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41st Annual International Glass Invitational – Habatat Galleries

h a b atat g a l l e r i e S

Visions


Visions The Next 50 Years

41st Annual International Glass Invitational Awards Exhibition 2013 April 27th, 2013 — May 25th, 2013 Grand Opening: April 27th, 2013 8:00pm

Habatat Galleries MICHIGAN

4400 Fernlee Avenue | Royal Oak, Michigan, 48073 248.554.0590 | info@habatat.com | www.habatat.com


HABATAT GALLERIES Ferdinand & Kathy Hampson Corey Hampson Aaron Schey Debbie Clason Rob Bambrough Rob Shimmell Nick Solomon David Walstad Jurors: Joseph Becherer Chief Curator and Vice President for Collections and Exhibitions at Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture, Grand Rapids, MI Charles A. Shepard III Executive Director of The Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, IN Hal and Myra Weiss Noted collectors from Michigan Design and Layout by John Bowman Planning by Ferdinand Hampson, Corey Hampson and Aaron Schey Compilation and Editing by Aaron Schey and John Lawson Š2013 Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, Michigan All rights reserved. This book may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, including illustrations, in any form (beyond that copying permitted by Sections 107 and 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law and except by reviewers for the public press), without written permission from the publisher. This catalogue was published to coincide with the exhibition 40th International Glass Invitational at Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, Michigan, Saturday, April 27, 2012 to Saturday, May 25, 2012. ISBN 978-1-928572-01-5 Cover sculpture by Petr Hora


THE NEXT 50 YEARS History is a great teacher. We can use it to predict the future and chances are as the old saying goes, “history will repeat itself”. Artists using glass as their medium is not an unusual phenomenon. There are isolated examples of craftsman successfully creating objects never before seen in glass. The Portrait of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, an ancient Egyptian object the Corning Museum just acquired, the Lycurgus Cup, a diatreta vessel from ancient Rome, or the Portland Vase, an ancient Roman cameo, both located in the British Museum are extraordinary examples of ancient craftsmanship. However, the idea of artists worldwide creating in a material primarily used for functional purposes and exploring it for its sculptural opportunities, does not have much in the way of precedence. The first fifty years of studio glass in America, which we celebrated last year, exposed a few things about the growing acceptance and interest in the glass medium. The celebration gave us some insight and opened discussions concerning the future of the material. This 50 year history is a bit skewed by the tradition of glassmaking and an association with “back to the earth” craft movement of the ‘60s. This created some prejudices in its acceptance in the fine art community. The early artists, most of who came from a craft based education in the glass medium, were not accepted by the larger fine art combine of critics, galleries, museums and publications. Therefore they went on to develop their own galleries, publications, critics and sympathetic museums. Collectors, who were not interested in defending a particular turf and were drawn to the allure of glass, were more open to learning and acquiring these objects. Artists responded to the freedom that this market provided and became more expressive with the material. We can certainly see immediate trends such as increased scale, more narrative imagery and a greater use of mixed media. Looking further ahead, we can speculate on a variety of possibilities. We can see in our crystal ball (pun intended) that many artists are finding their artistic vocabulary with the medium. Glass is exceptionally versatile. Artists can create in glass using the same inspiration as painters and sculptors or can develop an inner world that few materials allow. This versatility will be enhanced by the application of science and technology to the material. As science probes glass for products such as flat screen TV’s and innovations in lighting, artists using their creativity will be the beneficiaries of this research. The future of glass as an art medium is in part based on its amazing diversity. We believe many artists will be drawn to the material not by the process of working with it but by what

visual experiences can be developed. A larger group of sculptors and painters – not trained in glass but aware of its potential will emerge, many with unique ideas. This tremendous versatility will be a key to its placement in art history. Trends come and go and if glass is considered a decorative substance, it could be subject to this. If it finds a place in contemporary art, not just as a material but, as another medium for making significant statements, then it will be lasting. Historically speaking we are in a moment in time. We are living at the beginning of something quite special. With each International Invitational we do see the progressions which hint at the future. After 42 years we anxiously wait to see the new work that artists have made for this exhibit and each year they surprise, astound and amaze us. As long as this continues and as long as we are visually stimulated, glass as an art material will have a rightful place in the history of art. We have created a new exhibition for this year to perhaps help envision the future. eXpose features over 20 artists that have not been seen at Habatat in the Internationals. We expect some exciting, provocative and revealing work to help us contemplate possibilities for the future. For this year’s catalogue we asked the artists to address the future whether it involves their specific work or the medium as a whole. Those that responded to this very difficult question offer an insight that we can monitor for the next 50 years. The good news is no one is going to tell most of the artists or myself that we’re wrong … or is that the bad news? Please enjoy the catalogue and the exhibitions. - The Staff of Habatat Galleries

The Portrait of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, an ancient Egyptian object the Corning Museum just acquired, the Lycurgus Cup, a diatreta vessel from ancient Rome, or the Portland Vase, an ancient Roman cameo, both located in the British Museum are extraordinary examples of ancient craftsmanship.*

*Thank you to William Warmus

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In Memoriam... The wonderful thing about our business is the amazing people that come into our lives and unfortunately go. We would like to pay tribute to the following people and dedicate this year’s International Glass invitational catalogue to them. Tom Kully, 1941 – 2011 The consummate collector. He enjoyed all types and periods in art. His and his wife Sandy’s collection reflected a deep knowledge and Tom’s enthusiasm enriched my life. Maria Lugossy, 1950 – 2012 A Hungarian sculptor that brought glass as an art material to a new level of significance. She was in the Habatat International for the past 20 years. We will miss the excitement and anticipation of seeing her new work, and are thankful that her husband Zolton Bohus will continue his participation in this year’s exhibition. Ben Heineman, 1914 – 2012 A brilliant man who was a mentor to me. He collected glass as he lived, quietly helping many and making excellent choices. His collection is now part of the Corning Museums contemporary collection of studio glass. Jean Sosin, 1925 - 2012 One of the first collectors of studio glass and one of its greatest supporter, she was always willing to open her home for people to see her collection that spanned over 35 years. Many artists owe a debt of gratitude for her and her late husband’s for their unwavering support. Jim Herrington, 1928 - 2013 Jim and his soul mate Carol Camiener collected glass in a very thoughtful way. They took great pride in helping young artists and discovering new talent. Anne Bachman, 1937 - 2013 Wife of Bruce Bachman. Together they assembled an encyclopedic collection of studio glass that spanned 5 decades. Very recently they committed their collection to the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village for future generations to enjoy.

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Maria Lugossy


Studio Glass in America

A 50 Year Journey

The American studio glass movement can be traced to 1962, when Harvey Littleton, a professor of ceramics at the University of Wisconsin, had a dream to alter molten glass into unique forms in a studio setting and teach his techniques. For the first time in its 3,500 year history, glass production that had been limited to factory settings, moved to the artists’ studios and became a part of an academic program in the fine arts.

Since then, glass has become the fastest growing studio art medium throughout the world. This book takes us from the first workshop in a Toledo, Ohio garage, to reveal decade by decade the unprecedented growth of studio glass. Through high quality, detailed images and stories, this retrospective of 50 top artists is a collector’s dream. Noted art dealer Ferdinand Hampson offers a unique perspective on this exciting evolution.

About the Author Ferdinand Hampson has been president of Habatat Galleries in Michigan for over 40 years. He has created numerous publications, including 3 previous books, and has lectured extensively on 4 continents. Ferdinand has been responsible for over 100 museum exhibitions. His name is synonymous with Studio Glass.

Size: 9 x 12� Illustrations: 455 Full color images Pages: 256 Binding: hard cover Available at Habatat Galleries

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Participating Artists Shelley Muzylowski Allen Herb Babcock Rick Beck Michael Behrens Howard Ben Tré Alex Bernstein Martin Blank Zoltan Bohus Peter Borkovics STANI Christina Bothwell Jacqueline Hoffmann Botquelen Latchezar Boyadjiev Peter Bremers Emily Brock Lucio Bubacco José Chardiet Daniel Clayman Deanna Clayton Keith Clayton Matthew Curtis Dan Dailey Miriam Di Fiore Laura Donefer Irene Frolic Susan Taylor Glasgow Javier Gomez Robin Grebe Eric Hilton Tomáš Hlavicˇka

Petr Hora David Huchthausen Toshio Iezumi Martin Janecky Richard Jolley Steven Klein Marta Klonowska Vladimira Klumpar Judith LaScola Jiyong Lee Shayna Leib Antoine Leperlier Stanislav Libensky & Jaroslava Brychtova Steve Linn Marvin Lipofsky László Lukácsi Lucy Lyon Ivan Mares John Miller Charlie Miner Debora Moore William Morris Kathleen Mulcahy Bretislav Novak Jr. Stepan Pala Albert Paley Zora Palova Mark Peiser Marc Petrovic Jenny Pohlman & Sabrina Knowles

Stephen Powell Clifford Rainey David Reekie Colin Reid Ross Richmond Richard Ritter Marlene Rose Davide Salvadore Jack Schmidt Mary Shaffer Ivana Sramkova Paul Stankard Therman Statom April Surgent Tim Tate Michael Taylor Margit Toth Bertil Vallien Janusz Walentynowicz Vivian Wang Leah Wingfield & Steven Clements Ann Wolff John Wood Hiroshi Yamano Albert Young Brent Key Young Udo Zembok Toots Zynsky

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People’s Choice 2012

Kathleen Mulcahy

Shelley Muzylowski Allen

Award of Excellence 2012

Collector’s Choice 2012

Racine Art Museum Award

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BOTHWELL

CHESNEY

CLAYMAN

LUGOSSY

PALA

SURGENT

TOTH

YAMANO

Bruce W. Pepich - Executive Director and Curator of Collections, Racine Art Museum, Racine, Wisconsin


Collector’s Award

HILTON LEPERLIER

DONEFER JOLLEY

CURTIS IEZUMI

HUCHTHAUSEN

BEHRENS

Larry Sibrack - Noted lecturer, docent and collector

Critic’s Award

BABCOCK

BERNSTEIN

FROLIC

LEPISTO

PEISER

PERETTI

RAINEY

TATE

William Warmus - Noted curator, art historian and author

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Shelley Muzylowski Allen The process of blowing glass is unparalleled. I can compare it only to working on a favorite oil painting while cycling through an incredible landscape — physically and visually thrilling but at the same time, a daunting task! It’s easy to get swept away with the pace of the medium and its steep learning curve — forgetting “why” you are making instead of “how” and continue on a technique driven quest. It’s a difficult transition (and a little frightening) but necessary, to allow yourself to make costly mistakes in order to develop an intimate expression and a unique way of working with the material. A challenging medium on many levels, it keeps me coming back for more. In my current work, energy and focus has shifted from the sole object to the creation of a psychological composed of stories or vignettes. The narrative is expressed through subtle clues and tension provoking curiosity. It is important that the pieces reflect not just my own insights or experiences, but that they inspire an emotional connection for the viewer. The perseverance and inquisitive nature of artists working in glass over the last 50 years has propelled the medium from the confines of craft and escalated it to the realms of the art world. Redesigning equipment, developing new resources and mindsets have become necessary to weather the economic and physical state of the world. This change is constant as life and art are inseparable.. Although I am not sure that the glass that we are familiar with now will be available in the future or what next 50 years of the glass movement will bring, I do know its artists will continue to see beyond the usual —inventing and reinventing — in order to work with this medium to which we are drawn. - Shelley Muzylowski Allen

Empyreum - 2013 (left) 25 x 17 x 12” Blown & off-hand sculpted glass, horse hair, leather, stone, steel

By the Grove - 2013 (right)

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23 x 24 x 12.5” Blown & off-hand sculpted glass, horse hair, leather, steel Photo: Russell Johnson


Herb Babcock

Assurance of material and what it brings to the palette, glass becomes a common art medium. For me, 25 studio years would be good. I continue to strive for articulation and living in the present. - Herb Babcock

Of Space in Time - 2013 34.5 x 23 x 15� Cast glass, bronze, stone Photo: The Artist

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Rick Beck Thoughts on questions - as a glass worker, I intend to continue working hard and expect that I will continue to be confused by the nature of art. Glass as a medium is splitting. Exciting work is being done on the corporate/design level but it will continue to be, well, corporate. Thought, intent, content and beauty is elusive but a handful of young artists are poised to accept the mantel. They will need encouragement. Each of us will determine what the next 50 years will bring. Have fun, Rick Beck

Shiny New Leg - 2013 (left) 37 x 14 x 11� Glass, steel

Broken Wing - 2013 (right)

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37 x 21 x 11� Glass, steel, leather Photo: David Ramsey


Michael Behrens

I am addicted to making art; to putting all my love, passion and pain into these sculptures. It takes years to accept the vocation of an artist. I have made this commitment for the rest of my life. At this point in time, I am the new kid on the block, but I expect to grow each year with my artistic and technical skills. I am addicted to this fascinating material. I hope to make a contribution to the world that will last forever. Nature of any kind and variety will be my source of inspiration and give me power and strength, whether it´s the majestic ocean or a breathtaking landscape. Making art is my way of reaching out with much love. - Michael Behrens

Seaforms 2012-56 - 2012 32.5 x 31.5 x 7� Kiln cast glass Photo: Paul Niessen

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Howard Ben Tre´

If I were 20 it would be impossible to give a vision for the next 50 years. If, as an artist, you know what you are to make in 5 years you are in the wrong profession. When my hand knows where exactly to put the pencil to paper I am skeptical of my need to create new work with new expressions that reflect new interests. What I can say is that I intend to age gracefully and that my sculpture will reflect that change. It will change again as it has continuously for 38 years. - Howard Ben Tré

Lightness of Being #9 (edition 1 of 2) - 2010

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91 x 7 x 7” Cast glass, cast bronze, gold leaf and patina Photo: Ric Murray


Alex Bernstein As for what the future holds for me, I will always strive to become better and better. I constantly push myself each day when I enter my studio. I hope the future will show that I always make the best work possible. As far as the studio glass movement, I have an interesting perspective on this since both of my parents were early members of the movement and my father, William, was as a founding member of the Glass Art Society. I saw the challenges they faced, promoting glass as a valid artistic endeavor. I feel that glass as a material for making art will continue to be realized throughout the world as a respected medium. The future is exciting. - Alex Bernstein

Black Mountain - 2013 16 x 14 x 4� Cast and cut glass with fused steel Photo: Steve Mann

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Martin Blank

Art is such a personal rewarding exploration! Everyday spent in my studio is a privilege. The people I have met through this journey have enriched my life. Whether its collectors, dealer, fellow artists; it’s humbling how many different and extremely talented people there are in the world. My goal for the future is to be able to continue to live this life that I love creating works that move and speak to people’s hearts. How cool would that be!! - Martin Blank

Cariatide - 2013

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54.5 x 20 x 18” Hot sculpted glass, paint and silver leaf Photo: Russel Johnson


Zoltan Bohus Our society has been talking about modern art for something like a hundred years. They already knew then that amazing scientific and technological developments would fundamentally change the future of art - that is to become today’s art. However, this has only partly happened. We can see that the majority of artists are still using traditional tools to create magnificent works of art. Very few artists, maybe 2%, are taking the trouble to explore the possibilities of the latest cutting edge technologies. I’m therefore very optimistic that over the next 50 years or so, this number could increase to four or five percent. - Zoltan Bohus

Landscape - 2013 (left) 2.4 x 14.2 x 11” Glass, laminated, cut, hand ground, silk-mat surface

Dune - 2013 (right) 2.75 x 12.2 x 12.2” Glass, laminated, cut, hand ground, partly polished, partly silk-mat

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Peter Borkovics In 50 years I will probably look at the world from a different perspective. Hopefully with the knowledge that I have done everything that I could, but of course even 100 years would not be enough to achieve everything I wish for. Lots of great creators have already left this world which has lit the way for us with torches in the darkness. It is time for my generation to pass on those human values, that which we have magnanimously inherited from our ancestors. From the joy of creation to the knowledge of tools and materials. The exhausting beauty of the demanding work.

The search for beauty and purity. The experience of collaborative work and the enchantment of the fire. Art is a very serious game, and glass is a very magnificent element in this game. I just wish good health for my family and for myself. I have to carry alone the burden and gift of talent, until I cannot any longer. - Peter Borkovics

Blue Spiral - 2012 (left) 17.5 x 17.5 x 1.25� Kiln-formed color and polished glass

Brown Spiral - 2012 (right)

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19.5 x 17.5 x 1.25� Kiln-formed color and polished glass Photo: Janos Ratki


STANI

(Stanislaw Jan Borowski) Glass is popular, by its very nature. I have no doubt that as long as the sun comes up glass will always be loved. Eventually, I think glass will be used almost like a found object, and its connection to architecture, technology and consumer culture will get more emphasis. I hope we will use the seductive qualities of glass, look for the subjects of glass, and the subjects of craft, and combine them to make objects so compelling that all the future art-lovers can’t take their eyes off them. For me, as an artist working with glass as a medium for conversation, my main focus is to keep on doing what I love. I believe that you can only grow in doing good if you do something that you really love. Good luck to all of us! - STANI

Fire burning solo - 2012 23 x 25 x 10� Hot sculpted glass

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Christina Bothwell

When I contemplate my future as an artist, I refer back to my good friend the painter Will Barnet, who died a couple of months ago at the age of 101. He was my first art instructor, and a true mentor. We wrote letters back and forth to each other for more than thirty years. Until the very last days of his life, he still painted four to six hours a day... and every year he had a solo exhibition, either at the galleries that represented his work, or at museums. He said to me a few months before he died that when he was painting, he still felt like he was twenty one. I aspire to be like him! He always stressed the importance of holding steadfast to one’s artistic vision, regardless of what was going on in the economy or with trends in the market, or even with one’s own popularity as an artist. Even though he is gone now, I still hear his voice in my head when I need encouragement. I hope that in fifty years, I can still be working in the studio every day! - Christina Bothwell

Gravity - 2013

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26 x 12 x 14� Cast glass, pit fired clay, found objects, oil paints Photo: Robert Bender


Jacqueline Hoffmann Botquelen

Cultures – passed, present and future - and their influence on our lives intrigue me. Today, glass is used as a major medium in everyday activities, for communication, for research or learning processes. Glass is and will be one of the major media through which our cultures will be transmitted. When thinking of glass, the first thing that comes in mind is light and this is mostly what new technologies are about. Another strong association with glass is fragility. On the other hand, glass artifacts are a proof of the resilience of this material and how it can transcend time. Fragility and resilience are the key qualities why I use glass and more precisely Pâte de Verre in my art work, technically and conceptually. They are also resonant of passed and present cultures, which have been subject to change or even disappearance, but who survive all the same in our museums, through ethnological and archeological studies. Pâte de Verre, embodies perfectly this duality and opens up dialogue and challenge. My vision and wish for the next 50 years would be to continue with my research, and to be there to see art made from glass move onto the next level, to admire and be amazed. - Jacqueline H. Botquelen

Tribal Iconics

- 2013

32.5 x 17.5 x 1.75” Pate de Verre and electroplated metals

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Latchezar Boyadjiev The future! It is so hard to predict! Nevertheless I have my vision for the direction where my work is headed. I see myself working on a larger scale work that compliments modern architecture and design. Also I will continue working on a smaller scale work. I see myself creating new and exciting sculptures that will find home in a great private and museum collections. I hope the glass art will be more popular in the future to include the larger new generation understanding, appreciating and supporting it. I see Habatat gallery opening a gallery in every state in the USA in the near future! - Latchezar Boyadjiev

Freedom - 2013

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40 x 25 x 6� Cast glass Photo: The Artist


Peter Bremers The next 50 years? It is hard enough to be in the present! To keep developing the artistic depth, the quality of the making and the beauty of the ideas. What I see as essential is that art in glass will be fully excepted and appreciated as fine art, shedding the stigma of craft and defining artists and artisans without diminishing the value of either. Glass is a medium full of artistic potential, artists have the responsability to excavate this potential to it`s full extend. This goes beyond technique and even craftsmanship. It`s truly about the balance between content and context or form and concept, beauty and meaning, body and soul! - Peter Bremers

Traveling III - 2012 28 x 17 x 6� Kiln cast glass

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Emily Brock Since the question of what might become of glass in the future outdistances my abilities as a soothsayer, I have revised the question. With daily stunning advances and innovations in chemistry and technology affecting almost every field, I am only able to sit back and watch and try to understand. But I have some hopes of what may become of the material in terms of its artistic as well as its functional uses. Since glass has fed my internal and external experience in so many ways, I have always wished that an appreciation of the material and its diversity could extend to a wider audience. The understanding of the origins and manufacture of functional substances like glass has become more and more remote from the average citizen who uses them in their technically focused everyday lives. Artists who work with glass are close to the use of raw materials to create an object, forming artwork with their hands, mind, and heat. My wish is that the process will continue to bring pleasure to the maker and the viewer. I hope that regardless of the technological innovations to come, personalized use of this wonderful material in artistic expression only continues to grow. - Emily Brock

Needlework - 2013

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13.5 x 14.5 x 15.25� Kilnworked, cast and lampworked glass Photo: Terry Brock


Lucio Bubacco Great works of art will be judged by the future itself, based upon what enduringly matters: the balance between technique and concept. Today we are engulfed with works that suffer from being appraised socially. Their assessment is made without knowing how to choose between conceptuality, which stresses originality; and technique, which can limit the artist’s individualized work. Additionally, the discernment of art in the future will be free from all of today’s contaminations. I hope that the focus will be on the artwork, which should speak for itself. My technique necessitates quite some time in order to fill space. Space is another element that I wish would undergo a conceptual and perceptual shift. I always thought that the work’s essence, as well as its appreciation, should express its meaning rather than its size, shape or grandeur. I hope I can continue to develop my most recent, daring and innovative ventures. These are projects in which light allows me to express myself for the first time on a large scale. These works are often in collaboration with young people in exploring new technologies through which I always find a great deal of excitement when experiencing unchartered territory. - Lucio Bubacco

Through the Passage Series V - 2012 23.25 x 17.75 x 12.75” Lamp worked glass

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Jose´ Chardiet It’s not in my nature to think into the future about my work. Like most artists, I want my work to be in the finest museums and private collections. I really immerse myself in the work that I am making at the moment, focusing on trying to push it as far as I can. I foresee the acceptance of glass as an art medium continuing to grow into the future. Hopefully, over time, the prejudices against certain materials will totally disappear. - José Chardiet

Birch - 2013

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30.5 x 9.5 x 8.5” Sand cast and hot worked glass Photo: Marty Doyle


Daniel Clayman At age fifty-five, if I really consider the next fifty years, then I must contemplate being 105 years old! At that point in time, perhaps I will be able to just think of an idea and an object would appear out of thin air. To that extent, the future is on its way! In my studio practice, I employ age old techniques that are driven by my hand. At the same time, I am utilizing the most current computer driven techniques for conception and production of sculptural concerns. As an artist, I am committed to continue making work with an avid determination to embrace newly emerging technologies while continuing to work with my hands. In short, any technique is game to bring my ideas to fruition. - Daniel Clayman

Marque Two - 2013 18 x 6.75 x 6.5� Cast glass Photo: Mark Johnston

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Deanna Clayton “The future you have, tomorrow, won’t be the same future you had, yesterday.” - Chuck Palahniuk, Rant I believe the art world will be amazed at what is accomplished in glass over the next 50 years. The future is so promising for artists who choose to work with glass for artistic expression. The tendency to refer to sculptural works made in glass as “glass art” rather than “art” will, hopefully, dissipate. As with most things, our children will have it easier than ourselves. The advancement of available tools and studio accessibility will make those hurdles bend leaving artists more time and energy for creative expression without the fatigue of technical issues. My personal wish for my future as an artist working with glass is that the material will be secondary to the work itself. Glass is captivating by nature which brings a special life to any form. I believe it is a monumental task to make work that speaks regardless of the medium. I would like to stop referring to myself as a “glass artist” and simply say I am an “artist“. The evolution of my vision coupled with my experience are working towards creating that future. - Deanna Clayton

She - 2013

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10 x 11 x 9” Cast glass & electroplated copper


Keith Clayton My hope for the future of glass and its role in the art world is that it will stay the course of becoming an uncontested sculptural medium. Fifteen years ago while I was in graduate school, my sculpture critiques were constantly bogged down with the debate of glass: I.E. a medium too steeped in craft to be taken seriously in a purely sculptural format. It has now blossomed, and for the most part, anyone reading this statement has played a role in nurturing that process. Obviously this catalog is a great testament to that process as well and for that I thank Habatat for being a beacon for so many interested parties. As for my own goals for the future, I definitely have my most exciting work ahead of me. My days in the studio are still filled with discovery; and some disappointment. I have always said glass is a merciless material that will forever keep you humble. Much like raising children it has its challenges at every new stage of the process. So for all of us I raise my handmade glass in a toast to the next 50 years - Cheers! - Keith Clayton

Component of Time - 2013 12 x 12 x 8� Cast glass

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Matthew Curtis This sculpture draws upon the ambiguous sense of an artifact, amorphous yet structured. This essentially architectural façade, references the intricacies of microscopic cellular architecture. This diversity of forms in nature and the ability of humans to describe the universe mathematically is a recurring theme within my work. Into the future, I envisage continuing this sculptural investigation with the material. I see the potential and the complexity of glass as a medium to continue and grow in recognition within the fine art community over the coming decades. Whilst the strengths of the studio glass movement will continue to foster techniques and skills, much may be lost in this changing landscape of small factory closures. The strength of all our artistic endeavours with glass must be partnered by the commitment of strong galleries and passionate art lovers. - Matthew Curtis

Xylem Section Amber and Scarlet - 2013

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16.5 x 36 x 12� Blown, constructed and carved glass Photo: Rob Little


Miriam Di Fiore The next 50 years compels me to recollect my past. I have already lived 54 years and I am a lucky woman: I have not suffered from lack of love, or hunger, nor cold. I breathe fresh air most of my time, am loved and still love. All of my five senses are intact, maybe even a sixth. My mind is able to take root in the ground and also to fly high. Conflict and pain have brushed by me without harm or damage. I was born female, and with the gift of art. Thankfully, I belong to that small group of people in the world who can express those gifts. My works have found beautiful places in the hearts of my collectors. I never feel alone. The glass, ah, the glass - he is the most charming and passionate lover, the most difficult to conquer, the most unpredictable, fickle, and brilliant in his joy, sharp in the cusp of his wrath. He is soft and yielding to my desires, hard and cold in demanding respect. My glass, he is always faithful. It seems almost incredible. How can I ask for more? What can I dare to hope for the future? I can only thank life and pray to the fates not to forsake me; to allow me to continue on my way for another 50 years!!!!! I have delusions of immortality which I owe to my passion for glass. I promise to continue sharing all of this grace, not to interrupt the flow of poetry and beauty, play and folly, of human hope in the divine wisdom of nature. I promise not to conceal anything. I am vulnerable and naked and will continue to follow my love of glass for the next 50 years. - Miriam Di Fiore

Wolff - 2012 15 x 15 x 14� Fused glass and mixed media

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Dan Dailey

Right - 2011

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16 x 16 x 4� Blown and cast glass with metals Photo: Bill Truslow


Wall Street Times Journal, May 12, 2034 Berkshire Hathaway Zuckerberg announced the purchase of Habatat Galleries International (HGI) today, for an undisclosed amount. Royal Oak, Michigan based HGI controls fifty galleries worldwide, mostly operated by Hampson family members, descendants and relatives of original gallery founder Ferdinand Hampson. Currently HGI represents over 7,500 artists who make their art from glass. HGI began purchasing other art galleries in the early 21st century, often converting the galleries from a focus on traditional painting and sculpture to glass-based works of art, and aided numerous artists trained in other mediums in their conversion to a palette of glass. The Berkshire acquisition, which will leave the Hampson family in management, merges HGI with sixteen other art-oriented businesses including Sotheby Bonham Group auction houses, Picasso-Warhol-Hirst Enterprises, Shanghai Bombay Art Culture World, and the Brandt International Art Publishing consortium.

Montecito California, June 24, 2063 HUSBAND (exasperated) “What are we going to do with all this glass stuff from your parents’ house? WIFE (pleading) “My father wanted to give it all to a museum so they could take a tax deduction, but there are so many glass collections in museums, they told him they only wanted two pieces from their collection.” “Well that doesn’t do us any good! There are 23 glass sculptures in heavy boxes filling up our garage, and I just got my new car.” “But they have to be valuable… My mother said they were all made by famous artists.” “Maybe they were famous—back then.” “You don’t think anybody knows who they are now?” “We’ll have to find out their names and see if their art’s still worth anything.” “Hm…. We could try finding a glass art gallery to sell them, like that International Habatat I read about.” “Think we could get a good price?” Silence HUSBAND “Maybe you should have let your sister take it all, instead of just her favorite three.” WIFE “Come on, you said you liked some of them when they were all displayed on pedestals and those glass shelves and lit up with special lighting.” “I guess I did say that. We should get them all out of the boxes and take a good look at the art, and find out more about the artists who made them.” “Oh, the glass could look nice in our house!”

Bentonville, Arkansas, September 7, 2047 Thank you for this opportunity to speak. Personal feelings of awe for the collections in this museum and deep respect for the evident scholarship that underlies your acquisitions have long inspired my curatorial goals. In addressing the topic of works made from glass, please allow me to review the development of certain material based art movements which began a little over one

hundred ten years ago; about 1950. Artists who sought a professional education at an art college or university, imagining they might become a painter or a sculptor, became interested in various mediums then known as the basis for particular handicrafts. Pottery making and glassblowing and jewelry making and furniture making and other traditional crafts were taught in art colleges and universities without the intention of educating makers of useful things. Therefore the artists adopted palettes, if you will, of working techniques with certain materials. Many artists learned how to make a pot or blow a glass vase and they continued to adopt these traditional forms as a kind of format for their personal work. This can be seen as similar to a painter working on a rectangular canvas, where acceptance of the form is subliminal and the viewer focuses on the image the artist has created instead of the shape on the wall. Artists working with glass often made vessel forms because it is a common creative response to the natural shape of a bubble on the end of a blow pipe, rolling back and forth in a lathe like manner on the rails of the bench. The goal of these artists seems to have been skill development through practice and learning many time honored techniques so they could produce beautiful vessels. However some artists, when introduced to glass as a medium, immediately launched into works that bore no resemblance to the traditional objects produced through these craft methods, and they used the materials in ways quite different from historical precedents. Each of the mediums I have mentioned went through a long period of such transition, where artists confronted the traditions and either adopted them as their own while making slight twists on historic precedents, or put the skills to use in the realization of other visual thoughts, thus advancing the history of the medium. During the height of this movement, which has been labeled Materialism, the question “Is it Art or is it Craft?” was often debated. In fact, this Art versus Craft controversy was the result of a movement that lasted at least 75 years, from 1950 to 2025. It can be compared to significant art movements such as Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, or any other “ism” that has been identified. Works of art made from glass were at the vanguard of this movement. Perhaps no other material based art was so avidly produced by artists, sold by galleries, purchased by collectors, or became part of museum collections. From the earliest experimental glassblowing workshops in the 1960’s until about 1980 works beyond tradition were tentative and small with a few rare exceptions. But during the late 20th century and into the 21st century artists began to make large and complex works, and technically sophisticated, highly expressive works that are well distinguished from anything produced during the prior 3,500 year long history of glass. It must be said that the market for their art enabled them to make such progress with the medium. Patronage has historically provided impetus for the creation of important works of art, and it is fortunate that so many supporters of the artists, from the galleries to the collectors and museums encouraged and enabled the artists to produce. While it may difficult to imagine in 2063, with art made from glass as prevalent as paintings on canvas, glass 75 years ago was regarded as an art material for artisans instead of artists. Because the high art - low art schism existed, and it was unusual for any museum of fine art to exhibit works made from glass. This was largely because many considered only the material when evaluating the works, and they were therefore not considering the motives and manifestations of this unusual group of artists. Eventually the accomplishments of some artists, through their life’s work, became not only popular but critically accepted for the powerfully rich and important contribution it has been to the history of art. Now I will show you particular examples of artists’ work, and discuss their individual rationale and methods. The artist probably known to all of you is...

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Laura Donefer Three Decades are Just the Beginning! Throughout my thirty year career I have attempted to produce heartfelt work with an unbridled passion, seeking to push the boundaries of traditional glassmaking. My work always begins as an emotional response to a specific situation that deeply affects me. I then experiment with the glass to best illustrate my reaction. Many of the pieces created, from the early “Witchpot” series to the “Shields to Ward off Madness” installation, also contain diverse materials to compliment the glass components, and this combination of elements adds to the power of the work. Everything that I create with glass and mixed media is imbued with compelling colour combinations either describing intense emotions or serving to reinforce a spirit of joie de vivre. Riding on this hot firebrand of a material has taken me on a crazy journey of creativity and self-discovery, and I have come to understand how complex a soul lies beneath its lustred façade. Glass is a shape shifter, and can be anything it wants to be; translucent, opaque, transparent, textured, coloured, sharp, smooth, rough, ugly, gorgeous, broken translating into any metaphor that the artist brings to it. So I will continue my journey of discovery, keeping alive my burning passion for this molten material; Glass has become my true soul sister. We are forever intertwined, her heat tattooed into my blood. My future is Glass, in whatever form that takes, and I cannot wait to see what crazy path I get to gallop down. I might even last fifty more years, just wheel me up to the glory hole! - Laura Donefer

MiniBaskets - 2013 Small Blue Amulet Basket (top) 7 x 9” - Blue blown/flameworked glass

Small Red Amulet Basket (middle left) 6 x 10” - Red blown/flameworked glass, mixed media

Small Red with Purple Dots Basket (middle right) 5.5 x 10” - Red, purple, green blown/flameworked glass, mixed media

Small Green Amulet Basket (bottom left) 8 x 10” - Green, purple blown/flameworked glass, mixed media

Small Yellow Amulet Basket (bottom right)

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8.5 x 8.5” - Yellow blown/flameworked glass Photos: Stephen Wild


Irene Frolic

As an artist, my quest has been to explore and expand the emotive possibilities of glass as a medium for artistic expression. I have wanted to have the viewer feel what I feel, even though I am not always exactly sure what that is! To some extent I have been successful. For the future, I hope to represent what I have learned so far about living in the world: as an artist and as a human being. In the past two years I have sent four works to the Habatat International that represent four things that I believe are important. 1.

Subdue your monkey brain: Thirteen Monkeys, 2012

2.

Accept all gifts: The Gift, 2012

3.

Have no fear: The Tempest 2013

4.

Go to your well: The Well 2013

As for the future of glass as an art medium: I think that it is not primarily the glass which will lead that, but the artists. I am hoping that the young artists continue to individualize and forge their own trail. They are capable of doing that as I have met so many of them in the workshops. Don’t be tame! And finally, gazing into my crystal ball…..I saw the opening night of the 2063 Habatat 91st International. And there were the grandchildren of today, all the now middle age little Hampsons and Scheys smiling and greeting the glass aficionados who came to wonder at the creations before them, and to bask in the hospitality they have come to expect from Habatat. Carry On!! - Irene Frolic

The Tempest - 2013 17 x 12 x 6” Photo: Rebekah D’Amboise Tremblay

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Susan Taylor Glasgow Judging by the tremendous strides of the previous 50 years of studio glass, the next 50 are sure to amaze, stir our hearts, and inspire us all. I hope that in 50 years, the next generation of emerging glass artists will look upon present artists with the same admiration as we had for our glass predecessors. We’ll have to earn it, of course, by creating quality work and challenging content. By developing new techniques and voices; by taking chances and working hard; by setting a good example for the newly born emerging artists. My personal goals within my art are to address human issues that cannot be controlled – the choices in our lives, or the lack of choices; people we meet and the places they hold in our lives; dreams, or the absence of dreams. My “Bound” series of work attempts to address these concepts by binding two related domestic objects together with glass chain. One object is as beautiful as I could make it, the other as ugly, representing how our lives are bound to unforeseen circumstances. - Susan Taylor Glasgow

It’s Always With Me - 2013

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7.5 x 18 x 8.5” glass, mixed media


Javier Gomez

The title “Visions” was chosen for Habatat Galleries 41st International Glass Exhibition. Since I was a kid, I have always looked at my inner dreams, emotions, feelings and visions to help shape my work. My visions are still flowing within me. They lead me into unknown worlds that reflect my feelings and sensibilities. - Javier Gomez

Eclipse - 2012 26 x 31.9 x 13.75” Laminated Glass

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Robin Grebe I see glass as a material rooted in the earth and the working of it, in some ways, primal. I find it difficult to fathom what the glass in the world of art will look like in 2063! However, the work that is coming out of the studios of new students is very exciting and isn’t at all rooted in ‘primal’ processes. The future looks bright. As for my own work, I am currently playing with changing imagery as well as some new processes. To date these pieces have yet to yield results that are suitable for exhibition, but I’m confident that they will be in the future. - Robin Grebe

Mariner - 2013

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24 x 7 x 8” Cast Glass, paint


Eric Hilton 50 years on – general thoughts. To move onwards from the present to new concepts of innovation. Energetic dialogue with diversity. Recognize, define, overcome traditional boundaries. Fulfill newfound desires. To share explore cultural diversities. Fluidity of exploration. Merging of science and art as one. Pursuit of history, myth and illusion. Influence of the Earth’s climate. Dictates of Earth’s resources. Nature perceived as unaltered art. - Eric Hilton

Primordial Deep - 2013 16 x 11.5 x 11.5” Cut, polished and engraved glass Photo: The Artist.

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Toma´sˇ Hlavicˇ ka The world of constructing sculpture in glass is very diverse and incorporates many styles and techniques. And that’s the problem. How do we know what to do? I would say that we are waiting for some impetus. We have the desire to express our ideas and be identified by our technique and style. This may dilute the fact that we are European, American or from anywhere else in the world. We are waiting for the new Libenskys, Wirkkala, Chihulys and others. When sculptural glass exploration began in the ‘60s, techniques such as lamination were discovered. In the future, glass will be electrically integrated, illuminated and conceptually innovated. Glass will not melt but print. Cutting, grinding and polishing process will be fully automated. I will not fantasize anymore. I want to remain true to my technique of fusing glass with metal because I have still have a lot to develop in my creative space. Long live the glass! - Tomáš Hlavicˇka

Cradle - 2013

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18.9 x 8.7 x 4.7” Cut, polished and laminated glass, gold and silver leafing


Petr Hora Where glass as an art medium will be headed in the next 50 years? That’s really tough question, because 50 years in the whole history of glass is not so much. Glass as a material has been around for more than 5000 years, and it took another 3000 years for the Phoenicians to create whistles made from glass. Within the history, probably the biggest revolution glass made in architecture and hi-tech industry. Today we cannot imagine the light in our homes without the bulbs and bulbs without glass. Optical glass has paved the way to the mysterious universe; the optical fiber is connected with the transmission of information. I have been working with glass for almost 50 years, but I cease to understand its mysteries and broad applications. My goal in art, which I would like to achieve, is not unusual. I wish to make glass objects which will still be an essential part of our lives and homes. Glass is a splendid material and has been since its inception. As a sculptural material it is tricky due to its physical properties. We can be “fooled” by its optical effects that are not found in other sculptural materials. At the same time its fragility makes the artist incredibly vulnerable and open to discouragement. - Petr Hora

Esprite - 2013

17.75 x 17.75” Cast glass Photo: Gabriel Urbanek

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David Huchthausen I started working with glass in 1970 and became aware of Harvey Littleton’s program in Madison about a year later. There were only a handful of university glass programs across the United States back then, and a relatively small number of exhibiting artists. I don’t think any of us working at the time had any concept of how far glass would evolve over the ensuing decades. Up until the mid 1970s, most artists working with glass were still struggling to master techniques necessary to work with the material. By the late 1970s, technical abilities began to catch up to aesthetic concepts and the studio glass movement expanded quickly. More galleries were opened, a market developed, and prices increased to the point where an artist could make a living from his work. The glass movement spread rapidly through the university system and small production studios such as Lundberg and Orient and Flume also sprung up. Most of the early sculptural work was very experimental and a market did not really start to develop for it until the early 1980s. There were certainly some excellent examples of early sculptural work, including Joel Meyers “Doctor Zarkov” series from 1970, Marvin Lipofsky’s “Leerdam” series, and Dale Chihuly and Jamie Carpenter’s neon installations in 1971, but these were exceptions to the rule. Between 1978 and 1984 I curated the “Americans in Glass” triennial exhibitions, which toured to various museums across the United States. Most of the work in the 1978 catalogue consisted of vessel forms. The 1981 exhibition showcased a greater number of female artists and an increasing emphasis on sculpture. By the time the 1984 exhibition toured to ten museums in Europe, virtually all the work was sculptural. In recent years we have seen increasing emphasis on conceptual work with glass, including mixed media and larger scale installations. Some of this work is now readily accepted into museum exhibitions along with traditional sculpture. The stigma and perception of a “glass ghetto” has dissipated significantly. Many new and exciting artists, such as Josiah McElheny, Karen Lamont and Beth Lipman, are pushing glass into intriguing sculptural realms. While it is impossible to predict exactly how the use of glass may fit into the fine art world 50 years from now, I would assume that it would be treated the same as any other sculptural material without bias or prejudice. In my introductory essay to the 1981 “Americans in Glass” catalogue, I stated that studio glass objects had emerged in a continual unchallenged stream, escaping significant critical evaluation. Today we have a much-improved level of criticism and dialogue, but the work is seldom challenged and analyzed to the extent that it would be in the fine art world. I expect this to evolve and intensify along with the sophistication of the work. I believe that glass will continue to gain acceptance as an artistic medium with a bright and illustrious future that none of us could possibly have envisioned 30 years ago. - David Huchthausen

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Telstar Three - 2012 10 x 10 x 10” Cut and polished glass Photo: Lloyd Shugart


Toshio Iezumi I know that the art museums in U.S.A. house good collections of Japanese craftwork and that there are so many collectors of them. About at the end of 19th century Westerners imported so many good craft products, which the Japanese Meiji people neglected. Do you know that Japan had no concept of fine art before the modernization in Meiji Period (c.1868-1912)? The Meiji Government introduced the concept of fine art for the purpose of commercialization and the fine art separated itself from the traditional craftwork around the beginning of the twentieth century. Now in Japan the craftwork as industrial art at the end of 19th century is beginning to be re-evaluated. I suppose that the craftwork produced in the course of segregation of fine art and craftwork has some riches based on the un-differentiation between craft and expression. This kind of history suggests the possibility of reconstructing the relation between craft and expression. I believe it is necessary to look at the past in order open the way to the future. - Toshio Iezumi

M.080704 - 2013 82.7 x 7.9 x 3.9� Directly carved, polished, laminated float glass and mirror Photo: The Artist

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Martin Janecky My goal for the next 50 years is to keep my dream alive, to keep developing and exploring the endless possibilities of Glass. Although, I wish I knew what is going to happen tomorrow. - Martin Janecky

Hero T2 - 2013

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31 x 9 x 7� Hot sculpted glass Photo: The Artist


Richard Jolley One immediate goal I have is to complete the fabrication and installation of the site specific project [titled Cycle of life, with in the power of dreams and the wonder of infinity] I have been working on for the Knoxville Museum of Art since 2009. This has afforded me an amazing opportunity to work on a monumental scale (it is 180 running feet with an overhead suspended component that is 8 x 22 x 6 feet) and I hope to work on other projects of this scope in the future. It has been challenging and rewarding to blend the architectural, engineering, and artistic elements required to accomplish my vision for the installation. This project is epic in nature and has been a stretch for me and for my studio to produce this work in glass and metal. We have one estimate that the installation could take up to six months so the size and logistic are daunting. To see this 6+ year undertaking come to fruition in the near future is both exciting and frightening because the pressure is on to have it completed in time to be unveiled in May of 2014. Longer term goals are similar to what most artists want which is to continue to make work because there are always more ideas than time to realize them. As for the future of glass, it lies with those that work with the material. - Richard Jolley

Suspended in Dreams #3 - 2013 22 x 17 x 9� Hot sculpted glass

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Steven Klein The work that I make differs in inspiration, yet is the result of considered contemplation and my desire to bring beauty to life. Inspiration comes from my emotional interaction with everyday life and quite often is influenced by the environment and special moments that I experience. With all of my work, now and in the future, I seek to provide a moment away, a very small respite of beauty and solace from the everyday. In the process of developing and making, I’m constantly reminded to look for beauty and positive aspects in that occur in every part and phase of my life. I am taken with the sensuous and sensitive beauty of glass, and it’s relationship with light and the excitement of the cast reflections. I’m excited to be making work at a time when this wonderful material is reaching beyond material and technique into the recognized circles of art. Like most of the artists working with glass, the relationship and understanding between the material and the artist’s thoughts and ideas continues to grow and mature. We see that there are no barriers in what we can do or say with this material. We only need the time and desire to continue on this exciting, evolving and ever changing path of discovery. - Steve Klein

Exploration 173 - 2012

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18.5 x 18.5 x 7” kilnformed and blown glass Photo: Jason VanFleet


Marta Klonowska My animal figures are part of historical paintings, where they play a secondary role to the sitters. In my art the animals perform as the principal actor. Animals are difficult to understand and it is difficult to communicate with them. My glass animals open therefore a new reality, which is different from ours. The sitters in the painting, the animals and the audience of my art perform in a kind of theatrical stage, where the different levels become indistinct. This clash of realities should make us think about the uncertainties of life.� - Marta Klonowska

Chamois - 2010 41 x 43 x 16� Assembled glass

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Vladimira Klumpar Just as people today print their photos on their printers at home, they will probably soon use three dimensional printers to print out of plast or other new materials their own objects. I believe glass, due to technical difficulties and cost, will be exclusively used by the craftsman or artist. It will stay the same outstanding and magical material. In the future, I would like to more deeply understand its great properties. I am continually amazed by the beauty and magic of glass. - Vladimira Klumpar

Hold - 2012

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72 x 13 x 12.5� Cast glass Photo: Eva Heyd


Judith LaScola I cringe when asked, “What’s next? Where is the future direction of your work leading you and how does it relate to a new time?”. Such a question initially draws me outside myself; but when applied to one’s artwork the answer is so deeply personal. It always gives me a shot of anxiety. Change for me can and usually does happen slowly. It is only in hindsight that I understand the direction in which my work has evolved. We all make small choices every day and experience teaches us these small personal preferences define us simply by their accumulation. With honesty, we admit these steps are an attempt to be true to ourselves and our creativity. I don’t think most of the time I know where the future is taking me, but with trust I learn to accept and follow. The future of my work is equal to the faith I carry with me in those small daily steps. With a combination of time and creative wisdom I begin to see and feel a direction that I may choose to follow. I am left to contemplate the “what ifs.” For me, part of the answers begin with play, observation, new information and a period of hibernation. - Judith LaScola

Red on the Right Returning - 2013 18 x 18 x 10” Blown, hot worked and enameled glass

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Jiyong Lee My art education was grounded in the long history of Korean ceramics tradition joined with modern Bauhaus philosophy. This education concentrated on refining design and technical skills with an emphasis on developing a strong work ethic. When I relocated to the United States in 1998, I decided to move “across the corridor� from clay to glass and focus on refining my sensitivity as an artist. I am fascinated with the translucency and transparency of glass, two qualities of the material that I believe serve as perfect metaphors for what is unknown and known about life science. My segmentation series is inspired by my fascination with cell division and the journey of growth that starts from a single cell and goes through a million divisions to become a life. Cell biology and cell division are quiet, visually unperceivable, yet incredibly powerful processes, and for the years ahead I intend to visualize those aspects of life science in the series of work. - Jiyong Lee

White Embryo Segmentation - 2013

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7 x 13.5 x 5� Cut, color laminated, carved, glass


Shayna Leib Twenty years ago when I started my journey into glass, it had already begun transcending its origin as a craft based material. The eighteen and twenty-year-old hotshots who were my classmates would have vehemently argued that the only true path to glass heaven was to be an Italian master. Even in those days, it wasn’t common for a girl to study glassblowing, and the obligatory heckling from the boys was enough to make one challenge the resolve to learn one of the most difficult mediums of expression known to the art world. Although I’m still enjoying the moniker of newbie in the glass world, I have seen my own share of progressive tendencies in this medium. Never more so than when I taught glassblowing at the University of Wisconsin and received my roster for the class which included a female to male ratio of 13:3. I remembered that twelve years prior, I was the only female to go through six years of glassblowing classes at Cal Poly University. I was very amazed that my group of young students were as interested in casting and kiln forming techniques as they were in learning the art of blowing. I couldn’t believe the changes just twelve years brought, not only in gender ratios, but in the evolving interests of the students. Technology has evolved exponentially in glass. It’s nice to not have to worry if the pumpkin orange colorant you want to use will crack your piece. It’s nice to have cullet that doesn’t require an industrial self-contained breathing apparatus to charge into the furnace. And it’s even nicer that I am able to now run my moly furnace for two months and then shut the thing off for however long I want. I can only look upon the future with a sense of giddiness at being able to charge borosilicate in my tank and blow with it like soda-lime glass without any limitations. I can dream of fire-apparatus overload, as if an octopus of various hoses and torches and burners capable of melting any type of glass awaits me in the future so that my every idea can become a reality. In the future we won’t be inhibited by the limitations with which we started. I believe, that although technique is rightly revered, the concept will triumph with a little help from new technology. As for my own work, it is changing and evolving, in order to keep the boredom at bay, I have been engaged in research and development of a new body of work that incorporates cast glass and light. I believe I have figured out a way for technology and the annealer to express my OCD instead of my worn fingers. That is one beautiful light at the end of the tunnel. Two Seas - 2012 24 x 44 x 8” Glass and resin Photo: Eric Tadsen

- Shayna Leib

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Antoine Leperlier My view is to combine glass with other materials because I believe that to achive real art we cannot be defined by just one material. Material is very important to me, even more important is why I use it. If a material does not suit my purposes, I have to find another one, as I do with ceramic today. During 50 years we have been under the question of ‘How ?’ Now we must know ‘How ?’ and ‘Why ?’ - Antoine Leperlier

Flux Et Fixe-XXVIII - 2013

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30 x 9 x 30” Cast glass pâte de verre with inclusion of ceramic material. Two firing process


Stanislav Libensky &Jaroslava Brychtova

Metamorphosis V - 1994-08 38 x 30.75� Cast glass

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Steve Linn Recently I participated on a panel with Peter Bremers and Alex Bernstein at Art Palm Beach. The topic was “What will happen to glass art in the next 50 years”. The lively discussion produced a number of interesting thoughts, chief among them was that glass art must join the world of contemporary art as a full partner and not be seen as a borderline craft medium. We want to see glass artists exhibited in major museums next to Jean-Michel Basquiat, Damian Hurst, Tracey Emin or any of the ranking artists of the current avant-garde. The other subjects were how would more sophisticated educational programs and the development of new technologies affect the work that is produced in the studio. Would advances in fiber optics enter the work of Toots Zynsky? Would liquid crystal technology allow Tim Tate to make three-dimensional moving images? As far as my work goes, I can’t say specifically. Recently a product has been developed to make thick colored glass available. It is a process whereby the film between two laminated panels is colored thereby allowing normal float glass to be tinted to a choice of 300 colors. I have begun to use this glass in several projects. What else will come along that will open my eyes to new possibilities? Heaven knows. While on the panel in Florida I related an anecdote that I will repeat here. In France there was a woman, Jeanne Calment, who lived to be 122 years old. She was in good health until the end, drinking her two glasses of red wine a day and smoking until she was 119. I will be 70 on May 3 of this year and I fully intend to break her record and be a strong participant in the next 50 years and into the 50 years that follows. - Steve Linn

Provocateur (Marcel Duchamp) - 2013

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61.5 x 39.5 x 31.5” Sandblasted carved glass, cast glass, wood, cast bronze Photo: The Artist


Marvin Lipofsky My work at the International Glass Symposium in the Czech Republic changed at a time when Czechoslovakia had divided into two separate countries, The Czech Republic and Slovakia. I was very excited to have been invited to an International Glass Symposium in 1982. Ten years later, just as the country peacefully separated, so had my sculptures, creating the first series of split pieces I named “Czech Flowers.” The new nations gradually developed, and so did my work, becoming more complex and more sensitive to the nuances of the medium. Later in my Berkeley Studio, the work of refining the pieces through cutting and grinding completed the process. I see the sculptures as reflecting a bridge between two cultures and I offer them in celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the establishment of the Czech Republic and Slovakia. 50 years ago I started working in glass with Harvey Littleton, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. At that time, I could not possibly see the evolution of the glass world to what it is today. Maybe Harvey did. My approach was to work at my art and resolve problems as they came up. It has been an interesting life. I was a student then and now I am considered one of the “old glass guys.” My hope is that I can still continue working with the challenging world of glass for another 50 years. - Marvin Lipofsky

IGS VI 1997-99 #10 - 1997-1999 (International Glass Symposium VI) 13” x 24” x 17” Blown at Novy Bor, Novy Bor, Czech Republic with help from: Frantisek Cejka and team Finished by the artist in his Berkeley studio Photo: M. Lee Fatherree

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La´ szlo´ Luka´ csi in the World of [my] Glass Works I think only visions can be imagined and descripted relating to future. As I can forsee the role of glass in different ways of our life – I mean everyday objects too – it will be given bigger and bigger importance. Architecture and design too will apply glass in more and more measure and it has effect on the (fine) art of glass as well. The high tech of forming of glass as a noble matter will cause that the borders of forming glass become wider so glass-artists can make and express their imaginations more precise and easier. As an artist surveying my past and imagine my future glass-works similarly my purposes I can see a glassworld that gradually becomes more creative, more thoughtful, more precise, more clear, fine and silent that can tell more and more to other people. I do hope. - László Lukácsi

Leaf - 2012

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11.75 x 15.75 x 4” Cut and laminated glass Photo: Douglas Schaible


Lucy Lyon Since early days my work has involved the figure. People have been the most important element. When I began casting glass I relied on the material to give the figures an inner light. At first I made portraits in stained glass. The first castings were anonymous figures in groups interacting. More developed figures, alone or in pairs, in complex environments followed. The environments became simplified into geometric shapes as the figures became larger. I began exploring the power of non-verbal communication: a tilt of the head, a twist of the body. Subtle gestures, color and details of hair and dress told the story. Today the figures are larger still, more finely sculpted, and making it possible to convey more nuanced gestures. The figures use the subtle aspects of body language to tell you more about an individual. Color also plays an important role and can easily change the tone of expression. My desire has always been to connect the viewer and the figure on an empathetic level so that the viewer can say, �I know that person.� I will continue to seek that connection. - Lucy Lyon

Second Station - 2010 21 x 39 x 15� Cast glass figures and fabricated steel base Photo: Addison Doty

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Ivan Mares

Leaf - 2009

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35 x 51 x 5� Cast glass


John Miller I feel privileged to have been introduced to glass at Southern Connecticut State University by one of the original group of students from Harvey’s first class in Madison, Wisconsin. Peter Pelletieri was a maker, historian and collector of glass most of his life. He assured me that there was a bright future for glass in the fine art arena. Peter gave me the chance to teach for the first time. I immediately felt a deep connection with the students and I thoroughly enjoy my role as an educator now at Illinois State University. Instructors like Peter largely shaped the first fifty years of the glass movement. We must thank the pioneers that created this monsterLittleton, Myers, Halem, Dreisbach, Babcock and Carlson just to name a few. The current university glass faculties in this country have the important but gratifying job of steering the next generation through another Fifty. - John Miller

Box O Fries - 2012 33 x 26 x 17� Mold blown and sandblasted glass w/ mixed media Photo: The Artist

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Charlie Miner Wow! 50 years of studio glass! The glass movement for me was a complete gift, having always being in the arts, high school through college. I immediately started work out of college in a bronze foundry in Santa Fe. In 1972, I attended a sculpture conference in Lawrence, Kansas. They had a small glass studio set up (Harvey Littleton). When I returned to Santa Fe, I hooked up with ‘Glory Hole Glassworks’ and immediately fell in love with functional glassblowing. I spent the next Ten years at craft fairs. After that I traveled out to Pilchuck for a glass casting workshop. When I returned home I started combining bronze techniques with ancient glass casting techniques. Here I am, 65, and still loving it! In the next 50 years, I hope to go back to some of my earlier drawings (alien fish traps!). We’ll see if I can make them come alive!!!! - Charlie Miner

Permit Bowl - 2013

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14 x 23 x 23” Cast glass Photo: Douglas Schaible


Debora Moore In the future, I see glass having a larger role in architecture and architectural components. As the medium evolves with technology, it will be exciting to see how the structural possibilities are integrated into innovative construction. - Debora Moore

Moth Orchid - Gigantica II - 2012 16 x 15 x 7� Blown and Sculpted Glass Photo: Lynn Thompson

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William Morris Stories are the vehicle that moves metaphor and image into experience. Like metaphors and images, stories communicate what is generally invisible and ultimately inexpressible. In seeking to understand these realities through time, stories provide a perspective that touches on the divine, allowing us to see reality in full context, as part of its larger whole. Stories invite a kind of vision that gives shape and form even to the invisible, making the images move, clothing the metaphors, throwing color into the shadows. Of all the devices available to us, stories are the surest way of touching the human spirit. - William Morris

Alligator Mask - 2003 (left) 11 x 14 x 7� Blown glass and steel stand

Artifact: Mask - 1995 (right)

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14 x 11 x 17� Blown glass and steel stand Photo: Rob Vinnedge (both)


Kathleen Mulcahy Events of the past year have conspired to have me reconsider everything, including my work and where it is heading. It is easy to look back and say “yes, I see the path I am on” but forward is like looking through a Kaleidoscope. How does one choose where to go, or not go? In fact, by standing still I am choosing to go deeper. Does anyone really leap? I don’t. I am a planner, a plodder, an observer of the smallest detail. Most recently this hit home when one of my tai chi instructors said that one could spend all of their time just in the very first move of “opening the door”. Right there at the beginning we can learn so much about ourselves. That is how I feel about the drop form. I think the future should be about holding to a small piece of ground, mapping it thoroughly, discovering every corner, and finding out what makes it breathe. By allowing the image I am seeking, the one I am asking for, to come into focus from this crazy prismatic puzzle, it arrives fully formed in concept, permitting me, the artist, the use of the broad brush to shape it to my will. Deeper, holding close, listening for the “tang”, the clang, the ring, the thing, that arrives as the field disappears. - Kathleen Mulcahy

Tidal - 2013 68 x 42 x 6” Aluminum and drops

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Bretislav Novak Jr. It is a courageous thought. If the technological development continues to move quickly, the future will allow the creation of objects that can be applied to 3D printers that can form a variety of materials, including glass. These innovations will provide inspiration and appreciation of the artist’s sculpture. - Bretislav Novák Jr.

Avalanche - 2013

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17.7 x 11.8 x 11.4” Cut glass


Stepan Pala Vision for next 50 years in glass sculpture: Searching the new creative spaces and topographic and geometric forms. Searching the new possibilities in the mass of glass /3D, colours, opaque mater, optical boundary-line, space score.../ New technologies in glass... - Stephan Pala

Red Wings - 2013 15 x 16.75 x 15� Cast, cut optical and red glass

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Albert Paley My involvement with sculpture is an ongoing dialogue of inner-relationships Fundamentally involving the polarization of opposites Engaging a broad spectrum of sensibilities Transparency Fragility Rigidity Opacity Organic Inorganic The Physical The Concrete The Ephemeral The Alterability of Memory The Intimacy of Transformation The Language of Form Present yet Transient An Evolution of Perception Fundamental and Incorruptible Occupying Space Responding to Gravity Touched by Light The Shadows Passage Holding the Image Most Valued Most Evasive Most Sought - Albert Paley

Subduction - 2013

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54.5 x 15 x 15� Glass, painted steel Photo: Bruce Miller


Zora Palova 50 years? In my age of vision for the next day. Future of glass? Yes. Altough I think no one will work as hard as we do – days,nights, Sundays, even on holidays. On the other hand, there are so many open themes and ideas to work on. I believe to the future of the glass sculpture will continue as new ideas and technologies emerge. - Zora Palova

Sky Waves - 2013 77.75 x 19.75 x 15.75� Cast and cut glass

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Mark Peiser I don’t know about the next 50 years, but last year I discovered a glass that colors light like the sky. - Mark Peiser

Passage Etude Tableau #2 - 2013

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16.25 x 22 x 5.87� (without base, not included) Hot cast phase separated glass. Acid finished Photo: Steve Mann


Marc Petrovic My hope for the future of glass is that artwork made with glass will be seen for what it is, and that is art. - Marc Petrovic

Predator/Prey - 2012 21 x 20 x 5.5� Hot sculpted and fused glass murrini

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Jenny Pohlman & Sabrina Knowles Where Are We Going? In the past several years we have found solace and satisfaction in stylizing and minimizing our glass forms, concentrating on perfection of form in the hot shop and assemblage of pattern and repetition outside of the hot shop for scale and narrative. Now that we have matured these forms, we are being called again by the rhythms of vibrancy and complexity that infused our earlier work. We see each form as a canvas, a symbolic framework onto which specific details of our narrative can unfold and we are exploring venues to manifest this vision. These Selected Works The works we have selected for this year’s invitational unify the two worlds that call to us: the solace of simplicity and the vibrancy of complexity. These works possess both solace and vibrancy and the internal glow inherent in translucent glass. In their totality they possess the subtle and complex curvature we strive to achieve in the hot shop. Once assembled and suspended, they appear effortless and weightless as if floating or transcending, something we attempt to achieve as we craft, create and balance all of our work. The Future of Glass as an Artist’s Material We believe that the pursuit and advancement of green technology in all arenas of glass making is essential for the continuing success of we who choose glass as our medium. That said, we imagine that the individual artist/storyteller will pursue line and verse, chapter after chapter, infusing the material with meaning; we imagine that the artist/musician will do the same, learning chords and assembling visual songs using glass as a material and that the artist/mathematician and the artist/engineer will continue to find challenge and thrill pushing latticino and murrini techniques beyond what is seemingly possible. Perhaps there is no other artist material in existence that can fulfill so many different personalities, both those who work with it and those who appreciate it. - Jenny Pohlman & Sabrina Knowles

Hanging Pod - 2004 (left) 76 x 13” Off-hand sculpted glass, ferrous and non-ferrous metals, findings

Mona’s Sensor - 2004 (right)

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40 x 17” Off-hand sculpted glass, ferrous and non-ferrous metals, findings Photo: Ritama Haaga


Stephen Powell In the last few years my work has gone sort of counter the norm as I have, in some ways, approached making my forms with more traditional techniques. The “Echoes” (bowls) are more neutral shapes that allow my focus on the color inside the forms and on the refractions created as light passes through the pieces and lands on the surface below. Another break from my own tradition has been a departure from using a pointillist (murrini) approach to exploring color and moving in to more linear combinations of color. The influences here are the color field painters such as Kenneth Noland and Gene Davis, along with solar tracking created by stars and moons, such as the moon tracking around Jupiter. Another special influence on these pieces is Lino Tagliapietra who came to Kentucky and helped me develop the Echoes, both technically and aesthetically. In the future, the only real constant that I know will remain in my work is my exploration of color. While the forms of my work seem to be headed in a more traditional direction at this time, I expect that I will need to get crazier and move back to exploring more non-traditional techniques of making glass sometime in the future. Color Rocks! - Stephen Rolfe Powell

Manic Carrot Twister - 2012 6 x 26.5 x 26.5”

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Clifford Rainey The next 50 years will be different than the last as I will not be twelve years old anymore and will most likely have to slow down a bit at some point in the future. I do however know a lot more than I did 50 years ago and I intend to put this knowledge to good use. I hope I continue to wake each morning with an urgency to get to the studio. Not unlike an inquisitive child, my days will be spent asking questions, engage independent thinking and have the integrity to seek truth in what I make with my own sore hands. All artists are born equal but over time a few artists become more equal than others. The terminologies of art have blurred. What is sculpture today? What is craft today? What will art be tomorrow? Will a digitally conceived, machine made object be considered well crafted? In 2062 glass will still be glass, stone - stone, charcoal charcoal, silicon - silicone. Only the artists and their art will be different. - Clifford Rainey

Literary #1 - 2012

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22 x 10 x 10� Cast glass and mixed media Photo: Douglas Schaible


David Reekie I have been working as a glass artist for the past 40 years and my vision of the next 50 years is very positive. My work has always had a figurative element and this use of the figure has created a narrative in the work which has evolved over the years. It has followed social and political changes and I have looked at the human condition as an ever evolving source of ideas. These influences will continue to feed my creative process. Abstracting the figure to give emotive feelings will continue to intrigue me. The series Anonymous Figures is part of this process and leaves on lookers to come to their own conclusion. Glass as an art form is still in its infancy and is now finding its way into the main stream art world. Young artists are pushing the boundaries of glass into new and exciting areas. It is becoming a rich additive to the art of mixed media and sculpture and is educating people in the mysteries of the material. The next 50 years and the future of glass in art is very bright indeed. - David Reekie

Anonymous Figure I - 2012 (left) 15 x 14.2 x 4� Lost wax cast glass abstract figure with enamel colors

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Colin Reid As I write I am preparing for a major retrospective of my work over the past 30 years, so my immediate focus is on the road I have already travelled. It has been a fascinating journey. When I started in the 70’s glass was a new art medium in terms of technique, education, artistic range and market. Since then things have moved forward. So what future trends can we identify? Here are a few observations from a UK perspective; As a student, my goal was to have my own glass studio and make a living as an exhibiting artist. There is now more emphasis among younger artists on travelling light, avoiding the commitment of all that equipment and overhead costs. They tend to rent facilities as needed and be less committed to a particular technique. Work is becoming more conceptdriven. I only hope that the extraordinary skills needed to execute fine work in glass are not compromised. In the UK, the education infrastructure for glass has passed its high water mark and courses are being cut as a quick way to economise in a harsh economic climate. This is a depressing development. The excellent Contemporary Glass Society has likewise lost its core funding, but it is a vibrant organization and is still extremely active. Glass is increasingly being shown in a more mainstream art environment and this is broadening the market for work that can hold its ground in this context. This is an important development and very good for the long term health and dynamism of the medium. I lectured at Tsing Hwa University Glass Department in Beijing a few years ago and was faced with a very smart group of students who asked insightful questions. The market in China is developing fast. As China continues its amazing trajectory it will be interesting to see what impact this has on world glass. Then there is the cost of energy. In Europe, this is an on-going problem and will have a tremendous impact on how we make things. Personally, my upcoming retrospective and book will be a milestone. It has been thought provoking to reflect on where my work has taken me. When the show is over, I plan to take few months off and then return to work- ready for the next chapter. - Colin Reid

Ring of Fire R1718 - 2013

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24.4 x 25.2 x 4� Kilncast glass, ground and polished Photo: The Artist


Ross Richmond Since my start in the field of glass, I have been passionate about using the medium in a sculptural way, trying to bring it out of the realm of craft. My ideas have always been focused on using the material to bring my figurative ideas to life, using glass for its sculptural aspects, rather than it’s colorful and light capturing qualities. However, I’ve recently found inspiration from the paintings of Gustav Klimt, and I’m currently attempting to capture some of the aspects of his paintings in a sculptural form. While studying images of his work, I came across a description of his paintings that is the main impetus behind my current ideas, where “anatomy becomes ornament, and ornament becomes anatomy.” The figures of his “golden phase” have a luminosity to them which has brought me to use some of the natural qualities of glass, such as transparency and light. I’ve also recently visited the Tutankhamun exhibition and have been influenced by the many ideas of ornament and figure composition of ancient Egypt. Both Klimt’s figures and ancient Egyptian sculptures are highly ornate but simplistic in form. I’ve found a common thread in these different ideas that are the inspiration for creating my current body of work. - Ross Richmond

Gilded - 2013 25.5 x 5.5 x 6” Blown hot sculpted glass Photo: Dan Fox

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Richard Ritter Look forward, garden with passion, worry less, love my family, split more wood, fire up the furnace, keep warm, keep cool, enjoy the moment, melt more colors, pull more cane, bundle one more complex murrini, and try not to sweat the small stuff. - Richard Ritter

Les Pommes Verre - 2012

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6 x 6.5 x 6.5� Blown, etched glass and murrini


Marlene Rose The future of glass is bright. It thrills me when I hear people say, “What a great piece of art,” rather than, “What a great piece of glass.” Artists create the future. Making glass is for me about making futures, about taking inspirations from the past, molding them against the ideas of the present and giving them physical forms to carry forward. I want to make great big substantial pieces. I want to push the technical limits far beyond what we know. And I know I am not alone in this desire: I see new things, new techniques, new imaginings, newly made in every studio, at every show. With all of this, I am proud to be part of this exciting period in history. - Marlene Rose

Red Memento - 2013 99 x 27 x 23” Sandcast Glass Photo: David A. Monroe

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Davide Salvadore Until now glass has not truly been seen at an artistic level, but as a product or commodity. It has therefore been appreciated without question. If a buyer likes the finished product, it is purchased. In the last 50 years, thanks to the great wealth of information brought forward by various institutions, schools, galleries, museums and artists associated with the studio glass movement, famous or not, people have begun to understand that behind the finished object, there is great passion, dedication and effort. The ability to create the designs you envision requires years of sacrifice and experience, and many times, not even a lifetime is enough. In this time of crisis, with mass production of poorly made or inauthentic goods, there is an increased need for proper development in the research of conceptual art. I imagine that the challenge of the next 50 years will be the continued development of both quality and concept in glass art. - Davide Salvadore

Spingarpa - 2012

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43 x 12 x 24� Blown and carved glass Photo: Douglas Schaible


Jack Schmidt The beauty of art is that no one can know where it is headed. Our culture, our imagination and our spirit will guide us there. When we began our glass journey as studio artists in the United State in 1962 we had little to work with but our enthusiasm. We shared techniques as we mastered them and went back to our studios to create where our individual imaginations could take us. Today, there is a vast array of technology and techniques to choose from but in the end it will always come down to the personal. What do I have to say? And who is listening? - Jack Schimdt

Stone 100 - 2011 80 x 28 x 14� Stacked and blown glass with steel

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Mary Shaffer What I hope to accomplish as an artist, in the time I have left, is to finish some of my dreams about imagined projects. II would also like to complete a body of work that incorporates found objects, light, and gestural line that will be exhibited this fall at OK Harris in NYC and travel to several museums. I will continue as an activist to support sustainability, to educate people on the fragile nature of our eco system and stand against companies that pursue huge short term profits without regard for long term consequences or for the common good. Glass in mainstream art is what I envisioned 33 years ago in Diamondstein’s book ‘Handmade in America’, and that happened. The enormous contributions made to glass by galleries and collectors will continue, and then quiet down as glass gets accepted as just another material with which to make stuff. The explosion of creativity with glass in the ‘70s is basically over. What we have now is often imitation or virtuosity. In 50 years much of our studio glass will be exhibited in highend craft stores; just as the work, made of wood by Martin Puryear is seen now in art galleries and museums so will real ‘art’ glass. I won’t know if my predictions for the next 50 years will happen but I imagine that the great developments in glass will be in science and technology; perhaps a super light weaving of glass that floats, bringing photovoltaics to a new level....or that all roads in Europe, will be covered with a type of glass that harness solar energy. - Mary Shaffer

Theater II - 2012

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20 x 14 x 8” Cast Glass


Ivana Sramkova

Yellow Dog - 2006 45.5 x 47.25 x 11.25� Cast glass

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Paul Stankard I’m celebrating my 70th birthday as one of five honorees at a Renwick Gallery luncheon receiving a Masters of Material award. I believe my current work is the strongest in my career. That said, being asked to reflect on the future as this year’s theme for the International Glass Invitational left me smiling because I am in my future and each piece completed in the studio is significant and my best effort. I am no longer anxious about the marketplace…but I hope you sell a few pieces. - Paul Stankard

Morning Glory Bouquet with Honeybee and Golden Orb Botanical - 2010

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5.75 x 3 x 3” Photo: Ron Farina


Therman Statom For the past 50 years the glass artist has redefined beauty. In the next fifty years the language of beauty will explore and define unprecedented territories into our lives. Hopefully my best work is yet to come and I hope that this applies to all of us. With all the technological advancements in our daily lives I believe that the importance of what we do with our hands will take a new and far reaching definition in our lives. - Therman Statom

Untitled - 2012 18 x 10 x 12� Painted and assembled glass Photo: Colin Conces

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April Surgent The beginning of the 21st century has arrived with fast-moving technologies and a perpetual barrage of inconsequential information. We now live in a world directed by smart phones, social media and an increasing ‘need’ to be ‘connected’. Our rapid technological advancements are transforming our very fundamentals as we shift away from the traditions and knowledge we have accumulated over our existence. Being of one of the last generations to know life before cell phones, home computers and the internet, I ask myself what life will look like in 50 and 100 years. How much of mankind’s essence and ingenuity, as known before the 21st century, will continue on into the future? Regarding the past, my work strives to challenge the 21st centuries move away from tradition by sustaining an age-old craft and integrating it with contemporary themes and technologies. I use digital photography along with the antiquated technique of cameo engraved glass to make archival records of contemporary life. My engravings symbolize my collective experiences and observations and are a portrayal of what life looks like at the beginning of the 21st century. Focusing on the tangible, I document my surroundings or people in their environments to contemplate our existence. My work looks to the past as a directive of how to navigate the present. Learning how to slow down and take time to become intimately close with the ostensibly insignificant moments that together make up life. In an age of rapid change and when many traditional crafts and skills are being lost, I feel it especially important to record and document life through visual art, so as to be learned from and not forgotten in the rush of the 21st century. - April Surgent

Bright Nights - 2012

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12.75 x 17.4 x 1.7” Cameo engraved glass Photo: Spike Mafford


Tim Tate In this second decade of the 21st century, we enter the time of mixed media sculpture. No longer hemmed in by focusing on technique only, the American Studio Art Glass Movement has come of age. Multiple materials, highly narrative works, interactive electronics - these are all part of the 21st century glass artists image library. Mastering several media is the way to stand apart from the crowd. Compelling thoughts, time orientation and audience reliance will all become part of fabric of the fine art world. We stand at the same opportune moment when perspective was first taught in painting - when Stiglitz was first given a camera. All things are possible. There could not be a more exciting time to be an artist working in glass. - Tim Tate

She Was Often Gripped With The Desire To Be Elsewhere - 2012 26 x 10 x 10� Blown and cast glass, video Photo: anythingphoto.net

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Michael Taylor The most significant issue is that glass has become an important mechanism for expressing ideas. That was a principal part of Littleton’s vision. Proof of this fact was best stated with a t-shirt he would expose at the opportune moment in a lecture - it read “Technique is Cheap”. This 1970’s message emphasized a manifest goal which was that glass goes beyond traditional process into fine art. This vision is becoming a reality. Glass has been crossing boundaries from decorative art to fine art and vice versa for the last 35 years with a few exceptions. Fine art includes music, literature, and theater, without hindrances of technical process. For example; the artist, Martin Puryear had no technical knowledge of tar or animal skin, yet he made a number of works using these mediums because they best express his thinking. Decorative artists are historically limited to implied or actual utilitarian form, surface decoration and technique. I predict that decorative art will exist as it has before recorded history from Cro-Magnon arrowheads to hand blown vessels. The best source for predicting the future uses of glass are academic arts programs because they are the primary source of its practitioners. Specific programs in glass, clay, fiber and other material based studies will no longer exist, as such, in the next 50 years. Universities will have visual arts majors with two-dimensional and three dimensional concentrations. Glass may be part of the latter and incidentally the art supply store will be Home Depot. Yale, Cal Arts, Goldsmith College and other leading colleges of art are already structured in this fashion. This pedagogy will eventually trickle down to the main stream of higher education. Today’s art students are encouraged to explore visual expression using any material or medium necessary for clarity. This is evident with the percentage of glass used in a typical MFA exhibition. The university has traditionally strived for scholarly excellence and groundbreaking research in all fields of study, however technique in glass blowing will be seen as a vocational pursuit and will be taught in high schools as it is in the Europe Union. University art programs will become more intellectually demanding. In the future there will be a curriculum merging with theater, music and visual art. Fine art already influences every human endeavor from religion to economics in ways so subtle they are not easily recognizable. Current research for MFA thesis uses verbal, visual and media resources. Extraordinary artwork includes objects, but will also include installations, performance, video and any material necessary to express narrative thought. Contemporary art has few perimeters. It can be Damien Hirst’s terrifying large shark in a tank of formaldehyde, none the less terrifying. The frozen blood sculpture by Marc Quinn uses 4.5 liters of his blood that is shown on a freezer that is used as a pedestal. More than ever there are no limitations for sources or presentation and glass has and will have a prominent place in contemporary art. Trends in fine art are established, influenced by writers, such as Clement Greenberg, critic for the NY Times during the late period of modernism, art critics, museums, fine art fairs such as Art Basel in Switzerland and Miami, Venice and other major biennials, art theorist and others. The future of glass will be guided by innovative thinkers, yet to be discovered influential writers, and will be one of many materials for expressing postmodern and conceptual thought. - Michael Taylor Propeller - 2013

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16 x 8 x 8” Hand cut, and polished, machined, laminated, optical glass Photo: Brian Sprouse


Margit Toth Man makes glass from sand. Glass affects us in so many ways- from it’s use as tableware, to optical lenses in scientific research to fiber optics. More recently, glass has become an important medium in the world of art. We make tableware from glass - conquering our everyday life lenses-longing to get to know the micro and macro world - fiber optics - discovering the moments of progress - we make works of art - getting to know the inner world of men. In the future, the glass will be made from special material like moldavit and new usages will come to light. The artwork created in glass will have an inner strength – drawing an amazing aura that strongly compels the viewer. - Margit Tóth

Slumbering - 2013 17 x 16.75 x 9.25” Cast glass Photo: The Artist

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Bertil Vallien 50 years from now I will be 125 years old. Men in Sweden today live many years longer than men did 50 years ago. Who knows, I could still be working in the factory (if there is still a factory) in 2063. I have been working for 50 years with glass and have seen amazing developments during that time. If that exploration continues at the same pace for the next half century it will probably be a continuation of the way that glass can be used as a medium of artistic expression. I just learned that 3-D printers can be used with glass. No more sweaty ladling and the most fantastic pieces you can imagine will be designed on the computer. Possibly glass that talks, sings, and depending on the light, changes color and the viewer’s mood. Glass that contains memories and hopefully still, wine. For me, I will stick to the sandbox. I feel that I have just learned to play the piano, and by then maybe, a major symphony. - Bertil Vallien

WHY 1-12 - 2009

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8.5 x 28 x 5.5� Sandcast glass Photo: Douglas Schaible


Janusz Walentynowicz

Loss - 2013 30 x 34.5� Cast glass, oil paint, galvanized steel frame

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Vivian Wang Four years ago my artistic journey began with figurative work in cast glass and stoneware. The glass allowed me to achieve a sense of transparency, as though one could see the spirit of my figures. My heads were made in glass, my bodies in stoneware, the hands and feet in glass. My first collections in glass involved a variety of figurative themes but I soon focused on children, realizing how much I loved portraying them. Mostly they were children of the west. My more recent collections, however, show children - and women with children - of royalty, drawn from several ancient Chinese dynasties. I take great delight sculpting the big round heads of young children, with their unusual multi-bun hairdos and the huge, elaborate hair styles of women from a thousand years ago. I take equal joy creating western children from the nineteen forties and fifties, dressed in old - fashioned ways, with layers of clothing in a mixture of patterns and textures. How will these subjects and styles evolve? Where are my little people headed? Most immediately, I want to explore my fascination with other Asian civilizations, especially ancient Japanese and Korean cultures. Depicting their tastes and style will alter the nature of my work, changing the silhouettes and patterning of the layered textiles to reflect ancient Japanese and Korean wardrobes. My plan is to display the variety of Asian cultures, contrasting the figures of Japanese and Korean children with my earlier Chinese characters. I’m especially looking forward to capturing the beauty of the minimalist style of the Japanese. I also intend to work on a larger scale, sculpting figures that are more imposing and important. In addition to the children and the women with children that now comprise my sculpture; I plan to introduce the figures of men into my work. Most likely the men will be portrayed as father figures. I imagine creating groups of families from both Eastern and Western cultures. Although cast glass and stoneware will remain my main mediums, I intend to incorporate metal into my work as ornamentation for warrior figures. I have visions of portraying these ancient warriors with their children. A warrior and child create a poignant tableau, with the implicit suggestion that the warrior must go away and leave his child, not knowing if he will ever come back. Even an emperor going into war doesn’t know if he’ll ever see his sons again. Though set in ancient times, this is a very contemporary theme. It is difficult for an artist to know where her work will lead her. One necessarily follows ones instincts. But these ideas are ones that I expect will appear in my work over the course of the next few years. - Vivian Wang

Double Fortune - 2013

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24 x 13 x 12” with steel base Cast glass, stoneware, pigment powders, oil and casein paints Photo: Gregory Ross


Leah Wingfield & Steven Clements Truth is, I’m a little stumped on this one. I’ve been trying to think about the questions regarding the future that have been posed for this year’s catalog and I can’t seem to summon anything very compelling or interesting. I just haven’t thought of it much and the more I think about it...well here goes. Goal #1 - Make sculpture until I die. Most likely will happen sometime in the next 50 years, but I am really healthy. Goal #2 - Sell a piece to a museum this year. This one is for Ferd, to see if he reads this. Goal #3 - Find the opportunity to make monumental sculpture. Goal #4 - Always stay fresh, interested and willing to change. As I am technically entering the Mid-Career Artist stage, I figure I am also in the Pre-Curmudgeon stage and therefore will air a few pet peeves that I hope to see resolved in the glass sculpture world in the next 50 years. Peeve #1 - I would like to see the practice of making molds of found objects abolished in teaching casting and to see the skill of actual sculpting and modeling taught. Peeve #2 - I would like to see artists find another story to tell that doesn’t involve making replicas of clothes by dipping them in wax and casting them. Peeve #3 - I would like to see the day when glassblowers knocking off Dale Chihuly don’t innocently exclaim “Chihuly who?” Peeve #4 - I would like to see the day when galleries stop carrying that knock off work. Peeve #5 - I would like to see the day when the escalating discount game is seen for what it is unnecessary, detrimental & disrespectful. Lastly I do hope to see a renaissance of ideas that match the incredible level of skill that is prevalent in glass. The plastic nature of glass and the possibilities for using it for deep, soulful expression have hardly been explored. When this happens, it will be very exciting. Okay, so a couple of thoughts came up. See you at the 100th, Corey & Aaron, I am really healthy! - Leah Wingfield OK, here’s the thing: My brain only allows me to peer 5 years into the future. I see continuing to have sculptural “Conversations...” with wife & partner, Leah. Having worked hot glass for the last 45 years (that’s right - 1968, one year after graduating from the Summer of Love)...I’m just shooting for another 5, to make an even 50. After that, my dear friends & comrades... you’re on your own. My request to the upcoming glass generations - do not recycle what has already been done. Be creative, be original. That alone will make the next 50 as amazing as the last 50. What a long, strange trip it’s been. - Stephen Jon Clements Conversations...#19 - 2012 42 x 15.5 x 11” Cast glass and steel

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Ann Wolff My visions concern the next day: going on with work curiously each step is important. Art is important glass became a medium for art That is fine. - Ann Wolff

NOTES 2/6 - 2012

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35.375 x 45.25 x 14.125� Cast glass and concrete (three parts)


John Wood The New York Times on February 17 of this year reported that the US government is proposing to launch a decade-long project to “build a comprehensive map” of the human brain, its 100 billion neurons, and it’s activity, similar to the Human Genome Project for genetics research – “The Brain Activity Map” Project. So what does this mean for glass as an art medium fifty years from now? My guess is that we are headed towards the ultimate in “bespoke” sculpture – where the link between perception and emotional response, be it awe, joy, despair, rapture, or even revulsion, can be tailored specifically to each individual. In previous thoughts on the dimensions of what makes good and great sculpture (see Habatat International Catalogues No. 38 and 39, or my website www. JBWoodGlass.com) I’ve argued that great form, intense color, compelling narrative, and visual motion are some of the key ingredients necessary for great sculpture. I now need to add a fifth ingredient: emotional response. I would guess that everyone has a favorite piece or area of the “arts” that evokes strong personal emotions. For me, the Rothko Chapel, Monet’s Waterlilies, Picasso’s Guernica, Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, and even Stonehenge all evoke emotional responses that are difficult to put into words, but exceeding powerful and almost addictive none the less. In the musical arts, Beethoven’s Fifth and Ninth Symphonies and almost anything by Bach do the same. Glass is a medium that has that same potential to speak directly to each individual, and evoke strong emotions that few other stimuli can provide. Enabled by a new understanding of the human brain “map”, my prediction is that 50 years from now the sculptural client will visit the artist’s physical/electronic “studio”, specify the set of emotional responses he or she wishes to experience when viewing their personal sculpture, and the artist will be able to design a specific, individually-tailored, “bespoke” sculpture to achieve the “contracted” emotional state (s). My small beginning contribution to this perceptual revolution is “UP!” (see opposite page). I’m strongly affected by Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD); on sunny days I’m “up”, and on cloudy days “down”. Yellow for me evokes the promise of Spring and seasonal renewal. It helps battle the dark emotional months of Winter, and it promises joy and hope for the future. The triangular forms are a small tribute to Sir Isaac Newton’s groundbreaking experiments with light and color, and the beginning of the scientific revolution. In this sculpture, I’ve tried to encapsulate the form, color, light, motion, and hope of Spring (and Science), as sunlight strengthens and nature emerges again from the winter snows -- to grow “UP!”. Hopefully this is a case of “artist, heal thyself “ – 50 years ahead of its time. - John Wood

UP! - 2013 21 x 12 x 23” (approx. ensemble) Cast lead crystal (four pieces) Photo: Leslie Patron

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Hiroshi Yamano Looking ahead, I am now over 50 and will be over 60 in three years. Buddhism philosophy divides a lifetime four times; from the first year to 25 years of age, one owes society. From 25 years to 50 years, one pays back to society. From 50 to 75 one has paid back and now may live in nature and away from the city for a while and during 75 to 100 is the time when one fines the end of life. I am in the time to live in peace in nature to allow for doing more of what I like because I am now in that period. I would like to enjoy my life more and more as an artist. That is what I want. - Hiroshi Yamano

From East To West “Scene of Japan” #127 - 2013

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54.5 x 20.5 x 8” Blown, cold and lamp worked glass, copper plating


Albert Young My goal as an artist is to continue working as a purveyor of ideas and objects derived from my experiences, past, present and future. Weather it be glass-metal-wood or plastic I believe it will be the idea that caries on and that my artwork will merely be foot prints leading in the right direction. - Albert Young

ZEPPO - 2013 45� Cast Glass and welded steel Photo: Leslie Patron

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Brent Kee Young In reflecting on this last year, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement, it is appropriate to think about what is to come. Generally, I believe that we as makers have transitioned from being totally engrossed with the medium of glass- it’s beauty and challenges, to learning to achieving greater skills and becoming better purveyors of the craft. We will be on a place where artistic ideas and ideals can be formed and realized. Recently, I have been interested in dialogue that transforms an increasingly sophisticated and educated audience into discovering not only this interesting material, but also what, how, and why each individual artist makes his vision a reality. I am creating with glass an interpretation of Artifacts bound in our cultural history, as well as making pieces that are inspired by everyday objects. Upon analyzing them within the context of past and present, it begs the question of the existence of early cultures and questions where our current culture is going. Think of a container to organize and carry, and contemplate a Native American basket made of bark and a paper bag that is used and discarded. Each is made of fiber and each has a practical purpose. How does its interpretation in glass change the way it is perceived? Does the choice of material create a question? What dialogue comes to mind? What makes these objects iconic? - Brent Kee Young

“Yes Sir, Yes Sir…”, Shimmer Bags - 2013

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Each varies, aprox. 17 x 12 x 7” Installation size varies Sculpted with flame worked borosilicate glass


Udo Zembok In my work I demonstrate the powerful beauty of colour as an authentic artistic expression. Colour is emotion and it is space. Glass is the only medium that reveals this ‘colourspace’ through the translucent three dimensional void of this material. Abstract basic forms carry limitless hues in monochrome or bichrome compositions and invite the spectator, via his visual perception, to dive into an ocean of colour without any narrative bounderies. Small scale sculptures seem to open up larger unexpected emotional dimensions. Future works should feature ‘colourspaces’ including large scale sculptural and architectural installations where the ‘subject visitor’ would penetrate and perceive an environment of subtle colour and light experiences. People in our post modern screen orientated societies need to rediscover the delight of true perceptive impression as the basis of human learning and understanding. The visual arts based on sense orientated research help to build bridges towards these basic and necessary human potentials. My work tries to contribute to this magnificent goal. - Udo Zembok

HORIZON 02 - 2013 23.25 x 23.25 x 2” Multilayered fused glass, inclusion of pigments, partly polished

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Toots Zynsky Mostly, I hope that we all leave behind, for the future, a better public education system which once again includes all of the arts: visual, music, dance, theatre, new media, etc. As to where glass is headed? Forward, I hope. As to where I am headed? The same. In 50 years I plan on being in a very warm place looking at the world from the inside out. - Toots Zynsky

Terrazza - 2012

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7.75 x 15.5 x 8.25� Filet du verre


Participating Artists Sean Albert Dean Allison Cassandria Blackmore Eoin Breadon Nancy Callen Domenico Cavallaro Eunsuh Choi Scott Darlington

Laura Donefer & Jeff Mack Kathleen Elliot Jason Gamrath Slate Grove Sean Hennessey & Tim Tate Silvia Levenson Alicia LomnĂŠ Nick Mount

Gregory Nangle Erik & Israel Nordin Amy Rueffert Anna Skibska Casandra Straubing Miles Van Rensselaer Norwood Viviano Danny White

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Sean Albert Much of my work deals with the extraordinary attributes of light and its collaboration with a plethora of other materials. For me the union between light and material ranging from canvas to glass serves as a tool to capture or convey movement, highlight the ethereal qualities of transparency, or possibly fool the viewer into seeing something other than what is actually there. In conjunction with light, I also make use of multiples, pattern, and micro vs. macro relationships in order to blur the lines between two and three dimensional objects. Thus I would classify many of my sculptures as paintings in the round. I’m also drawn to the ways in which the combination of light, tangible material, and non-tangible phenomena has the means to allow a viewer to become aware of the act of viewing. By utilizing phenomena that isn’t immediately apparent or obvious viewing can become a transformative experience for my audience. Through the act of looking and possibly seeing or finding what isn’t suddenly available, I hope to allow the viewer to become aware of themselves at that moment simply by doing just that… looking. - Sean Albert

Intentionally Random Line Study 1.4.11 - 2012

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13.5 x 12 x 2” Kiln formed glass Photo: Russell Johnson


Dean Allison My work is an exploration of figurative art using glass informed by an interest in people, recognizing and recording their characteristics and relationships. My practice utilizes advanced life casting processes to investigate traditional views of portraiture. Sculptural glass can communicate ideas and feelings by looking through and into it. I love working with glass and though challenging, it has the capability to capture subtleties and generate depth to my work. I am drawn to the individual as a form; through process each piece becomes an abstraction of the original person and yet a record or snapshot in time. My work replicates the outward appearances that I observe in others and in myself; embedded in the glass are the inner states of being and the bonds that describe moments in time, relationships and life. Themes including family, admiration, life, death, strength, weakness, fear, and love appear in my work. Who the people are in my portraits and why they are important can be discovered through perspective on the human condition and the experiences we have with others. The way we see ourselves and how others see us is woven behind closed eyes. - Dean Allison

Backbone - 2013 28 x 40 x 20� Cast and blown glass on steel and wood

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Cassandria Blackmore Glass is a smooth, seductive and mysterious substance yet at the same time, a very ordinary substance. It can be as common as a wine glass or it can be a treasured work of art. It’s part of our world culture. Glassmaking has been estimated to have been around for over 5,000 years. The same piece of glass can appear to be invisible at one moment and opaque another through its display of reflection. With my work you may, at times, see the painting through the transparent surface while later you might see the reflection of the environment around it thus obscuring the artist’s physical mark. Glass is a chameleon of sorts, an illusionist. There is a water-like quality to glass even though it is impervious to water. The way a brush glides across the smooth surface of the medium is appealing to me. I have always been attracted to the tactile qualities of mosaic, yet drawn to the fluidity of painting. I often wondered if I must choose between the two. I began painting on glass during a period in which I couldn’t afford the expensive Italian glass I had become accustomed to. I was going through a tough time. I had moved to Seattle in the middle of a dark, gloomy winter. I was dealing with personal heartache and to top it off, I had no money for art supplies. I recall listening to Etta James while drinking a glass of wine in my Seattle loft when a family photograph caught my eye. It was a portrait of me with my bohemian parents in Berkeley, CA in the late 60’s. I really missed them. As I studied the photograph, I noticed the glass in the frame. That was a defining moment. The idea suddenly came to me. What if I remove the glass, paint a self-portrait, shatter it and reassemble it like a puzzle? I was taking what shielded a physical memory from my past and turning it into my present. It was broken and put back together - an allegory for my life at the time. It was the perfect marriage of painting, image making, tactile qualities, reflection and resurrection. The fusion of painting and surface became my medium. - Cassandria Blackmore

Navigatio - 2012

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60 x 55” Reverse painted shattered glass


Eoin Breadon Our history is defined on a personal and cultural level in large part by our objects and the rich tapestry of people and place contained in our stories. The adornment and form, the function and intent, all blend to create a synopsis of not only individual choice, but a record of the greater community as well. The analogies and hypothesis of previous cultures are heavily influenced by the information gained from extant items and the imagery and subjects illustrated upon its surface. It is this visual documentation of cultural identity into the tangible representations that drives my exploration and transmission of personal and cultural synergy. While it can be described as visually “ethnic”, my work stands outside the specificity of a distinct culture. It is the multitude of influences that converge to create an individual image or sculpture that reflect not only the traditional references, but also the broader actions and interactions that create the context of its genesis. I embrace the notion that there is no objectivity in ethnography as everything is known through perspective. It is with the continued artistic evolution through traditional craftsmanship, and the aesthetic and mnemonic value of imagery and composition, that I document my own movement through a culturally historical context. As a creator, I balance classical usage of material with an artistic license that stays true to the essence of traditional, cultural transmission. It is this first hand physical involvement of a fluid tactile material as a conduit to the personal and physically exhaustive labor that went into the transcription and documentation of many of the world’s great ancient cultural and literary works that continues to provide the framework of my expression. - Eoin Breadon

First Transformation of Tuan - 2010 27 x 17 x 12” Blown, hot sculpted, and engraved glass Photo: DJohnson Photography

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Nancy Callen My current work in glass is concerned with the marriage of form and surface. In many of the new pieces I strive for a sculptural essence that recalls nature. I love Brancusi and the pure, refined shapes that he created. That kind of formal clarity is important to me. I try to give each piece a definite personality or attitude. The gestural quality gives it life. I think that is why I’m often attracted to asymmetrical forms -- they seem to balance or move in a more interesting way. Many of my recent forms are drawn from nature: seeds, leaves, cacti and even insects have beautiful shapes. Getting up close and looking at the textures on a cactus or the pattern on a bug is amazing. I also find ideas for surface treatments in current and vintage fashion and fabrics. Currently I’m drawn to superfine lines and patterns that have a more random look. My aesthetic embraces irregularity, experimentation and a wide range of color combinations. I continue to find new ideas for the “Cloud” and “Top” series -- these forms are a wonderful canvas for color and movement in the glass. I use the traditional Venetian cane methods as a palette of options for my surfaces. Varied line widths, broken canes and distorted and overlaid patterns are a few of the new approaches that I am beginning to explore. It is fun to realize that I can do things in glass that I thought weren’t possible five years ago. As my skills continue to develop, I hope to fully embrace a sense of adventure and play in the studio. - Nancy Callan

Chartreuse Murrine Top - 2012

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11.5 x 16.5 x 12” Blown glass Photo: Amos Morgan


Domenico Cavallaro One of the things that intrigued me most as I entered the field of contemporary glass over 15 years ago was the fact that the medium was fresh and new in terms of where it stood in the art world. At that time, as there is today, there was much discussion on whether glass should be considered art or craft. I personally always held glass to be an art form, regardless of what art scholars have suggested. That being said, I certainly recognize that not everyone who works with glass is an artist. The more I learn about the material, the more I see that the technical possibilities are endless. Yet, as my knowledge of glass art has grown over the years, I’ve increasingly understood the meaning of the famous Harvey Littleton quote, “Technique is Cheap.” Mastery of the glass making process is important, but if it is not coupled with an original idea, it is just a demonstration of technique. I have been fortunate to work with many glass artists throughout my career, some of whom might be considered to be “ the last of the Mohicans,” or the first generation of contemporary glass artists internationally. These experiences, combined with opportunities to see multitudes of glass exhibitions throughout the world, have provided me with a unique vantage point from which to observe the Studio Glass Movement. Until recently, what I have seen could mostly be described as reinterpretations of traditional Italian techniques, designs and ideas. I believe we, as American glass artists, owe a great debt to to the generosity of the Italian masters for lending their knowledge and expertise. This gift has allowed the next generation of glass artists to focus on ideas, rather than taking an entire career to develop their technical skills. It seems to me as though the glass world is experiencing a renaissance, as young artists explore fresh conceptual territory and push the boundaries of the material. Fifty years from now, I feel that the distinction between glass art and contemporary art will have disappeared, and the idea that the value of glass as an artistic medium would ever have been questioned will seem ludicrous. I myself am very much looking forward to being both a contributor and a spectator as this shift occurs. Evviva il Vetro!!! - Domenico Cavallaro

Fuoco Nero - 2013 58 x 39 x 12” Hot sculpted, fused and slumped glass Photo: Douglas Schaible

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Eunsuh Choi My work specifically focuses on communicating the graceful flow of our emotional tendencies through the plastic medium of flame worked glass. I like to work sculpturally, utilizing form and its surrounding atmosphere to portray narratives based on the human encounter with success and failure in the pursuit of personal ambition. My recent work carries a quiet, meditative tone that lends heavily towards its spiritual emphasis. It’s the kind of work that viewers bask in rather than investigate on behalf of its celestial allure and its ability to evoke introspection. It wouldn’t be accurate to consider me as a spiritual spoken person, nor should my work be considered prophetic. However, there is an undeniable internal and contemplative aura within my work that resonates with our human desire for and pursuit toward something “higher” and “bigger”. From my work, I would like to give a chance for viewers to identify their own dreams with my portrayal of the human need to progress to remembrance. We will try every possible approach towards achieving a certain goal. - Eunsuh Choi

The Limited Barrier II - 2013

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20 x 16 x 6” Flameworked, borosilicate glass, sand-blasted


Scott Darlington My four years teaching glass arts in Japan at the Toyama City Institute of Glass Art was a profound experience. I think about it everyday. I hope I never get over it. Even though I was the Sensei (teacher), I learned more than anyone! The customs, language, food, history and day to day life were an adventure around every corner. I learned the language, history, customs, foods, patience, diligence, respect, communication, and so many things that it’s hard to verbalize. My wife and I had two children there, and they are a constant reminder of our experiences and growth. Mostly, I found that I was capable of much more than I thought. These experiences inform my art making in many ways. Many of the objects I make today are based on my Japanese experiences. But, I have never been able to sum it all up in one body of work. Since our return to the U.S., I have worked on many aspects from my Japanese inspirations. It has always been a few pieces here and then a few more pieces again, later. Refining these objects has taken a lot of practice and patience, but there has never been a resolution or end. Through a residency at the Museum of Glass in Tacoma this past summer, I made a body of work that encapsulates all of these dreams and desires. I have been making what I call “Owara” figures. They are kimono clad dancers that perform at a harvest festival in the neighboring town near Toyama every September. I was so enamored with the beauty and simplicity of this event that I became obsessed with the refining of the glass pieces that were inspired by it. Another part of this body of work are glass versions of Chochin (Japanese paper lanterns). These paper lanterns are decorative and informative. They are traditionally hung at festivals or outside of restaurants and businesses. Some have words for foods and some have decorative motifs. They are always a sign of hospitality and welcome. I hope to never stop being inspired by my experiences from living in such a deep and rich culture. This body of work is entitled “Ukiyo-e” (literally translated as “floating world”) which is just how I feel about my Japanese experience…dreamy! - Scott Darlington

Owara - 2012 25” Solid sculpted glass Photo: Mike Seidl

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Laura Donefer & Jeff Mack “INTO THE VORTEX” The exuberant Laura Donefer moves beyond flameworking to an alchemical collaboration with her polar opposite, the glassblowing virtuoso Jeff Mack, to achieve classical vessel forms that shimmer with vitality. - James Yood Spring 2013 edition of Glass Quarterly #130 Quote (page 38) “Mack’s classicism harmonizes perfectly with Donefer’s predilection for primary frontal views. The two see the relationship of the object to the viewer similarly and the august but still vibrant shape of Mack’s vessels takes Donefer’s surface enrichment well; she sweeps them up in a rich vortex of flame and deep encrustation that results in something almost decadent. Collaboration isn’t always marked by what the artists bring; it sometimes reflects what they are willing to leave behind. Donefer here sacrifices flamework, and Mack surrenders the classical grace of which he is capable. The two achieve a conjoining in which both bring their skills to something they would not do on their own, express their individual visions, and also show their collegiality and respect for one another.” James Yood teaches art history at the School of Art Institute of Chicago

Wine Red Amphora - 2013 (left) 25 x 14 x 9” Blown and bit worked glass

Transparent Grey Amphora - 2013 (right)

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22 x 15 x 10” Blown and bit worked glass Photo: Leslie Patron


Kathleen Elliot What is real? The undercurrent of my work is the shifting nature of “reality”. I’m curious. I like to be curious. I like to venture into new understandings, interpretations, and experiences. Encountering new worlds, new realities, brings a sense of scared excitement, and I like that. My life has been a pursuit of these experiences — hippy commune, hairstylist and make-up artist, administrator, educator, writer, 30-year student of philosophy, linguistics and business, 10-year participant in shamanic ceremonies and student of A Course in Miracles, instruction from Carlos Castaneda and other spiritual leaders, corporate manager and educator, marriage to an amazing man, mother of three children and two stepchildren and now an artist. Through all these life experiences, I have come to learn that there are as many “realities” as there are people on Earth. In my work, I like to play with this phenomenon. I like to juxtapose different realities or different experiences, usually with botanical forms — a school of fish becomes a plant, a botanical cyclone, my struggles with depression become a thorny vine, genetically modified “foods” growing on a skeletal branch. My hope is for viewers to enjoy that magical experience of wonder when our eyes are opened to something new, surprising, outside our normal reality. My favorite quote is the last line from Memoirs of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar — As Emperor Hadrian lies on his deathbed, he says to himself, “Let us try, if we can, to enter into death with open eyes.” That is how I intend to live my life! - Kathleen Elliot

When Plants and Animals Merge, Arctic Giraffe - 2013 27 x 6 x 10” Glass, flameworked Photo Keay Edwards

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Jason Gamrath The most beautiful, extravagant man-made object could never creatively equal the simplest and smallest naturally occurring life form. The purpose of creating this series on a macro scale is to bring to light the beauty that exists within the micro scale of nature. Through the rigors of day-to-day life in an urban setting, I find it all too easy to overlook the natural beauty that has ultimately birthed us as a species. Small plants, although miniscule in comparison to our human-sized way of existing, are overwhelmingly perplexing when held inches away from one’s face. The vast majority of people will seldom grasp this seemingly secret perception of existence. When I scale life forms up to be larger than a person, they can be observed with this perspective from across a room due to the overwhelming physical presence they command. It is my hope that when people admire my large-scale renderings, they become curious and captivated by the hints of realism I incorporate into my designs. I encourage people to attempt to observe with the same eyes through which I humbly and graciously experience our natural world. Glass has always fascinated me–from the first piece I saw as a child, to the works you see before you today. Glass holds the ability to reflect light at one angle, yet become transparent at another—tactile and fragile. Most interestingly of all, glass freezes a moment in time. The tool marks and bubbles I force into glass will greatly outlive my physical self. As an artist, I mercilessly ask myself, “What is it you wish to say? What do you want to leave behind?” These questions have proven to ever motivate my creations. I find that in order to make sense of the world I live in I need to reflect upon my personal encounters. I find myself pondering my emotional motives, as well as my desires and ambitions, thus clearly revealing what is truly important to me. - Jason Gamrath

Clementine - 2012

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8 x 8’ Hot sculpted glass and acrylic paint on steel Photo: Daniel Fox


Slate Grove

In my work, I explore products of our culture that have a distinguished role in our collective American experience, while they maintain aspects firmly rooted in folk culture. I make choices that impact the mind of the viewer, coaxing them to look deeper into the veiled complexities of our corporeal realm; this allows for an original reexamination of pop cultural phenomena. I manufacture a kind of hyper-pop cultural construct in the process, using glass for its innately fragile and ghostly qualities. I aim to engage the viewer in a pleasant memory rooted in reverence. - Slate Grove

Everlast - 2012 24 x 24 x 36� Blown, sculpted and fabricated glass, stainless steel and laces

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Sean Hennessey & Tim Tate The Graffiti Series is collaboration between glass/video artist Tim Tate and glass/mixed media artist, Sean Hennessey. The work has grown out of the artist’s friendship and common interest in old urban architecture, the narratives of dreams and mystery, and in the immediacy and impact of street art. The work is slump cast glass panels that depict facades of old spalted brick and mortar, a rowhouse scribed with glowing words of yearning or of concern and with windows revealing moving imagery of private and personal moments. RADAR: A two story building, a door, the artist’s work on the ground floor wall. Peering inside the second floor window reveals the two ends of a table with people actively involved in conversations. The conversations center on Art and Craft. Do they talk of the new directions taking place in the glass world? Do they talk of the artists that make the work? Some may know the people in the conversation, all active members of the craft world and deep lovers of art. Do they know how much impact they have had on the lives of artists? Which artists are in their thoughts? Are they, in turn, the topic of artists conversations? In this piece they certainly are. INVISIBLE: Clearly visible, the graffiti illuminated brightly against the brick and mortar, the windows featuring the hidden world of a dream. The billowing curtains and a sleepwalker adrift in a soft, private world. A reference to the early Spirit Photography of William Mumlar, this invisibility shows how the lives of everyday people remain curtained off from the notice of society. And how artists frequently feel invisible to the world.

Invisible - 2013 (left) 22 x 35 x 3” Float glass, paint, cement, video, electroluminescence, steel. Slump cast in dry plaster mold

Radar - 2013 (right)

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32 x 22 x 3” Float glass, paint, cement, video LED, steel. Slump cast in dry plaster mold Photo: Pete Duvall


Silvia Levenson I produce installations as well as objects to inquire and say aloud what is usually felt or whispered. My work is centralized on this unspeakable space sometimes so small and so big, located between what we can see and what we guess. Through my pieces and installations I explore the daily interpersonal relationships and I use glass to reveal and show those things that are normally hidden. I believe that there are no neutral materials; in my work I mainly use glass because I am fascinated by its ambiguity. It is a material that we all know well because it protects and isolates our homes, we use it to preserve our foods and beverages but in some ways we also know that it is fragile, that it can break into thousands of tiny pieces and hurt us. For my work it becomes the ideal material to show the ambiguity of human relationships and of the things that exist but that hide behind the thousand folds of what we call reality. Furthermore, as Tina Oldknow noted, “women’s works, such as cooking and crafts, is often sarcastically described as product of “loving hands at home” and it is considered the antithesis of male-dominated “high art”. I use a very traditional, hand-crafted material to describe not what we put on top of our furniture but what we carefully hide under our rugs. - Silvia Levenson

Still Life - 2012 13.75 x 9 x 7.9” Kiln formed glass Photo: Marco Del Comune

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Alicia Lomne´ For years I have been fascinated by our cultural relationship to fairy tales. Drawn to the idea of creating my own mythology, I’ve daydreamed about the objects or relics that might inhabit it. These pieces are the manifestations of those musings. My fairytale warriors have come forward to defend nature, my greatest love and the thing I feel is most threatened. Their armor represents the idea that we are each our own greatest strength and worst weakness. The medium of glass acts as a perfect metaphor; simultaneously possessing immense strength and fragility. - Alicia Lomné

Mater Cuirass - 2013

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21.75 x 14.25 x 9.75” Pate de verre glass backed by mixed media. Base is purple heart wood and steel Photo: Michael Stadler


Nick Mount Nick Mount is one of Australia’s most accomplished and celebrated studio glass artists. Approaching his fifth decade working in the field, he has been at the forefront of innovation and achievement since the early 1970s. Mount’s earliest and most enduring influences include the US west coast glass scene and the traditions of the Venetians. Informed but not confined by tradition, Mount is known for his production, commission and exhibition work. Since the late 1990s the latter has comprised of an evolving series of sculptural assemblages. Ranging in scale and character, they sensitively combine a respect for traditional Venetian glassmaking techniques with a wry Australian wit. Mount’s work is represented in major public and private collections and his reputation as a generous teacher, demonstrator and mentor sees him teaching regularly at glass centers around the world.

Scent Bottle with Aubergine and Strange Fruit: A Still Life #030213 - 2013 15 x 33 x 8.5” Blown glass, murrini, carved, polished, assembled, Olive wood stems, Huon Pine base Photo: Pippy Mount

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Gregory Nangle By contrasting two distinct materials with opposite properties of workability in their respective states of matter I am able to produce unique occurrences with my glass. By contrast, I am showing the property of the glass in its elastic state, but allowing it to remain in a state of motion while it solidifies. Like glaciers, or stalagmites, these references to the natural processes of growth and progression are able to be observed in their transitional state. By relating these processes to everyday events like that one dinner you had with someone close, or the time you worked all night on cutting material up for a sewing project, we are able to appreciate another side to something that seems mundane and uninteresting, something that is fleeting and lost remains still for consideration. These works were all made using a new technique I am experimenting with that I call ‘destabilized silvering’, again adding another layer of contrast to further the visual impact of these often unrealized surfaces and forms. - Gregory Nangle

Scissors - 2013

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Dimensions variable Cast glass, cast bronze Photo: Ken Ek


Erik & Israel Nordin

ART = LIFE

Derived from Circles - Self Series – III - 2012 9 x 3 x 1’ Glass and stainless steel Photo: Nordin Brothers

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Amy Rueffert My sculptural glass explores the rich implications of objects in everyday life. The central focus is domestic visions presented through 20th Century culture as well as Victorian sensibilities. These works illuminate, and are limited by, the interior worlds offered by the juxtaposition of these eras. This work evokes aspects of the Victorian Decorative Arts period such as orderliness, ornamentation, and a mixture of Gothic, Tudor and Elizabethan stylistic eras. The Victorian curio, an intriguing object presented for contemplation, provides an ideal context for the relationship between the viewer and my repurposed objects. These pseudo-Victorian objects are connected to the 20th Century through commercially produced ceramic decals as well as the use of Vitrolite architectural glass. Decals from the 1960s and 70s consisting of prints, patterns and reproductions evoke nostalgia; Vitrolite, produced mostly in the 1920s and 30s, adds another visual and historical dimension when used as a base for the works. The medium of glass provides unique sculptural opportunities, especially optics that allow dynamic presentation of the decals. These optics are also combined with traditional Italian glass patterning techniques such as zanfirico and reticello. This body of work allows viewers opportunities to experience objects, as well as to confront our motives in appropriating and enjoying works of art. - Amy Rueffert

Bouquet - 2013

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10 x 4.75 x 4.75� Blown glass, found glass, decals, ribbon Photo: Chris Brown


Anna Skibska Trained as an architect, then in fine arts, now recognized as a sculptor of glass, I am not interested in glass per se. It is only one medium that conveys my thoughts, embodies my visions. I work with space, time, light. Sometimes I do collages, photography, film. Sometimes I design small sculptural forms like jewelry. Sometimes I design interiors—just for my proper, artistic hygiene. I believe that architecture is a crown for art, sound and silence, light and dark, not mere brick and steel. Architecture and art are strongly connected: Fine arts do not decorate architecture; architecture is not a shell for fine arts. They are an integral part of each other, and this relationship interests me, as do monumental forms. I develop my thoughts via a unique technique that serves me well: I like to wrap space, embrace time, and trap light, working on them simultaneously from the same beginning. I wish to have a thoughtful, intelligent dialog with other creative minds and the land itself. And through this dialog, we will give visitors a fascinating perspective and a place of beauty. I am interested in using native materials to simultaneously express the uniqueness of the space and show its connection to the larger world through forces of nature (four cardinal directions, elements), a microcosm with monumental forms. I want the space to be a living dialog with tradition, the sacredness of the land and of the individual, using universal symbols and archetypes. The space will be appreciated by those on the ground and those high above it. Project elements will include: light, darkness, stone (rock and vitrified forms), puzzles and poetic inscriptions that take visitors on their own journey through the space. - Anna Skibska

...with a nametag - 2012 13 x 19 x 23� Anna Skibska Technique

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Casandra Straubing

My work explores the sociological aspects of working-class garments and the tools of blue-collar labor — how they define a person, externally and internally. These objects become a representation and a symbol of what a person does to contribute to western society and culture. They become a skin, defining a person’s economic and social position as well as their gender role. Clothing, used as a skin to cover the vulnerable and fragile body, is rendered transparent in glass. The viewer can see through the superficial definitions of gender and status to a personal truth without the exterior facade society so readily judges. The choice to fabricate and cast these objects in glass lends itself conceptually to the sociological study of these belongings and the social systems that surround them. Glass displays ghostly reminiscences, representing a personal history or memory left behind. It can also portray a lack of memory, representing the invisibility of an uncomfortable emotion. Glass becomes a window for the viewer to explore what might otherwise never be seen. - Cassandra Straubing

She Waits for Him on Pins and Needles - 2012

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37 x 19 x 5� Cast glass and mixed media Photo: Esteban Salazar


Miles Van Rensselaer Jumping OFF the Pedestal After 50 years, glass is just now beginning to enjoy it’s welldeserved and long overdue acceptance into the Fine Art world, a field historically dominated by materials like stone, wood, ceramic and metal. It has an intrinsic beauty, an ephemeral, spiritual feel and optic qualities that allow us to incorporate and manipulate light into otherwise dark form. The relative infancy of glass compels us to push the envelope on technique ever further. I seek to produce pieces that both stand alone as fullyrealized works of Art and help to shatter the “Art vs. Craft” controversy which has haunted this incredible material since Littleton & Labino dragged it out of the factory a half century ago. Who cares what “box” people put me, my work or the entire American Studio Glass Movement into, provided both technique and concept are at their highest level? There are those who claim that “everything’s already been done” in glass - I believe the surface has only been scratched. With more and more students gravitating towards glass each year, with new hot shops popping up left and right all over the world, glass is by far the hottest and youngest of sculptural mediums. Over the next 50, we will continue to see fresh application of existing technique and innovative new ways of shaping the stuff into both gorgeous - and hideous works of Art. I, for one, can’t wait to be part of it! - Miles Van Rensselaer

Perfect Girl - 2012 18.5 x 15.5 x 20” Blown glass and bronze Photo: Kenny Ek

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Norwood Viviano

The installation Cities: Departure and Deviation is comprised of 24 blown-glass forms based on three-dimensional rotations of statistical data for major urban centers in the United States. Each individual piece explores the speciďŹ c history of its namesake city - tracking shifts in population growth and decline relative to their dependence on the expansion and contraction of local industry. The blown-glass objects, created entirely in shades of clinical white, black and gray, reference the weight and precision of hanging plumbs and the precariousness of spinning tops. In the installation they are paired with digital renderings, which originally served as working plans for the glass pieces. They provide a timeline deďŹ ning connections and drawing comparisons amongst cities. Reminiscent of typology charts used by historians and archeologists to classify ancient vessels, the renderings are created with digital programming currently used by industry. I use contemporary technology and a formal vocabulary to impose on the hand-blown nature of each object. The analysis of the rise and fall of populations in American cities over nearly 400 years is a visually striking statement about the geographical, historical and cultural factors affecting our urban landscape. - Norwood Viviano

Cities: Departure and Deviation, Atlanta to Los Angles - 2011

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Dimensions variable Blown glass and vinyl cut drawings Photo: Cathy Carver


Danny White The work that I create has always been derived from my experiences. Life’s little inside jokes and social inadequacies have always had a place in my heart and is what I aim to base my work around. Simply put, my art is made for others as much as it is for myself. Using expression and gesture I look to incite narrative within the viewer. It is important for me to lay the groundwork and establish character in order for the audience to receive a justified experience. Coming from a painting background I strongly adhere to the guidelines of composition and color theory because it allows me more freedom in subject matter. All in all my works are up to the audience to interpret, they are open to humor, skepticism, and double takes. I just enjoy what I do and putting it out into the world. - Danny White

The Gang From Toledo - 2013 Average height 13.5� Blown and hot sculpted glass Photo: Tom Brooks

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Artist Re´sume´s (Invitational)

Shelley Muzylowski Allen Born: Manitoba, Canada 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions: Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Museum of Northwest Art, La Conner, WA 2013 Solo Glass Exhibition - Blue Rain Contemporary, Scottsdale, AZ 2013 Art Palm Beach - Habatat Galleries, MI 2013 41st Annual International Glass Invitational – Habatat Galleries, MI 2012 “Menagerie” Solo Glass Sculpture Exhibition - Blue Rain Gallery, Santa Fe, NM 2012 “Midas” Solo Glass Sculpture Exhibition - Blue Rain Contemporary, Scottsdale, AZ 2012 “50 Years of Studio Glass” - Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, Louisville, KY 2012 Art Palm Beach – Palm Beach, FL – Habatat Galleries 2012 SOFA Chicago - Habatat Galleries, MI 2012 40th Annual International Glass Invitational – Habatat Galleries, MI 40th Glass Invitational – Habatat Galleries, MI 39th Glass Invitational – Habatat Galleries, MI Toyama City Institute of Glass Arts, Permanent Collection Toyama, Japan Solo Exhibition – Traver Gallery, Seattle, WA SOFA NY – Blue Rain Gallery, NY, NY

Herb Babcock Born: Bloondale, Ohio, 1946 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Columbus Museum of Fine Art, Columbus, Ohio Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, MI Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Glasmuseum Frauenau, Frauenau, Germany J & L Lobmeyer, Vienna, Austria, Vienna, Austria Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, Coburg, Germany Morris Museum, Moristown, New Jersey Museum die Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg, Germany Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, Michigan Tittot Glass Art Museum, Taipei, Taiwan Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio

Rick Beck

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Born: Alberta, Canada, 1960 Selected Collections: Asheville Art Museum, Asheville, NC Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC Fletcher Barnhart, White Corp., Charlotte, NC Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Hickory Museum of Art, Hickory, NC

McDonald’s Corporate Collection Mint Museum of Craft and Design, Charlotte, NC Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, LA Wustum Museum of Fine Art, Racine, WI

Michael Behrens Born: Dusseldorf, Germany, 1973 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Seven Bridges Museum, Greenwich, CT Uroboros Glass Studios, Portland, OR Museum Ajeto, Novy Bor, Czech Republic Ernsting Foundation, Coesfeld, Germany Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf, Germany Museum of Modern Glass, Öhringen, Germany Glass Museum Immenhausen, Germany Selected Exhibitions: 2013 Art Palm Beach, with Habatat Galleries MI 2013 Art Fair Utrecht, with Etienne Gallery, The Netherlands 2012 Sofa Chicago, with Habatat Galleries, MI 2012 Pan Amsterdam, with Etienne Gallery, The Netherlands 2012 Art Fair Cologne” with Continuum Gallery, Germany 2012 Art Napels, with Habatat Galleries MI 2012 Art Palm Beach, with Habatat Galleries MI 2011 Sofa Chicago, with Habatat Galleries, MI

Howard Ben Tré Born: Brooklyn, New York, 1949 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Corning Museum of Glass, NY Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY National Museum of American Art, Washington, DC Detroit Institute of Arts, MI High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington,DC Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Huntington Museum of Art, WV Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain, Nice, France Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Lausanne, Switzerland Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA Royal Ontario Museum of Art, Toronto, ON, Canada

Alex Bernstein Born: Celo, North Carolina, 1972 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Palm Springs Art Museum, CA Corning Museum of Glass, NY Glassmuseum Frauenau. Frauenau, Germany Royal Caribbean – Oasis of the Seas, FL Deloitte & Touche, Boston, MA Wallace Memorial Library, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY The Dean of Liberal Arts, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY Mellon Financial Corporation, Harrisburg, VA Wachovia Financial Group, Greenville, SC Bascom-Louise Gallery, Highland, NC

Martin Blank Born: Sharon, Massachusetts, 1962 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions: Seven Bridges Foundation, Greenwich CT Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN Naples Museum of Art, Naples, FL Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI Steninge Palace Cultural Center, Sweden Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, QC, Canada Bergstrom-Mahler Museum, Neenah, WI New Britain Museum of America Art, CT Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Krannert Art Museum, Champaign, IL Tampa Museum of Art, FL Honolulu Academy of Art, HI Shanghai Museum of Fine Art, China Millennium Museum, Beijing, China Museum of Contemporary Art, Lake Worth, FL

Zoltan Bohus Born: Endrod, Hungary, 1941 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Musée du Verre, Sars Poteries, France Veste Coburg, Germany Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf, Germany MUDAC, Lausanne, Switzerland MAVA, Madrid, Spain Corning Museum of Glass, NY Carnegie Museum of Arts, Pittsburgh, PA Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Indianapolis Museum of Arts, IN Kentucky Art and Craft Foundation, KY


Péter Borkovics Born: Salgótarján, Hungary, 1971 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Solo Exhibitions: 2006 “Fres Casting” Glass Pyramid Gallery, Budapest 2004 Summary exhibition, Rippl-Rónai Museum, Kaposvár 2004 Eventuelle Gallery, Budapest (with Kristóf Bihari and Kovács Szabolcs, Gergo Kovács) 1995 “ Lámpaláz “, Young Artists’ club, Budapest 1994 Introductory exhibition, Mátranovák 1994 Introductory exhibition, Bernáth Galéria, Marcali 1994 “ On and on”, Parti Galéria, Pécs (with István Czebe )

STANI

(Stanislaw Jan Borowski) Born: Krosno, Poland, 1981 Selected Exhibitions: 39th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI Art Palm Beach January 2010, Habatat Galleries, MI Sofa Chicago November 2009, Habatat Galleries, MI Solo Exhibition December 5th 2009, Habatat Galleries, MI 38th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 37th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 36th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 35th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 34th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 33th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI PAN Amsterdam Kunstmesse, Etienne & Van den Doel, Expressive Glass Art, Netherlands Compositions Gallery, San Francisco, CA International Frankfurt Fair TENDENCE

Christina Bothwell Born: New York, New York, 1960 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Shanghai Museum of Glass, Shanghai, China Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL Tutsek-Stiftung Foundation, Munich, Germany The Smithsonian Museum of Art’s Archives of American Art, Oral History Collection Fuller Craft Museum, MA Racine Museum, Racine, WI Corning Glass Museum, NY Palm Springs Museum, CA Lowe Art Museum, FL Candace Groot Collection, IL

Jacqueline Hoffmann-Botquelen Selected Exhibitions: De Young Museum, San Francisco, CA 2012 Primal Inspiration”, Museum tour, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 “Pâte de verre”, Europaisches Museum für Modern Glas, Veste Coburg, Germany 2012 Swiss art space, Lausanne, Switzerland 2011 Musee du Vitrail, Romont, Switzerland 2011 Zürich ART, Sanske Galerie 2010 Sanske Galerie, Zürich, Switzerland 2009 La Nef, Le Noirmont, Switzerland. 2009 Contemporary European Glass artists, Sanske GalerieCreative Glass, Kindhausen, Switzerland 2009 Glass beads,”TheTempest”, Switzerland, Europe, USA 2008 Sanske Galerie, Zürich, Switzerland 2008 Glas Galerie Stadler, Linz, Austria 2007 Contemporary Swiss Art Glass, Espace Art et Objets, Lausanne, Switzerland 2007Galerie Kürzendorfer. Pilsach, Germany

Latchezar Boyadjiev Born: Sofia, Bulgaria, 1959 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: De Young Museum, San Francisco Naples Museum of Art Museum of Applied Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Glassmuseum, Ebeldorf, Denmark Glassmuseum der Ernsting Stiftung, Germany Museum de Alcorcon, Spain First Interstate World Trade Center Los Angeles, CA Scottsdale Center for the Arts, AZ The White House, Washington DC Private collections in USA, Canada, Europe, South America, Asia, Australia New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA

Peter Bremers Born: Maastricht, The Netherlands. 1957 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Den Haag, Gemeentemuseum, NL National Glassmuseum, Leerdam, NL AON, London, England Glasmuseum Alter Hof Herding, Coesfeld Lette, Germany

Kunstgewerbe Museum, Berlin, Germany Glasmuseet Ebeltoft, Denmark Mobile Museum, AL D.S.M. collection, Delft, Netherlands Kunst und Gewerbe Museum Hamburg, Germany Museum Jan van der Togt, Amstelveen, Netherlands Museo de Arte en Vidrio MAVA, Madrid, Spain Glasmuseum Alter Hof Herding, Coesfeld Lette, Germany

Emily Brock Born: Des Moines, Iowa, 1945 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Rockford Art Museum, IL Bergstrom-Mahler Museum, Neenah, WI Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, QC, Canada Franklin Park Conservatory, OH Patrick and Beatrice Haggerty Museum of Art, Marquette University, WI Hsinchu Cultural Center, Taiwan Racine Art Museum, WI Columbus Museum of Art, OH Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Albuquerque Museum, NM Museum of American Glass, Wheaton Village, NJ University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA The Toledo Museum of Art, OH Shimonoseki City Art Museum, Japan Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA

Lucio Bubacco Born: Murano, Italy, 1957 Selected Collections: Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Glasmuseum Frauenau, Frauenau, Germany Atelier du Verre, Sars-Poteries, France Nagoya Museum, Nagoya, Japan Museo del Vidrio, Monterrey, Mexico Niijima Art Center Museum, Niijimamura, Tokyo, Japan Museo del Vetro, Murano, Venezia, Italy The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Venetian Glass Art Museum, Otaru, Japan National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania J & L Lobmeyr Museum Collection, Vienna, Austria Museum Boymans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The Netherlands Museum of American Glass, Wheaton Village, Millville, NJ Tampa Museum, Tampa, Florida

125


Artist Re´sume´s (Invitational)

José Chardiet

39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Low Art Museum, University of Miami, FL Museum of Fine Arts, MA Museum of Arts and Design, NY Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC American Craft Museum, NY Corning Museum of Glass, NY Yokohama Museum of Art, Japan Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Lausanne, Switzerland High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Detroit Institute of Art, MI Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC Asheville Museum of Art, NC Museum of American Glass, Wheaton Village, NJ Racine Art Museum, WI Cincinnati Art Museum, OH Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, QC, Canada

Daniel Clayman Born: Lynn, Massachusetts, 1957 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Cleveland Museum of Art, OH Milwaukee Art Museum, WI Museum of Fine Arts, CA The High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA American Craft Museum, New York, NY Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Toledo Museum of Art, OH Portland Museum of Art, ME Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Art, WI Rockford Art Museum, IL Museum of American Glass, Wheaton, NJ Museum of Art, Fukui, Japan

Deanna Clayton

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35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions: Ferro Corporation, Cleveland, OH Janus Mobile Art Collection Denver, CO Ritz Carlton, Grand Cayman The Four Seasons, Doha, Qatar The Four Seasons, Miami, FL

38th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, MI 37th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, FL 36th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI

Keith Clayton Selected Collections and Exhibitions: Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2013 “A Passage Through Glass”, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2013 Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2012 Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2011 Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2010 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, MI Kaiser Permanente Building Collection, Cleveland, OH Janus Mobile Art Collection, Denver, CO Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2009 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, MI Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2008 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, FL Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2007 Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2006 Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, FL, 2006 Solo Exhibition, Pismo Gallery, Aspen, CO, 2005 Large Scale Glass Outdoor Sculpture, Oakland Arts Center, Pontiac, MI, 2005 Solo Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, FL, 2005

Stephen Clements

(with Leah Wingfield) Born: Richmond, California, 1948 Selected Collections: Arizona Commission on the Arts Phoenix, AZ Brockton Museum - Boston, MA Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, De Young Museum - San Francisco, CA Kishijimi Collection - Japan The National Gallery of American Art & Renwick Gallery - Smithsonian Institution- Washington DC Prisident’s Collection - People’s Republic of China Richmond Art Museum - Richmond, CA Standard Oil Corporation – California Museo Del Vidrio - Monterrey, Mexico

Matthew Curtis Born: Luton, England, 1964 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions: Etihad Towers, Abu Dhabi, UAE Art Trust, Australia National Gallery of Australia Wagga Wagga National Glass Collection, Australia Mobile City Art Glass Museum Collection, America Ernsting Stifting, Glass Museum, Coesfelfd Germany De Young Museum, Saxe Collection, San Francisco, America Palm Springs Museum, CA. USA Societe General, Singapore Selected Exhibitions: 2013 Tom Malone Glass Prize Finalist, Art Gallery of W A Australia 2013 Habatat International Invitational, Michigan, USA 2012 Global + Local, Museum of Fine Arts St Petersburg, FL 2012 SOFA Chicago, co Pismo Gallery USA 2012 Habatat International Invitational, Michigan, USA 2011 Habatat International Invitational, Michigan, USA 2011 ‘Geometry’ Masters Exhibition, Sabbia Gallery, Sydney 2011 SOFA Chicago, co, Pismo Gallery USA 2011 Members Exhibition, Craft Act

Dan Dailey Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1947 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Corning Museum of Glass, NY Darmstatt Museum, Darmstatt, Germany Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, MA High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, TN Huntington Museum of Art, WV Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Louvre, Paris, France Musee de Design et d’arts Appliques Contemporains, Lausanne, Switzerland Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan Racine Art Museum, WI Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY Toledo Museum of Art, OH


Miriam Di Fiore

Susan Taylor Glasgow

Born: Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1959 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Corning Museum of Glass, NY Newark Fine Art Museum, NJ Cafsejian Museum of Contemporary Art, Armenia Mobile Museum of Fine Arts, AL Museo Nazional del Vidrio, Segovia, Spain. Coleccion Estable de la Revista del Vidrio, Barcelona, Spain Hotel Murano, Tacoma, WA “A Path to Art”, Pegli, Genoa, Italy. Fused Glass Windows of the Town Hall of Suria, Barcelona, Spain

Born: Superior, Wisconsin, 1958 Selected Exhibitions: 2011 39th Habatat Galleries International Glass Invitational Award Exhibition, Royal Oak, MI 2010 “Glass Uprising”, Swanson Reed Gallery, Louisville, KY. Glass Art Society 2009 “Love Hurts”, Heller Gallery, NYC, NY. Solo exhibition 2009 “The Communal Nest”, George Caleb Bingham Gallery, Columbia, MO 2008-09 “Absence of Body”, Pittsburgh Glass Center, Pittsburgh, PA 2008 Glass Concepts, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 2005-08 SOFA Chicago. Represented by Heller Gallery, NYC 2007 Arkansas Center for the Arts, Little Rock, Arkansas. Permanent Collection 2007 “Reminiscence”, Grounds For Sculpture, Hamilton, NJ 2006 Solo Show, “Mirror, Mirror”, William & Florence Schmidt Art Center, Belleview, Illinois 2006 Solo Show, “Domestic Fairy Tales”, Heller Gallery, NYC 2006 “Life InSight”, Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft. Curated by Gail Brown 2006 “Edges Of Grace”, Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA. Curated by Gail Brown

Laura Donefer Born: Ithaca, New York, 1955 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Museum of Civilization, Hull, Quebec, QC, Canada Museo del Vidrio, Monterrey, Mexico Corning Museum of Glass, NY Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, WI Claridge Collection, Montreal, QC, Canada Pilchuck Permanent Collection, Stanwood, WA Clay and Glass Gallery, Waterloo, ON, Canada Indusmin, Toronto, ON, Canada University of Iowa Hospital Collection, Iowa City, IA Royal Bank of Canada Collection, Toronto, ON, Canada Skydome Glass Collection, Toronto, ON, Canada Julian Art Collection, Trinidad. Mendel Glass Collection, Montreal, QC, Canada

Irene Frolic Born: Stanislavov, Poland, 1941 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Bergstrom Mahler Museum. Neenah, WI Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery. Waterloo, ON Clairidge Collection. Montreal, QC Contemporary Crafts Gallery. Portland, OR Indusmin Corporate Collection. Toronto, ON Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Montreal, QC Museum of Decorative Art, Lausanne, Switzerland Museo del Vidreo, Monterrey, Mexico National Liberty Museum. Philadelphia, PA North Lands Creative Glass. Lybster, Scotland

Javier Gomez Born: Pedro Bernardo, Ávila, Spain, 1957 Selected Collections: Musée Atelier du Verre de Sars-Poteries, Sars-Poteries, France Liége Glass Museum, Belgium Ebeltoft Glass Museum, Denmark Kestner Museum, Hannover, Germany Corning Museum of Glass, NY Museo del Vidrio, Monterrey, México MAVA - Museo Municipal de Arte Contemporáneo en Vidrio de Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain Museu do Vidro, Marinha Grande, Portugal Glasmuseum Frauenau, Germany The Finnish Glass Museum, Riihimäki, Finland Tucson Museum of Art, AZ Haggerty Museum of Art, Milwaukee, WI Museum Jan van der Togt, Amstelveen, Netherlands

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, AL Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, PA DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, MA Charles A. Wustum Museum, Racine, WI J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY Detroit Institute of Art, David Jacob Chordorkoff Collection, MI Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY

Eric Hilton Born: Bournemouth, England, 1937 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Corning Museum of Glass, NY Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Japan Lowe Art Museum, FL Musee Des Arts Decoratifs, France Musee Des Arts Decoratifs, Switzerland Otari Memorial Art Museum, Japan Pilkington Glass Museum, England Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Liuligongfang Museum, Shanghai, China

Tomáš Hlaviˇcka Born: Prague, Czech Republic, 1950 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Museum of Decorativ Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Glass Museum Koganezaki Crystal Park, Japan Glass Museum Kanazawa, Japan The Finnish Glass Museum, Riihimäki, Finland Dennos Museum, Traverse City, MI, USA Museum Pardubice, Czech Republic

Robin Grebe

37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Canada Lowe Museum of Art, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL

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Artist Re´sume´s (Invitational) 128

Petr Hora

Toshio Iezumi

Born: Brno, Czech Republic, 1949 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions: Naples Museum of Art, Naples, FL Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Heller Gallery, New York, NY Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, FL Kinsky Gallery, Chateau Zdar nad Sazavou Consument Art, Nuremberg, Germany Czech and Japan Glass Festival - Prague, Tokyo, Hiroshima, Nagano Gallery Schalkwijk, Schalkwijk, Netherlands Sofa Chicago - Heller Gallery, New York, NY Habatat Galleries, Pontiac, MI Klub Vytvarnych Umelcu Horacka, Zdar nad Sazavou, Czech Republic Habatat Galleries, International Glass Exhibition in Beijing and Shanghai, China

Born: Ashikaga City, Tochigi Prefecture, Japan, 1954 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: St. Louis Museum of Art, St. Louis, MI Detroit Institute of Art, Detroit, MI Milwaukee Museum, Milwaukee, WI Los Angeles County Museum, Los Angeles, California Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, Wausau, Wisconsin Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, Ohio Kyoto Museum of Moden Art, Kyoto, Japan Museum of Decorative Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland Shimonseki Art Museum, Shimonseki City, Japan Hokkaido Museum of Modem Art, Sapporo, Japan Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario American Craft Museum, New York City Yokohoma Museum of Art, Yokohama, Japan

David Huchthausen

Martin Janecky

Born: Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, 1951 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Bergstrom-Mahler Museum, Neenah, WI Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, VA Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Hokkaido, Japan Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, WV Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis, IN Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Musée Cantonal des Beaux Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland Museum of Arts & Design, New York, NY National Gallery of American Art, Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC J. B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, WA Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, OH

Born: Liberec, Czech Republic, 1980 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions: “Heroes”, Habatat Galleries, MI Art Palm Beach, Habatat Galleries, MI Art Naples, Habatat Galleries, MI Art Sarasota, Habatat Galleries, MI “Theatre” Solo Exhibition Habatat Galleries, MI SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, MI, Art and Craft, Novy Bor, Czech Republic Pilchuck Glass School, WA Marta Hewett Gallery, OH Pilchuck Auction, Seattle, WA Habatat Galleries, Chicago, IL “International Invitational”, Habatat Galleries, MI Traver Gallery, Tacoma, WA Marta Hewett Gallery, Cincinnati, OH Jean-Claude Chapelotte Gallery, Luxembourg Galerie K, Maastricht, Netherlands

Richard Jolley Born: Wichita, Kansas, 1952 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Chrysler Museum at Norfolk, Norfolk, VA Coburg Museum, Coburg, Germany Corning Museum of Glass, NY Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, TN International Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark

Knoxville Museum of Art, TN Lowe Art Museum, Coral Gables, FL Mint Museum of Craft & Design, Charlotte, NC Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL Museum of Contemporary Arts and Design, New York, NY Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY

Steven Klein Born: Los Angeles, California, 1946 Selected Collections: The Studio at Corning, Corning, NY Nacional Museo Del Vidreo, La Granja (Segovia), Spain Museum Of Art and Design, New York, NY, USA Northlands Creative Glass, Lybster, Scotland The Bullseye Collection, Portland, OR, USA Museum, Academy of Arts and Design”, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China Tittot Glass Art Museum, Taiwan, Taipei National Museums Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland Eretz Israel Museum, Tel Aviv Museum of Northwest Art, La Conner, WA, USA

Marta Klonowska Born: Warsaw, Poland, 1964 Selected Collections: Alexander Tutsek-Foundation, München, Denmark The Corning Museum of Glass, NY Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, Denmark Glas-Museum Hentrich, museum kunst palast, Düsseldorf, Denmark Ernsting-Foundation, Coesfeld-Lette, Denmark Musée-Atelier du Verre, Sars-Poteries, France Selected Exhibitions: 2012 Glasstress New York - New Art from the Venice Bienniales, Museum of Arts & Design New York 2012 In the Name of Love | Curated by Dr. Eva-Maria FahrnerTutsek, Alexander Tutsek-Foundation, München, DE 2011 Menschen, Tiere, Sensationen | lorch+seidel | Berlin 2011 Materials Revisited - 10. Triennale für Form und Inhalte, Museum für Angewandte Kunst, Frankfurt/Main, DE 2011 Glasstress, Museum of Foreign Art, Riga, LV 2011 Glasstress, Millesgarden Museum, Stockholm, SE 2011 Glasstress, Berengo Centre for Contemporary Glass, Murano, IT 2011 Art Karlsruhe, with lorch+seidel galerie


Vladimira Klumpar

Jiyong Lee

Antoine Leperlier

Born: Rychnov nad Kneznou, Czech Republic, 1954 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Seven Bridges Foundation, Greenwich, CT Regionalni Museum Mikulov, Mikulov, Czech Republic Glass Museum, Novy Bor, Czech Republic North Bohemian Museum of Liberec, Czech Republic Museum of Glass and Jewelry, Jablonec nad Nisou, Czech Republic Corning Museum of Glass, NY Lannan Foundation, Palm Beach, FL Wusham Museum of Art, Racine, WI Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC American Arts and Craft Museum, New York, NY Cafesjian Museum Foundation, Yerevan, Republic of Armenia

Born: Seoul, Korea, 1971 Selected Collections: The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Samsung Electronics, Seoul, Korea Yunnan Hanringxuan Culture and Art Museum, Yunnan Province, China Selected Exhibitions: 2013 Habatat Galleries 41st International Glass Award Exhibition, Royal Oak, MI 2012 50 years of studio Glass, Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, Louisville, KY 2012 Duane Reed Gallery, “Segmentation”, October 19December 9, St. Louis, MO 2012 SOFA Chicago, Duane Reed Gallery, November 1-4, Chicago, IL 2011 Habatat Galleries 39th International Glass Award Exhibition, Royal Oak, MI 2010 Duane Reed Gallery, “new work”, St. Louis, MO 2010 SOFA Chicago, Duane Reed Gallery, Chicago, IL 2010 New Harmony Gallery of Contemporary Art, “Contemporary Glass” IN 2010 Amy Rueffert, Carmen Lozar, Matt Urban, New Harmony, IN 2010 SOFA West Santa Fe, Duane Reed Gallery, Santa Fe, NM 2010 SOFA New York, Duane Reed Gallery, New York, NY 2010 Morgan Contemporary Glass gallery, “Expertease”, Pittsburgh, PA 2010 “We’re on Huron”, Current SIUC Faculty and Graduate Student Exhibition, Chicago, IL

Born: Evreux, France, 1953 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Musée des Arts Décoratifs de Paris, France Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, Paris, France Corning Museum of Glass, NY Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Japan Collection du Conseil Régional de Haute Normandie, Rouen, France Morris Museum, Morristown, NJ Museum for Contemporary Art Glass, Scottsdale, AZ Victoria & Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom Leperlier glass art fund, Vendenheim, France Liuligongfang Museum, Shanghai, China Museum of Art & Design, New York, NY

Jenny Pohlman & Sabrina Knowles Born: JP – Monterey, CA 1955 SK – Cincinnati, OH 1960 Selected Collections and Exhibitions: Cancer Care Alliance Center, Seattle WA Mobile Museum of Art, AL Racine Art Museum, WI Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Museum of American Glass, Millville, NJ Habatat Galleries, MI Duane Reed Gallery, MO Pismo Gallery, CO Butters Gallery, PR Edmonds Museum, WA Thomas Riley Galleries, OH

Judith LaScola Selected Collections and Exhibitions: 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Swedish Cancer Institute Collection, Seattle, WA Montreal Museum of Fine Art, QC, Canada Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA Charles A Wustum Museum of Fine Art, Racine, WI Hunter Museum of Fine Art, Chattanooga, TN The Jewish Museum, San Francisco, CA Habatat Galleries, MI Maurine Littleton Gallery, DC Habatat Galleries, FL Hooks Epstein Galleries, TX

Shayna Leib

38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions: 2013 Art Palm Beach, Echt Gallery, Chicago, IL 2013 41st International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2013 Solo Exhibition, Echt Gallery, Chicago, IL 2012 Solo Exhibition- Habatat Galleries, FL 2012 Liberty in Bloom, American Libery Museum 2012 Boca Museum of Art, Boca Raton, FL 2012 40th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 Art Palm Beach, Echt Gallery, Chicago, IL 2012 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 SOFA New York City, Echt Gallery, Chicago, IL 2012 Samuel Lynne Gallery Featured Artist, Dallas, TX 2011 Back to the Tropics- Habatat Florida 2011 SOFA Chicago- featured solo artist 2011 Washington DC Four Seasons Hotel 2011 39th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI

Stanislav Libensky & Jarolsava Brychtova Born: SL – Sezemice-Mnichovo Hradiste, Czechoslovakia, 1921- deceased 2002 JB – Zelezny Brod, Czechoslovakia, 1924 Selected Collections: Brooklyn, Museum of Art, NY Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, Germany Corning Museum of Glass, NY Glasmuseum Hentrich im Kunstmuseum Ehrendorf, Duesseldorf, Germany Hamburg, Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg, Germany Museum of Art, Indianapolis, IN National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan Victoria and Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom City Art Gallery, Manchester, United Kingdom Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, VA Musee des arts Decoratifs – Louvre, Paris, France Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sappora, Japan Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney, Australia Toledo Museum of Art, OH

129


Artist Re´sume´s (Invitational)

Steve Linn

Lucy Lyon

John Miller

Born: Chicago, IL, 1943 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Indianapolis Museum of Art, IN Albany Museum of Art, GA Museum of American Glass, Millville, NJ Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Lausanne, Switzerland New York City Fire Museum, New York, NY Verrerie Ouvrière d’Albi, Albi, France National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, PA Museum of Art and History, Anchorage, AK Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL

Born: Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1947 Selected Exhibitions: 2012 40th Annual International Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 Bold Women-Translucent Expressions, RC Gorman Gallery, Taos, NM 2012 SOFA Chicago, represented by Thomas Riley Gallery, Cleveland, OH 2011 Clear and Present, LewAllen Contemporary, Santa Fe, NM 2011 Glass Weekend, Wheaton Village NJ represented by Thomas Riley Gallery 2011 SOFA Chicago, represented by Thomas Riley Gallery, Cleveland, OH 2010 38th Annual International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2010 Feel Free to Touch,Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities, Carbondale, CO 2010 Luminous Forms, LewAllen Contemporary Santa Fe, NM 2010 SOFA West, represented by Thomas Riley Gallery, Cleveland, OH 2010 SOFA Chicago, represented by Thomas Riley Gallery, Cleveland, OH

Born: New Haven, CT, 1966 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL Tacoma Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Glazen Huis, Lommel, Belguim Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Museum of Arts & Design, New York, NY Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, WA Museum of American Glass, Millville, NJ Selected Exhibitions: SOFA Chicago Blue Plate Special, Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Fifty by Fifty, Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI XL, Neusol Glassworks, Cincinnati, OH Studio Glass at 50: A tradition in Flux, Illinois State University, Normal, IL Class Heat, LeMay Car / Tacoma Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Fire Nation Glass Studio and Gallery, Holland, OH

Marvin Lipofsky Born: Barrington, Illinois, 1938 Selected Collections: Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, OH National Museum of Glass, Leerdam, NL National Gallery, Canberra ACT, Australia Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Art, MI International Glass Museum, Ebeltoft, Denmark National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan Musee des Arts Decoratifs (Fonds National d’Art Contemporin) Paris, France Huntington Museum of Art, WV Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, New York, NY Mint Museum of Craft + Design, Charlotte, NC Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL Tacoma Art Museum, WA

László Lukácsi

130

Born: Budapest, Hungary, 1961 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions: Bakony Museum, Veszprém, Hungary Museum of Applied Arts, Budapest, Hungary Glassmuseum of Frauenau, Germany Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Pfm-Gallery, Köln, Germany Gallery Painen, Berlin, Germany Klebelsberg’s Castle, Budapest, Hungary Portia Gallery – Chicago, IL Art Budapest / Art Expo – Budapest, Hungary Gallery Rob van den Doel – the Hague, Netherlands FORD Pyramid Salon – Budapest, Hungary

Ivan Mares Born: Decin, Czech Republic, 1956 Selected Collections: Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Saporo, Japan Glasmuseum Düsseldorf, Germany Museum of Applied Arts, Prague, Czech Republic The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, U.S.A. Moravian Museum of Applied Arts, Brno, Czech Republic Koganezaki Museum of Glass, Koganezaki, Japan Selected Exhibitions: 1999 SOFA CHICAGO, New York / I. Mares - New Sculpture 1997-99 “The Glass Skin” Touring: Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Saporo, Japan Shimonoseki City Art Museum, Japan The Museum of Fine Arts, Gifu, Japan The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, U.S.A. Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf im Ehrenhof, Germany Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, Germany 1995 Heller Gallery, New York / I. Mares - Objects, U.S.A. 1993 Manes, Prague / Students of Prof. Libensky, Czech Republic 1991 Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Saporo, Japan / World Glass Now - Honorary Price

Charlie Miner Born: Modesto California, 1947 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Telfair Museum, Savannah, GA Art Museum of South Texas, Corpus Christi, TX Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA Corning Museum of Glass, NY Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Museum of Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX New Orleans Museum of Art, LA New Mexico Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe, NM Tucson Museum of Art, AZ

Debora Moore Born: St. Louis, Missouri, 1960 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI Selected Exhibitions: 2013 41st International Invitiational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 Fifty by Fifty: Celebrating 50th Anniverary of Studio Glass, Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, FL 2012 Evolution/Revolution: 50 Years of American Studio Glass, Naples Art Museum, Naples, FL


2012 Liberty in Bloom, National Liberty Museum, Philidelphia, PA 2012 50 Years of Studio Glass, Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, Louisville, KY 2012 40th International Invitiational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2011 Convergence Zone, Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue, WA 2011 Glass Quake 2011, Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA 2011 Seattle Reigns, Ken Saunders Gallery, Chicago, IL 2011 39th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak MI 2010 Flora – The Botanical Experience, Glasmuseet Ebeltoft, Ebeltoft, Denmark

William Morris Born: Carmel, California, 1957 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: American Craft Museum, New York, NY Auckland Museum, New Zealand Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, Racine, WI Corning Museum of Glass, NY Daiichi Museum, Nagoya, Japan Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Hunter Museum, Chattanooga, TN J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Mobile Museum of Art, AL Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, France Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Toledo Museum of Art, OH Victoria and Albert Museum, London, England

Kathleen Mulcahy Born: Newark, New Jersey, 1950 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: American Art Museum, Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. American Eagle Outfitters Headquarters, Pittsburgh, PA American Craft Museum, NY Heinz History Center, PA State Museum of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, PA Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, PA The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY

Bretislav Novak Jr. Born: Semily, Czech Republic, 1952 Selected Exhibitions: 2011 39th Habatat Galleries International Invitational Award Exhibition, Royal Oak 2009 37th Habatat Galleries International Invitational Award Exhibition, Royal Oak 2008 36th Habatat Galleries International Invitational Award Exhibition, Royal Oak 2005 Gallery Porkova 2002 30th Habatat Galleries International Invitational Award Exhibition, Royal Oak 1997 Riley Hawk Galleries, Columbus 1996-SOFA, Chicago 1995 Heller Galleries, New York 1993 Habatat Galleries, Detroit 1991 21st Habatat Galleries International Invitational Award Exhibition, Royal Oak 1989 The Suntory Prize ’89 JAPAN 1988 World Glass Now ’88 1987 Novak Exhibition, Phoenix

Stepan Pala Born: Zlin, Czechoslovakia, 1944 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions: Slovak National Gallery, Bratislava, Slovakia Museum of Fine Arts, Kanazawa, Japan Dutch Quin Collection, Netherlands Museum of Applied Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Nationale Netherlanden, Rotterdam, Netherlands Castle Lemberk, Collection of Symposia, Czech Republic Victoria & Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom Green House, Bratislava, Slovakia Gallery Jean-Claude Chapelotte, Luxembourg Gallery Komart, Bratislava, Slovakia

Albert Paley Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1944 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: British Museum, London, UK Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Cambridge University, The Fitzwilliam Museum, United Kingdom Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, Australia High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, TN Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX Smithsonian Institution, Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC Toledo Museum of Art, OH Victoria & Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom The White House, Washington, DC Wustum Museum of Fine Art, Racine, WI

Zora Palova Born: Bratislava, Czechoslovakia, 1947 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, Coburg, Germany Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Nationale Nederlanden, Rotterdam, NL Shimonoseki Museum of Modern Art, Japan Slovak National Gallery, Bratislava, Slovakia Ulster Museum, Belfast, Ireland Victoria & Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom Corning Museum of Glass, NY Dutch Quin Collection, Netherlands Koganezaki Glass Museum, Shizuoka, Japan

Mark Peiser Born: Chicago, Illinois, 1938 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Fine Arts Museum of the South, Mobile, AL Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Huntington Museum of Art, WV Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY

131


Artist Re´sume´s (Invitational)

Marc Petrovic Selected Collections and Exhibitions: Habatat Galleries, MI Niijima Museum of Glass, Tokyo, Japan Charlotte Mint Museum, NC Tucson Museum of Art, AZ Racine Art Museum, WI Arkansas Arts Center Foundation Collection, Little Rock, AR Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA Vero Beach Art Museum, FL Irvine Contemporary, Washington, DC eo art lab; Chester, CT Reynolds Gallery; Richmond, VA Heller Gallery; New York, NY

Stephen Rolfe Powell Born: Birmingham, Alabama, 1951 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Racine Art Museum, WI Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, TN Muskegon Museum of Art, MI Corning Museum of Glass, NY Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, Racine, WI Cleveland Museum of Art, OH Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Wagga Wagga City Art Gallery, Australia Sydney College of Art, Sydney, Australia The Auckland Museum, Auckland, New Zealand Huntsville Museum of Art, AL Mobile Museum of Fine Art, AL Birmingham Museum of Art, AL Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia

Clifford Rainey

132

Born: Whitehead, Country Antrim, Northern Ireland, 1948 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Ulster Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Belfast, Northern Ireland Municipal Gallery, Dublin, Ireland American Museum of Art and Design, New York Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, Ireland Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Lausanne, Switzerland Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan Institute du Verre, Hate-Normandie, France Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio

De Young Museum, San Francisco, California The Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky The Corning Museum, New York Tutsek-Stiftung, Munchen, Germany

David Reekie Born: Hackney, London, 1947 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Portsmouth Museum & Art Gallery, UK Broadfield House Glass Museum, UK Glasmuseum Ebletoft, Denmark Crafts Council Collection, London, UK Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK Musee-Atelier du Verre de Sars Poteries, France Birmingham City Museum & Art Gallery, United Kingdom Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, PA Glass Art Fund, Strasbourg, France National Museum of Scotland Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, USA Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, United Kindom Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, QC, Canada

Colin Reid Born: Cheshire, England, 1953 Selected Collections: Victoria & Albert Museum, London Corning Museum of Glass, New York Kunstmuseum der Stadt Dusseldorf, Germany. Musee de Design et d’Arts Appliques Lausanne, Switzerland. Ebeltoft Glass Museum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art, Japan Hokkaido Museum of Art, Japan Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Birmingham, UK National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indiana, USA Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Art. Racine, Wisconsin J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky, USA National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Candada Seven Bridges Foundation, USA Shanghai Museum of Glass, China

Ross Richmond Born: 1971 Selected Exhibitions: 2013 41st Annual International Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 2013 Figure Studies and Gestures, Hooks-Epstein Galleries, Houston, TX 2012 Northeast Ohio Art Dealers Association Art Exposition, Thomas Riley Galleries, OH 2012 Toledo GAS Conference, Thomas Riley Galleries, OH 2012 Fifty by Fifty, Muskegon Museum of Art, MI 2012 “In the realm of Yin and Yang” An Exploration of Creativity, Friesen Gallery, Sun Valley, ID 2012 Coming Together, Duane Reed Gallery, MO 2012 SOFA New York, Duane Reed Gallery, MO 2012 SOFA Chicago, Duane Reed Gallery, MO 2011 Silver Summit, Friesen Gallery, Sun Valley, ID 2011 Meditations on the Figure, Friesen Gallery, Seattle WA 2011 Reflections on the Figure, Thomas Riley Gallery, Cleveland, OH 2011 SOFA Chicago, Duane Reed Gallery, MO 2011 SOFA New York, Duane Reed Gallery, MO

Richard Ritter Born: Detroit, Michigan, 1940 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Detroit Institute of Arts, Aviva and Jack A. Robinson Studio Glass Collection, MI Chrysler Museum, Norfolk VA Corning Museum of Glass, NY High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hunter Museum, Chattanooga, TN J.B. Speed Museum, Louisville, KY Milwaukee Art Museum, WI Mint Museum of Craft and Design, Charlotte, NC Racine Art Museum, WI Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC American Art Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC St. Louis Art Museum, MO The White House Permanent Art Collection, Washington, DC

Marlene Rose Born: 1967 Selected Collections: Leepa-Rattner Museum of the Arts, St. Petersburg, FL National Gallery for Foreign Art, Sofia, Bulgaria Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL Museum of Contemporary Art, Yerevan, Armenia Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI


Ritz-Carlton, Hong Kong Seven Bridges, Greenwich, CT Selected Exhibitions: 2012 ngela King Gallery New Orleans, LA 2011 Watson MacRae Gallery, Sanibel, FL 2010 PISMO Galleries, Aspen, CO 2010 Hodgell Gallery, Sarasota, FL 2009 Manitou Gallery, Santa Fe, NM 2008 Kuivato Gallery, Sedona, Az 2008 Gallery DeNovo, “Eastern Light” Sun Valley, ID 2008 Hawthorn Gallery, Birmingham, AL 2008 Evan Lurie Gallery, “Pop in the Midwest”, Carmel, IN

Davide Salvadore Born: Murano, Italy, 1953 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions: Naples Museum of Art, Naples, FL Art Palm Beach, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI International Glass Exhibition, Litvak Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI SOFA Santa Fe, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Art Amsterdam, Participation KunstRAI, Amsterdam, NL Hooks-Epstein Galleries, Houston TX Thomas R. Riley Galleries, Cleveland, OH SOFA New York, Thomas R. Riley Gallery, Cleveland, OH Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI

Jack Schmidt Born: Toledo, Ohio, 1945 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Alpena Power and Electric Company, Alpena, MI Bellerive Museum, Zurich, Switzerland Bowling Green State University, OH Chubu Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Japan Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Art, MI General Electric Company, Milwaukee, WI Illinois State University, Normal, IL Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI Rochester Institute of Technology, NY Shaw Walker Company, Muskegon, MI Toledo Federation of Art, OH National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

Mary Shaffer Born: Walterboro, South Carolina, 1945 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan Museum of Art & Design, New York, NY Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Montreal, QC, Canada Huntington Museum, WV Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland Museum of Decorative Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Musee du Verre; Sars-Poteries, France Corning Museum of Glass, NY Stadt Museum; Frauenau, Germany Glas Museum; Ebeltoft, Denmark Indianapolis Museum, IN

Ivana Sramkova Born: Liberec, Czechoslovakia, 1960 Selected Collections: National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia Museum of Arts and Crafts, Prague, Czech Republic National Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic Northbohemian Museum, Jablonec, Czech Republic Victoria and Albert Museum, London, Great Britain Corning Museum of Glass, Corning Museum of Modern Art, Lausanne, Switzerland Ulster Museum, Belfast, Ireland Regional Museum Pardubice, Czech Republic Toyama Museum, Japan

Paul Stankard Born: Attleboro, Massachusetts, 1943 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Corning Museum of Glass, NY GlasMuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Huntington Museum of Art, WV Hsinchu Cultural Center, Taiwan Indianapolis Museum of Art, IN J.B. Speed Museum, Louisville, KY Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY

Mobile Museum of Art, AL Musee des Arts Decoratif, Palais du Louvre, Paris, France Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Renwick Gallery, The Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Victoria & Albert Museum, London, England

Therman Statom Born: Escondido, California, 1953 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: California African-American Museum, Los Angeles, CA Corning Incorporated, NY Craft and Folk Art Museum, Los Angeles, CA Detroit Institute of Arts, MI High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, FL Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI Mint Museum of Craft and Design, Charlotte, NC Musse des Arts Decoratifs, Palais du Louvre, Paris, France Musee de Design et D’Arts Appliques /Contemporain, Lausanne, Switzerland Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, FL National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center, Columbus, OH Racine Art Museum, WI Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC Toledo Museum of Art, School of Art and Design, OH

April Surgent Born: Missoula, Montana, 1982 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Awards: ‘Artist Choice Award’, Tacoma Museum of Glass auction award, USA, 2011 ‘April Surgent, Forging Relationships in Reflections’ article, Drawing Magazine, Naomi Ekperigin, 2011 Artist in Residence, Museum of Glass, Tacoma, USA, 2011 New Talent Award, Urban Glass, New York, USA, 2010 Bellevue City Council Grant, in support of Bellevue Arts Museum project, Bellevue, WA, 2010 4Culture grant, in support of Bellevue Arts Museum project, Seattle, 2010 Selected Collections: Museum of Glass, ‘The Valley’, Tacoma, WA Ulster Museum, Belfast, Ireland Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY, USA Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, VA, USA Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Hotel Murano, Tacoma, WA, USA. Australian National University Public Artwork Program, Canberra, Australia Bradley Allen Acquisition Award, Canberra, Australia Embassy of Spain Art Collection, Canberra, Australia

133


Artist Re´sume´s (Invitational)

Tim Tate

Margit Toth

Born: Washington D.C., 1960 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Prince Georges County Courthouse, Upper Marlboro, MD Food and Friends Donor Wall – Washington, DC District Government Project - Wilson Building Public Art, Washington, DC Liberty Park at Liberty Center, Outdoor Sculpture Commission, Arlington, VA The Adele, Outdoor Sculpture Commission, Silver Spring, MD US Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building Courtyard, Outdoor Sculpture Commission, Washington, DC National Institute of Health (NIH) Sculpture Commission, Hatfield Clinic, Bethesda, MD American Physical Society / Baltimore Science Center, Sculpture Commission, Baltimore, MD Holy Cross Hospital, Sculpture for Oncology Ward, Silver Spring, MD

Born: Hajkuszoboszlo, Hungary, 1963 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions: Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Compositions Gallery, San Francisco, CA Art Glass Centre, Netherlands Museum of Applied Arts, Budapest Brauckman Gallerie, Netherlands Dennos Museum, Traverse City, MI Habatat Galleries, Mi Wheaton Village 2005, 2007, 2009 Habatat Galleries Mi Sofa Chicago, 2004 - 2010 Habatat Galleries, MI, Art Palm Beach, 2006 - 2011

Michael Taylor Born: Lewisburg, Tennessee, 1944 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: National Collection of American Art, Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, ON, Canada Sung - Jin Glass Museum, Kimpo, Korea Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC Corning Museum of Glass, NY National Museum of Glass, Marina Grande, Portugal Notojima Museum of Art, Japan Del Vedrio Vidricra, Monterrey, NL, Mexico Glas Museum Ebeltoft, Ebeltoft, Denmark Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, TN National Museum of Glass, Leerdam, Netherlands Kunsthaus Am Museum, Köln, Germany Düsseldorf Museum of Art, Düsseldorf, Germany

134

Bertil Vallien Born: Stockholm, Sweden, 1963 Selected Collections: Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, Australia Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark H. M. the King of Sweden’s Collection, Stockholm, Sweden Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Japan Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY MUDAC, Musée de Design et d’Arts Appliqués Contemporains, Lausanne, Switzerland Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, France Museo del Vidrio, Monterrey, Mexico Museum of Arts & Design, New York, NY National Museum of Art, Stockholm, Sweden National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, Japan Pilkington Glass Museum, St. Helen’s, Merseyside, UK Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, ON, Canada Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK

Janusz Walentynowicz Born: Dygowo, Poland 1956 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Ebeltoft Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark. Handelsbankens Kunstforening, Copenhagen, Denmark. Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Rockford Art Museum, IL Hsinchu Cultural Center, Taiwan Museum, Beelden ann Zee, Scheveningen, Netherlands National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, PA

Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Milwaukee Art Museum, WI Museum of Fine Art, Montreal, QC, Canada Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL

Vivian Wang Born: Shanghai, China Selected Collections: Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton, Florida Selected Exhibitions: 2013 Art Palm Beach, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 “Children of the Past”, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 “Glass Act; Contemporary Studio Art Glass Turns 50”, Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton, FL 2012 “New Work” by Gallery Artists, Stewart Fine Art, Boca Raton, FL 2011 “Rising Star”, Stewart Fine Art, Wheaton Glass Weekend, Millville, NJ 2010 “Glass & More”, Stewart Fine Art, Boca Raton, FL 2010 “Glass Now 2010”, National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, PA 2009 “Simple Addition and Subtraction”, Stewart Fine Art, Boca Raton, FL 2009 “Artistic Visions”, The Armory Art Center, West Palm Beach, FL

Leah Wingifeld

(with Stephen Clements) Born: Phoenix, Arizona, 1957 Selected Collections and Exhibitions: Naples Museum of Art, Naples, FL Galerie International du Verre - Biot, France Museo del Vidrio - Monterrey, Mexico Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburg, PA Toledo Museum of Art, OH Lux Center for the Arts, Lincoln, NE Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Miller Gallery, New York, NY Compositions Gallery, San Francisco, CA Habatat Galleries, Chicago, IL Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Japan Hsinchu Cultural Center, Taiwan


Ann Wolff

Brent Kee Young

Born: Gotland Kyllaj, Sweden, 1937 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Corning Museum of Glass, NY Ebeltoft Glasmuseum, Denmark Frauenau Museum, Germany Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Japan Lobmayr Museum, Wien, Austria Metropolitan Museum, New York, NY Mint Museum of Craft & Design, Charlotte, NC Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, France Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Museum Bellerive, Zürich, Switzerland National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, Japan National Museum, Stockholm, Sweden Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands Victoria and Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom

Born: Los Angeles, California, 1946 Selected Collections: American Glass Museum, Millville, NJ Bergstrom Mahler Art Museum, Neenah, WI Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY First Contemporary Glass Museum, Alcorcon (Madrid), Spain High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hokaido Museum of Art, Sapporo, Japan Niijima Contemporary Glass Art Museum, Niijima, Tokyo, Japan New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA Racine Art Museum, Racine WI Smithsonian Museum of American Art, Renwick Gallery, Washington, D.C. The Toledo Museum of Art, Glass Pavilion, Toledo OH

John Wood Born: 1944 Selected Collections: Habatat Galleries, 38th International Glass Invitational, Royal Oak, MI Alan B. Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland, MI Flint Institute of Arts, MI PRISM Contemporary Glass, Chicago IL Center for Creative Studies, President’s Permanent Exhibit, Detroit, MI

Hiroshi Yamano Born: Fukuoka, Japan, 1956 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: USA Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Gerald L. Cafesjian Museum of Contemporary Art, Yerevan, Armenia Grand Crystal Museum, Taipei, Taiwan Kurokabe Glass Museum, Nagahama, Japan Lowe Art Museum, Miami, FL, USA Museum of American Glass, Millville, NJ, USA Museum of Arts and Crafts, Itami, Japan Rochester Institute of Technology Library, Rochester, NY Winter Park City Hall, Winter Park, FL, USA Potash Corporation, Northbrook, IL, USA Palm Springs Art Museum, Palm Springs, CA, USA Hotel Murano, Tacoma, WA, USA

Albert Young Born: Mt. Clemens, Michigan, 1951 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions: Muskegon Museum of Art, MI Hodgell Gallery, Sarasota, FL Habatat Galleries, Chicago, IL Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, FL Habatat Galleries, Pontiac, MI Miller Gallery, New York, NY Vesperman Gallery, Atlanta, GA Flint Institute of Arts, MI Museo Del Vidrio, Monterrey, Mexico Habatat Galleries, International Glass Invitational, Royal Oak, MI “Sculpture Objects Functional Art” SOFA Exhibition, Chicago, IL

France Frac Haute-Normandie, Rouen, France Musée des Beaux-Arts, Lyon, France Entergy Corporate Collection, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, Alabama, USA

Toots Zynsky Born: Boston, Massachusetts, 1951 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, TN Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, WV J.B. Speed Museum, Louisville, KY Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Musée de Design et D’Arts Appliqués, Lausanne, Switzerland Musée des Arts Décoratifs du Louvre, Paris, France Museo Municipal de Arte en Vidrio de Alcorcon, Spain Museo del Vidrio, Monterrey, Mexico National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

Udo Zembok Born: Braunschweig, German, 1951 Selected Collections: Alexander Tutsek Stiftung, München, Germany Musée-Atelier du Verre, Sars-Poteries, France Europïsches Museum für Modernes Glas, Coburg, Germany Communauté Urbaine, Strasbourg, France Museo de Arte en Vidrio de Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain City Hall, St. Just-St. Rambert, France Préfecture de L’Allier (regional administration), Moulins,

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Artist Re´sume´s (eXpose)

Sean Albert

Cassandria Blackmore

Born: Woolwich, Maine 1975 Selected Collections: Ebeltoft Glass Museum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Mayo Clinic Muskegon Musuem of Art, Muskegon, MI Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA Northlands Creative Glass, Lybster, Scotland Solo Exhibitions: 2009 Lines, Light, and the Spaces In-between, Peel Gallery, Houston, TX 2008 Phenomena: Defining Space, Traver Gallery, Seattle, WA 2007 A Light Shadow, William Traver Gallery, Seattle, WA 2007 New Work, D and A Fine Arts, Los Angeles, CA 2006 Phenomenon…In Particular Order, William Traver Gallery, Seattle, WA 2006 New Work, D and A Fine Arts, Los Angeles, CA 2006 New Work, Victoria Price Contemporary, Santa Fe, NM 2004 pattern(s) (un)randomized, William Traver Gallery, Seattle, WA 2002 Concept: Subtle, Vetri International Glass, Seattle, WA

Born: San Diego, California, 1986 Awards: 2007 Renwick Smithsonian, featured Art of month, Washington D.C. 2002 John Hauberg Fellowship, Pilchuck, Stanwood, WA 1994 Award of Excellence in Art, The Fashion Group, Portland, OR 1993 Dean’s List Award, Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland, OR Selected Exhibitions: 2012 Hawk Galleries, Solo Show, Columbus, OH 2012 SOFA Chicago, Hawk Galleries, Chicago, IL 2012 Heather Gaudio Fine Art, New Canaan, CT 2012 SOFA New York, Duane Reed Galleries, New York, NY 2012 Art Palm Beach 3, Palm Beach FL 2011 SOFA New York, NY 2011 Glass Weekend, Hamptons, NY 2011 G.A.S. Seattle, WA 2011 Art Palm Beach, Palm Beach, FL 2011 SOFA, Chicago, IL 2010 Hawk Galleries, Columbus, OH 2010 SOFA New York, NY 2010 Palm Beach 3, Palm Beach, FL 2010Duane Reed Gallery, St. Louis, MO 2009 SOFA New York, NY 2009 Duane Reed, Solo Show, St. Louis, MO

Dean Allison Born: Chicago, Illinois, 1976 Selected Exhibitions: 2013 Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 The Center of Craft, Creativity and Design, Asheville, NC 2012 Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI 2012 TRAC Gallery, Spruce Pine, NC 2012 Neusole Glass, Cleveland, Ohio 2012 Fire Nation, Toledo, Ohio 2011 Green Plum Gallery, Spruce Pine, NC 2011 Bender Gallery, Asheville, NC 2010 National Self Portrait Show: 33 Collective Gallery, Chicago, IL 2009 Beauty Born of Fire: The Kavanagh Gallery, St. Charles, IL 2009 Sculpture on The Edge: Bermagui, Australia 2008 Aus Glass: Tasmania 2008 Moka Gallery- solo show, Chicago, IL 2007 Pilchuck Glass Auction 29th Annual 2006 Moka Gallery, Chicago, IL 2006 Kraft Lieberman Gallery, Chicago, IL

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Eóin Breadon Born: Rochester, Minnesota, 1975 Awards: 2007 Finalist, Arts Educator of the Year Award, Niche Magazine, Baltimore, Maryland 2005 Pilchuck Scholarship Recipient, Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, Washington 2005 Finalist, Arts Educator of the Year Award, Niche Magazine, Baltimore, Maryland 2005 Harvey and Bess Littleton Scholarship Award, Penland School of Crafts, Penland, North Carolina 2004 Tyler School of Art-Temple Univ, Elkins Park, PA Jack Malis Glass Award 2004 Tyler School of Art-Temple Univ, Elkins Park, PA Steve Stormer Memorial Fund Scholarship Selected Exhibitions: 2012 Reopenings, Flame Run Gallery at Glassworks, Louisville, Kentucky 2012 Sculpted, FOCI Gallery, Minneapolis, Minnesota 2012 Alumni Exhibition, Central College, Pella, Iowa 2012 Minnesota State Fair Exhibit, FOCI Gallery, Minneapolis, Minnesota 2012 Spring Show, FOCI Gallery, Minneapolis, Minnesota 2012 Engaging with Glass, exhibition of Irish glass artists, Traver Gallery-Tacoma, Tacoma, Washington 2012 50 x 50, exhibition of international glass artists,

Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, Michigan 2011 Odd Couples, invitational collaborative exhibition, Flame Run Gallery, Louisville, Kentucky 2011 Regional Glass Exhibition, invitational at River Falls Public Library Gallery. River Falls, Wisconsin 2011 Engaging with Glass, juried exhibition of Irish glass artists, Solstice Art Centre, Navan, Ireland 2011 Glass Invitational, Gallery A, Corning, New York

Nancy A.J. Callan Born: 1964 Selected Collections: Museum of Northwest Art, La Conner, WA Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI Wheaton Village Museum of Glass, Millville, NJ Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Selected Exhibitions: 2012 “Nancy Callan: Elemental”, Blue Rain Gallery, Santa Fe, NM 2012 “Duality: Nancy Callan and Ethan Stern”, Hawk Galleries, Columbus, OH 2012 “Strong Presence”, Group Exhibition, Hodgell Gallery, Sarasota, FL 2012 “50 x 50: 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass”, Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI 2012 “The Kaplan/Ostergaard Collection”, Palm Springs Art Museum, Palm Springs, CA 2011 “Clouds”, Solo Exhibition, Davis and Cline Gallery, Ashland, OR 2011 “Homage to Bornholm”, Group Exhibition, Gronbechs Gard, Hasle, Denmark 2011 Featured Artist, Schantz Gallery Glass Tour, Seattle, WA (Catalog) 2011 “Glass Quake”, Group Exhibition, Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA 2011 “Convergence Zone”, Group Exhibition, Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue, WA 2011 “Pictures of the Best Kind: The First 100 Years”, Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI

Domenico Cavallaro Born: Akron, Ohio 1977 Selected Collections: 2012 Cafesjian Center for the Arts, Cafesjian Foundation 2007 The Corning Museum of Galss 2007 Rochester Institute of Technology 2005 Korea Craft Museum, Korea 2003 Kim Young English Institute, Korea Selected Awards: 2013 Talented Award, Jutta Cuny- Franz Memorial Award 2013 (GERMANY) 2011 First place in Glass, Art Buzz, The 2012 Collection (USA) 2011 People’s Choice, Images 2011, Robeson Gallery, Penn State University, Philadelphia, PA (USA) 2011 2nd Place, 2011 Art Glass Festival, Delphi Glass Inc,


Lansing, MI (USA) 2011 NICHE award, Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA) 2010 3rd Place, 2010 Art Glass Festival, Delphi Glass Inc, Lansing, MI (USA) 2009 Selected Entries, Jutta Cuny- Franz Memorial Award 2009 (GERMANY) 2009 Corning Award, Pilchuck Glass School (USA) 2008 Honorable Mention, International student exhibition, The 38Th Annual GAS Conference (USA) 2008 The Becky Winship Flameworking Scholarship, The 38Th Annual GAS Conference (USA) Selected Collections: 2008 Tasty Jones Restaurant, Akron, OH 2005 Oakley Eyewear Corporation, Foothill Ranch, CA 2005 Short North Foundation, Columbus, OH 2003 Dominican College, Columbus, OH Selected Exhibitions: 2012 “Glass Art Society Exhibition”, Cavallaro Pop-up at the Sur St. Clair, Toledo, OH 2002+ Exhibiiton of work Hawk Galleries, Columbus, OH 2005 Pilchuck Auction, Seattle WA 2004 Pilchuck Auction, Seattle WA 2004 Eye Works Gallery, Columbus, OH “Opera Di Vetro” 2004 “Contemporary Glass by Ohio Artists”, Manchester Museum, Manchester, OH 2004 “New Works in Glass”, Springfield Museum of Art, Springfield, OH 2003 Pilchuck Auction, Seattle WA

Kathleen Elliot

Scott Darlington

Jason B. Gamrath

Born: Charlotte, North Carolina, 1968 Selected Collections: Louisville Slugger Museum and Factory, Louisville, KY Lambert Edwards and Associates, Grand Rapids, MI The Ohio State University Student Union, Columbus, OH The City of Toyama, JAPAN Muhammad Ali Center, Louisville, KY Jimi Hendrix Foundation, Seattle, WA Selected Exhibitions: 2012 Here’s to the Next 50 Years, Firenation Gallery, Holland OH., GAS Conference. 2012 Gathered Gallery & Studio, Toledo, OH. GAS Conference. 2011 Pilchuck Glass School Auction, Nordstrom Display, Seattle, WA. 2011 Traced and Reinvented, Neusole Glassworks, Cincinnati, OH 2010 National Art Museum of Sport, Indianapolis, IN. 2010 Faculty Show, Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery, BGSU, B.G., OH 2010 Penland Instructor Exhibition, Penland School of Crafts, Penland, NC. 2010 Hot Glass, Edison Building, Toledo, OH. 2009 ArtPrize, 47 Commerce, Grand Rapids, MI. 2009 Leaders In Glass, OSU Faculty Club, Columbus, OH. 2009 Cool Yule, Hudson Gallery, Sylvania, OH. 2009 NowOH, Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery, BGSU, BG, OH.

Born: Akron Ohio, 1958 Selected Awards: 2010 Jurors’ Choice Award, Bay Area Glass Institute, San Jose, CA 2009 Hans Godo Frabel Award Exhibition Award, 2009 Bay Area Annual Exhibition, Sanchez Art Center, Pacifica, CA 2009 NICHE Award Finalist, 2008 Award of Excellence, Cabrillo Gallery, Aptos, CA 2008 NICHE Award Finalist Selected Collections: 2013 “Reflections: Contemporary Studio Art Glass,” Morris Museum, GA 2013 “Playing with Fire,” Ellen Noel Art Museum, TX 2013 The Washington Pavilion of Arts and Sciences, Visual Arts Center, WA 2013 The Paul and Lulu Hilliard University Art Museum, LA 2012 “The Natural & the Imaginary,” Krasl Art Center, MI 2012 “The Enchanted Transient Reality,” Ferris State University, Rankin Art Gallery, MI 2012 “New Life Forms,” Davis and Cline Gallery, solo exhibition, Ashland, OR 2012 “Art of the Organic,” Cultural Forum, University of Oregon, solo show, Eugene, OR 2012 “Playing With Fire: Artists of the California Studio Glass Movement,” Oakland Museum, CA

Born: Renton, Washington, 1986 Exhibitions and Awards: 2012 Private show, Black Hat Studio and Showroom, Seattle, WA 2011 Group show, Seattle Design Center Seattle WA 2010 Solo show, Park Lane Gallery, Kirkland, WA 2009 MIVAL show, Mercer Island, WA (2nd Place award) 2008 MIVAL show, Mercer Island, WA (2nd Place award) 2007 MIVAL show, Mercer Island, WA (2nd place award) 2006 Solo show, Avelino Gallery, Mercer Island, WA 2006 MIVAL show, Mercer Islnad, WA 2005 Solo show at Six Walls Interior Design, Mercer Island, WA 2005 MIVAL show, Mercer Island, WA (honorable mention award) Experience: 2005-2010 Artist assistant to Randy Walker 2012 Opened Black Hat Studio and Showroom 2011 Privately contracted to Jenny Pohlman and Sabrina Knowles 2011 Privately commissioned by P.W.A.P event 2009 Privately contracted to Ginny Ruffner 2008-2011 Artist assistant to Ross Richmond 2008 Teaching assistant to Karen Willenbrink Johnsen/Jasen

Johnsen at Penland School of Craft 2008 Artist assistant for Manitou Gallery Crossing Boundaries Show featuring Liz Wolf, Kim Goldfarb, Hib Sabin, Randy Walker, Ross Richmond and Raven Skyriver

Slate Grove Born: Fort Dodge, Iowa, 1979 Awards: 2012 Outstanding Glass Artist; Florida Glass Art Alliance 2012 Mayor’s Purchase Award; Uptown Normal Transportation Center, Normal, IL 2012 ISU Student Annual Glass Departmental Award, Normal, IL 2012 Pilchuck Partial Scholarship; Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, WA 2011 Charles and Jeanne Blines Scholarship Glass Award, ISU, Normal, IL 2010 Metropolitan Contemporary Glass Art Group; Best Graduate Student Work, Chicago, IL 2005 Eaton Corporation Contest; Second Place, Cleveland, OH Selected Exhibitions: 2013 “eXpose”, Emerging Artist Group Exhibition; Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2013 “Emerging Artist”, Glass Weekend Exhibition; Creative Glass Center of America, Millville, NJ 2013 MFA Biennial”, ISU; University Galleries, Normal, IL 2012 “Studio Glass at 50: A Tradition in Flux”. ISU; University Galleries, Normal, IL 2012 “Student Annual”, ISU; University Galleries, Normal, IL 2011 “Lasikomppania – Glass Artists of Nuutajärvi” Group Exhibition, Finnish Glass Museum, Riihimaki, Finland 2011 “MFA Biennial”, ISU; University Galleries, Normal, IL 2011 “MCGAG” Group Exhibition, Marx Saunders Gallery, Chicago, IL 2011 “Student Annual”, ISU; University Galleries, Normal, IL

Sean Hennessey Born: Boonton, New Jersey, 1972 Collections: Howard TheatreTrumpet on The Jazzman Sculpture Washington, DC Library of Congress, Adams Building Reproduction of the Lee Lawrie Doors Washington, DC The Wilson Building heART of the City Washington, DC The City of Washington DC Art Collection Prince Georges County Art Collection, Maryland Selected Exhibitions: 2013 Habatat Galleries eXpose Royal Oak, MI 2013 Duncan McClellan Gallery Art in Glass St Petersburg, FL 2013 Edison Place Gallery International Glass and Clay Washington, DC 2012 Aqua Art Miami Alida Anderson Art Projects South

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Artist Re´sume´s (eXpose)

Beach Miami, FL 2012 410 Good Buddy Gallery Reimagining Alice Washington, DC 2012 Washington Craft Show with Maurine Littleton Gallery Washington, DC 2012 Blue Spiral Gallery Glass Secessionism Asheville, NC 2012 Delaplaine Arts Center Constructing Content Frederick, MD 2011 Long View Gallery Artists of The Washington Glass School Washington, DC

Silvia Levenson Born: Buenos Aires, Argentina 1957 Selected Collections: Fine Art Museum, Houston. USA. New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fè Corning Museum, Corning USA (Rakow Commision) Tikanoja Art Museum, Vaasa, Finland Alexander Tutsek-Stiftung , Munich, Germany. Musée du Verre Sars Poteries, France Glasmuseum Ebeltoft, Denmark Museo Leon Rigaulleau, Argentina Coleccion Casas de las Americas, Cuba. Comune di Castelvetro, Castelvetro (Modena).Italy Glas Museum Fraueneau, Germany Museo del Vetro, Altare. Italy Selected Solo Exhibitions: 2013 Not Neutral. ( with Mindy Weisel) Lorch + Seidel Gallery. Berlin. 2012 Life Strategies. David Richard Gallery, Santa Fè. NM 2012 Camouflage. Luciano Colantonio, Brescia. 2011 Everything is OK. Solange Guez, Buenos Aires. Argentina 2010 The plan was perfect, curator E.Aro. Sansalvatore Artproject. Modena, Italy. 2010 Life’s Strategies. (installation) . Micaela Gallery, San Francisco.USA. 2010 I feel in balance. Project room at Fondazione Durini, Milano.

Alicia Lomné

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Born: Bastia, Corsica, France, 1972 Selected Exhibitions: 2012 “Fifty by Fifty”, Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI 2012 “Whidbey Island Glass Invitational”, Museo, Langley, WA 2012 “50 Years of Glass”, Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft 2012 “Spring Instructor Exhibit”, Penalnd School of Crafts, Penland, NC 2011 “Whidbey Island Glass Invitational”, Museo, Langley, WA 2011 “Tresspassing”, Pucini Lubel, Seattle, WA 2011 “Alicia Lome, Seed Thoughts”, Museo, Langley, WA 2010 “Alicia Lomne”, Museo, Langley, WA 2010 “Whidbey Island Glass Invitational”, Museo, Langley, WA

2010 “Glass Now Auction”, National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, PA 2009 “Wire We Here?”, Museo, Langley, WA 2009 “Filling the Void”, Bullseye Gallery, Portland, OR 2009 “SOFA Chicago 2009”, Riley Galleries, Cleveland, OH 2008 “Glass Quake”, Mobilia, Cambridge, MA 2008 “Big Ideas/Small Packages: Magnificent Glass Under 20”, Berstrom Mahler Museum, Neenah, WI 2008 “Whidbey Island Glass Invitational”, Museo, Langley, WA

Jeff Mack Born: Born: Parma, Ohio, 1973 Collections: Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Daimler Chrysler Headquarters, Auburn Hills, MI Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, MI Henry Ford Museum, Dearborn, MI Michigan Governor’s Mansion, Lansing, MI Robert M. Minkoff Foundation Collection The Historic Player’s Club, Detroit, MI Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, OH Selected Awards: 2006 Artistic Merit Scholarship, Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, WA 2004 Niche Award Finalist for Goblets, Niche Magazine 2003 Corning Award Winner, Corning Award Nominee, Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, WA 2002 Corning Award Nominee, Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, WA 2001 Distinguished Artist Award in Glass, Royal Oak Clay and Glass Show, Royal Oak, MI 2001 Niche Award, First Award for Blown Glass, Niche Magazine, 2001 1996 The Dominic and Elizabeth Labino Art and Technology Award for Glass

Nick Mount Born: Adelaide, South Australia, 1952 Collections: National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Vic, Australia National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, ACT, Australia Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia Geelong Gallery, Geelong, Vic, Australia Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, Qld, Australia Museum of Contemporary Glass Art, Toyama City, Japan Wagga Wagga Regional Art Gallery, Wagga Wagga, NSW, Australia Ararat Regional Art Gallery, Ararat, Vic, Australia The Gordon Institute Collection, Geelong, Vic, Australia Sale Regional Art Gallery, Sale, Vic, Australia Latrobe Valley Regional Art Gallery, Morwell, Vic, Australia

State Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia ArtBank, Sydney, NSW, Australia Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, NSW, Australia The New Federal Parliament House, Canberra, ACT, Australia State Craft Collection, Melbourne, Vic, Australia The Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark

Greg Nangle Born: 1973, Pennsylvania Collections: Low Museum, Paley Collection, FL Glass Musee Ebeltoft, Denmark Wheaton Museum of American Glass, NJ Selected Exhibitions: 2013 Habatat Galleries, eXpose Exhibition, 41st International Invitational, Royal Oak, MI 2013 Wheaton Museum of American Glass, CGCA Fellowship 30th Anniversary Show, Millville NJ 2011 Philadelphia Museum of Art, Craft Show 2011 Pop-up, Philadelphia, PA 2011 Princeton Day School Gallery, Gallery Club Exhibit, Princeton, NJ 2011 Wexler Gallery, Glass Weekend Exhibition, Wheaton Arts, Millville, NJ 2011 Pittsburgh Glass Center, 10 x 10 x 10, Pittsburgh, PA 2011 Snyderman Works Gallery, Goblet Show, Philadelphia, PA 2010 Wayne Art Center, Craftforms 2010, Wayne, PA 2010 Wood Turning Center, Magic Realism: Material Illusions, Philadelphia, PA King Street Gallery, Transmuting Craft: Making Craft Sculptural, Takoma Park, MD Wayne Art Center, Reflections in Glass, Wayne, PA

Israel and Erik Nordin Israel Nordin Born: 1976 Erik Nordin Born: 1966 Collections: Rock Companies, Detroit Madison Theater, Detroit Gerard Van Grinsvan, CEO Henry Ford Hospital West Bloomfield, MI Innovation Institute, Henry Ford Health Systems, Detroit, MI St Joseph Hospital, Macomb, MI City Center, Las Vegas, NV The Whitney, Detroit, MI The City of Brighton, Brighton, MI The City of Beverly Hills, Beverly Hills, MI Saretsky Hart Michael and Gould - Birmingham, MI The Ford Foundation; Prechter Holdings, Grosse Isle MI DTE Energy, Detroit, MI Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, Detroit, MI Strategic Staffing Solutions, Detroit, MI Mosaic/Santorini, Detroit, MI Cork, Pleasant Ridge; Vinology, Ann Arbor


Vinotecca, Royal Oak; Duo, Southfield, M Ron and Roman Architects, Birmingham, MI The Willy’s Overland, Detroit, MI Universal Images, Southfield, MI

Miles Van Rensselaer Born: New Jersey, 1973 Selected Collections: 1999-2007 Clifton Sculpture Park: Clifton, NJ 2002 National Liberty Museum: Philadelphia, PA 1997 Kenyon College: Gambier, OH Exhibitions Selected: 2013 41th Annual International Glass Invitational & EXPOSE, Habatat Galleries, MI 2013 Art on Fire, Studio 7 Gallery, Bernardsville, NJ 2013 Summer Installation, Pismo Gallery, Aspen, CO 2012 Group Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 Gallery Artist, Heller Gallery, New York, NY 2012 Gallery Artist, Wexler Gallery, Philadelphia, PA 2012 50 Years of Studio Glass, Studio 7 Gallery, Bernardsville, NJ 2011 Primal Inspirations: Contemporary Artifacts 2011 Fete de Verre: FUTUR (auction to benefit UrbanGlass), Capitale, NYC 2011 39th Annual International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 2011 GlassWeekend 2011, (with Habatat Galleries Michigan), Wheaton Arts, Millville, NJ 2010 38th Annual International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 2010 Art Palm Beach (with Habatat Galleries, MI), Convention Center, Palm Beach, FL 2010 Group Exhibition, Heller Gallery, New York, NY

Amy Rueffert Born: Laconia, New Hampshire, 1972 Selected Collections: Arkansas Art Center; Little Rock, AK Corning Museum of Glass; Corning, NY Design Center Ishikawa; Kanazawa, Japan Glassmuseet Ebeltoft; Denmark Shanghai Museum of Glass; Shanghai, China Tacoma Museum of Glass; Tacoma, WA Selected Exhibitions: 2013 eXpose; Habatat Galleries; Royal Oak, MI 2013 Sculpture in Glass; Ann Briely Gallery, New Trier High School; Winnetka, IL 2013 Gallery Artist Group Exhibition; William Traver Gallery; Seattle WA 2012 The Art of Seduction: Exquisitely Crafted Temptations; The Rouse Gallery, Howard Community College; Columbia, MD 2012 School of Art + Design Faculty Exhibition; Krannert Art Museum; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; IL

2012 Fifty by Fifty; Muskegon Museum of Art; Muskegon, MI 2012 50 Years of Studio Glass; Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft; Louisville, KY 2012 Glass: A Juried Art Show; Minnetrista, Muncie, IN 2012 Vase as Voice; McLean County Arts Center; Bloomington, IL 2011 5 x 5: An Invitational; Westmont Museum of Art; Santa Barbara, CA 2011 Fergus Fellows Exhibition, Hopkins Hall Gallery; Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 2011 Traced & Reinvented, Atmosphere@Neusole, Cincinnati, OH 2011 A Touch of Glass 2, Cinema Gallery; Urbana, IL 2011 The Nature of Glass, Schack Art Center; Everette, WA 2011 10x10x10, Pittsburgh Glass Center, Pittsburgh, PA 2011 Glass Carnival, Flame Run Studio and Gallery; Louisville, KY

Anna Skibska Born: Warsaw, Poland, 1959 Selected Collections: Musee-Atelier du Verre, Sars-Poteries, France Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Mesa, Arizona SAFECO Art Collection, SAFECO, Seattle, Washington Selected Exhibitions: 2013 Museo del Vetro, Venice, Italy 2012 “Anna Skibska” Film Première IMA, San Juan Islands Museum of Art and Sculpture Park, Friday Harbor, WA 2012, Anna Skibska, IMA, San Juan Islands Museum of Art and Sculpture Park, Friday Harbor, WA 2012 Q, Rainer Club, Seattle, WA 2011 Pacini Lubel Gallery, Seattle, WA 2009 Church of Skibska, Oysterville, WA 2008 Anna Skibska Follow The Line. The Path To Form, Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue, WA 2007 Sculpturesite, San Francisco, CA 2006 No Exit, Bullseye Gallery, Portland, OR 2006 Landscape with Stars, Studio Centella, Tucson, AZ

Cassandra Straubing Born: Pasadena, California, 1978 Awards: 2012 Jurors Choice Award, Benefit Auction, Bay Area Glass Institute, San Jose, CA 2011 Dorothy and George Saxe Fellowship Award, Bay Area Glass Institute, San Jose, CA 2010 Emerge “Kiln Casters Award”, Bullseye Gallery. Portland, OR 2008 “Exhibition First Place Award”, Cabrillo Art Gallery, Santa Cruz, CA 2007 “Alumni Scholarship Award”, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY 2007 “Library Purchase Prize”, Rochester Institute of

Technology, NY 2006 NICHE Finalist for cast glass “Buttons” 2003 “Emerging Student Artist,” California Glass Exchange, CA Selected Collections: 2012 SJSU Faculty Exhibition, Natalie and James Thompson Gallery, San Jose, CA 2011 GlassWeekend 2011, Creative Glass Center of America, Wheaton Arts, NJ 2011 SOFA Santa Fe, NM 2010 Domesticity; How We Live, Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery, Pittsburg, PA 2010 Fragile Strength, Two Person Art Exhibition, Cabrillo Art Gallery, Santa Cruz, CA 2010 Emerge 2010 Bullseye Gallery, Portland, OR 2009 SJSU Faculty Exhibition, Natalie and James Thompson Gallery, San Jose, CA 2010 Bullseye Residency Emerging Artist Exhibition, Bullseye Gallery, Portland, OR 2008 The Unbreakables- A Glass and Ceramics Exhibition, Cabrillo Art Gallery, Santa Cruz, CA 2007 Hot Glass In The Bluegrass, Lexington Art League, Lexington, KY 2007 Roles, Rights, and Rituals, Pen and Brush, New York, NY 2007 Glass Art Society International Student Exhibition, Pittsburg, PA

Norwood Viviano Born: 1972 Collections: Lincoln Motor Company, Dearborn, MI Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan, WI Kohler Co., Kohler, WI Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Selected Collections: 2013 “Mining Industry”, Winthrop University, Elizabeth Dunlap Patrick Gallery, Rock Hill, SC 2013 “Ordinary Landscape (w/ Sarah Lindley)”, WMU, Albertine Monroe-Brown Gallery, Kalamazoo, MI 2011 “Cities: Departure and Deviation”, Heller Gallery, New York, NY 2009 “Object Permanence (with Sarah Lindley” Paint Creek Center for the Arts, Rochester, MI 2008 “Trace”, University of Michigan, Taubman Gallery, Ann Arbor, MI 2008 “Shifting Scale (with Sarah Lindley)”, Art Gallery, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI 2004 “Trace”, Garibaldi-Meucci Museum, Staten Island, NY 2004 “The Public Art Project: Billboard”, Lemberg Gallery, Ferndale, MI 2001 “Installations”, Esther Claypool Gallery, Seattle, WA 2000 “Earth Room”, Spaces Gallery-SPACELab, Cleveland, OH

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Artist Re´sume´s (eXpose)

Danny White Born: Dayton, Ohio, 1985 Selected Awards: Craig A. Schnuth Memorial Glass Scholarship Presidential Suite Invitational Exhibition Award, Bowling Green, OH Outstanding Student Achievement, BGSU, Bowling Green, OH Robert W. Hurlstone Memorial Glass Scholarship BFA 3-D Talent Award Scholarship Undergraduate Research Scholarship Award Corning Award Nominee, Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, WA Selected Exhibitions: EXPOSE, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Making Friends, Solo Exhibition, Atmosphere, Cincinnati, OH New Work, Private Showcase, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Featured Artist Exhibition, Public Glass, San Francisco, CA NEXT, Group Exhibition, Seattle Glass Gallery, Seattle, WA G.A.S Exhibition, Seattle Glassblowing Studio, Seattle, WA Pilchuck Staff Show, Stanwood, WA BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition, Bowling Green, OH Cohesion, Glass 3 International Exhibition, Washington D.C Toledo Hot Glass Biannual Invitational, Toledo, OH Studio Assistant Show, Penland School of Crafts, NC ArtSpace, Lima, OH Toledo Area Glass Exhibition, Toledo, OH Newish Work, Hawthorne Gallery, Port Orford, OR Teach Your Children to Play With Fire, Bowling Green, OH Figuratively Tweaking, Solo Exhibition, Bowling Green, OH

Banana Boy - 2013

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24” x 36” Oil on panel Photo: Larey McDaniel


AACG Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass

The Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to further the development and appreciation of art made from glass. Formed in 1987 by a group of the earliest collectors of contemporary studio glass art, AACG is today the largest organization of collectors, galleries, artists, curators, and museums in the world. Our members: • Go on fabulous AACG trips • Visit spectacular homes and collections • Meet artists and visit artists’ studios • Enjoy complimentary passes to SOFA Chicago, Art Palm Beach and other events • Meet other collectors and make lifelong friendships

AACG AD – coming from group

Visit AACG’s award-winning website: www.contempglass.org. Join AACG Today ( Join at www.contempglass.org or use the enclosed membership form )

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MGCA

Michigan Glass Collecting Alliance

Contemporary Glass throughout Michigan

Watch and Learn Glass blowing, lampworking, casting and foundry work

Visit both public and private collections as well as museums and art centers

Meet artists, collectors and other glass lovers

Join in the MGCA and help spread the word Interested? Contact Corey@habatat.com Like us on Facebook and join the group online

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Albert Young “Kudzu”, 84” high Cast glass and metal


MASTERWORKS : Habatat Galleries Annual Masterworks Contemporary Glass Auction

A Contemporary Glass Auction Thursday, April 25, 2013

April 25th, 2013 at 8:00 pm Offering 44 works of contemporary glass artwork Contact the gallery for a catalogue of the auction.

Habatat Galleries

Pioneering the secondary market in contemporary glass! Selling events and auctions planned Include your collection and consignments Contact Habatat Galleries today Note: All pieces shown sold at previous auctions.

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Habatat Galleries opening night celebration

Artists attending Glass International

Artist talk at Summerset Inn

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Party at Ferdinand and Kathy Hampson’s

We would like to thank all the artists, clients and sta for participating in the 41st International Invitational and eXpose.

Home Tours


4 4 0 0 f e r n l e e a v e r O Y A L O A K M I 4 8 0 7 3 ( 2 4 8 ) 5 5 4 0 5 9 0 I NFO @ H A B A T A T . C O M W W W . H A B A T A T . C O M

41st Annual International Glass Invitational – Habatat Galleries

h a b atat g a l l e r i e S

Visions


41 International Glass Invitational Catalogue Habatat Galleries