year-old who was born deaf and never learned to speak, was one of 15 children from Gaza and the West Bank who regained their hearing after cochlear implant surgery at Hadassah Ein Kerem. • Global Disaster Response HMO’s Dr. Esti Galili-Weisstub—a global trauma expert—helped the Mexican government, after the devastating earthquake, develop its strategic response to long-term psychological impact. The Mexican Health Secretary thanked Dr. GaliliWeisstub, praising the strength of the Israel-Mexico relationship.

TACKLING THE TOUGHEST PEDIATRIC AND PRENATAL CASES • Israel’s first Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) opened at Hadassah Ein Kerem, combining advanced technology with a multidisciplinary professional team. • A world-first surgical procedure saved a baby whose intestines formed outside of her abdomen. • HMO inaugurated its Pediatric Palliative and Supportive Care Center, providing infants and youth who have life-threatening or complex medical conditions with comprehensive, holistic care and family-centric support.

LEADERSHIP AT LARGE • Modeling Peace US First Lady Melania Trump and Sara Netanyahu visited Hadassah Ein Kerem, putting an international spotlight on HMO as a “center of coexistence” in Israel. Shortly afterward, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Health Minister Yaakov Litzman visited IDF soldiers injured in a terrorist attack being treated at HMO, thanking them for their service. • Women’s Leadership at HMO in 2017 Dr. Tamar Elram became the director of Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus, and Prof. Dina Ben-Yehuda became Dean of the Hadassah-Hebrew University Faculty of Medicine—the first woman to have the position.

2017 BY THE NUMBERS +3%

96,079

+3%

SAME-DAY HOSPITALIZATIONS

FROM 2016

91,217 +7.5% FROM 2016

AMERICAN SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS ABROAD PROGRAM • Women’s Health Center at Mt. Scopus The US Agency for International Development has provided approximately $1 million per year to the Hadassah Medical Organization since the 1960s, supporting HMO through the American Schools and Hospitals Abroad program (ASHA). ASHA provides sophisticated medical equipment to Hadassah’s hospitals to ensure they can deliver high-quality clinical care to everyone in need regardless of race, religion, gender, ethnic origin, age, or sexual orientation. In 2017, the ASHA program delivered a range of essential equipment for the new Women’s Health Center at Hadassah Mount Scopus, including mammography machines, ultrasound devices, and special monitors for mothers and babies.

HOSPITALIZATIONS

FROM 2016

+3%

FROM 2016

BIRTHS

12,855 EMERGENCY ROOM VISITS

154,571 +6%

OPERATIONS

FROM 2016

37,568

+6%

LABORATORY TESTS

FROM 2016

4,484,538

+7%

EXAMINATIONS IN OUTPATIENT CLINICS

FROM 2016

752,364

THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP 7


THE POWER OF HEALIN DR. RADGONDE AMER OPHTHALMOLOGIST EXTRAORDINAIRE When Dr. Radgonde Amer, then a medical student in Jordan, saw the back of the eye for the first time, she fell in love. “It’s so beautiful,” she said. “I knew at that moment that I would make ophthalmology my life’s work.” Born in Jerusalem to a Christian Arab family (her younger brother Johnny is a PhD researcher in the Hadassah Medical Organization’s Liver Department), her rare first name comes from a sixthcentury French princess who escaped from a Hamlet-like royal intrigue and became a saint. That Radgonde became a renowned healer. The name choice was prophetic. Today Dr. Radgonde Amer heads HMO’s Uveitis and Ocular Immunology Service in the Department of Ophthalmology. She received her medical degree at the University of Jordan in Amman, then returned to Jerusalem to do her residency at Hadassah Hospital. During that period she saved the eye of New Yorker Jamie Sokolow, then 12, who survived a Jaffa Road terrorist explosion, earning Dr. Amer accolades from then First Lady Hillary Clinton. Uveitis is the inflammation of the uvea, the pigmented layer including the iris between the better-known retina and cornea. Dr. Amer specialized in uveitis at the Aberdeen Royal Infirmary in Scotland, under Dr. John Forrester. Dr. Forrester and Dr. Amer are still in close contact and Dr. Forrester plans to attend HMO’s Centennial Celebration of Ophthalmology in 2018.

8 2017 A YEAR IN REVIEW

Dr. Amer opened HMO’s uveitis clinic in 2007 at the request of then Department Head Prof. Jacob Pe’er. The clinic serves a community of over a million men, women and children. Uveitis and other ocular immunological diseases link ophthalmology and internal medicine, another field that engages her. “Eye disease doesn’t all start in the eye,” she said. For example, she was called for a consultation about a young woman in the Internal Medicine Department. The patient couldn’t move her head to either side, and her vision was blurry. Her situation was critical. The teen’s blurred vision was related to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, a systemic disease that affects joints and eyes. It’s one of Dr. Amer’s specialties. “We’re blessed in Israel with a very fast referral service when general doctors and general ophthalmologists quickly send patients to experts at Hadassah Hospital in most cases,” said Dr. Amer. “Despite this clear case of parental neglect, we were able to reverse the disease, ease her joints and save the teen’s vision.” The diseases she deals with have often been misdiagnosed. Take Behçet’s disease—the highest prevalence of which is in Turkey. It starts with mouth sores, so the diagnosis does not become clear until much later when the patient develops uveitis and visits the ophthalmologist.

Dr. Amer does in-clinic training for ophthalmologists from other hospitals and clinics who might miss the systemic diseases to which blurry vision and red eyes are a clue. Her clinic is already a site of international clinical trials, and her dream is to be able to establish a team to increase research in this field at the Hadassah Medical Organization. Teaching medical students is one of her favorite parts of her job. She makes sure her students are broadly educated in every aspect of the field and does her best to infuse them with her love of ophthalmology. She also shares her unabated awe of the eye, “one of God’s creations—and a glorious one.”

Love at First Sight: The first time Dr. Amer saw the back of an eye, she said, “I knew I would make ophthalmology my life’s work.”


ING

THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP 9


THE POWER OF CARI N RUVEN GELFOND CHIEF NURSE OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY “It may sound banal, but if you need to take blood from a patient to use later in his or her own surgery and you don’t have the exact sterile equipment, the entire surgery may be compromised,” said Ruven Gelfond, who speaks from his experience handling logistics and nursing for life-saving Hadassah Medical Organization (HMO) humanitarian missions, often to places lacking modern medical facilities. “At HMO there is a blood bank, for example, but in Ethiopia there isn’t.” Gelfond, 47, is renowned for being able to predict a need or to come up with a creative answer when there is no obvious solution to a problem. It’s an invaluable trait for the doctors he works with as Chief Nurse of Orthopedic Surgery at Hadassah Hospital on the Mount Scopus campus. Indeed, it was Gelfond who headed the team to set up Israel’s field hospital in Haiti in 2010 and who was sent by the IDF (Israel Defense Forces) to the Philippines after the typhoon in 2013. He’s also served in the IDF’s Good Neighbor field hospital, treating Syrians devastatingly injured in their civil war. Born in 1970 in Tbilisi, the capital of Soviet Georgia, he finished nine years of school before being sent to a practical nurses course in Vitebsk, Belarus, hometown of Marc Chagall. His inborn ability to think out of the box was nurtured from his first job, when he was placed in charge of the community health clinics in five villages. “I had to deal with whatever came my way— giving shots, delivering babies, and treating the elderly,” said Gelfond. He was 18 years old.

10 2017 A YEAR IN REVIEW

After completing a two-year stint in the Red Army, he moved with his parents and siblings to Israel in December 1992, in the first wave of Russian aliyah. After a crash course in Hebrew, he signed up for a program (sponsored by Hadassah, The Women’s Zionist Organization of America) to train Russian medical professionals for work in Israel. “It was a time of tremendous learning for me,” he said. “True, I had more experience than many other students, but there was so much to become familiar with. I never took it for granted that Hadassah would invest so much in my training, and I’m grateful.” He filled in both his academic and technical background, and went on to specialize as an operating room nurse. He also served in the IDF, becoming part of the YAKAM field hospital team. Today he’s an officer with two stripes on his shoulder, serving in the Reserves and on-call for emergency missions abroad. Gelfond is married to Inna, an economist turned nurse. One of their children is studying medicine in Slovakia, another is in the Israeli Air Force.

In Haiti, Israel received international praise for the speed in which the triple-tent field hospital was set up and for its high standards. “We have to maintain the same level of sterility in the operating theaters as we

do at Hadassah’s hospitals or we haven’t done our job,” says Gelfond. In Haiti, he looked at the long line of men, women and children waiting for orthopedic surgery and realized the team would run short of orthopedic screws. “When we packed, we couldn’t predict how much exactly of each kind of equipment we would need,” said Gelfond. “We had more broken hips than we had anticipated because so many homes collapsed. For that you need orthopedic screws. If you don’t do the surgery quickly, the patient can even die from a broken hip.” Gelfond insisted that he could make the orthopedic nails, of which they had many, into screws with grooves. To the surprise of the team, he asked to be escorted to the factory area of Haiti. Amid the buildings destroyed by the earthquake, he found a machinery shop and the tool he needed to create enough screws until a supply was flown in. In Ethiopia, when a team of Israelis and Ethiopians prepared the operating room to his high standards, he had one more detail to attend to before surgeries began. He and the surgeons put up a mezuzah on the door of the operating room. “If this is a branch of Hadassah’s hospitals, even for a week, we need ‘Hear, O Israel’ on the door.”


I NG

THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP 11


2017 IN REVIEW ON-THE-GROUND IMPACT

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12 2017 A YEAR IN REVIEW

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LIVING IN 3 RESIDENTIAL HADASSAH YOUTH ALIYAH VILLAGES IN ISRAEL, FINDING THEIR FOOTING ON THE PATH TO A SUCCESSFUL FUTURE

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DAY STUDENTS BETWEEN THE THREE VILLAGES

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GUARDIANS OF THE FUTURE: 10 ($10,000,000+) GUARDIANS OF HOPE: 12 ($5,000,000-$9,999,999) GUARDIANS OF ZION: 23 ($2,500,000-$4,999,999) GUARDIANS OF TOMORROW: 98 ($1,000,000-$2,499,999) GUARDIANS OF LIFE: 118 ($500,000-$999,000) GUARDIANS OF THE DREAM: 259 ($250,000-$499,999) SOCIETY OF MAJOR DONORS: 882 ($120,000-$249,999) CIRCLE OF FOUNDERS: 972 ($72,000-$119,999) FOUNDERS: 1,122 ($36,000-$71,999) BENEFACTORS OF PEACE: 374 ($18,000 TO $35,999) YOUNG FOUNDERS (UNDER AGE 46): 412 ($15,000 TO $17,999) CHAVERIM: 3,144 ($5,000 TO $17,999) KEEPERS OF THE GATE: 3,586 ($1,000+ ANNUAL DONORS) CHAI SOCIETY: 3,504 ($180+ ANNUAL DONORS) THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP 13


THE POWER OF WOME ACROSS THE GENERATIONS

ESTHER PANITCH “We are a four-generation Hadassah family,” said Miami-born Esther Panitch, who credits her mother, Linda S. Goldstein, and grandmother Yetta Fried z”l for her commitment to Hadassah’s mission. “My mom brought me to meetings as far back as age 6,” said Panitch. “Women gave me cookies, let me practice reading out loud, and they doted on me. I did not understand everything Hadassah did then, but I knew it was about Israel and women, and I loved both.” During law school, Panitch craved being part of a group of Hadassah women her own age. She found one in Miami and joined with some of her like-minded friends. “We wanted to speak up, using our skills to become advocates.” Now 46, Panitch describes herself as “primarily a criminal defense attorney who also does family law and specializes in cases where those two fields come together.” She’s had a number of high-profile cases and is a soughtafter legal analyst who comments on cases for local and national media. Panitch and her husband, Roger, met in Israel on a Jewish Federation mission in 1997 and now have a daughter and two sons. “My daughter has attended many events with me,” said Panitch. “She loves the women and thinks they’re badasses. Those are the kind of women I want her around. She just graduated high school and will be studying in Israel on a Young Judaea program. And, a year and a half ago, my youngest had his bar mitzvah in Israel.” Panitch and her family relocated in 2004 to Georgia, where she continued practicing law and became active in the Greater Atlanta Hadassah Chapter. When her chapter promoted a young women’s campaign for stem cell research, Panitch was eager to help. She’d just recently lost her 56-year-old father to heart disease and diabetes. 14 2017 A YEAR IN REVIEW

Although she wasn’t a science researcher, Panitch found another way to make an impact. She used her voice to raise money for building a stem cell lab at Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem. “It was a thrill when we met our goal a year early!” said Panitch. At that time, US laws restricted medical stem cell research. “That made Israel’s involvement especially important. By promoting HMO’s research around the world, we knew results would be faster.” And they have, including HMO clinical trials for potential treatments of ALS and neurodegenerative diseases that have riveted the worldwide medical community. Panitch was grateful for the opportunity to help all of humanity. “Believe me,” she joked, “nobody wants me in a lab. I’m a lawyer, not a scientist—if you saw my science grades, you’d never let me near anything scientific.” With her thriving law practice in Atlanta, Panitch works full-time and then some, as do her colleagues. Yet, despite their limited time, they continue their quest to fundraise and educate about HMO’s medical research. Esther is a Keeper of the Gate and proud member of the Circle of Founders. “It’s so important to work on something bigger than us. It fulfills the need to do our part in making the future better. On days I’d rather stay in bed, Hadassah motivates me to get up and get going. As my mother did for me, I want to inspire my daughter to be a strong citizen of the world.”


MEN’S PHILANTHROPY LINDA S. GOLDSTEIN Linda S. Goldstein inherited a passion for giving. “My parents, Benjamin and Yetta Fried z”l, met at a Jr. Hadassah dance, fell in love, and married two weeks later,” said Goldstein. “I wouldn’t be here if not for Hadassah!” Goldstein passed along the philanthropic gene to her three children who, in turn, led their offspring along the same path. Goldstein kvells, “My mother and I had the privilege of installing my daughter, Esther Panitch, as president of her Hadassah Miami chapter. Then I had the amazing honor of my daughter, Esther, installing me as Hadassah Greater Miami President.” In 1966, during Goldstein’s third year of college, she studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. “At the start of our year, we visited the beautiful Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem and its Chagall windows. But in June 1967, the Six-Day War broke out. My dorm was almost converted to a hospital.” Goldstein chose to stay and help. “After the war, I witnessed the terrible state Hadassah Mount Scopus was in, but I knew the women of Hadassah would make it whole again.” Her experiences in Israel made a tremendous impact on Goldstein and inspired her lifelong support for Hadassah. “As a CPA, I recognize the importance of philanthropy to a nonprofit organization. I am a proud member of the Society of Major Donors as well as a Golden Keeper of the Gate.” Looking to the future, she’s “currently raising funds to renovate the iconic Round Building” on the Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem campus, part of the 360 Degrees of Healing campaign.

Goldstein’s tireless efforts include organizing the Hadassah Greater Miami Region Symposium on Human Trafficking. She now sits on Miami’s State Attorney’s Task Force for Human Trafficking. She has spoken in synagogues and participated in community events alongside grateful patients and Hadassah Medical Organization physicians and nurses. Goldstein’s story, “A Hadassah Legacy,” appears in Hadassah’s centennial book, Real Stories of Hadassah Life Changing Moments. Goldstein says she’s particularly proud that Hadassah’s Youth Aliyah Villages enable disadvantaged students to become productive members of Israeli society and proud that Hadassah scholarships for Young Judaea empower Jewish continuity. In 2017, she participated in three Hadassah missions to Israel. “The first,” said Goldstein, “was the Region Presidents Mission. Two weeks later we celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the Reunification of Jerusalem and the return of Hadassah Mount Scopus. The third was a Hadassah Florida Mission I helped lead. These missions gave me the opportunity to learn and educate others about the life-saving work we do and inspire more Jewish women to get involved. It’s a joy to visit with my daughter, Esther, during our Hadassah national events.” “Hadassah has given me a platform to promote Zionism. I’ve been educated about women’s health issues and how to advocate for change. The feeling I get from contributing to Hadassah with my time and professional expertise, as well as philanthropically, is best described by a quote from Hillel: ‘If I am not for myself who will be for me? But if I am only for myself who am I? And if not now, when?’ ” THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP 15


IMPACT 2017: HADASSA WOMEN’S HEALTH

Women’s Health Equity: In 2017, Hadassah convened the first Women’s Health Empowerment Summit with the Coalition for Women’s Health Equity, bringing together more than 150 advocates, grassroots leaders, students and government representatives. In 2017, the Coalition grew to 28 member organizations, doubling in size from its founding by Hadassah in 2016. Coalition member organizations work together to address health inequities, from prevention and diagnosis, to treatment and cure.

Meeting with Policymakers: Hadassah organized more than 20 legislative meetings to advocate for a strong US-Israel relationship and on bills to combat anti-Semitism and BDS, as well as women’s health, and other policy issues. These meetings with US Senators, Representatives, and congressional staffers in their district offices were the first phase of a strategic national push to expand local efforts and grow Hadassah’s Day in the District program. Date with the State: California State Senator Henry Stern met with Stacey Dorenfeld and Stacey Devries, co-chairs of Hadassah Southern California’s “Modern Day Slavery: An Insight Into Human Trafficking” event. Senator Stern introduced Senate Bill 225, which would require hotels to publicly post the number for the human trafficking hotline. Standing Up for Immigrants and Refugees: Hadassah proudly advocates for immigrants and refugees, passing a new policy statement in January 2017. Hadassah joined with a long list of elected officials and community leaders in supporting the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and advocating for comprehensive bipartisan immigration reform.

briefs in 2017, including on reproductive health, LGBT rights, and religion-state separation. The Attorneys Council is one of several Hadassah professional networking councils. Hadassah Leadership Fellows: In 2017, Hadassah’s elite fellows spearheaded the creation of Hadassah’s young women’s network, EVOLVE (Engage, Volunteer, Opportunity, Leadership, Vision and Empowerment), which creates Hadassah events for savvy younger Jewish women committed to women’s health, volunteerism, Zionism, and Jewish identity. Cultivating Local Leaders: Hadassah’s many strategic partnerships include a collaboration with the Jewish Women’s Renaissance Project (JWRP) to empower women to change the world through Jewish values that transform themselves, their families, and their communities, through trips to Israel and follow-up support. The initial program in 2017 with Hadassah Greater Chicago-North Shore (CNS) was successful, with 80% of CNS participants on track to take local Hadassah leadership positions. Plans are under way to expand this program to 10 new cities by 2019.

ADVOCACY IN ACTION

EMPOWERING WOMEN

MAKING HEALTH & WELLNESS A COMMUNITY PRIORITY

Speaking Out on the Issues: We sent over 33,000 messages to elected officials on women’s health, women’s economic equity, violence against women, immigrant rights, and against hate, racism, and white supremacy.

Friends of the Court: Hadassah’s National Attorneys Council, now in its 18th year, brought 14 attorneys to be sworn into the US Supreme Court Bar and for a private meeting with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a Hadassah Life Member. Hadassah signed onto 11 amicus curiae (friend of the court)

Every Bite Counts: Hadassah’s Nutrition Program: With the help of food guru Shannon Sarna, Every Bite Counts puts a fun spin on healthy choices. In 2017, Every Bite Counts reached audiences young and old, online and in person, through four cooking videos, recipe cards, online food columns, social media

16 2017 A YEAR IN REVIEW


SAH IN ACTION posts and live cooking demonstrations at high-profile Hadassah events. Education Saves Lives: Hadassah is well known for its ability to engage and educate communities around the country, bringing 20,000 individuals the tools they need to live healthier lives. In 2017, Hadassah held more than 172 health and wellness events focused on heart disease, nutrition, breast cancer, women’s health equity, melanoma, multiple sclerosis and more.

President Ellen Hershkin at an official ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of the return of Hadassah Hospital Mount Scopus to Hadassah after the Six-Day War.

Immersive Israel: Each year, Hadassah leads guided tours to Israel, helping Diaspora Jews forge connections to Israel, Hadassah’s Youth Aliyah villages and the work of the Hadassah Medical Organization. In 2017, Hadassah trips to Israel included the Geopolitical Mission, with stops in Rawabi and Ramallah, and briefings from military and political insiders. Youth Programs: Hadassah scholarships supported 412 youngsters and their families enabling them to attend Young Judaea programs in the US and Israel.

AT-RISK YOUTH IN ISRAEL

“I don’t think there’s any bigger and better partner to Jerusalem than the Hadassah Medical Organization,” Programs with Purpose: Hadassah members raise awareness about breast cancer and the lifesaving work of the Hadassah Medical Organization, whose researchers were the first to identify the BRCA gene mutation’s disproportionate appearance among Ashkenazi Jews. Hadassah women have taught breast cancer awareness education for 20 years, reaching 1 million teens around the country with Check It Out®. As part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month in 2017, Hadassah raised awareness in Florida—and funds for HMO—with displays of artist-decorated bras at five Bloomingdale’s locations, mirroring efforts in other states.

A MAGAZINE OF MERIT

Hadassah Magazine takes home seven 2017 Simon Rockower Awards from the American Jewish Press Association.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF REUNIFICATION Jerusalem Jubilee: “I stand here in the footsteps of the giants whose vision and courage to build Zion continues to guide our path,” said Hadassah National

said Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat. The mayor was one of several dignitaries marking the milestone, including Jonathan Kamin, Deputy Mission Director of USAID; HMO leaders, and two dozen women and men on Hadassah’s “O Jerusalem 50th Reunification Mission.”

FOSTERING SUPPORT FOR ISRAEL Thought Leadership: As part of our efforts to advance civil dialogue on Israel in the United States, our Defining Zionism in the 21st Century program hosted 17 speakers addressing timely topics such as feminism and Zionism, intersectionality, interfaith initiatives, reaching millennials, and more. Created as an online video series, the program interspersed live events and a strong social media presence, including a 2017 Facebook reach for Defining Zionism of 129,143 people. Teaching Values: Emerging Hadassah leaders began teaching classes on “Jewish Values & the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict” in 16 communities around the country, using the Shalom Hartman Institute’s iEngage syllabus.

Israel Finance Minister at HadassahNeurim Youth Village: “I was a terrible student, getting up every morning at 3:00 am to fish, so that I could help my parents put bread on the table... Hadassah Neurim never gave up on me,” said Israel Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon during a visit to the village. “I went from Hadassah-Neurim to Harvard and the Knesset.... Any one of you boys or girls can do the same thing.” Hadassah’s three Youth Aliyah villages set at-risk children in Israel on the path to a successful future through education, psychological support, and love in a secure environment that fosters independence, self-esteem, and success. Since 1934, over 300,000 young people from 80 lands have graduated from Youth Aliyah. Youth Aliyah student Leyla Vinopal represented Israel at the European Union Contest for Young Scientists for her work on the immune system and Alzheimer’s, part of her Youth Aliyah vocational training. Three Youth Aliyah 12th-graders took 2nd place in Israel’s National Cyber Competition, sponsored by the Ministry of Education. A new student learning center, the Nancy Falchuk Enrichment Center, opened at Youth Aliyah’s Meir Shfeyah Village, also home to the newly dedicated Marcie Natan Dining Hall. THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP 17


THE PO SUSAN ADLER With a career spanning nearly four decades, Susan Adler got her start in Washington, DC. She was hired right out of Boston University as a legislative assistant to New Jersey Congressman Peter W. Rodino, Jr. When he was promoted to chair the House Judiciary Committee overseeing President Richard Nixon’s impeachment hearings, Adler was catapulted into a new role. “I’d only been there six months,” she said, “when I had to learn quickly how to navigate and advocate in a politically charged environment.” Those early lessons provided the strong foundation for her professional life and Hadassah service. After relocating to Seattle in 1987, Adler headed nonprofits in education and health policy, including the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research for 16 years. During that time, Adler accepted an invitation to the Hadassah Leadership Academy (HLA), visiting both Hadassah hospitals in Jerusalem. From that moment, Adler’s dream was to encourage Seattle-based researchers to partner with their counterparts at the Hadassah Medical Organization. When asked about her top accomplishments as Hadassah Seattle President, a role she took on in 2015, Adler cites the Hadassah Salon Series. “We identify amazing local women who embody the Power of Women Who Do and invite them into our homes to share their life stories and the Jewish values they embrace. This is how we foster and grow community!” At one Seattle Salon, Adler said, she listened with pride when Dr. Carla Greenbaum of the Benaroya Research Institute’s Diabetes Research Program at Virginia Mason Hospital spoke about her new diabetes research 18 2017 A YEAR IN REVIEW

collaboration with a doctor affiliated with Hadassah Hospital. “They had just been funded by the National Institutes of Health,” said Adler, whose HLA dream is now becoming a reality. In her personal life, too, Hadassah has loomed large. “When my husband was hospitalized, the women of Hadassah were there for me.” While he’s out of the danger zone now, in 2017 she made 78 trips to the hospital. As an East Coast transplant, she added, “I have no family in Seattle. The women of Hadassah have become my family.” As Seattle’s Jewish population spikes, Adler sees an exceptional opportunity to grow Hadassah Seattle. “We are attracting women from diverse backgrounds—from the Sephardi community, the Ashkenazi community, South Africa, Israel, Eastern Europe and across America.” Some, like Washington State Rep. Tana Senn, have lived in Seattle most of their lives. A fourth-generation Hadassah member who was hired by Hadassah post-college, today Rep. Senn “is dramatically moving the needle for women’s equity issues,” said Adler. Adler says her own advocacy is about “communicating why Hadassah’s dedication to building bridges to peace through medicine impacts women and families in the United States and across the world.” In the US, Adler has joined the push for women’s health equity, serving as an ambassador in 2017 for Hadassah’s first Women’s Health Empowerment Summit with the Coalition for Women’s Health Equity, which Hadassah founded. “As Hadassah members, we are well positioned to raise our voices and redefine how this country addresses the role women play as the CEOs of their family’s health decisions, as patients, as clinical trial participants and as caregivers.”


POWER OF ADVOCACY KINDRA COOPER Mix a Jewish Seattle lawyer with two master’s degrees—one in bioethics, another in public administration—and you get powerhouse advocate Kindra Cooper. After joining the board of directors for Hadassah’s Seattle chapter, Cooper dove right into service as their Advocacy Committee Chair. Within months, Cooper was representing Hadassah at statelevel Jewish advocacy events including a panel discussion aimed at community education, and a Jewish women’s advocacy training. Since then, she and other members of her chapter have represented Hadassah in a Day in the District meeting with US Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal, discussing gender equity in health care and medical research, and in a meeting with Senator Patty Murray’s outreach director, discussing Hadassah policy priorities including support for family caregivers and women’s health equity.

For Cooper, advocacy is a perfect expression of her Jewish ideals, like tzedakah (charity and justice) and tikkun olam (repairing the world). It was a deeply personal experience, however, that brought her to medical advocacy.

“Medical research is part of the reason I get out of bed in the morning.” “When my then husband was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive GI cancer, he was only in his mid-30s. If it weren’t for medical research, my son would not have his father.” Recently, Cooper has been actively representing Hadassah policy priorities, including at the Jewish Community Lobby Day at the Washington State Capital in Olympia, focused on combating bias, racial equity, criminal justice reform, gun violence protection, and supporting immigrants and refugees. Participants raised support for a budget measure providing greater financial assistance for anti-hate and Holocaust education programs, which successfully passed both houses of the Washington State Legislature the following day. Cooper has found a way to fight for what she believes. “My parents joke that I was born saying, ‘That’s not fair.’ I always stood up for other kids at the playground— trying to right all wrongs.”

19


A POWERFUL FORCE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH RITA LOURIE-GALENA Hadassah New York President Rita Lourie-Galena has spent her life helping others in the arena of public health nursing. She’s accumulated many degrees (BSN, MSN, MPH) and awards along the way, including Temple University’s College of Health Professions Innovation in Teaching Award and the APHA PHN Arnstein Award for Public Health Nursing. In her role as Hadassah New York President, which she assumed in 2016, Lourie-Galena has coorganized meetings with New York legislators—including Senators Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer, Congresswomen Carolyn Maloney, Grace Meng and Nydia Velazquez, and Congressman Jerrold Nadler—to advocate for women’s health equity and other priority Hadassah issues. “We made very strong inroads with our bill for the Women’s Health Equality Act,” she said. “They all said when it’s reintroduced, they’ll support it.” Back in 1993, Lourie-Galena was invited to speak for the Philadelphia Hadassah Nurses Council. “I was inspired and became a member that day,” she said. Before that, she helped launch a Temple University community health center and was an early leading advocate on lead poisoning and second-hand smoke, securing federal grants for environmental health and other public health projects. In 2008, she left Philly and came to New York, reviving the NYC Hadassah Nurses Council that year. She served as co-chair of the Hadassah National Nurses Council for four years until she became the NY Region president, which includes nine Manhattan chapters and one in Queens. 20 2017 A YEAR IN REVIEW

“The Hadassah National Nurses Council is the umbrella for our local Nurses Councils throughout America,” she said. It’s one of several Hadassah national councils that bring together professionals to network, advocate, educate and advance the work of Hadassah and the Hadassah Medical Organization.” As region president, one of her proudest accomplishments is bringing in more young people. “I have a talent for finding the right people for the right job,” she said. That helped her find women in their 30s and 40s to serve on her region’s board, including as chapter presidents. Lourie-Galena is passionate about fundraising, especially motivated by Hadassah’s 360 Degrees of Healing campaign, which will help reinvigorate and renovate the iconic Round Building on the Ein Kerem campus, including a state-of-the-art simulation lab that will be used by students at the Henrietta Szold Hadassah-Hebrew University School of Nursing. “It’s so important for nurses and medical students to practice in computerized simulation labs before going into actual patient experiences.” She has helped create many Hadassah health and wellness programs—breast cancer awareness, heart health and melanoma. “Helping others is what made me want to be a nurse,” Lourie-Galena said. “That and making connections to help others.” Lourie-Galena takes advantage of opportunities that present themselves. “I always say yes before I say no, and I’m always looking for opportunities to make Hadassah more visible here in New York City. That’s my number one priority as I enrich connections with the nurses here and in Israel.”


2017 national board/assembly members NATIONAL OFFICERS PRESIDENT Ellen Hershkin VICE PRESIDENTS Ruth Ann Freedman Michelle Goldberg Dianne Gottlieb Carol Ann Schwartz Rhoda Smolow Kacy Spivack PORTFOLIO COUNCIL OFFICER Roz Rosen TREASURER Roni Schwartz SECRETARY Gail Hammerman PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENTS Nancy Falchuk Carmela E. Kalmanson Bonnie Lipton Marcie Natan Marlene E. Post ALL OFFICERS ARE MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL BOARD AND THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

NATIONAL BOARD MEMBERS Liz Alpert Haidi Appel Sue Beller Pennie Sessler Branden Sharon Cadoff Janet Deixler Sheila Derman Karen Ezrine Rena Feuerstein Elizabeth Fox Clara Gillman Jill Goldstone Phyllis Hartstein Lynda Heyman Marlene Kaplan Rebecca Krasnegor Marcia Gabrilove Ladin Anita Levy Valerie Lowenstein Dale Marcus Sheree Mirochnik Melanie Nasberg Benita Ross Merna Shapiro Robin Shuman Barbara Shurberg Diane Sigel Fern Tannenbaum Laurie Werner

NATIONAL PORTFOLIO COUNCIL Beth Saltzman Aaronson Phyllis Abramson Renee Albert Sandra Alfonsi Lynn Altshuler Sherry Altura Amy Applebaum Miriam Aron Sara Aronson Joan Baron Rachel Baum Liz Bazini Phyllis Berlow Esther Yelen Berman Janice Bernstein

Elaine Binder Mindy Bloom Nancy Bluth Stephanie Z. Bonder Aileen Bormel Leona Brauser Caren Caplan Randi Cohen Coblenz Gail Cohen Leona Cohen Ruth G. Cole Lisa Davidson Lynn Davidson Rhoda Dombchik Madelyn Donoff Rochelle Edelman Judith Edwards Sandy Einberg Ann Eisenberg Marsha Eisenberg Peg Elefant Joan Epstein Sherri Ades Falchuk Carol Fasman Carol Fein Karen Feit Frances Feldman Nikki Feldman Judith Fellner-Weiss Francine Fettman Beverly Fine Barbara Fleischer Joan Florsheim Connie Cirillo Freeman Debbie Friedman Leslie Gaffin Dorothy Ganz Doris Geller Norma S. Gindes Susan Glicksberg Lynn Gold-Benjamin Zandra Goldberg Karen Goldman Dawn Goldstein Rita Gottlieb Adele Greenblatt Carole Greenfield Janice Greenwald Ruth Grossberg Patsy Gruenberg Rae Gurewitsch Haren Haber Linda Hakerem Ruth Hendelman Sylvia Herman Jill Hershbein Kathy Hershfield Barbara Horwitz Diane Issenberg Jane Jacobson Beatrice Johnson Deborah Kahn Roz Kantor Shelley Kaplan Ann Karty Carol Goodman Kaufman Sherryl Kaufman Eddyse Kessler Sandra King Josie Kivort Sally Kleinman Janet Klein-Young Vivian Kovacs Sharon Krischer Dorothy Lasensky Barbara Levin Patricia Levinson Judith Levy Gail Lieb Dina Lipschultz Karen Lustig Sheila Macks Judith Mann Roslyn Markovitz Fern Marks

Ellen Masters Debra Mazon Linda Minkes Deborah Minkoff Barbara Mishkin Sue Mizrahi Julie Morris Susan Moye Miffie Nagorsky Luisa Narins Soraya Nazarian Jane Nyce Tobey R. Olken, Esq. Cathy Olswing Judy Padolf Judith L. Palkovitz Emily Pinchuk Carolyn Plessner Stacie Podos Sue Polansky Hanna Pollack Joy E. Pollock, Esq. Joyce Rabin Ada Rabinowitz Edria Ragosin Sonia Raizes Nancy Rapoport Lonye Rasch Leah Reicin Roz Rettman Frieda Rosenberg Renee Rosenheck Carol Rosenthal Marlene Rosenthal Carol Rotenberg Jim Rotenbeg N  ational Associates President Loren Roth Michele Rubin Joan Walder Sacarob Alecia Sachs Tamar Sadeh Jill Sapperstein Judith Saxe Barbara Scheinberg Laura Schiff Sharon Schneider Rachel Schonberger Maureen Schulman Sima Schuster Jill Schwartz-Chevlin Gillian Sescoe Betty Shapiro Rita Shapiro Judy Shereck Shelley Sherman Susan Musicant Shikora Nancy Shuman Sarene Silver Natalie Silverman Judith Silversmith Belle Simon Sharon Sisselsky Amy Solomon Barbara Spack Tema Sternberg Jane Strom Diane Taub Iris Tishkoff Melanie Topper Anastasia Torres-Gil Mindy Tucker Rosalyn Tuton Roselle Ungar Ruthanne Warnick Dana Waxler Helen Weisberg Jean Weitz Laurie Weitz Marcia Weller Nancy Wiadro Elaine Winograd Deborah Wiskind Ruth Zimbler Jane Zolot

PRESIDENTS

HONORARY COUNCIL

BOSTON Varda Farber

Chris Adler Gerry Sue Arnold Wendy Backelman Claire Baer Elaine Baker Naomi R. Barsky Phyllis Berlas Bettye Berlin Rhoda Bernstein Shirley Blumberg Rhoda Breverman Freda Brode Dorothy R. Bucksbaum Judith R. Clements Karen Dannin Roberta M. Ebert Elaine H. Ellish Barbara Extein Bobbie Feinstein Linda Elfmon Fleishman Arlene Freedman Rae G. Gelfand Rae M. Ginsburg Carol Goldsmith Sandra Goldstein Anna E. Greenberg Doris Greenberg Betty Rapoport Hamburger Marjorie G. Housen Ruth B Hurwitz Sharon Jacobson Paula Jarnicki Leah-Dee Kahn Helene Karpa Joyce C. Kitey Bea Klein Bobbee Slotsky Kramer Sheila Lebowitz Rickie Leiter Marilyn Levine Bobbie Limor Seema Liston Lee Lobel-Zwang Ellyn Lyons Susan Mark Barbara G. Melamed Dovie Melnick Annette Meskin Linda Glesser Morris Helaine Ohayon Barbara Pailet Renee Resnik Corinne Ravel Retchin Barbara Sabin Lisl Schick Elaine M. Senter Rhesa E. Shapiro Deborah Shendelman Andrea Silagi Eva Silberman Jacqueline Silverberg Lois Slott Annette Sondock Ceil Stern Judith Swartz Barbara Tirschwell Barbara Topol Karen Venezky Susan Weinberg Mona Wood Susan Yorke Edith Zamost Susan Zimmerman Theda Zuckerman

BROOKLYN Barbara Katz CENTRAL PACIFIC COAST Sandy Sidorsky CENTRAL STATES Lynn Furness CHICAGONORTH SHORE Luisa Ellenbogen CONNECTICUT Joyce Backman DESERT-MOUNTAIN Barbara Raben FLORIDA ATLANTIC Marion Aronheim FLORIDA BROWARD Dorrie Kahn FLORIDA CENTRAL Susan Lafer GREAT PLAINS Teree Farbstein GREATER BALTIMORE Julie Bernstein GREATER DETROIT Carol Ogusky GREATER MIAMI Linda Goldstein GREATER PHILADELPHIA Joyce Laiter GREATER PITTSBURGH Rochelle Parker GREATER SOUTHWEST Linda Freedman Block GREATER WASHINGTON Judy Erdheim LOWER NEW YORK STATE Sharon Kelson NASSAU Tracey Drayer NEW YORK Rita Lourie-Galena NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND Rhonda Saunders NORTHERN NEW JERSEY Gail Black PACIFIC NORTHWEST Donna Blankinship & Brandy Moss SOUTHEASTERN Toby Parker SOUTHERN Bonnie Boring SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Deborah R. Kessler SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND Joan Astor Paula London SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY Michelle Krasner SOUTHERN SEABOARD Gail Moskowitz SUFFOLK Stacy Berman UPPER MIDWEST Anna Walter WESTCHESTER Rachel Freedman

THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP 21


executive /management team Executive Team

Management Team

Janice Weinman was appointed in June 2012 as the Executive Director/Chief Executive Officer of Hadassah, with over forty years of experience in the not-for-profit and government sectors. She came directly from her post as President of K.I.D.S., an organization supporting millions of children in need in communities across the United States and overseas. Prior to her position at K.I.D.S., she served as Vice President for External Affairs of The Mount Sinai Hospital/NYU Medical Center and Health System in New York, where she was responsible for government and community relations, marketing, communications and public affairs of the five-hospital consortium.

Naomi Brunnlehrman is the Director of the PRogramming, Advocacy, Zionism and Education (PRAZE) Division. Naomi has been an advocate for over 30 years and is a cofounder of The Jewish Deaf Resource Center, which builds bridges between individuals who are deaf and hard-ofhearing and the wider Jewish community. She is a tri-lingual interpreter, a past Assistant Vice President at KeyCorp, a Software Conversion Project Specialist for over 10 years and most recently worked at DOROT as their Education Director. Naomi has her MA in Jewish Studies from the Graduate School of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America and has an advanced certificate in Jewish Philanthropy from Yeshiva University.

Janice also previously served as Executive Director and CEO of the American Association of University Women (AAUW), a nationwide grassroots network of more than 200,000 members and 800 college and university partners, and was Executive Vice President of the College Board, which works to ensure all students in the United States have adequate preparation and the opportunity to enroll in and graduate from college. She also served as the assistant to US Secretary of Education in both the Carter and Clinton Administrations. Among the many leadership positions Janice has held in civic and community organizations, she was an inaugural board member of the Hadassah Foundation, has served as Chair of the Board of the Jewish Community Relations Council of New York, Chair of the Board of the Women’s Leadership Board of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and member of the Visiting Committee of the Harvard University Graduate School of Education. She holds doctorate and master’s degrees from Harvard University, and a bachelor’s degree from Brandeis University. Ron Aloni, Chief Financial and Operations Officer, has more than 17 years of experience in the corporate and not-for-profit sector, first as a senior manager at KPMG and at Ernst & Young, and most recently as the Chief Financial Officer at the Friends of the Israel Defense Forces (FIDF). A Certified Public Accountant (CPA) in both the US and in Israel, Ron has earned his MBA in Strategic Management from the Lubin School of Business at Pace University in NY, and his bachelor’s degree in accounting and psychology from Tel Aviv University in Israel. Ron is also a member of the New York State Society of CPAs Not-for-Profit Committee and was invited to present in various not-for-profit events. Sheryl Zeligson, Hadassah’s General Counsel, has been with Hadassah since 1992. Prior to Hadassah, Zeligson served as an associate at the law firms of Fulbright and Jaworski, LLP and Kelley Drye & Warren, LLP. She graduated from Barnard College, Columbia University with a BA in Political Science. Sheryl was awarded a JD degree from Fordham University School of Law. She is a member of the New York and New Jersey State Bars, Southern and Eastern Districts of New York and the District of New Jersey. She has been a member of the Committee on NonProfit Organizations, Association of the Bar of the City of New York. She is a member of the New York State Bar Association, the New York County Lawyers Association, the Association of Corporate Counsel and the Association of the Bar of the City of New York. In Fall 2017, Sheryl was an Adjunct Professor of Law at the Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University. 22 2017 A YEAR IN REVIEW

Lindy Ettin is the Interim Director of the Member & Unit Services Division. Lindy has worked in the Jewish non-profit sector for the past 13 years and focuses her efforts on Organizational Development and Strategic Planning for Hadassah. She volunteers for various organizations and most recently served on the steering committee for the Southern California, Orange County JCC Maccabi Games® and ArtsFest®. Originally from South Africa, Lindy immigrated to the US in 1999. Lindy graduated from the University of Vermont with a BA in English and holds an MBA from Baruch College, Zicklin School of Business in New York City. Sheryl Hoffman is the Director of Marketing and Communications. Sheryl has over 35 years experience in marketing agencies, corporate and non-profit organizations. Prior to joining Hadassah, Sheryl was the Director of External Affairs at Teachers College, Columbia University and the Executive Director of Marketing and Communications at Jewish National Fund. Sheryl is a past president of

her synagogue, and has also served on various boards and committees, including the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) Cantorial School Focus Group and the JTS Cantorial School Task Force. Sheryl graduated from Rutgers University with a BA in Communications. Bart R. Minsky is the Chief Human Resources Officer. He has over 30 years of Human Resources experience including Chief Human Resources Officer and other senior HR leadership roles. Prior to Hadassah, Bart served as a Human Resources consultant to the healthcare industry and before that was Vice President of Human Resources at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He graduated from the University at Albany with a BA in Economics and from the New York Institute of Technology with an MS in Labor and Industrial Relations. Bart holds Senior Human Resources certifications from the HR Certification Institute and the Society for Human Resources Management. Joshua W. Rednik, CFP® is the Chief Development Officer. He has more than twenty years of experience in the non-profit sector, managing organizations and developing and executing multi-milliondollar fundraising campaigns. Prior to joining Hadassah, Josh served as President and CEO of the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation (DRIF) from 2014-2018, where he and his team raised over $60 million from foundations, corporations and individuals in support of DRIF’s mission to cure type 1 diabetes. Josh is a graduate of Washington University in St. Louis with a BA in Psychology and received his MSS in Social Service at Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA. He is a Certified Financial Planner™ professional, having received an Executive Certificate in Financial Planning from Georgetown University in Washington, DC.


Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization of America, is a volunteer organization that inspires a passion for and commitment to the land, the people, and the future of Israel. Through education, advocacy, and youth development, and its support of medical care and research at Hadassah Medical Organization, Hadassah enhances the health and lives of people in Israel, the United States and worldwide.


balance sheet information (summarized) December 31, 2017 HADASSAH MEDICAL HADASSAH ORGANIZATION ELIMINATIONS

TOTAL

ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents

$30,318,787 $60,849,807

$

-

$

Accounts receivable for medical services, net

-

121,270,297

933,863

-

Accrued interest income and other receivables

121,270,297

1,791,010

Prepaid expenses and other assets

32,282,351 (33,139,498)

731,282

46,886,102

-

-

Contributions and bequests receivable, net

21,834,896

Investments

506,528,204

Investments of charitable gift annuities held by Hadassah

57,665,646

-

Assets of trusts and other split-interest agreements held by others

29,481,953

-

5,038,305

Property, plant and equipment, net

TOTAL ASSETS $653,390,083

- 193,723,816

787,897,967

$1,242,910,340

91,168,594

47,617,384

21,834,896

700,164,176

-

57,665,646

-

29,481,953

-

792,936,272

(87,844)

$(33,227,342) $1,863,073,081

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS LIABILITIES Accounts payable and accrued expenses

$7,857,500 $155,755,980

Short-term debt Liabilities under deferred giving and annuity trust arrangements

-

Malpractice and other liabilities Accrued employee benefits liabilities

Due to Hadassah Medical Organization

46,415,068

$ 163,613,480

-

5,099,309

-

117,282,657

-

117,282,657

-

147,361,482

-

147,361,482

-

-

- 33,139,498

5,099,309

$

-

46,415,068

(33,139,498)

-

Advance from Government of Israel

-

6,134,231

-

6,134,231

Loan from Government of Israel

-

28,852,035

-

28,852,035

Long-term debt

-

16,602,037

-

16,602,037

TOTAL LIABILITIES

$ 87,412,066

$ 477,087,731

$(33,139,498)

$ 531,360,299

$

NET ASSETS Unrestricted

$311,567,924 $650,035,045

(87,844)

$961,515,125

Temporarily restricted 153,990,966

113,152,796

-

267,143,762

Permanently restricted

2,634,768

-

103,053,895

TOTAL NET ASSETS

$565,978,017

100,419,127

$ 765,822,609

$

(87,844)

$ 1,331,712,782

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS $653,390,083

$1,242,910,340

$(33,227,342)

$1,863,073,081


statement of activites information (summarized) For the year ended December 31, 2017 HADASSAH MEDICAL HADASSAH ORGANIZATION ELIMINATIONS

TOTAL

REVENUES Patient service revenue

$

Contributions and bequests

-

$ 603,811,187

53,424,525

$

107,720,330

-

$ 603,811,187

(27,500,377)

133,644,478

Change in value of split-interest agreements

1,073,207

-

-

1,073,207

Member dues

504,813

-

-

504,813

Investment return

70,407,082

292,694

-

70,699,776

Net income from recovery agreement

-

38,615,166

(12,666,667)

25,948,499

Income from affiliation agreement

-

9,558,188

-

9,558,188

Government grants

95,526

-

-

95,526

Magazine revenue

496,126

-

-

496,126

Other revenue

2,447,930

9,169,697

TOTAL REVENUES

$128,449,209

8,495,701

$768,493,266

(1,773,934)

$ (41,940,978)

$855,001,497

$

-

$584,586,865

-

70,254,658

EXPENSES PROGRAM Medical Services

$ 9,446,446

$ 575,140,419

Education and research

1,590,820

68,663,838

Grants and allocations

42,101,467

-

(40,167,044)

1,934,423

Magazine

1,811,996

-

-

1,811,996

Membership services

7,970,805

-

-

7,970,805

Communications and public affairs

4,605,241

-

2,831,307

Young Judaea programs

306,264

-

(1,773,934) -

306,264

-

-

11,313,280

-

93,529,914

SUPPORTING SERVICES Fund-raising

11,313,280

11,648,676

Management and general

81,881,238

TOTAL EXPENSES

$90,794,995

$725,685,495

Increase in net assets before foreign currency translation gain and other changes

$ 37,654,214

$ 42,807,771

$(41,940,978)

$

$ 774,539,512

-

$ 80,461,985

Foreign currency translation (loss) gain

(126,547)

67,475,397

-

67,348,850

Reclassification of funds and other changes

(645,000)

-

-

(645,000)

Increase in net assets

36,882,667

110,283,168

-

147,165,835

Net assets at beginning of year

529,095,350

655,539,441

(87,844)

1,184,546,947

NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR

$565,978,017

$765,822,609

$

(87,844)

$1,331,712,782


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