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Grand Opening: Saturday, April 25th, 2015 at 8:00pm Show continues through Friday, June 26th 2015

The Creative Process Within the last few years we used the Annual International Catalogue to reach into the imaginative minds of our participating artists. We tackled inspiration and asked artists the question: what inspires you to create? We read many colorful statements; anywhere from friends and family to nature and nurture. The next year, we explored expression and wanted the artists to allow us some insight into why they use glass as a material to express themselves. Again, we received some spectacular reasoning on why glass, as a material, can be used and should be used as a means for communicating an idea. Last year, we asked artists where they saw themselves in the grand scheme of the entire art world. Some artists responded with pinpoint accuracy of where they thought their work would be placed. Other artists were conflicted and did not want to define themselves as an “ism” or a category defined by the art world. Although, we loved the debate that our last catalog caused, this year we wanted to get a glimpse into something very personal: the creative process. To really get this idea down on paper we realized that we needed more space. This publication is exactly double the size of our previous catalogues which makes it the most substantial volume in our 43 year history. We offered each artist an extra page for a glimpse into the most precious of all personal possessions for an artist...their sketchbook. Over 100 artists are participating in this year’s exhibition, half of whom will be in attendance during the opening weekend. That is more artists in attendance this year than any other year in the history of this annual exhibition. We have asked each artist to submit two of their most significant works to be reviewed by an elite panel of jurors. This year’s panel include: Bruce Bachmann, noted studio glass collector; Charles A. Shepard III, President and CEO of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana; and Gregory Wittkopp, Director of both The Cranbrook Art Museum and The Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research. The winners will receive a museum exhibition this summer at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana. During the opening in our galleries, one artist will receive a People’s Choice Award, voted for by the public, which will travel on to the museum exhibition along with the juried winners. Newcomers to the exhibition include artists who are not known to typically use glass to explore their ideas: Judy Chicago is an art educator and writer known for her large collaborative installations which examine the role of women in history and culture. Chicago had coined the term “feminist art” in the 70s and had founded the first feminist art program in the United States. Concurrent with the opening of the exhibition we are offering another exhibition entitled: Glass in the 2nd Dimension. This innovative exhibition consists of framed renderings, photographs as well as other two-dimensional imagery by various artists who are participating in the Habatat Galleries International. We are temporarily opening a space across from the gallery for this separate exhibition that will feature one unique example by each artist. We are proud of this annual exhibition. Over the years, it has been fueled by the excitement of the collectors and the enthusiasm of the participating artists. The International has grown over 43 years and has become the oldest and largest annual studio glass exhibition in the world. If you cannot attend this year please consider coming next year. If you are a serious glass collector or are a novice to glass and want to learn more, please consider attending the Habatat Galleries International as it is an eye-opening and life-changing experience. As long as artists continue to create, glass will prevail as a means for expression. Join us in becoming an important part of studio glass history. - Corey Hampson


The Creative Process

43rd Annual International Glass Invitational Awards Exhibition 2015 April 25th, 2015 — June 26th 2015

HABATAT GALLERIES MICHIGAN

4400 Fernlee Avenue | Royal Oak, Michigan, 48073 248.554.0590 | info@habatat.com | www.habatat.com


HABATAT GALLERIES Corey Hampson Aaron Schey Debbie Clason Rob Bambrough Rob Shimmell David Walstad Ferdinand Hampson Kathy Hampson Samantha Menzo Danny Sermo Jurors: Bruce Bachmann Noted studio glass collector Charles A. Shepard III President and CEO of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana Gregory Wittkopp Director of both The Cranbrook Art Museum and The Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research Design and Layout by John Bowman Planning by Corey Hampson and Aaron Schey Compilation and Editing by Aaron Schey Š2015 Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, Michigan All rights reserved. This book may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, including illustrations, in any form (beyond that copying permitted by Sections 107 and 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law and except by reviewers for the public press), without written permission from the publisher. This catalogue was published to coincide with the exhibition 43rd International Glass Invitational at Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, Michigan, Saturday, April 25, 2015 to Friday, June 26, 2015. ISBN 978-1-928572-03-9


In Memoriam

Irwin Borowski (1924 – 2014) Irwin Borowski was the founder of the National Liberty Museum which was the culmination of his life’s work. Irwin had a legendary career in the publishing and printing industries including founding the North American Publishing Company, a highly successful publisher of magazines nationwide. Irwin stated “We who are fortunate enough to live in the land of liberty must protect it, preserve it and guard it for future generations”.

Suzanne Kaine (1929 – 2014) Suzanne Kaine was one of the first collectors of Studio Glass. She and her late husband Bud started visiting Habatat in the mid-70s. They both loved glass and collected in an adventuresome way. They were never afraid of new thoughts and often surprised me with acquiring works before they became popular. I often remember the first thing they would say coming to the gallery, “We’re not buying a thing”. It was to my personal enjoyment that I sent them home with a new piece!

Norman J Milchus (1935 – 2015) Coming to Studio Glass rather late in life did not in any way deter the enthusiasm that both Norman and Natalie had for collecting and enjoying art. They traveled with us on Habatat’s glass collector’s tour enjoying both the many artists and their work along with the fellow collectors. I loved when they would visit Habatat. They shared their joy and remained open to new ideas while continuing their glass exploration.

Richard Redmont (1939 – 2015) Richard and his wife Barbara have been part of the studio glass world for a number of years. They have supported a number of artists through acquisitions. Richard’s love and enthusiasm for studio glass as well as his generosity will be forever cherished among the people he inspired. His legacy will continue on through his contribution to The MIND Center, Medical Center at the University of Mississippi.

Robert Turssini (1931 – 2014) Robert Turssini lived with wife Liz in the Finger Lake region not too far from the Corning Museum and corporate headquarters. Robert was a high level executive for Corning and his many visits to the museum gave him a great eye for what was being created in glass. This enjoyment led Robert and Liz to developing a wonderful collection of Studio Glass. They graciously opened their home to many groups including a visit from the Habatat glass collector’s tour.


Award of Excellence 2014 Collector’s Choice 2014

People’s Choice 2014

eXpose

Martin Janecky

Susan Taylor Glasgow

Richard Royal

American Art Collector Award

Joshua Rose - Editor of American Art Collector Magazine

Peter Bremers

Preston Singletary

Janusz Walentynowicz

Bertil Valien

Paul Stankard

Hiroshi Yamano

Charlie Miner

Shelley Muzylowski Allen


Richard and Barbara Basch Award

Richard and Barbara Basch - Noted collectors from Florida

Martin Blank

Latchezar Boyadjiev

Irene Frolic

Vladimira Klumpar

Clifford Rainey

Ann Wolff

Laura Donefer

Michael Taylor

Charles Shepard Fort Wayne Award

Charles A. Shepard III - Executive Director of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, IN

Albert Paley

Beverly Fishman

Zora Palova

Michael Behrens

Alex Bernstein

PĂŠter Borkovics

Christina Bothwell

David Huchthausen


Shelley Muzylowski Allen

Undercurrent - 2015

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29.5 x 20 x 8� Blown & hand-sculpted glass Photo credit: Russell Johnson


Dean Allison

And I’m sorry I could not travel both - 2014 (left) 17 x 16 x 8” Cast glass

What would the earth look like if all the shadows disappeared? - 2014 (right) Dimensions: 15 x 20 x 16” Cast glass Both photos credit: Mercedes Jelinek

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Herb Babcock

Traveler II - 2015

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50 x 26 x 12.5� Cast glass & bronze


Herb Babcock My own creative process is a combination of methodology, procedure and something more. Methodology and procedure are obvious. The last component, while not exactly ephemeral, is certainly harder to define. It rambles. It might be incoherent. It is my “stream of consciousness.” States of being contrasted Light reflected from opaque surfaces Metal smooth or textured Form folded by shadow Utilize more than chiaroscuro with color membrane over clear. Reveal transparency with color removed. Let the eye penetrate the surface. Use the dichotomy of the past and the present. Harness the tension of the past and the present. Integrate question into the object. Lastly, never negate the “three B’s of creativity.” All creative minds know the bed, the bus or the bath. Renowned for their passivity, they free the mind to reflect and consider.


Rick Beck

Pineapple Reamer with Seed - 2014 (top) 33 x 14 x 9” Cast & carved glass

Fluted Reamer with Seed - 2014 (bottom) 38 x 14 x 10” Cast & carved glass

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Michael Behrens

Seaforms 2014-120 - 2014

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42.5 x 21 x 7� Kiln casted glass


patience

elegance

mystic

silence

depth


Robert Bender

Jellyfish - 2015 15 x 15 x 15� Cast glass Photo credit: Robert Bender

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Howard Ben Tre´

The Lightness of Being #8/2 - 2009

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91 x 9 x 9� Cast glass, cast bronze, patina, adhesives


PERMISSION OF THE MIND OPTIMISM OF THE WILL


cast, cut, grind, carve, chisel, sculpt, until...

...the intended piece appears...


Alex Bernstein

Northern Lights Disc - 2015 21 x 21 x 3� Cast & cut glass, fused steel

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Cassandria Blackmore

Paradeisos - 2015

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40 x 40� Reverse painting on glass


Creating, producing, whether it’s a garden or a complex invention is an essential activity that unites us. Art is the cultural bridge that inspires and connects us.

I work with my hands as a maker. I thrive on musing on an idea, then collecting a unique team of individuals. We embark on an adventure that doesn’t necessary have a clear defined end point. Creating is a very personal experience, there’s no right way to do it, no rule books or programs to follow. It takes years of just showing up in your studio, taking your seat no matter how you feel, and putting down your thoughts.

It’s creativity that separates us from the animal kingdom. To build tools, to have time to ponder, to work through an idea. It’s a small act of grace that a “thought,” a mere electrical pulse crossing across millions of synapses, based from an emotional stimulus can be manifested into a three dimensional object that on its own can evoke and emotional response. With that spark, you can share a deep understanding and connection with a perfect stranger. We share a bond, and sometimes that bond can last a lifetime. Trust your intuition, believe in your ideas, stay steadfast to your goals, work your nails to the bone and I promise you life will be a rich and engaging ride!!


Martin Blank

Demeter - 2014 78 x 43 x 15.5� Hot sculpted glass Photo credit: Douglas Schaible

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Pe´ter Borkovics

Set 4 - 2015

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15.5 x 15 x 3.75” Fused color glass, hot formed & polish Photo credit: Viktoria Gyo˝rfi


Christina Bothwell

Soul Sentinel - 2015 18 x 23 x 9.5� Cast glass, pit fired raku clay, found objects, oil paints Photo credit: Robert Bender

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Latchezar Boyadjiev

Relationship - 2015

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30 x 24 x 5� Cast glass


The lower part seems to have disappeared into the ground while the upper part reaches for the sky.

It connects the earth with heaven, the profane with the sacral, the physical with the spiritual.

It is a reminder that we are all that; that our persona is always connected to our spirit like the individual to the universal...


Peter Bremers

Connected - 2014 86.75 x 40.5 x 8� Kiln-cast glass Photo credit: Paul Niessen

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Emily Brock

Room for a Muse - 2015

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16.5 x 16.5 x 16.5� Kilnworked, lampworked, mixed media Photo credit: Norman Johnson


My creative process is woven throughout every day. I am constantly gathering information, observing details, absorbing reflections on relationships, colors, and the printed word. It seems that without my intention all minutia is saved. At some point, sparked by a request or by chance, an idea or a fully formed image of a sculpture will present its self. This image is undoubtedly seeded by a previous chain of work. Then follows a time where all possibilities are considered. It is important to sort the good ideas from the unattainable ones. After achieving some clarity of direction the studio work time begins. It involves more decisions, ritual, mistakes, and repetitions of movement using equipment and tools. After an interminably long time of creating a tabletop landscape of chaos, a recognized moment of completion emerges.


William Carlson

Robigo - 2010 174 x 98 x 2� Cast glass, pigment & metal

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Jose´ Chardiet

Second Passage - 2010

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24.5 x 18 x 7.5” Sandcast & hot sculpted glass Photo credit: Marty Doyle


Working in Glass - Judy Chicago I worked in glass for the first time in the early 1990's when I created several stained glass pieces, one of which, Rainbow Shabbat, was the culminating image in the Holocaust Project: From Darkness into Light, an examination of the Holocaust in a contemporary context, undertaken over an eight year period with my husband, photographer Donald Woodman. I have always selected techniques for their specific expressive potential and in this exhibition, my goal was to conclude with a hopeful vision for the future. Because glass is the only material that simultaneously exists in the realm of the tangible and the intangible, it seemed the perfect medium to give physical form to an ineffable ideal, that is, a world of equality and justice. Over the next decade, I began to explore etched and painted glass with a California artisan who used acrylic and enamel. But I soon wanted to apply some of the lessons I had learned when I was studying china-painting twenty years earlier. Many of the china-painters also painted on glass, using a type of paint that - I soon discovered - is almost unknown in the glass world. In 2003, I was an artist-in-residence at Pilchuck where I tried to spray and fire color unto a number of etched and cast glass pieces. I can still recall spraying $150 worth of purple glass paint onto one cast piece only to have it completely burn off in the kiln. By the time my three week residency was over, I found myself on the outside edge of glass technology, a familiar place in that there have been many techniques that I have attempted to turn to an expressive purpose. Since then, I have spent many months in my glass painting studio figuring out how to paint and fire glass paints onto a variety of surfaces, primarily clear, black, fused, cast and/or etched glass. For my first major series - hands - I cast in the Czech Republic, where the quality of the glass is superb. However, strangely, they use a rather primitive investment process which requires a considerable amount of cold working to achieve the surface quality that is so important to me. It was one thing to do cold working on hands and quite another to do it on heads, the focus of my subsequent work which demanded a level of detail that took me to Taiwan. These last two series took seven years to complete; first, the Toby Heads, a meditation on mortality and the power of the human spirit. It was then that I began to incorporate porcelain and bronze (materials I had used earlier), often combining them with glass as in Toby Head with Copper Eye, which was an enormous technical challenge. In Facelift from the Heads Up series, I continued combining materials in a series of cast sculptures (along with paintings on glass) that allowed me to do what glass does best; that is, look beneath the surface in order to explore the emotions we often hide but ultimately, all feel and observe. As Dr. Kathy Battista wrote in the catalog essay for my last glass show: �These sculptures...capture a haunting quality that is simultaneously elegant and unsettling...they move beyond the physical world to that of the everlasting.� Judy Chicago working on Grand Toby Head with Copper Eye Photo Š Donald Woodman


Judy Chicago

Grand Toby Head with Copper Eye - 2010 30 x 26 x 26� Copper gilding on cast glass & cast bronze Photo credit: Donald Woodman

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Dale Chihuly

Seaform Series Cobalt Blue with Coral Lip Wrap - 1998

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9.25 x 22 x 20� Blown glass Photo credit: ADPhotography


"I just liked the name Persian. It conjured up Near-Eastern, Byzantine, Far East, Venice, all the trades, smells, sense. It was an exotic name to me, so I just called them Persians." Photo: Bryan Ohno


Daniel Clayman

Aperture - 2007 24 x 48 x 36.25� Cast glass, hand ground, acid washed & assembled glass Photo credit: Mark Johnston

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Deanna Clayton

In One Ear Without the Other - 2014

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9 x 9 x 5� Cast glass & electroplated copper Photo credit: Larry Sanders


Brian Corr

Pneuma - 2014 31.5 x 31.5 x 5.5� Kiln cast & sandblasted glass

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Matthew Curtis

Compound Amber - 2015

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17 x 18 x 10� Cast, fused & polished tinted glass, stainless steel rim Photo credit: Robert Little


I begin sketching with chalk on the ground; this is a part I really enjoy. Making these preliminary impermanent sketches allows a certain freedom. Working through ideas for forms and exploring geometric elements. Puzzling together in two-dimensions, whilst tussling over interpreting these as three-dimensional forms. This then leads on to technical drawings and maquettes. Through all of the steps the ideas are sharpened and refined. The work I make is often constructed from individual elements, crafted from molten glass. Here the geometric components are fused into a partial hemisphere. The cell-like elements form an organic yet architecturally inspired structure. With multiple imperfect lenses distorting and magnifying our experience.


INDIVIDUALS The Individuals resulted from my interest in the traditional bust, a sculptural form that has been used to portray individuals for thousands of years. Although the bust is usually a heroic and dignified pose, I have explored ways of portrayal that capture and exaggerate elements of character, with gestures and features that express attitudes and moods. The use of glass with a hollow volume gives a sense of life to the bust, as light and color move within the form. Some typical glassblowing techniques are employed to create patterns and color applications that define key elements of the sculpture. I have stylized facial features, body parts, and garments in ways dictated by the liquid qualities of hot glass. These pieces were blown in Seattle at Ben Moore’s studio where I have the expert help of a team of artist friends, (Ben Moore, Rich Royal, Sean O’Neil, Sam McMillen, and Granite Calimpong) Then the glass was shipped to my studio in New Hampshire where we (Chris Chandler and Pat Morison) cut, ground, and fit the blown glass parts to build the sculpture. We took the parts

Persuasion, Individuals Series - 2013 25.5 x 14.5 x 14” Blown glass, sandblasted & acid polished, anodized aluminum Photo credit: Bill Truslow


Dan Dailey to West Virginia and acid polished them, and finally completed the assembly in my studio. This long distance sequence of work places and assistants gives me the control and quality of expert work to produce the piece in the way I have imagined. From my first drawings to the completed work usually takes about one year because it is practical to work on several pieces simultaneously. Making a sculptural form this way is a direct result of the techniques I have used in glassblowing to make vessel forms. The overlaid translucent colors and the manipulation of the glass to form heads, torsos, hands and other parts all have precedents in different series I have made over many years. Having familiarity with the material allows me to imagine the piece at the drawing stage, and work with my assistants in all stages of the production to realize the form. I don’t think I could achieve similar results with any other material, and this is the main reason I continue to be intrigued by glass.

Expert, Individuals Series - 2013 23 x 15.5 x 11� Blown glass, sandblasted & acid polished, anodized aluminum Photo credit: Bill Truslow

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David Datuna

LV

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54 x 64 x 5� Mixed media Photo credit: Douglas Schaible


Laura Donefer

Duet Amulet Basket - 2015 20 x 19 x 7� Black, white, red, grey blown & flame worked glass Photo credit: Steven Wild

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Chad Fonfara

A Raft of Revelations - 2014

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36 x 27 x 24� Hot sculpted glass, bronze


Found objects Wait Rubber Silicone Asian brush paintings Waxes Desert solitude Plaster Buckets A little dark chocolate Wood molds More buckets Plaster Steam Glass Kiln Wait Mold out Clean Grind Clean Grind Sandblast Steel Weld Grind Fix Sandblast Paint Glue Wait Paint Wait Question Grout Wait Hang Look Photograph Question


Katja Fritzsche

Polnesian Garden - 2014 27.5 x 15 x 3� Cast glass

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Susan Taylor Glasgow

Beauty First Spiked Slipper on Pillow - 2014

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8 x 15 x 16� Glass & mixed media Photo credit: Taylor Glasgow Studios


My Mother was a complicated woman. Raising we girls by the Book of Conflicting Messages, my Mother lovingly shaped me into an ask questions later act like a lady you can do anything but learn to type first boys only want one thing but don’t say what it is do it right or don’t do it at all fall in love but have something to fall back on artist. Oh, and learn to cook and sew. Men like that. In response, or perhaps as a result of, I embrace domesticity in feminine spirit but not in action. My life is the culmination of feminine expectations gone awry. I like to sew things, but more in a mad scientist sort of way. My misguided domestic talents eventually grew into concepts of sewing magical dresses and illuminated gowns. Unyielding yet compelling, they are dresses for the brave of heart and well insured. As an artist, I have the luxury of exploring the complexities of domestic life from the safe distance of my studio. I pursue beauty and sensuality in my work giving the viewer a reason to examine it more closely and find their own personal meaning. For years I believed my work was about myself. But ultimately my work is about my Mother. With her messages firmly imbedded, I’m able to indulge my own notions of domestic role-playing. My work embraces the feminine ideals of sensuality, in a seductive but unforgiving material, offering conflicting messages of comfort and expectation.


Robin Grebe

Mariner 2 - 2014 7 x 28 x 8� Cast glass, paint

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Wilfried Grootens

W.T.S.B.B.H3 - 2015

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8.75 x 8.75 x 8.75� Optifloat, painted, glued, polished glass Photo credit: Norbert Heyl


The creative process for my work is composed of:

T I M E

Time to plan and think

S P A C E

Quiet space for creating my ideas

M A T E R I A L

Choosing and handling the material


Sean Hennessey

Releasing, 67 - 2015 (top) 25 x 37� Glass, photo, paint, LED backlighting

Mother of Invention - 2015 (bottom) 25 x 37� Glass, photo, paint, LED backlighting

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Josh Hershman

Ptolemy’s Pentax - 2014

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19 x 8 x 8” Cast glass, encased words, polished Photo credit: Shaun Griffiths


Eric Hilton

Cosmic Birth - 2015 27 x 12 x 12� Sandblasted, cut, polished, sagged, stained maple base

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Toma´sˇ Hlavicˇka

Bowl - 2015 (top) 11.25 x 11.25 x 5.5” Cut, polished, laminated glass, gold leaf

Plate - 2015 (bottom)

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4 x 17.75 x 10.75” Cut, polished, laminated glass, gold leaf


Jacqueline Hoffmann Botquelen

Sweet Arrows - 2015 24.18 x 23.4 x 33.15” Pâte de Verre “affresco”, copper electroplating Photo credit: Evy Cohen

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Petr Hora

CLARISA - 2014

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17 x 20 x 3.33� Cast glass


David Huchthausen

Probe - 2015 10 x 10 x 10� Cut & polished glass Photo credit: Lloyd Shugart

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Sidney Hutter

Rainbow Polished Plate Glass Vase - 2015

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(Polished Plate Glass Vase #32, 15) 16 x 9.25 x 9.25� Cut, laminated & polished glass Photo credit: Chris Peaden


Toshio Iezumi

M.141001 - 2014 78.75 x 6.5 x 4.75� Laminated & polished float plate glass

89


Michael Janis

Mariposo - 2015 (left) 23 x 35 x 4� Fused & cast glass with glass powder imagery & steel frame

The Lost Garden - 2015 (right)

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23 x 35 x 4� Fused & cast glass with glass powder imagery & steel frame Both photos credit: AnythingPhoto.net


Richard Jolley

Cosmic Square - 2015 42.5 x 42.5 x 10.0� Glass & steel

93


John Kiley

Curly Orb - 2014

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16 x 15 x 13� Blown, cut & polished glass Photo credit: Jeff Curtis


“Constantly, I ask myself the question why do I choose to work with glass? Transparency, optics, the physical challenge, or a primal fascination with fire, are valid reasons that many glass objects are created. For me, it is important that these material attributes work in service of the sculpture, rather than be the reason for the sculpture. I am drawn to how glass, and its perceived delicacy and preciosity, can create a sense of tension, concern and longing in the viewer (and myself). The final decision I make before a piece is complete is how it will be situated. During this final step, there is a moment when I don’t known for sure if it will survive or lie broken on the studio floor. It is in this final step that each piece finds its own unique balance; it is in this moment that the sculpture emerges and comes to life.�


Shelter 20 and 21 were inspired during a residency in New Mexico near Abiquiu. With a group of artists I visited Plaza Blanca (the white place). It’s a canyon named years after Georgia O’Keefe began to paint this landscape and another she called the black place. Plaza Blanca is a canyon of ancient wind and weather beaten limestone rocks that in the sunlight appear almost white. As the weather changes, the color of the monoliths reflect the ambient light and change as well. Our group was hiking in the area and most were taking pictures, while some of us drew and painted the beauty landscape. When we arrived the sky was a pure intense blue. Over the hours that we were there a storm quickly moved in. The varied grey, white and black clouds dramatically consumed the sky and Plaza Blanca turned grey with muted shadows changing by the minute. The storm moved in very quickly. It was faster than we could escape. Thunder brought on sheets of rain which further changed the color of the surrounding landscape, and of course doused our group. The statuesque monoliths, the colors and the color change were simply stunning to me. I was in awe of the natural beauty and wanted what I was witnessing and enjoying to be part of my work.

The “Shelter” series began in Scotland and was a reaction to a similar event. While hiking amongst stone burial cairns on a beautiful sunny day, a strong icy wind came up. We took shelter in a “fenk” which is a round stone enclosure used thousands of years ago to shelter sheep and shepherds. While inside we felt warm and were stunned by the beauty of the blue sky, the green grass and the pink ling heather. That was an “ahhh” moment, I wanted to share. After two years, and many drawings, models and samples, the “shelter” series came to reality. While Plaza Blanca does not look like the round stone shelter that started the series, the feeling I had was similar. The walls that make up the shelter pieces, over the years, have become a vehicle for sharing special, beautiful, and moving experiences. From writing, to the many drawings to the selection of the colors, to the designs, to cutting the glass and coldworking the surfaces, I’m privileged to not only relive my experience, but to share it.


Steve Klein

Shelter 20 - 2015 21.5 x 12 x 12� Fused glass Photo credit: Peter Kuhnlein

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Jon Kuhn

Sacred Dream - 2010

98

20 x 14.5 x 10.25� Ground, polish & laminated glass Photo credit: Douglas Schaible


Cut Grind Polish Laminate Thousands And Thousands And Thousands Of Times Then Repeat


These two works are continuation of the segmentation series that is inspired by my fascination with science of cell, its division and the journey of growth that starts from a single cell and goes through a million divisions to become a life. I work with glass that has transparency and translucency, two qualities that serve as perfect metaphors for what is known and unknown about life science. The segmented, geometrical forms of my work represent cells, embryos, biological and molecular structures - each symbolizing the building blocks of life as well as the starting point of life.The uniquely refined translucent glass surfaces suggest the mysterious qualities of cells and, on a larger scale, the cloudiness of their futures.The Segmentation series is subtle and quiet yet structurally complex. I transforms solid glass using cutting, lamination, carving, and surface refining processes to make art that is both beautiful and deeply invested with meaning.


Jiyong Lee

White Structural Trace Embryo - 2015 (top) 8 x 15 x 8� Hot sculpted, carved & refined surface, glass

White-Purple Cube Segmentation - 2015 (bottom) 7 x 7 x 6.75� Cut, color laminated, carved & refined surface, glass

101


Antoine Leperlier

Flux et Fixe-LIV - 2014

102

12 x 12 x 3.5� Pate de verre


Silvia Levenson

Until Death Do Us Part II - 2009 20.5 x 11.75 x 11.75� Kiln cast glass Photo credit: Marco Del Comune

105


Stanislav Libensky & Jaroslava Brychtova

Horizon - 1992

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33 x 42 x 9� Cast glass Photo credit: Douglas Schaible


Their work begins with a drawing by Stanislav Libensky. These works are studies of form and volume, but more importantly they are studies in light. He is a master draftsman who can mold form through the illusion of light. It is hard to imagine how his geometrically based charcoal and tempera drawings are done without drafting instruments. (Professor) Libensky thinks with his hands. He often explains himself through drawings and seems most happy when he is holding a pencil. He is always careful to crumple and discard casual drawings. All the drawings are untitled (he prefers that each simply be called Drawing) and sometimes unsigned, but each is archivally dated and named for purposes of identification only. These archival titles either relate them to the specific sculpture for which they are studies, or identify them in broad, generic words such as Head Sketch, Female Figure, or Design of a Figurative Angel. Some drawings explore forms that at a later time will be further defined in charcoal and tempera.

The drawings are seeds from which the sculptures grow. Art is a visual process and at times drawing, more than speaking, is the major mode of communication between (Libensky & Brychtova). Many of the drawings are so closely linked to sculptures that once you have seen both, different as they are, they have eerie similarities that are deeper and more complex than obvious formal likeness. Jaroslava Brychtová, the sculptor, then renders his drawings threedimensionally in clay. She must read translucency and transparency into clay, create surface textures, and sculpt forms that will absorb color and breathe light when cast in glass. When both agree that a clay model is complete, plaster molds are made for glass casting. Their joint work continues once the pieces have been successfully cast. Shared decisions must be made about cleaning the pieces, reshaping areas, polishing surfaces and a host of other matters. They continue working together in deciding everything from where the works will be exhibited to how they will be packed and shipped. From The Inner Light by Robert Kehlmann


In the Air (Ai Weiwei) concept - 2015 64.75 x 72 x 14�

The large head in the center, approximately 48 inches in height, will be made of sandblasted carved glass. The right and left profile heads will be photos of my drawings printed on aluminum sheets. These will be mounted close to the wall with the large sandblasted head about 10cm in front. The vase in the upper left of the large drawing is kiln cast glass. The three vase images in the center will be monochromatic holograms of my original terra-cotta vases. The background behind the vases for the holograms are photographs printed on aluminum of the drawings that exactly correspond to the contour of the image on the sandblasted glass. Two of the holograms are hexagons and the third is a vertical rectangle The bronze at the bottom right is based on the well-known tryptic of Ai Weiwei dropping a Han Dynasty vase and will be at floor-level.. In 1976 while I was living in SOHO in New York the Museum of Holography opened I was fascinated by the visual possibilities but never saw a logical justification for these amazing images to enter my work. Now, after almost 38 years this piece has brought me to the door of this technology and I am very excited to see what will happen once I enter.


Steve Linn

Occupations and Evasions (Man Ray) - 2011 62.25 x 19.75 x 21.75” Carved glass & mixed media

When asked to share my creative process I immediately thought back to the 29th International in 2001 to see what I had to say at that time. Not much has changed in these past 14 years except to say that hopefully the work has improved, a bit of color has crept into several pieces, and I have begun to embrace new technologies. Art is still about ideas, and the process of developing a piece is still careful and slow. I am not impetuous, I choose the subject, do the research, get the details right, and don’t forget that the visual impact precedes the story for the viewer. Specifically, my new piece “In the Air” (Ai Weiwei) has taken some new twists and has built on a idea begun in some earlier work. Several years ago I incorporated a drawing into a sculpture “Mecene” about Gertrude Stein and that led to a more recent piece “Occupations and Evasions” about Man Ray which is also being shown at this years International. Taking the next step, I have made photographs of my drawings and printed them full size on sheets of aluminum. Ai Weiwei is not allowed to leave China yet he exhibits massive installations in Museums all over the world, therefore I decided to use holograms in part of the work to represent this presence/absence. Push the work, test the limits, don’t be complacent, continue to grow, no constraints.

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Marvin Lipofsky

Seattle Series 1990 #2 - 1990

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16 x 17� Blown glass Photo credit: M. Lee Fatherree


My work investigates space, seeing distance and understanding how wide open spaces, particularly of the Australian landscape affect us. I am fascinated by the unreachable space. The view we look upon, but can never reach. In this minimal landscape, all elements are stripped back, light becomes the landscape and I am left looking at space, the space between here.…and there. This viewed distance is a place we can never reach, never get to, for as we move towards it, it moves away from you. Is this a real place or is it a projected space of the imagination.

When visiting Kati Thanda (Lake Eyre) in South Australia, one becomes immersed in the present, but in the context of a much greater timeline. Lake Eyre is a landscape of water. Water travelled, evaporated, its residue left and then becoming visible again at altitude as cloud. An ever changing constant of formations. The process I’ve created to make the pieces reflects the concept. Solid glass is ground up to make glass powder. With water, the powder is moved across the glass surface. I then leave the water to evaporate: it leaves an imprint—a watermark—in the glass. The piece is then fired in the kiln and the process repeated for subsequent layers. The process is movement of water through evaporation.


Jessica Loughlin

Continuum V - 2015 26.5 x 41 x 1.25� each Kiln formed & enameled glass Photo credit: Rachel Harris

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La´szlo´ Luka´csi

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PALM - 2015 13 x 14.25 x 6.75” Cut, polished, laminated glass Photo credit: Liza Lukácsi


Every opportunity I get, I observe people and their body language. The ideas for my sculptures grow out of these observations and imagining myself in similar situations. I have just begun doing a series of couple pieces. Having been married for 40 years I have a number of ideas about couples and I use those ideas when I make a piece. Intimacy is about closeness. I have a vision in my brain, which is almost like a visual emotion. I want to create the tension of closeness without touching. My process varies depending on what I am making. Sometimes it involves drawing, Sometimes I start by making a small figure in plastilene clay. My process in making Intimacy was very direct. I often ask my assistants to pose for me. I will tell them what I’m thinking and have them adopt the pose. Here are a couple of pictures of one of them posing.

I sculpt directly in wax using these mannequins as a starting point. I cut them into a number of parts and reassemble them into the pose, using hot wax. Once the position is correct I begin to clothe them using warm wax, wax tools, and propane torches. I add texture and sculpt the faces individually. Each figure is unique. I place the figures so that the negative space between them creates the desired tension. Their positions and body language tell the story.

I made molds of a nude man and woman posed like this.

The resulting placement also determines the size of the base. At this point most of the decisions have been made and the goal is to follow the plan. The waxes are invested and cast in glass. A fabricator makes the base according to my specifications. The figures are in the kiln for a week and a half. When they are divested there is a period of time where they are ground and smoothed. Once they are finished they are pinned to the base and the skin is sandblasted. The base is sandblasted and patinaed and the piece is done. Although this is long slow process, I like the pace and am pleased with the result.


Lucy Lyon

Intimacy - 2015 22 x 14.25 x 11.75� Cast glass & fabricated steel Photo credit: Addison Doty

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Richard Marquis

Marquis Scarpa Series - 2000

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9 x 7.5 x 7.5� Fused, slumped, blown, & carved murrini glass Photo credit: Dan Fox/Lumina Studio


Mythological Heroes The Mythological Heroes Series deals with figures throughout history in which we know very little or nothing at all about. All we know are the stories passed down through myths and legends. I am most interested in figures that undergo a change of perception, from negative to positive, depending on the zeitgeist. This human tendency to idolize and condemn the same figure and the same idea reminds us how subjected and relative our perception may be.

Bodecea Bodecea is a full glass cast face with a glass engraved helmet. It features free sculpted knives on top of an iron pole 90 inches high on 20 inches wide. Bodecea was a warrior-queen who drove the Romans out of England. However, she was almost forgotten as the Romans intentionally wiped out her name from chronicled history. Consequently, Bodecea has remained a mysterious mythological figure according to lore. As legend has it, Bodecea united the rival tribes living on the island and attacked the Roman forces. She led her army of blue painted men (considerably less equipped and trained) to victory after victory against the Roman forces (which where the best equipped and trained army in the world at the time.) Forever known as “Bloody Bodecea,� she took no prisoners and would burn the Roman towns to the ground.


Mira Maylor

Lilith (Mythological Heroes Series) - 2014 (left) 90.5 x 19.75 x 11� Glass full solid cast, painting & metal work

Bodecea (Mythological Heroes Series) - 2015 (right) 90.5 x 19.75 x 11� Glass full solid cast, engraving, free hand sand blast, painting & metal work

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John Miller

O-Rings! - 2014

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15 x 13 x 7� Hot sculpted glass & steel Photo credit: Anthony Fumiatti


’       


Debora Moore

Specimen Box - Vermillion Lady Slipper - 2015 (left) 17.75 x 14.75 x 5” Blown glass

Specimen Box - Blue Epidendrum - 2015 (right) 14.25 x 13.25 x 5” Blown glass Both photos credit: Lynn Thompson

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William Morris

Mazorca - 2013

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45 x 23 x 11� Blown glass & steel stand Photo credit: Rob Vinnedge


Working out ideas were more often than not done using pencil and paper or drawing with chalk on the floor. Ideas were then hammered out in the shop.

There could be ten different ways to get one result and glass is an amazing material in that way. The expression comes out differently with each technique used and you are always coaxing the material to take shape and form.


    “”       


Nick Mount

Soft Geometric Fruit #070115 - 2015 (top) 28 x 28 x 10” Blown glass, surface worked, with Huon stem & maple base

White Nuts with Black Stripes #010514 - 2014 (bottom) 12 x 25 x 11” Blown glass, surface worked, with Huon stem & blackwood base Both photos credit: Pippy Mount

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Kathleen Mulcahy

A Last Long Line of Silver Rain - 2015

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48 x 120 x 3� Stainless steel with bent & etched clear plate & hotworked glass drops


I am floating along on the West Branch of the Susquehanna. It is a slow, wide river and the riverbed is so close you can almost touch it from the edge of the canoe. My arm drops over the edge and I let my hand open to the cool sluice of water through my fingers. The colors are warm iron, orange, a collection of browns and sand. The dark shadow of the vessel crosses these colors quietly while transporting us from campsite to campsite.

I begin my work by recalling a body of water. It could be the deepest blue with the high bright reflections of the open sea, the emerald green of an alpine lake, the horizon line at the Gulf or the shallow bed of a lazy river.

Several things coalesce in my dreaming on water: the need to look deeply below the surface, below the skin, allowing the transparency and diffusion of the etching to obscure and reveal at the same time. This river or stretch of horizon that I am willing into being presents me with that perfect moment of a storm receding, the air clearing and the feeling that everything has become new. Take a breath it says, everything is listening.


Albert Paley

Silver Fold - 2012 53 x 19 x 24� Glass & steel Photo credit: Douglas Schaible

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Mark Peiser

Passage, Etude Tableau 4 - 2014

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16.5 x 5.5 x 21.75� Hot cast phase separated glass & acid polished Photo credit: Steve Mann


“My creative process is figuring out the process that materializes the feeling that began it all. Everything else is just work. The title is derived from etude tableau, (study picture), from a group of piano pieces by Rachmaninoff. In music, an etude is usually a smaller composition of considerable difficulty conceived to provide practice at perfecting a particular skill but played for its artistic value. In my case, that skill is the casting and nuanced control of translucent phase separated glass.� — Mark Peiser


Sibylle Peretti

I Search in Snow Series - 2014 10 x 30 x 1� 3 part panel piece, fused glass

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Danny Perkins

Ronstadt - 2014

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64 x 14� Blown glass


As the work is large so is the artist and the many contradictions that play through his work. The glass moves from small loose particles to hot fluid strands of color. Its own heat etches the place it rests with scars and patterns. So too Danny: Quick, fiery, brash and yet with gentle touch to reshape the blown sculptures, to focus attention to the small outsider square. The energy of color and movement travel across the canvas. Washed in paint, star dust and enamel.

Danny’s struggles, tangles, wit and intellect are as his art, also seeking new dimensions, scattering beyond the bounds. Even after years of the successful hustle the fear of failure is no less real, the ego just as fragile as ever. And the joy, the laughter that spiels forth from the man and the art as exuberant as ever. The price for walking in these always-new pathways remains just as high as existed in the very beginning. A source of solace for the anxiety of the discord is short spurts of intense work and non-alcoholic O’Douls followed by long periods of chopper building and surfing the big waves in Costa Rica. - Jesse Sensibar


Jenny Pohlman and Sabrina Knowles

The Wheel of Liberation, aka Dandelion - 2011 100 x 100 x 4� Off-hand sculpted glass, ferrous & non-ferrous metals, beads

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Stephen Rolfe Powell

Lascivious Frazzeled Shrug - 2015 (left) 27 x 15.5 x 4.5” Blown glass & murrini

Salacious Slithering Tease - 2015 (right)

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19.25 x 17.5 x 4” Blown glass and murrini


Clifford Rainey

Upside Down - Things Fall Apart No3 - 2014 40 x 18 x 18� Cast glass Photo credit: Daniel Fox/Lumina Studio

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Wesley Neal Rasko

FFX 50 - 2014

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19.7 x 11.4 x 7.1� Laminated & cut cast glass & granite


Colin Reid

Curlicue R1817 - 2015 (top) 19.75 x 28.75 x 4.25� Kilncast, ground, carved & polished glass

Aqua Wave R1816 - 2015 (bottom) 16.75 x 12 x 4� Kilncast, ground, carved & polished glass

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Kait Rhoads

Ruga - 2010

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34 x 30 x 11� Blown glass, mixed green & gold hollow murrine woven with copper wire onto steel stand Photo credit: Robert Vinnedge


Ross Richmond

Woman in a Lilac Robe - 2015 22 x 8 x 8� Blown hot sculpted glass Photo credit: Daniel Fox/Lumina Studio

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Marlene Rose

Small Bell Trio - 2015

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37 x 22 x 7� Sandcast glass & steel Photo credit: David A. Monroe


Repetition and Resonance. Elegant forms of solid glass echoing the opaque hollowness of bells from the Han dynasty. As I carve I find myself creating tracks to follow, forms to fill... Big masculine bells with sober flat bases, baby bells with insouciant pointed bottoms, sensuously curved bells, harder, stricter formal bells. Each bell develops its own character, own personality. When I face the blank void in the sand, I clear my mind and fill the void with what I discover must be in it. I find the inherent geometry hidden within the form of the bell and tease it out in very different patterns... One is strictly ordered circles, one is simple lines, another is copper calligraphy and incised cylinders. All share the same set of focus points, intersections of alignments, call them what you will. Color comes last, though it is foremost in my mind. Aged gold, glowing metallics, the indigo blues of ancient skies and the deepest seas. The heat adds its random alchemy to my shapes and colors and the piece becomes what it always needed to be. There is forever a context, even when echoing the past. The history of China, and indeed the world, speaks of outer beauty and inner turmoil, of great works made at great cost. I release the resonances in color and form in a forever mute bells... Do they call across time? I like to think so.


Martin Rosol

Twilight - 2014 16 x 20 x 3� Cut, polished and laminated glass

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Richard Royal

Tropical Leopard Skin Scroll - 2014

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21 x 21 x 17� Blown, carved, sandblasted and assembled glass


Davide Salvadore

Murrinidoli Gato1 - 2014 25 x 8 x 5� Blown & carved

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Jack Schmidt

Rhubarb - 2015

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61.5 x 16 x 10� Cast dichroic & clear glass, stainless & slate Photo credit: Douglas Schaible


Livio Seguso

Rigore Cartesiano - 2014 25 x 25 x 5.5� White Carrara marble & clear crystal glass

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Harue Shimomoto

Spring Flower - 2015 (left) 28 x40 x 7� Fused glass, hanging with wires

The Way to the Moon - 2015 (right)

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Dimensions : 42 x 28 x 7� Fused glass, hanging with wires


My creative process is like cooking. Get fresh ingredients, Cook with your tools, season with Spices. (ideas)

(techniques)

(more ideas)

Then taste it. The difference between cooking and working with glass is the chemical reaction. Sometimes we get unexpected tastes.


When I first started working in glass, process was my only concern. Like any new craft or medium, so much of the challenge is the understanding and responding to the material, and therefore is primarily process-driven. While my main focus has shifted from process to personal expression, I still find the physical act of creating forms in glass the most stimulating and rewarding aspect of the work. When the combination of team work, timing, and skill coalesce, the result is artistic gratification. I continually strive to translate the fluid property of the material, into the finished piece. Imbuing the work with a spark of life.


Raven Skyriver

Huntress - 2015 31 x 15 x 30� Off hand sculpted glass Photo credit: kp-studio

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Ivana Sramkova

Luxury Pig - 2015 (left) 15.75 x 27.5 x 8” Cast glass Photo credit: Tomas Stolting

The Hen - 2015 (right)

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14 x 15.75 x 7” Cast glass Photo credit: Gabriel Urbanek


STANI

L.H. with Angry Bull - 2015 20 x 22 x 18� Blown, cast, wood, bronze, coppered steel

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Paul Stankard

Tea Rose Bouquet Cluster with Insects - 2009

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4 x 4 x 4� Flameworked glass Photo credit: Ron Farina


Ethan Stern

Lunar Light Bright - 2015 17 x 16 x 4� Blown & wheel cut glass

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Cassandra Straubing

1. An old cattle fence used to mark the border, but when the migrant arrived this time, he was faced with an impassible wall, preventing the return to his homeland. (shirt with strands of barbed wire) - 2014 37 x 15 x 2.5� Cast glass, found objects

2. He trusted the coyotaje would bring him to safety in a land of wealth and opportunity; only to find himself stranded along the fence, longing for his family. (shirt with ball of barbed wire) - 2014 37 x 15 x 2.5� Cast glass, found objects

3. He left his own land and family to chase a rumor of economic boom, only to find that the once passible cattle fence had become an impassible boundary, dividing poverty from opportunity. (shirt with loop of barbed wire) - 2014

178

37 x 15 x 2.5� Cast glass, found objects Photos credit: Elizabeth Torrance


Tim Tate

Opulent Surveillance - 2015 54 x 60 x 3� Cast poly vitro, glass, video

181


Michael Taylor

Codes for Artificial Intelligence - 2014

182

38 x 10 x 2� Laminated glass


Codes for Artificial Intelligence, (CAI) is part of a solo exhibition of my work to be held at the Museum of Glass, Tacoma in 2017. The exhibition speaks to the cutting edge research related to robotics, medicine, astrophysics, quantum mechanics, physics, cosmology and others. Our scientists are searching for the betterment of humanity, but their research can have despotic results. Both considerations are taken into account with this visual work.

CAI represents a kind of Rosetta Stone for Artificial Intelligence (AI). CAI’s complexity, colors and compartments hold information that contains code for reaching the final breakthrough in the AI discovery. That being consciousness.

Computer research is moving at an expediential pace. Predictions for completion escalate daily. CAI represents a time in the future when AI will be part of our reality.

Rosetta Stone

Computer Circuitry

Color & Spiritual Correlation


Winnie Teschmacher

The Eye Inside - 2013 6 x 12 x 12� Optical cut & polished glass Photo credit: Gerrit Schreurs

185


Margit Toth

I Am Flying In My Dream - 2015

186

21 x 12.25 x 10� Pate de verre


Brian Usher

WHITE LISSIL 0110 - 2015 49.75 x 29.5 x 1.5” Cast glass

189


Miles Van Rensselaer

Illuminated Helix: DNA - 2012

190

42 x 7 x 7� Cast bronze, blown glass, fabricated steel


Illuminated Helix Illuminated Helix is a totem inspired by and paying homage to the Asmat (a tribe I visited in West Papua, Indonesia). Like all indigenous peoples, the once-cannibalistic Asmat are threatened by modernity yet maintain their tradition of dynamic woodcarving. Spirals abound warrior shields in the form of enormous, dilated and connected pupils believed to paralyze the enemy. The Spiral is one of the oldest symbols known to man and is found in every ancient culture throughout the world. It occurs in plants, minerals, animals, energy patterns, weather, growth, death. It’s in shells, draining water, the night sky and human physiology. Individually, the two upwardly reaching spirals of Illuminated Helix invoke these associations. Pulled into the 3rd dimension, Spirals become Helices. The D “ ouble Helix” conjures the molecule DNA: that winding, two-stranded chemical structure that contains the instructions needed for any organism to develop, survive and reproduce. Just as DNA has power to make each species unique and ensure the survival of each, we have the power to ensure the uniqueness and survival of each differing culture (be it Asmat or other) within our own species. As the “dominant” species, we have the responsibility to preserve the endangered non-human species we’ve brought to the brink extinction. If glass is light and light is hope, is it expanding or constricting?


Norwood Viviano

Mining Industries: Highland Park Ford Plant - 2014 (top) 35 x 19.25 x 9� 3D printed pattern, kiln cast glass & fabricated steel

Mining Industries: Packard Automotive Plant - 2014 (bottom) 35.5 x 19.75 x 6.75� 3D printed pattern, kiln cast glass & fabricated steel Both photos by:

Tim

Thayer/Robert

Hensleigh

193


Janusz Walentynowicz

Obscurus - 2015

194

17.5 x 15.5 x 14.5� Cast glass


Vivian Wang

Dark Warrior - 2015 31 x 12 x 15� Cast glass, stoneware, steel base Photo credit: Gregory Ross

197


Leah Wingfield and Steven Clements

Precipice 1 - 2015

198

42 x 19 x 7� Cast glass, Madrone Photo Credit: Robert Jaffe


Once I have finished a clay model I use my hands to create a mother mold out of silicone and then another out of wax. This process is complicated and time consuming. It must be completed before I start kiln casting. My process is done directly with clay and without any drawing or sketching. When I create drawings I make them for their own purposes. Throughout my career I have created figures, heads, faces, masks on many different scales. Singles and doubles, doubles and singles...my never ending story.


Ann Wolff

HEAD and HEAD 1/6 - 2012 18.5 x 27.5 x 15” Cast glass & concrete Photo credit: Pierre Wilén

201


John Wood

Yellow Cut Cube - Summer - 2015 (top) 10 x 14 x 12” Cast & polished glass

Red Cut Cube - Autumn - 2015 (bottom)

202

10 x 14 x 12” Cast & polished glass Both photos credit: Douglas Schaible


My educational background is in Engineering, and I think that training leads one naturally to an inherent appreciation of the Platonic solids, especially the cube. I am also a multi-decade collector of glass art and a practicing glass artist, so of course the Libensky “Cube in Cube” series is well known and appreciated.

The Four Seasons Series - Cut Cubes

Recently I began to take another look at the cube in art in general, with the intention of putting my own stamp on that well-known form. The “Cut Cube” concept was the result. I am also a classical music listener and know and love Antonio Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons’ masterpiece. The idea of matching the organic flow of the four-part music and the solidity of the cubic geometric form in a single glass sculpture was irresistible.

This Mosaic image is composed of all the pictures of the creative process used to make Yellow Cut Cube - Summer (shown above), and the other three in the Four Seasons Series; Blue Cut Cube Winter, Green Cut Cube - Spring, and Red Cut Cube - Autumn. Magnifying Glass Optional!


Hiroshi Yamano

The Daffodils on Black Mountain in Winter #1 - 2015 26.75 x 25.5 x 6� Glass & mixed media

205


Loretta Yang

Arising Through Contentment - 2012

206

29.5 x 19.75 x 23.75� Cast glass


Design Design

Sculpting

Silicone Moulding

Release of Wax Form

Wax Form Refinement

Remove Wax Through Steam

Kiln Firing

Plaster Mold Removal

Cutting

Polishing

High Luster Polishing

Engraving


Although my work is primarily the product of a decaying urban landscape, it shares a great deal of its energy and beauty with many elements found in the wilderness.

Ironically, I’ve spent much of my life torn between these two worlds, trying to bring balance and calm to an ever changing and chaotic existence. It is my intention to expose and share with you a unique view of this rapidly evolving landscape.


Albert Young

City Tree - 2015 117� tall Welded steel & cast glass on steel base Photo credit: Leslie Patron

209


Brent Kee Young

Matrix Series: Quest - 2015

210

14 x 39 x 11� Flame-worked borosilicate glass Photo credit: Dan Fox/Lumina Studio


Udo Zembok

SpaceColor 2015-01 - 2015 22 x 22 x 2� Multilayered fused glass, inclusion of pigments, partly polished

213


Jeff Zimmer

We Were All Wrong (The Judgment of History) - Part of the Whitewash Series - 2013

214

20 x 16.5 x 6� Layers of hand enameled & etched glass in lightbox, vintage frame Photo credit: Shannon Tofts


Toots Zynsky

216

Untitled - 2015 Filet de verre


Developing new forms along with expanding the scale of my work has created new challenges from start to finish. The entire process - thought and physical - has become more complex and demanding but in order to achieve the end results, the increase in scale has been important. The last part of the whole process is photographing the pieces  - the moment when I have the opportunity to look more objectively at each one, exploring every angle and the effects of lighting at play on the many undulating surfaces. - Toots Zynsky - Spring, 2015


IS A PROUD MEDIA SPONSOR OF

Habatat Galleries 43rd Annual International Glass Invitational

NOW SHOWCASING GLASS, CERAMICS AND WOOD

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Shelley Muzylowski Allen

Dean Allison

Alex Bernstein

Emily Brock

Cassandria Blackmore

William Carlson

Jose´ Chardiet Herb Babcock

Rick Beck

Martin Blank

Pe´ter Borkovics

Judy Chicago

Dale Chihuly Michael Behrens

Christina Bothwell

Daniel Clayman Robert Bender

Howard Ben Tre´

Latchezar Boyadjiev

Deanna Clayton Peter Bremers

For more information about any of this year’s participating artists use your smartphone to scan the QR code under their name.


Brian Corr

Susan Taylor Glasgow Jacqueline Hoffmann Botquelen

Matthew Curtis

Robin Grebe Petr Hora

Dan Dailey

Wilfried Grootens David Huchthausen

David Datuna

Sean Hennessey Sidney Hutter

Laura Donefer

Josh Hershman Toshio Iezumi

Chad Fonfara

Eric Hilton Michael Janis

Katja Fritzsche

Toma´sˇ Hlavicˇ ka Richard Jolley

For more information about any of this year’s participating artists use your smartphone to scan the QR code under their name.


John Kiley

Steve Linn

John Miller

Steve Klein

Marvin Lipofsky

Debora Moore

Jon Kuhn

Jessica Loughlin

William Morris

Jiyong Lee

La´szlo´ Luka´csi

Nick Mount

Antoine Leperlier

Lucy Lyon

Kathleen Mulcahy

Silvia Levenson

Richard Marquis

Albert Paley

Stanislav Libensky and Mira Maylor Jaroslava Brychtova

Mark Peiser

For more information about any of this year’s participating artists use your smartphone to scan the QR code under their name.


Sibylle Peretti

Kait Rhoads

Livio Seguso

Danny Perkins

Ross Richmond

Harue Shimomoto

Jenny Pohlman and Sabrina Knowles

Marlene Rose

Raven Skyriver

Martin Rosol

Ivana Sramkova

Richard Royal

STANI

Davide Salvadore

Paul Stankard

Jack Schmidt

Ethan Stern

Stephen Rolfe Powell

Clifford Rainey

Wesley Neal Rasko

Colin Reid

For more information about any of this year’s participating artists use your smartphone to scan the QR code under their name.


Cassandra Straubing

Norwood Viviano

Loretta Yang

Tim Tate

Janusz Walentynowicz

Albert Young

Michael Taylor

Brent Kee Young Vivian Wang

Winnie Teschmacher

Udo Zembok Leah Wingfield and Steven Clements

Margit Toth

Jeff Zimmer Ann Wolff

Brian Usher

Toots Zynsky John Wood

Miles Van Rensselaer Hiroshi Yamano

For more information about any of this year’s participating artists use your smartphone to scan the QR code under their name.


MASTERWORKS: A Contemporary Gla ss Auc tion Stanislav Libensky & Jaroslava Brychtova Vladimira Klumpar Hank Murta Adams Lino Tagliapietra Richard Marquis Harvey Littleton Howard Ben TrĂŠ Ivana Sramkova William Morris Richard Jolley Dale Chihuly Mark Peiser T o m Patti Jo n Ku h n & Many More

A p r i l 2 3 r d , 2 0 1 5 at 7 : 3 0 p m 41 works of contemporary glass artwork

Contact Habatat for a catalogue of the auction Online: www.habatatglass.com


Grand Opening: Saturday, April 25th, 2015 at 8:00pm Show continues through Friday, June 26th 2015

The Creative Process

Within the last few years we used the Annual International Catalogue to reach into the imaginative minds of our articipating artists. We tackled inspiration and asked artists the question: what inspires you to create? We read many olorful statements; anywhere from friends and family to nature and nurture. The next year, we explored expression nd wanted the artists to allow us some insight into why they use glass as a material to express themselves. Again, e received some spectacular reasoning on why glass, as a material, can be used and should be used as a means for ommunicating an idea. Last year, we asked artists where they saw themselves in the grand scheme of the entire art orld. Some artists responded with pinpoint accuracy of where they thought their work would be placed. Other artists ere conflicted and did not want to define themselves as an “ism” or a category defined by the art world.

lthough, we loved the debate that our last catalog caused, this year we wanted to get a glimpse into something very ersonal: the creative process. To really get this idea down on paper we realized that we needed more space. This ublication is exactly double the size of our previous catalogues which makes it the most substantial volume in our 43 ear history. We offered each artist an extra page for a glimpse into the most precious of all personal possessions for n artist...their sketchbook.

ver 100 artists are participating in this year’s exhibition, half of whom will be in attendance during the opening eekend. That is more artists in attendance this year than any other year in the history of this annual exhibition. We ave asked each artist to submit two of their most significant works to be reviewed by an elite panel of jurors. This ear’s panel include: Bruce Bachmann, noted studio glass collector; Charles A. Shepard III, President and CEO of the ort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana; and Gregory Wittkopp, Director of both The Cranbrook Art Museum and The ranbrook Center for Collections and Research. The winners will receive a museum exhibition this summer at the ort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana. During the opening in our galleries, one artist will receive a People’s Choice ward, voted for by the public, which will travel on to the museum exhibition along with the juried winners.

ewcomers to the exhibition include artists who are not known to typically use glass to explore their ideas: Judy hicago is an art educator and writer known for her large collaborative installations which examine the role of women n history and culture. Chicago had coined the term “feminist art” in the 70s and had founded the first feminist art rogram in the United States.

oncurrent with the opening of the exhibition we are offering another exhibition entitled: Glass in the 2nd Dimension. his innovative exhibition consists of framed renderings, photographs as well as other two-dimensional imagery y various artists who are participating in the Habatat Galleries International. We are temporarily opening a space cross from the gallery for this separate exhibition that will feature one unique example by each artist.

We are proud of this annual exhibition. Over the years, it has been fueled by the excitement of the collectors and the nthusiasm of the participating artists. The International has grown over 43 years and has become the oldest and rgest annual studio glass exhibition in the world.

you cannot attend this year please consider coming next year. If you are a serious glass collector or are a novice to lass and want to learn more, please consider attending the Habatat Galleries International as it is an eye-opening and fe-changing experience. As long as artists continue to create, glass will prevail as a means for expression. Join us in ecoming an important part of studio glass history. - Corey Hampson


Participating Artists Shelley Muzylowski Allen Dean Allison Herb Babcock Rick Beck Michael Behrens Robert Bender Howard Ben Tré Alex Bernstein Cassandria Blackmore Martin Blank Péter Borkovics Christina Bothwell Latchezar Boyadjiev Peter Bremers Emily Brock William Carlson José Chardiet Judy Chicago Dale Chihuly Daniel Clayman Deanna Clayton Brian Corr Matthew Curtis Dan Dailey David Datuna Laura Donefer Chad Fonfara Katja Fritzsche Susan Taylor Glasgow Robin Grebe Wilfried Grootens Sean Hennessey Josh Hershman Eric Hilton Tomáš Hlaviˇcka Jacqueline Hoffmann Botquelen Petr Hora David Huchthausen Sidney Hutter Toshio Iezumi Michael Janis Richard Jolley John Kiley Steve Klein Jon Kuhn Jiyong Lee Antoine Leperlier Silvia Levenson Stanislav Libensky & Jaroslava Brychtova Steve Linn Marvin Lipofsky Jessica Loughlin

László Lukácsi Lucy Lyon Richard Marquis Mira Maylor John Miller Debora Moore William Morris Nick Mount Kathleen Mulcahy Albert Paley Mark Peiser Sibylle Peretti Danny Perkins Jenny Pohlman and Sabrina Knowles Stephen Rolfe Powell Clifford Rainey Wesley Neal Rasko Colin Reid Kait Rhoads Ross Richmond Marlene Rose Martin Rosol Richard Royal Davide Salvadore Jack Schmidt Livio Seguso Harue Shimomoto Raven Skyriver Ivana Sramkova STANI Paul Stankard Ethan Stern Cassandra Straubing Tim Tate Michael Taylor Winnie Teschmacher Margit Toth Brian Usher Miles Van Rensselaer Norwood Viviano Janusz Walentynowicz Vivian Wang Leah Wingfield and Steven Clements Ann Wolff John Wood Hiroshi Yamano Loretta Yang Albert Young Brent Kee Young Udo Zembok Jeff Zimmer Toots Zynsky


The Creative Process 2015 Habatat Galleries Annual Award Exhibition International Glass Invitational  

Celebrating over 100 artists participating in Habatat Galleries 43rd International Glass Invitational. Sharing a touch into the Creative Pro...

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