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42 ND ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL GLASS INVITATIONAL – HABATAT GALLERIES

G L A S S EVOLVED


The 42 nd International Glass Invitational Awards Exhibition 2014

Grand Opening April 26 th , 2014 at 8:00 PM Show continues through June 28 th , 2014

Please join us for the oldest and largest glass art exhibition in the United States held at Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, Michigan. Habatat Galleries will present over 200 works from 92 participating artists. 42 years ago, this annual glass exhibition started as a national and through the years has grown international with participating artists from all over the world. Each artist has sent what they consider their very best work to be on display in this most celebrated exhibition. Annually, 25 artists are chosen by a distinguished panel of jurors. This year Richard and Barbara Basch; noted contemporary glass art collectors; Charles Shepard, Executive Director of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art and Joshua Rose, Chief Editor of American Art Collector Magazine will make the selections. The 25 winners of this year’s International Glass Invitational will be given an exhibition at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art. Remember… On the opening night it’s your chance to vote. The winner of the “people’s choice” award will also participate in the Museum exhibition! Your vote is important to us! Illustrated are some of the works that you will see in this year’s Annual International Glass Exhibition entitled “GLASS EVOLVED.” In the exhibition catalogue, each artist addresses the question where does their sculpture fit in the ever growing vast world of art . On behalf of the staff here at Habatat Galleries, we look forward to seeing you at the International Glass exhibition which has become an exciting and historical event.

HA BA TA T GA L L E R I E S 4400 Fernlee Ave.,Royal Oak, MI 48073 2 4 8 . 5 5 4 . 0 5 9 0 | i n f o @h a batat.co m


GLASS EVOLVED 42 nd Annual International Glass Invitational Awards Exhibition 2014 April 26th, 2014 — June 28th, 2014 Grand Opening: April 26th, 2014 8:00pm

HABATAT GALLERIES MICHIGAN

4400 Fernlee Avenue | Royal Oak, Michigan, 48073 248.554.0590 | info@habatat.com | www.habatat.com


HABATAT GALLERIES Corey Hampson Aaron Schey Ferdinand & Kathy Hampson Debbie Clason Rob Bambrough Rob Shimmell Nick Solomon David Walstad Jurors: Charles A. Shepard III Executive Director of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, IN Joshua Rose Editor of American Art Collector Magazine Richard and Barbara Basch Noted collectors from Florida Design and Layout by John Bowman Planning by Ferdinand Hampson, Corey Hampson and Aaron Schey Compilation and Editing by Aaron Schey and John Lawson Š2014 Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, Michigan All rights reserved. This book may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, including illustrations, in any form (beyond that copying permitted by Sections 107 and 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law and except by reviewers for the public press), without written permission from the publisher. This catalogue was published to coincide with the exhibition 40th International Glass Invitational at Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, Michigan, Saturday, April 26, 2014 to Saturday, June 28, 2014. ISBN 978-1-928572-02-2


Harvey Littleton 1922 – 2013

The “Father “of Studio Glass in America. In 1962 Harvey Littleton conducted a work shop at the Toledo Museum which is considered the emergence date of artists using glass as their medium. In 1963, Mr. Littleton was responsible for creating the first glass making program associated with a University (University of Wisconsin, Madison). We all owe a debt of gratitude to the man most responsible for the early evolution of contemporary glass. He was both a pioneer and a visionary and the right man at the right time to alter the history of glass.

Alice Chappel 1942 – 2013

Started the Chappel gallery (1997) in Boston and later in New York, she was responsible for exposing many new and talented artists to the market. She specialized and nurtured many Japanese artists who worked with glass. Alice was the type of art dealer that we all should emulate.

Harvey Littleton

Ileene Hoffman 1947 – 2014

Ileene with her husband Gary carefully collected glass, developing a prominent collection. Their enjoyment and enthusiasm was contagious. We enjoyed traveling together and will always remember her style, grace and kindness.

1928 – 2013

Jiri made many trips to the United States, often as a teacher and always willing to share his engraving techniques. He was an innovator, using portraiture on glass with an incredibly high level of craftsmanship.

Gerard Cafesjian 1925 – 2013

A man that shunned publicity, he amassed a huge collection of art. Although he acquired all forms and materials of art, glass as well as Armenian causes were his passions. He blended these with the opening of the Cafesjian Center for the Arts, in Armenia. Over 5,000 works from his collection are on display. On a personnel note he was my great friend. We traveled the world together, had many laughs and sharing many adventures. I can’t think of him without smiling.

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- Ferdinand Hampson

In Memoriam

Jiri Harcuba


People’s Choice 2013

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Frederik Meijer Gardens Award

Michael Behrens

Latchezar Boyadjiev

Jiyong Lee

Albert Paley

STANI

Tim Tate

Udo Zembok

Joseph Becherer - Chief Curator and Vice President for Collections and Exhibitions at Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Mary Shaffer

Award of Excellence 2013

Steve Linn

John Wood

Collector’s Choice 2013


Zoltan Bohus

Peter Bremers

Keith Clayton

Tomáš Hlavicˇka

Vladimira Klumpar

Kathleen Mulcahy

Stephen Powell

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Brent Kee Young

Ann Wolff

Bertil Vallien

Zora Palova

Ivan Mares

Marta Klonowska

Toshio Iezumi

Christina Bothwell

Martin Blank

Hal and Myra Weiss - Noted collectors from Michigan

Collector’s Award

Charles A. Shepard III - Executive Director of The Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, Indiana Fort Wayne Museum Award


Art is a lie that makes us realize truth. - Pablo Picasso I first heard the above quote from a guest professor in Art History during my first year of art school. He spoke with such passion and earnestness that when he finished his two hour lecture with saying it is our job as artists to pursue this truth and show it to the world, I was filled with a sense of awe and purpose. I studied painting, drawing, glass sculpting and out of curiosity, combined one medium with another. I traveled parts of the world by bicycle in order to accumulate as much life and cultural experience as possible, gathering grist for the mill. I moved to a neglected part of the city, sleeping on a futon in a condemned warehouse within easy reach of my easel. My path as an artist stretched out in front of me.

medium. I create objects that interest me as a sculptor and hope to intrigue and instill a connection in the viewer. I work figuratively; paying attention to and collecting information from my experience and natural surroundings. A recent piece, Minstrel, has surfaced through my observation of the migrating swans gathering in the valley where I live; their grace and cacophony; white light soft against the dark winter ground. When asked where I feel my place is in the art world beyond the glass community, outside of being stiffly definitive, I have a difficult time finding the disparity between them in my own purposes. Grateful to be an active participant in both realms, I think back to that professor and thank him for being a catalyst that propelled me to pursue truth as an artist and opened these awe-inspiring doors.

- Shelley Muzylowski Allen, 2014

Shelley Muzylowski Allen

Over twenty years later, I continue to live an examined life. I am more than happy to wake in a real bed and work in my studio that has 300 pounds of viscerally satisfying molten glass. Yes, glass is a truly seductive material and I work with it the same as I would any other

Under the Blue Blue Sky (Left) - 2014 26 x 26 x 18 Blown & hot sculpted glass, horse hair, leather, rock steel

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Minstrel (Right) - 2014 25 x 23 x 17� Blown & hot sculpted glass, horse hair, leather, rock steel All photos by Russell Johnson


Creating from fire began to dominate my artistic life with the first attempt to blow glass in 1969. As an artist forging steel into sculpture, molten glass was an alternative: a quick, hot and risky route to a finished piece of art. Once I immersed myself in the glass process, this material became a fine art medium, another tool in my artist vocabulary. Evolving glass skill and process generated the Image Vessel Series in 1976. In this series I “painted” using color, line and “sculpted” to read a three-dimensional image through a blown glass vessel. Working toward a larger scale in the 1980’s led to a series of sculptures using assembled blown glass blocks and steel structures. Combining cast-glass elements with metal and stone in “precarious balance” began during the 1990’s and led to the Pillared Series. My current work still deals with this core aesthetic. During my BFA program, I sorted old documents at the Cleveland Museum of Art Library. From perusing that history, I decided that art criticism does not determine whether a work is remembered or forgotten. History is the measure of an artwork’s enduring aesthetic. In my art I strive to incorporate multiple layers, metaphorically, in glass so it is there for those who look and see. - Herb Babcock, 2014

Herb Babcock

Oval Shift - 2014

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35.5 x 28 x 17” Cast glass & bronze


My fantasy is that my work would be considered sculpture, not sculptural (petite idea). The reality is that work receives the respect (or lack thereof), that it has earned. Serious work will be taken seriously by art history.

Rick Beck

- Rick Beck, 2014

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Germinate - 2014 31 x 56 x 9� Cast glass Photo by David Ramsey


LOVE, PASSION and PAIN - Michael Behrens, 2014

Michael Behrens

Seaform-SF-99 - 2014

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48 x 23 x 7� Kiln cast glass Photo by Paul Niessen


As a member of the oldest profession in history it is impossible to describe one’s own work and place oneself in that history in a few brief words.

Howard Ben Tré

- Howard Ben Tré, 2014

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Lightness of Being #6 - 2008 87.5 x 8 x 8” Cast glass, bronze, patina


I bring this history and training to my endeavors in glass sculpture.

Envision - 2014

- Robert Bender, 2014

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12 x 17 x 7” Cast glass, iron oxide transfer All photos by Robert Bender

In Pop Art, Andy Warhol did not accept the traditional definition of what art is. Multiple images of Marilyn Monroe and soup cans were held up as something beautiful. I am drawn to the magnetic symbolic power that everyday objects hold, especially when used in a figurative context. In my heart, the remnants of editorial problem solving remain, except I am no longer illustrating articles. Instead, observations of the heart and mind are what I am searching to reflect and comment on. Viva found objects!

Robert Bender

When I studied art in college there was always a hard line dividing the “commercial arts” and “fine arts”. In commercial art the goal was to work within the parameters of the problem to be solved, while in fine art I sought for the purest form of expression that came from my core. In doing editorial illustration for many years, I used those constraints to focus my creativity. At its best I was creating personal, idiosyncratic art while also serving as illustration. This continued and expanded when I focused my attention on writing and illustrating children’s books.


Since both of my parents are glass artists and some of the founders of the studio glass movement, I have always wanted to have my own voice as an artist. While I will always be deeply rooted in studio glass, I feel my work can be defined as simply "sculpture." The techniques and processes I use are the same as those that stone sculptors have been using from the beginning of time. So I feel like I am simply a sculptor...with glass as my material.

Alex Bernstein

- Alex Gabriel Bernstein, 2014

Green Pinnicle (Left) - 2014 52 x 7 x 4� Cast and cut glass, fused steel

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Amber Pinnicle (Right) - 2104 52 x 7 x 4� Cast and cut glass, fused steel All photos by Steve Mann


Throughout history artists have always appropriated materials that were readily available to them. Sometimes this has been motivated by an artist’s personal economics and other times by an artist’s interest in new technologies. You can see this when viewing postwar modernism and the use of plastics in art for example. I think there can often be a rush to label an artist by the predominant medium in their work but that is changing as more artists are using a variety of materials and creating works that could be viewed as sculpture, installation and painting simultaneously. The lines are blurred. Should we be defining or labeling at all? Doesn’t that confine the artist? Does the “label” inform the context in which we view the art? I ask these questions because personally, I see all art as “art” and the use of glass is just a medium that can take on many forms and will continue to evolve.

- Cassandria Blackmore, 2014

Asimi Krema VII - 2014 40 x 61” Reverse Painted Glass

Cassandria Blackmore

In today’s society of mass information readily available at our fingertips, I believe we will see more artists from all kinds of disciplines using glass in their work because they became educated about its possibility as a medium. I find this exciting and freeing. I chose glass to be the substrate in which I apply paint to because I was drawn to the fluidity of the paint on its surface and the luminosity of the pigment’s color when viewed from the other side. I also wanted to explore its fragility and the tactile qualities of the material when it is shattered. There was a dichotomy in its broken state that although the thought of it being smashed into pieces seemed sharp and harsh, it actually appeared soothing and had a vortex feel to it that draws the viewer into the shards. Does that make me a painter, a sculptor, a glass artist? I believe it is simply “artist” the synonym of for someone making art.

Ceto VIII - 2014

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40 x 40” Reverse Painted Glass


I have been a maker, artist, and sculptor for over 3 decades. I believe myself and others, even the younger generation, are still on a similar trajectory of the true spirit and energy of what was coined the studio movement many years ago: To learn from, see, explore, and challenge the possibility of glass technically and conceptually. It is this seemingly boundless potential we delve into… no matter the generation or evolution in the material. From the organic molten material to the remaining captured still moments glass defines in its cooled state, each artist is making a record of his or her own experience, moxie, and world. As an artist, I have a calling and responsibility to bring an energetic sincerity or “self” to whatever materials I employ. How could one not in some way? At my best, I have been able to bring to light through my making, a glimpse of my deepest admirations and inspirations: The vast power of nature, the human condition, and its complex and intricate coexistence. I focus more on these ideas, rather than fitting within particular confines created by the art, glass, and craft worlds I am lovingly part of and have joyfully been accepted within. I think less of the delineations and more about the collisions of these worlds. They are at the least interwoven and undeniably interrelated.

Martin Blank

Some may refer to what I do and what others do as capital “A” art, or art, or glass art, or sculpture, or installation, or public art, or drawings, or mere scribbling. Call it what you will. I call it a Gift. One I am thankful for, an energy I am thankful for, a voice and life I am thankful for. - Martin Blank, 2014

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Demeter’s Song - 2013 34 x 8 x 8” Hot sculpted glass Photo by Russell Johnson


I feel the most of my works belong to the constructivist category of small scale sculptures. But during the very last period I made some steps towards a kind of “pantheistic” endeavors, so the two objects of mine belong to this conception. I think. - Zoltan Bohus, 2014

6.5 x 12.75 x 9” Laminated & polished glass 5.5 x 12.75 x 11” Laminated & polished glass

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Peak (Bottom) - 2013

Zoltán Bohus

Valley (Top) - 2013


My place in the world and in the word of glass art might be amongst the ones who are also trying to find their own place, … and amongst the ones who also do things for it to be at home there. The changing of the outside world is so incomprehensible. It is going to the deep mist of virtual reality. I hope it is going to roll forward and people with feelings, with creativity and with responsible thinking are going to be the in the centre of it, again. People, who are the part of nature, are also the caretakers of it. When I was a child I used to watch the water in the stream next to our house and the way the light plays on the water. I wanted to catch the waves and their light, and to take them home. Nowadays, nearly forty years later, I still do admire the endless variety of nature... and now I can hold a tiny bit of it in my hand: the glass.

Péter Borkovics

Glass is the “stone of dreamers” which puts a spell on you and flies you to another dimension. I never will get bored of it. - Peter Borkovics, 2014

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Aristoteles : Probleumata - 2014

14 x 12 x 2.5” Hot sculped, cut and polished glass Photo by Janos Ratki


Detail of image to right

STANI

Dizzy from the Fog - 2013

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25 x 18 x 10� Hot sculpted & sandcast glass, wood, steel


In the scheme of things, my work may fit in best with Low-Brow, and Outsider art. I get revved up when looking at unconventional art. I love to see the wacky visions of untrained artists, and artists who do not worry about making tasteful images "for commerce". Sometimes just seeing something visually shocking that I would have never imagined - like the artist who embroiders mold on toast, (Judith G. Klausner) or the artist who beads bird innards, (Jane Howarth), invigorates me and makes me happy to also make art. Even though I studied painting when I was at art-school, I am selftaught with glass. Perhaps because I am not a glass technician, I see my work as hanging out on the edge of the contemporary glass movement.

Christina Bothwell

- Christina Bothwell, 2014

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Air - 2014

31 x 9 x 9� Cast glass & paint Photo by Robert Bender


If I am to look beyond the glass community my work will fit perfectly in any sculpture gallery or in any contemporary interior enhancing the aesthetics. It will be part of modern architecture. I definitely consider my work as an abstract sculpture and using glass allows me to add another dimensions to it – transparency and translucency. Why am I leaving one of the planes of my sculptures flat and polished? The reason is if you look through it as an unobstructed window at the negative space it creates a lasting impression of a threedimensional drawing. Only the glass allows me to do this. It has a lot more to offer as a material for the creative person than any other. The light coming through the glass defining the texture and composition makes it pure magic increasing the emotive qualities of the artwork. My newest work is a large scale relief panels that could stand on its own as artwork or could have a function as well – a door, table or window. - Latchezar Boyadjiev, 2014

Latchezar Boyadjiev

The best is yet to come!

Torso V - 2013

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32 x 24 x 6” Cast glass


Glass is a medium full of artistic potential. It has unique qualities like no other material. It is challenging and seductive but also fragile and hard. As a sculptor I was never trained in glass and look at the material as a means to express myself in a 4-dimensional, sculptural way. In exploring my inspiration and artistic quest, I find myself to be rather conservative, striving to a certain aesthetic value combined with a meaningful intent. Creating freely within a context that is powerful yet sensitive, even poetic at times. Due to the development of low-expansion glass I am able to make large outdoor sculptures. This is an important addition to the qualities of the medium glass as it allows not only creating sculptures that can be in rural or urban settings but that can be monumental in size and evoke a new appreciation of its merits.

Peter Bremers

- Peter Bremers, 2014

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Elapse - 2013

30 x 32 x 7� Kiln cast glass Photo by Paul Niessen


In the early 1990s on a visit to the Toledo Museum of Art I found my piece “The Counterman”, in the middle of a gallery which exhibited the work of a number of Realism painters. It seemed that this placement has helped me answer the question of where I might align my work in the art world. I select important details to suggest an object without showing every attribute. In this, I wish to present a smooth transition between what we know to exist in the real world, and my glass translation of it. Upon reviewing my past work, I find that I have also been tracing changes within our culture from my initial sculpture through to the present. Spiral phone cords lead to cell phones; card catalogues to the click of a mouse and search engines; A simple cup of coffee at a corner diner to lines at stands offering ten kinds of espresso. Trying to place oneself in a movement or group from one’s own perspective is a difficult task. I certainly waiver between Realism and the world of the imagination. - Emily Brock, 2014

Emily Brock

Old School - 2014

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11.5 x 14.5 x 15” Kiln worked glass Photo by Norman Johnson


In the spectrum of the art world I would place my work alongside sculptors that come out of a crafts tradition. Images and forms from that tradition (such as the vessels and tools) are a common theme in my work. The presence of the hand is important to me. Walking the ground between craft and art is an exciting place to be and is fertile ground that has been mined by many contemporary sculptors such as Martin Puryear and James Surls.

José Chardiet

- José Chardiet, 2014

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Blue Etruscan Voyage - 2007

24 x 15.5 x 5.5” Sandcast and hot sculpted glass Photo by Marty Doyle


With my focus on the economy of line, shape and color and the lack of a true narrative, I would guess that my work will continue to belong to the school of minimalism. - Daniel Clayman, 2014

Daniel Clayman

Caminata - 2014

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23.75 x 7 x 7� Cast glass & copper Photo by Mark Johnston


An artist thrives in an environment suited for growth. Ideas and opportunity are the nutrients for evolution. Glass is evolving because of the amazing influx of these nutrients which are transforming what we see before us. I don’t think of myself in a category but rather as part of an evolution. I will leave it to the art historians to find a place for us.

Deanna Clayton

- Deanna Clayton, 2014

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Nikki - 2014 9 x 7 x 6� Pate de verre


I feel my work using the pate-de-verre glass and electroplated copper would fit best in a museum of unearthed vessels that were eroded through time and pieced back together. That is where the impetus to make the work began. - Keith Clayton, 2014

Keith Clayton

Rope Vessel - 2014

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22 x 24 x 24� Pate de verre, bronze and electroplated copper


I continually seek a deeper understanding of the world in which we live and the nature of our experience within it. My work is an expression of the depth and wonder I find in living, and seeks to embody a sense of the profound and the transcendent. The work in the International Invitational continues my exploration of contemplative and perceptual experience. Compositions of volume and void, activated by light and shadow, serve as meditations intended to reduce abstract concepts into elemental forms of visual expression and make manifest that which lies beyond the scope of my language.

Brian Corr

- Brian Corr, 2014

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The Fullness of Empty - 2014 31.5 x 31.5 x 3.75� Kiln formed, sandblasted glass Photo by Rob Little


The material of glass has become recognized within contemporary art practice both for its conceptual themes of translucency, fragility and for its durability. Within my practice the allure of glass has captured my imagination. As a malleable structural material, it allows the interior to become part of the form. From a broader Art perspective, I work within a sculptural context, with natural science and biological structures as my primary influences. - Matthew Curtis, 2014

19.5 x 12 x 3.5� Cast and blown vaseline glass, carved

Matthew Curtis

Translucent Diatom 1402 (Left) - 2014

Translucent Diatom 1401 (Right) - 2014

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19.5 x 12 x 3.5� Cast and blown vaseline glass, carved Photo by Rob Little


Materialism Like many American art students of the 1960’s, I began with the vague notion of becoming a professional artist. I could have been a painter, or a carver of marble statues, or a film maker or illustrator. But “The Crafts” were very compelling to me at the Philadelphia College of Art. Programs in Clay, Jewelry and Metalsmithing, and woodworking were very exciting compared to the many other offerings of major studies. Because of the rigorous training I received, and the demands put on us to perform at our highest level of commitment and skill, I began to expect a lot from myself in answer to the assignments and in creating works that were self assigned. When I was a sophomore in 1967 a ceramics teacher, Roland Jahn, asked me to help him build a glassblowing studio at the college. PCA had been given a grant by the Fostoria Glass Company, and we built the studio during the summer. In the fall, when we began to work with hot glass for the first time, it was an amazing addition to my accumulating palette of materials and processes for making art. There was no formal instruction in glassblowing; it was experimental for the students and the faculty. But we began to explore form and develop our own techniques for working with hot glass. Many of us in similar situations as art students decided to work in the craft mediums instead of the currently accepted fine arts mediums. We were attracted to the materials of the traditional crafts, and we adopted the working processes and even the forms (vases, chairs, necklaces, etc.) as formats for our artistic expression.

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Dan Dailey

As we developed skills and experience with these materials we became connected by the interchange of technical information and techniques with numerous colleagues all over America. The Materialist movement grew larger. The Materialist movement has never had a common conceptual philosophy similar to other art movements of the 20th century, such as Surrealism or Pop Art, for example. The mastery of specific traditional craft materials placed in service of individual artists’ concepts has defined Materialism as an art movement. The artists are materialists in the sense that they understand and employ specific materials, which identifies their art in some way. This differs from other definitions of materialism. In the philosophical sense, materialism describes matter and its motions constituting the universe and all phenomena, including thought. Therefore material is everything and everything is material. According to MIT professor Morris Cohen, materialism is a humanistic and cultural term: a description based on our genetic heritage, the human material. A popular current understanding of

the word materialism is the gathering of posessions to the exclusion of spiritual or more meaningful pursuits. I define materialism as the artist’s thorough devotion and accumulated knowledge and expertise based on the material they have chosen to make their art. It is therefore a philosophy of material mastery that characterizes their work and unifies them in a movement. The craft mediums bring with them a heavy legacy of forms born of process, which causes modern makers to repeat history and stay within the confines of tradition. However, some artists desire to communicate superceeds their need to make product. Many of them do not feel connected to the craft scene; they just use the materials and processes to express their thoughts. They are different from the potter making mugs for a craft fair or the furniture maker who makes reproduction Windsor chairs. Artists blur the line between art and craft constantly, with little regard for how they may be categorized. Collectors’ enthusiasm for the works of these artists has greatly affected the broader interest of galleries and museums. Museums are now involved in the historical documentation and collection of works from the Materialist movement. Whatever conclusions may be drawn by future scholars of Materialism, its vitality and importance as an American art movement has been established, and it has now endured for fifty years. We artists of the movement have forged out own ways through the traditions and techniques to create works that are new in the history of glass, clay, and the other materials. Artists who chose to work with glass have experienced an extraordinary amount of attention and support for our art as this movement has progressed. As a contributor to the movement I have described, I have been an artist and also an educator, and it is mostly in retrospect that I begin to see the ways Materialism parallels other art movements historically. I have learned much from my artist colleagues who work with glass through the collaborative attitudes that characterize the processes we employ. With the efforts of galleries to exhibit our art, and the numerous collectors who have purchased or work and enable us to continue following our individual creative notions, a symbiotic relationship has developed which is similar to all previous art movements. These lucky circumstances have contributed to my own work immensely. The industrial palette I adopted has allowed me to articulate my thoughts in multiple ways for many years. Certainly my material focus on glass has influenced my conceptual thinking, as I studied the history of glass and discovered the work of the ancient Egyptians, or the creative genius of Galle, the Daum brothers, Galle, and Lalique. Martinuzzi, and Barovier were also influential to my thinking about glass, especially during my time at Venini. Modernist art was a powerful influence on my development as an image maker, and from earlier periods I am strongly attracted to the works of Bosch, Titian and Caravaggio. I have tried continually to see myself in the larger context of the history of art, even though glass has been the dominant medium for my expression. - Dan Dailey, 2014

Overture - Scenes Series - 2011 22 x 25 x 14.5 Blown & hot sculpted glass, sandblasted and acid polished vitrolite, fabricated nickel plated copper and nickel plated aluminum base. Photo by Bill Truslow


Well…this year the theme is difficult. I simply enjoy that I consider myself an Artist. I don’t have any doubts that my work is Glass Art. If you ask me where else, beyond the glass art world, it can fit? I don’t have an answer. It just fits well in the Glass Art World. “That my work is “Art” is something discussible and a lot of people would not agree with it…but I don’t lie and it is not discussible if I say that it is Glass Art. The problem is that I do what I do because of glass. It was Glass that sent me into the Art World. If I was not a Glass Artist I really would not make any Art, except maybe for the “Culinary Arts”. Maybe if I would dedicate the amount of hours I give to Glass I could make art with figs and sugar? In truth, I always felt a sort of fear to talk about my Art. My way of seeing things and my culture does not include a complete understanding about Contemporary Art. Nothing compares with the explosively intense feelings I experience when viewing a show of Glass Art…. what happens inside me in front of a piece of Bertil Vallien or what I felt in Bergamo years ago walking in between Libensky sculptures…for sure their ART is SUBLIME and Transcendental ART and they used Glass… I also feel excited visiting the Corning Museum…those intense emotions I do not experience at any contemporary art museum.

- Miriam Di Fiore, 2014

40.25 x 27 x 7.5” Fused glass and mixed media

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L’Atessa: The Wait - 2014

Miriam Di Fiore

My pieces have multiple ingredients. For sure I “paint” but I love to do it ONLY with glass. Also, some of my objects could be considered sculpture….but the concepts and the ideas I want to express, I feel, can be done only through glass. Glass is my material; I don’t care much if it is ART. Everything I do has to be “well done” from the point of view of Glass. So… it is difficult to be honest and objectives with one’s self…. where my work can fit beyond the Glass community? My instinctive answer could be…nowhere…but I confess - I hope to be wrong.


“Intense emotion is stressful, and we look to artists to feel for us, to suffer and rejoice, to describe the heights of their passionate response to life so that we can enjoy them from a safe distance.” Diane Ackerman - “A Natural History of the Senses” It has been over three decades that I have been privileged to work as an artist with glass as my main material. Much of the work has been about exploring intense emotion and my attempts at describing the human experience from a personal perspective. Using glass and other materials to express powerful yet personal concepts has been an amazing journey of invention, determination, and self-discovery. Much of this type of work has been shown in museums, or public galleries, and has been seen by audiences not necessarily attuned to glass as an expressive medium. They show up to see what an artist has presented to them; whether or not they are moved by it, they stand in front of a fellow human being’s attempt at sincere communication through creation. Glass happens to be a material that I love to work with. It goads me, sometimes taunts me, and dares me to use it in a way that arouses my senses. This is how I want to move into the future, provoked by ideas that I hunger to explore, puzzling out the why, figuring out the how, all in an attempt to reveal my core to myself and to others.

Laura Donefer

- Laura Donefer, 2014

Wild Orchid Amulet Basket (Above) - 2014 28 x 28 x 14 Blown and hot sculpted glass

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Azzurro Amulet Basket (Left) - 2014 22 x 22 x 8” Blown and hot sculpted glass All photos by Stephen WIld


Glass is one of the many materials that I have utilized in my work. Scatters consisting of glass pills and tablets evoke a shrunken AliceThrough-the-Looking-Glass state-of-mind. Each element has a unique pattern and color configuration, allowing every viewer to construct their own "cure". - Beverly Fishman, 2014

Beverly Fishman

Untitled #3 - 2013

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Dimensions Variable Blown glass Photo by Brian Carpenter


I have been asked where I place myself in the spectrum of art making and find that to be an impossible task. I know I am part of that cohort. However, other than saying that perhaps I am somewhere in the area of figurative expressionism, I have no interest, nor would dare to claim a precise slice of that spectrum. I have had a long relationship with glass as a material for emotional expression and for reflection on personal history. My early work referenced the glass in the centre of the earth: the formative magma of our planet. Hope and love founded in destruction. In later years I searched for life saving beauty and found glass, with its seductive attributes, to be a willing partner in this quest. Of late the work has taken on a narrative quality as I attempt to find meaning in a life observed.

Irene Frolic

As an artist I have been allowed the pleasure of working on my own work and the privilege of contributing to the ever-flowering of human expression. My work is very personal. I like to tease out my ideas in solitude and then send them out to the world. I think it is up to others to decide where I fit into the wider spectrum of the art world. In the end it comes down to me, my brain, my heart and my hands. The rest is (art) history. - Irene Frolic, 2014

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The Gift - 2012 26 x 15 x 5� Lost wax technique, opaline and clear crystal


My Mother was a complicated woman. Raising we girls by the Book of Conflicting Messages, my Mother lovingly shaped me into an: ask questions later act like a lady you can do anything but learn to type first boys only want one thing but don’t say what it is do it right or don’t do it at all fall in love but have something to fall back on, artist. Oh, and learn to cook and sew. Men like that. In response, or perhaps as a result of, I embrace domesticity in feminine spirit but not in action. My life is the culmination of feminine expectations gone awry. I like to sew things, but more in the way a mad scientist might sew things. My misguided domestic talents eventually grew into concepts of sewing magical dresses and illuminated gowns. Unyielding yet compelling, they are dresses for the brave of heart and well insured.

For years I believed my work was about myself but ultimately my work is about my Mother. With her messages firmly imbedded, I’m able to indulge my own notions of domestic role-playing. My work embraces the feminine ideals of sensuality, in a seductive but unforgiving material, offering conflicting messages of comfort and expectation. - Susan Taylor Glasgow, 2014 Hanging Garden Chandelier Dress (Left) - 2014 48 x 26 x 26” Glass and mixed media

Susan Taylor Glasgow

As an artist, I have the luxury of exploring the complexities of domestic life from the safe distance of my studio. I pursue beauty and sensuality in my work to give the viewer a reason to examine it more closely and find their own personal connection.

Silver Empire (Right) - 2014

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72 x 24 x 24” Glass and mixed media


When I look around at work being produced today in the non-craft art world, I’m struck by the amount of critical and theoretical reading required to fully understand a piece of work. This means that the visual elements often take a backseat to the intellectual intentions of the artist. Work made in the craft-art world is usually different, because the making of the piece is constrained by the important formal consideration of the specific material language. My own work is driven by the need to express narrative themes that are in many ways recognized as time-honored traditions. Additionally I like the timeless and permanent quality that glass brings to my ideas and hope that it will endure beyond momentary fashions.

Robin Grebe

- Robin Grebe, 2014

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Eventide - 2014 15 x 6 x 3� Cast glass and mixed media Photo by Mike Newby


I’m very influenced by the power of common and nostalgic objects to tell us a little bit about ourselves. The way we feel and interact with these objects, the interpretations we bring to them often create a metaphor of the things we hold dear in our hearts. For the pieces in this exhibit, I share hands holding locks and an old Edison light bulb on a string. The pieces each contain an element of defying a way of thinking that holds us back. In The Possibility, that element is gravity and how our past expe¬riences may predict that certain things are impossible, but that through the power of imagination we can overcome obstacles. In Sharing What is Held Close, outreached arms and hands holding locks sit above an old pattern, that while beautiful and won¬derful can also represent a predictable and repetitious way of thinking. To present the openness of sharing or of allowing ourselves to unlock and see beyond what we’ve previously experienced to be true, we might shape our internal evolution and our mental growth. My approach to glass is to utilize the transparency of the material and a kiln forming technique to further my explorations of ideas and interpretations of the world. I use a form of float glass slump casting over quick but accurate plaster powder molds. I then paint and enamel to accentuate the glass and create imagery. The pieces are backlit to glow and to allow the layered color work to shine. - Sean Hennessey, 2014

24 x 30 x 4” Cast glass, paint, LED

Sean Hennessey

Sharing What is Held Close (Left) - 2013

The Possibility (Right) - 2013

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21 x 26 x 4” Cast glass, paint, LED


The triangle penetrates the circle. The circle represents the planet whilst the triangle’s sides symbolize the past, present and the future. At the center of the sculpture, the circular crucible holds the “Eye of Winter”. Visually jagged energetic forces interplay in a symphony throughout the form. The crucible’s eye invites the viewer to look into layers of time as they recede into history. Eons of time pass as one moves to its depths. The ever moving environment deep within the waters of our blue planet, create turbulent forces which have regenerated the Earth over billions of years. Within the eye we can, by imagination, get a sense of the wheel of time. A feeling of continuity can be established.

Eric Hilton

Our world’s energy is both open and hidden. When we view time we are like mayflies who “dance our hour upon the stage.” As the vast cold tree of winter comes, its branches embrace the land in a cacophony of sound and spirit. Out of the sea mist on a Northeaster, massive waves rage into the buttresses of rocks. The land trembles under the assault as the long journey into night comes upon the land. Light fluctuates through blades of winter ice. Unpredictably the sky fluoresces with northern lights. Purple, blue and green transparent veils dance across a steel black sea. As from our early evolution we are aware how closely we are related to the pulse of the planet. The nature of glass lends itself to infinite interpretation. The magic of light creates reciprocity between the viewer and the object. Relatively simple prismatic forms can achieve complex visual illusions. Each of my works attempts to invite a personal interpretation. They are an orchestrated response to the natural world; not to make a copied translation but to emotionally interpret its message. It’s the shear excitement of the life force all around that can make one feel like a child discovering the wonder of nature for the first time. Our creative spirit echoes through all human evolution and art sits at its core. As humans we are enmeshed in a multidimensional ever expanding experience. We need all the magic and mystery we can conjure up to help us.

- Eric Hilton, 2014

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Winter’s Eye - 2012 23 x 17 x 5.25” Cut and sandblasted glass Photo by the artist


It seems that although glass has its limits now, new technical developments will create new perspectives on aesthetics. If I look at contemporary art work my mind moves from minimalism to decorativism from naturalism to abstraction, from the classics to more conceptual and kitsch along with others we are afraid to name. The total reliance on eclecticism causes us to wait for a new impulse. I was classically educated. I say and I repeat that a work of art should speak for itself. It does not need story. It is not important whether it was created in an hour or a year. I'm trying to work responsibly and to please the human eye. - Tomas Hlavicka, 2014

17.75 x 10.25 x 11 Cut, polished, laminated glass, gold leaf

Tomáš Hlavicka ˇ

Cathedral (Top) - 2014

Femina (Bottom) - 2014

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23.25 x 7.5 x 4.75 Cut, polished, laminated glass, gold leaf


At a time, when creating my artwork with clay, metal, fibers, etc., searching for contrasting materials, I made my own paper combining it with my raku sculptures desiring the strength of one, with the fragility and translucidity of the other. Right at the same time, visiting an art fair, I was lucky to see beautiful art works made of ...raku and glass. That is it! I told myself, and right away took my first glass class.

Jacqueline Hoffmann-Botquelen

Since then, glass became my focus, but I always have kept the same spirit in my creation: combining it with other materials, and then further with other mediums. I consider myself a sculptor and then a technician. I want to express my emotions, my thoughts, and preoccupations with glass. I want to achieve not only an esthetic and technical piece of art, but, a sculpture which speaks of my intimate thoughts and my position in the world. Glass is very challenging, demanding and technical. To create a Glass sculpture, you need to let the material go and set your mind free. This release may be needed when using Glass more than when using any other medium. I feel that will all artwork that is created with inspiration and with any medium should be placed by its concept in the art world of today. Challenge, innovation, skill, and vulnerability are all words that describe the contemporary art world. I think that my own artwork definitely fits. - Jacqueline Hoffmann-Botquelen, 2014

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Echoes of Silences - 2014 43.5 x 28.75 x 13� Pate de verre, bronze, electroplate, copper, photo transfer Photo by Frank Schwarzbach


Glass is a material of the future. Thanks to its specific characteristics glass will play an increasingly important role in the visual arts. Within the expanse of time glass is a relatively young material for creating art. Recently it has become an equivalent material to the traditional ones - stone and bronze. The fundamental motto and inspiration for my work is modern architecture. In my own work I emphasize the technical perfection and beauty of the material and the main role geometry and color play. Individual pieces are formed with elementary shapes using simple geometric forms such as the cube, sphere, cylinder and cone. Using simple means to achieve maximum effect and by the removal of all unessential parts allows us to capture the basic and important features that are attributes to the object itself. This view is ideologically closest to minimal art, which gradually extends from the second half of 20th century into other areas of art - such as design or sculpture. - Petr Hora, 2014

18 x 22 x 22� Cast glass

Petr Hora

Milia (Left) - 2014

Lilius (Right) - 2014

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26 x 20 x 20� Cast glass All photos by Gabriel Urbanek Lukas


The evolution of what we currently perceive as contemporary “Fine Art” began after the end of World War II. Europe was in ruins, America was ascending as a world economic power and New York emerged as the new capitol of the Art World. Critics and historians were quick to employ prewar analytics in their attempts to classify post war art in terms of “movements” and “schools”; Abstract Expressionism, Realism, Conceptual Art, Pop Art and Photo Realism, to name a few. At that point in history, there were relatively few practicing artists compared to the plethora of “artists” attempting to compete in this arena today. Propelled by the University system, the last quarter of the 20th Century saw an exponential increase in the number of artists making things, shattering the concept of specific “movements” in art. By the mid 1970’s art critics essentially gave up and adopted the term “Pluralism”, which was nothing more than euphemistically cloaked verbiage for “artists doing a wide variety of things with a lot of different materials”.

David Huchthausen

When I was living in New York in the 1970’s, I distinctly remember one very “hot” color field painter, who shall remain nameless. He had just sold out an exhibition at a major SOHO gallery, sauntered into Puffy’s, a popular art bar in Manhattan at the time and bought drinks for everyone. He was heralded as the best of a new wave of painters and reviewed in Art in America and Art Forum. Within three years he had disappeared and was seldom heard from again. The only moral here, is that the “Art World” is a fickle mistress. Critics, collectors and galleries are always looking for the next rising star, and today’s trendy hot shot is often tomorrow’s landfill. Maintaining a significant artistic presence over many decades is extraordinarily difficult. Play in this arena at your peril, attempt to manipulate it if you must, but at the end of the day, be true to yourself, create only what you truly believe in, and let history sort it all out. I personally don’t care where I fit into the cavalcade of contemporary art; I simply pursue things that intrigue me, if others find them interesting as well, so much the better, but I have never made work that panders to external concerns. I believe it is counterintuitive for an artist to attempt to explain the often tortured conceptual process that lead to the creation of his or her work. Establishing a fixed parameter within which the viewer is expected to experience a work of art defeats the purpose. Art should create a unique visual and cerebreal experience for the viewer, untainted by the artist’s often contrived verbiage. Ultimately, the work must have an existence of its own if it is to have any real significance.

- David Huchthausen, 2014

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Altair IV - 2014 8 x 8 x 8” Cut and polished glass Photo by Lloyd Shugart


The tools and techniques to be used on float plate glass as material for sculpture have provided significant advances in the past 20 years including adhesive materials and a large variety of diamond tools which individual artists can use. With these tools we have come to carve glass just as well as stone or wood. I can carve glass just like stone. In the early 20th century the direct carving technique impacted on sculptors, many of which produced direct carving works. Direct carving is more suitable to make abstract body than modeling and has been used as one of the expressive techniques. My carved works are apt to be considered a kind of modern sculpture in glass. Socially I am a craftsman and a sculptor, but I don't distinguish between sculpture and craft. And I don't have much interest in which genre I belong to.

- Toshio Iezumi, 2014

Toshio Iezumi

Though few glass artists use adhesioncarving technique, I believe this technique poses great potential to connect the world of Glass Art to the Contemporary Art or Architecture.

M.130201 (Viewed from 2 angles) - 2013

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87 x 16.5 x 15.75� Laminated and polished glass


The theme for the 42nd International Glass Invitational is about evolution of glass as an art material. If you were to look beyond the glass community - where would your work fit in the spectrum of the art world? My sculpture would probably fit into working with the human form and the realm of portraiture - although I have no intensions of trying to fit into anything; I am inspired by the human figure just like many artists before me. Where would you place yourself and your work and why? I place myself among the other artists who use the human figure as their subject matter. However, I personally use one of the most difficult processes to create my work. In doing this I have found voice through the glass material.

Martin Janecky

- Martin Janecky, 2014

Thom (Left) - 2014 20 x 16 x 12� Hot sculpted glass

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Yan (Right) - 2014 18 x 16 x 12� Hot sculpted glass


I came to the glass art world from a different vantage point; having studied architecture at Bauhaus-inspired Illinois Institute of Technology and being an architect for 20 years. The Bauhaus training emphasizes balance of both form and material, ideas and implementation, where craftsmanship and technique are crucial in the development of the art concept.

- Michael Janis, 2014

The Loves of the Plants (Above) - 2014 35 x 22 x 5” Fused and cast glass, Powder imagery

Michael Janis

In the Fine Art world I use glass as an expressive narrative form; for me it’s a way to interpret nature, articulate wishes, evoke desires and hopes, and to arouse feelings. My work, like the world and people that inhabit it, is multifaceted. Social, political, and introspective psychological dramas are played out within layers of glass. In the process of creating, I learn more about myself and search for insight into what motivates those around me.

The Temple of Nature (Right) - 2014

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35 x 22 x 5” Fused and cast glass, Powder imagery All photos by anythingphoto.net


Glass is a non-traditional material for making sculpture and this is a core tenet in my attitude towards using this material to actualize my artistic concepts. Categorizing and labeling of the work is best left to critics and historians as I do not function well with constraints or being confined to a rigid definition. To quote Dan Klein from a 2008 article…. A lot has been written about Richard Jolley over the years and different authors have cited a whole host of comparisons from Cranach and Durer to Matisse, Dubuffet and Abstract Expressionism. Their comments include, he is an avid reader, has a wide appreciation of the arts and is a perceptive observer of life. The terms of reference in his work are as all-encompassing as his zest for life. ….Over the years Jolley has used a wide range of different media to express his personal vision as artist and maker, never shying away from technical challenge. The writer Robert C. Morgan has written ….Given the recurrence of these signs in his glass, paper and mixed media works, Jolley’s tendency is to move in the direction of Surrealist ambiguity –to escape from everyday time into the dream. This is all fine by me, defying classification and putting the poetry first and letting everything else fall behind it.

Richard Jolley

- Richard Jolley, 2014

Suspended in Dreams #6 (Above) - 2014 36.5 x 16.5 x 13.5” Blown and hot sculpted glass

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Suspended in Dreams #9 (Left) - 2014 24.5 x 13.5 x 12” Blown and hot sculpted glass


I would like to see my work more often exhibited with paintings and sculptures in other materials. I feel that this would be an exciting way to promote glass in the broader spectrum of the art world. - Vladimira Klumpar, 2014

Vladimira Klumpar

Assembled Geometry - 2014

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69 x 21 x 21� Cast glass Photo by Tomas Hilger


Shayna Leib

My work exists in the “in between” of the art world. Sometimes I think it fits nowhere but could situate anywhere. It’s between art and craft, between sculpture and glass, technical and artistic, decorative and purposeful, kitsch and content. It is my hope that because it’s something that is hard to categorize, it can withstand fads, and can exist in and of itself. The term “glass art” was once a term I worshipped, and is now a term of entrapment. I would like nothing more than to be known as a sculptor, not just a glass artist. I know this sentiment is shared among many of my peers. As glass meanders through its categorical limitations and makes its way permanently into the realm of legitimate art, it will stand the test of time and hopefully help our art hold a value beyond its vessel beginnings. - Shayna Leib, 2014

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Archipelagos 7 - 2013 14 x 38 x 7” Glass, resin, wire


I believe that we have arrived at the end of the domination of conceptual contemporary art. This is connected with the social and economic crisis in the world. In the global financial world contemporary art was the expression of the domination of goods and communication. Nowadays we will have to find another economic model that could sustain the development of emerging countries. We will need to consider another way in our relationship between matters and doing. We cannot continue anymore to share the production between emerging countries and occidental conceptual creation. We will need to re-localize production that means that we will need to connect doing and creating. Knowhow and material. Art is just an image and also a model of a way of life. It will follow the evolution of society. So, I think that glass art and ceramic, too, could be a way to imagine as practice, a new vision of life The field of art is on its way to include the craft. The borders between art, craft and design are collapsing. That supposes that we do not have to think in term of glass or ceramic as separated fields. Studio glass has done its best all these years. It gave means to artists for expressing themself with a material. Now we have arrived at the point that glass has entered art and changed it. Glass has become art. It is not returning back to the Middle Ages where an artist was a craftsman, but goes further after the division between head and hand, to unify them. We have to realize what the material entering Art contributes to it. I think that the introduction of materials such as glass or ceramic in Art changes its concept. That means that my position in this world, as for all glass makers must be understood as a new location in an extended field of Art. New materials drive artists to open new visions. In my work, with glass and ceramic, I try to open the fourth dimension, I mean Time in Space. In this sense I am not in a sculptural field but in an images field. As paintings in two dimensions are the representation of a 3D world, my works in 3D are the representation of a 4D world. Glass is the only material that allows this. Glass is to Time what bronze and marble are to Space.

- Antoine Leperlier, 2014

12.5 x 12.5� Pate de verre

Antoine Leperlier

Flux et Fixe-XXXXV (Left) - 2014

Flux et Fixe-XXXXVI (Right) - 2014

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12.5 x 12.5� Pate de verre


Stanislav Libenský and Jaroslava Brychtová

We have found reflections of tradition (cubism) in our work. The formally philosophical cubist way…the notion of brining the entire three-dimensional space into a twodimensional work…does not perhaps concern us as directly. We are influenced by cubism more in a sense of our material. It touches us through the properties of glass. The transparency, optical dimension, and the inner and outer space simultaneously contained in glass allows us to bring the rear planes into the foreground, not just through form but through the properties of light. - Jaroslava Brychtova (Robert Kehlmann, The Inner Light: Sculpture by Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova, 2002, p .5)

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Head T - 1996 23.25 x 25 x 8” Cast glass


The art world is a universal melting pot of diverse styles, cultures, and ideas and I see my work smack dab in the midst of it all. - Steve Linn, 2014

Steve Linn

To Swoop, Soar, and Surprise (Oscar Niemeyer) - 2013

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50.5 x 43.5 x 8.75� Kiln cast, Sandblasted glass, bronze, wood


In 1997 Marvin Lipofsky was invited to attend the 5th International Glass Symposium in the small village of Lauscha, Germany, located in the Thüringer Schiefergebirge mountain range. At the Farglashütte Lauscha GMBH glass factory, Lipofsky worked along side the glass team of Rainer Bock and Frnhk Ficht-Müller, assisted by Ingrid Conrad Lindg, to create his sculpture. Intermixing the colors available in the factory, Lipofsky used red to capture the warmth of the summer days, green to depict the dense forest and blue to portray the surrounding mountains. He used wooden mold forms of his own design, produced in the factory wood shop, to create the unique sculptural shapes. This series was completed in his Berkeley studio by cutting, grinding, and hand working each sculpture in his signature style.

Marvin Lipofsky

- Marvin Lipofsky, 2014

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Lauscha Group 1997 #4 - 1998 11 x 21 x 16” Blown glass Photo by M. Lee Fatherree


Have you ever seen a plume or a tailfeather of a bird or the petals of a flower or other natural shapes? They are all organic but perfectly regular... I always search out these amazing examples in nature to execute them in one of the most difficult and most resistant of materials: Glass. - Borbás Dorka Lukácsi László, 2014

13 x 26 x 6” Cut, polished, laminated glass

Lukácsi László

Fan (Above) - 2014

AngelWings (Right) - 2014

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8 x 26 x 2.75” Cut, polished, laminated glass All photos by Liza Lukácsi


To see my work in the context of the art world is something I’ve often thought about. Where does it fit? The work I am showing in the International is very close to cast bronze sculpture. I go about making it much as a bronze sculptor does, sculpting in clay and wax and I finish the work much like a stone sculptor. Yet I am working with glass and that adds another dimension to the sculpture…..light that is captured in the form. It seems that the material is the only thing which separates my work from more traditional sculpture. I have often cited Edward Hopper’s work, as one, with which, I feel a kinship. It is the situations he places his figures in that draw me. My figures are of this time, contemporary, ordinary people. People one sees in everyday life. Hopper’s work is considered Modern Americana. My work is also Americana but of this time. The other element in my work is the subtleties of interaction between the figures. They interact with one another, the viewer or are pointedly within themselves. I see elements of this interaction in Geiorge Segal’s work. He was considered part of the Pop Art movement. I don’t think my work fits there, but a comparison can be made in that I too am exploring connections.

Lucy Lyon

- Lucy Lyon, 2014

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The Reader - 2014 31 x 34.75 x 14.5” Cast glass and steel Photo by Addison Doty


My work renders classical themes and imagery in contemporary formats. Glass is very prominent in my body of work, usually serving as the main material. My objects and imaginary mechanical instruments are going through transfiguration by way of archetypical materials such as rusted iron and raw wood on the one hand, and on the other hand, antimaterials: glass and light. While glass objects straddle emptiness and fullness, being there and not there simultaneously, even when glass is not transparent it is still holding light, and that gives it its antimatter powers. My use of light as a material is defined by seemingly familiar images, including the most intimate images known to us: parts of the body. The human body is at once the most fundamental and the most highbrow familiar object, but depicting it in glass creates a sense of estrangement. Using glass’s antimatter quality as a metaphor urges the viewer to think of the familiar in different contexts, to think again about familiarity itself. Beyond this futuristic discourse, my works seek to speak a universal language, approaching the subconscious mechanism of symbolism, towards a timeless point of view that also looks ahead to re-defined Classicism, a re-edited art history crosscut with existential concerns fitting to our digital era post-2000, the Third Millennium. While at once classical, primordial, old fashioned, and contemporary, my body of work is a sort of alchemy of glass that explores the mechanics of familiarity and intimacy. The subject of heroes is something I have been preoccupied with for the past year. My pair of works from the Superheroes series, cast from life, “documents” imaginary figures in our perennial search for the heroic ideal. This gap between ideal and real heroes stimulates my work, between the inflated superheroes of childhood, like Batman, who possess superhuman powers, and real life heroes stinking of earth and blood.

Super Hero Series No. 1 (Above) - 2013 24.5 x 14 x 8” Cast glass and mixed media

Mira Maylor

- Mira Maylor, 2014

Super Hero Series No. 2 (Right) - 2013

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24.5 x 14 x 8” Cast glass and mixed media All photos by Ran Erde


The Contemporary Glass Movement in the United States was initially shaped by the glass blowing process: expand and stretch the bubble, flatten the bottom, transfer and open. Artists put their own, unique, creative spin on the vessel. A few began sculpting glass on the pipe, casting and using mixed media. I believe this experimental approach to making artwork, using glass, was the seed for the fine art crossover. The instructors from various university glass programs continue to be an important influence of this gradual change. Being a traditional glass blower, I was terrified to be tossed in with the sculpture program at The University of Illinois. It had a completely different set of rules that extended much farther then the hot shop walls. The “Blue Plate Special� work was the pivotal series for me. With its heavy Pop Art reference, it reaches past the contemporary glass movement into fine art territory.

John Miller

- John Miller, 2014

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Lasalle and Ontario - 2014 9 x 24 x 10� Blown glass Photo by the artist


Looking beyond the glass community, my sculptures fall into a world of "Biomorphic Vessels". I use the inspirations of nature to create concave and convex forms. These forms have an aesthetic, in the round that conveys my feelings for the beauty that surrounds us in life and in nature. - Charlie Miner, 2014

11 x 15 x 15” Pate de verre

Charlie Miner

Kitchen Carrot Bowl (Top) - 2014

Carrot Bowl (Bottom) - 2014

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9 x 18.5 x 6” Pate de verre All photos by Denny O’ Connor


Glass as a material is a fluid medium that exemplifies constant change. It has matured from the decorative arts and is now prominently used as a fine art medium. Originally used in utilitarian applications, glass has evolved into works that now inspire and evoke wonder in the fine art world. As an artist I am able to preserve the heritage of glass blowing while developing new techniques allowing my work to move into other spectrums and disciplines such as sculpture, painting, and abstract botanical studies.

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Debora Moore

- Debora Moore, 2014

Vanda Hybrid - Specimen Box II 2014 40.5 x 16.5 x 6.5� Blown and hot sculpted glass Photo by Lynn Thompson


- William Morris

William Morris

My work is about the symbolic meaning which is attributed to objects and/or artifacts from various cultures. Ordinary objects, such as bone, take on great cultural and spiritual significance, reflecting the values and beliefs of tribal man. Although my work is shaped by the influences of contemporary life and technology, it contemplates fragments from the past; reinventing the narrative of the hunt, stories and rituals which continue to live on in the artifacts which remain.

Engraved Urn - 2003

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17 x 16 x 11� Blown glass Photo by Robert Vinnedge


Kathleen Mulchay 58

There will always be twists and turns just like that lazy river or fast running rapids. Where to go next? That is something I ponder, as I think about the next stage of this glass journey, this sculpture journey, this conversation with myself and the earth. I am a friend of the glass community and participate in the strident research that gives us a quality of glass and a sharing of technique and process that is a measure of the very best. I am fortunate to live in this exciting time of change and growth and evolution. My investigations have always been in the large gray expanse of space between art and craft. Like a high powered electric line to my heart and mind, I pay attention to the transformation of a surface under my hands, with my hands. I don’t think about technique first. It is only the idea that motivates me then my own obsessive nature takes over to bring this thought to form, to life. My aim has always been the greater art world, a world that can engage a Christopher Wilmarth and an Italo Scanga. This is an engagement that always starts with a concept and makes technique its means, using just enough to advance the cause. My work stands squarely in that art world, feeling comfortable there, among the ocean of ideas and thoughts and paths to creation. Yet, I also feel comfortable among makers in glass. It is a loving, brilliant, difficult, slow, fast, hot, tender material, one that is embedded under my skin. - Kathleen Mulcahy, 2014

Cascade - 2014 59.5 x 192 x 5� Glass and aluminum Photo by Jim Judkis


(Stepan Pala’s) sculptures (are) of “infinite” architecture, structures offering endless possibilities for immersing oneself and opening one’s mind to infinite utopian ideas. Mathematics and geometry, poetry and play are the main constants of his recent creative work. In one part, the work connects with earlier starting points and takes them further, while in another part, the strict rationality is relaxed and the wings of fantasy appear. - Katarína Bajcurová

Stepan Pala

Blue Infinity - 2013

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15.75 x 19 x 6.5” Cast and cut glass Photo by Valeria Zacharova


Material and process makes tangible the creative insight in the development of sculpture. My work focuses on the aspect of paradox – the dialogue and thus synergy of opposites. Glass affords its specific characteristics in this dialogue – with the play of light, translucency, color and the organicity of plastic form or with the rational precision of machining.

Albert Paley

- Albert Paley, 2014

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Sepal - 2013 18 x 26 x 23” Glass and painted steel Photo by William DuBois


The essence of (Zora Palova’s) sculptural thought was never “literary” or epic, but rather metaphorical and pictorial, and now it is becoming ever more evocative. Through associative ideas, she mediates a whole range of the feelings and states accompanying our earthly existence, hopes, joys and sorrows, real and imagined, conscious and unconscious. Since she understands glass from all points of view, she can, so to speak, breathe life into this material. - Katarína Bajcurová

Zora Palova

Up and Down - 2013

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29.5 x 26 x 10” Cast and cut glass Photo by Valeria Zacharova


There is always a demand for artists to make transitions in their work, a demand for the next best thing. It is all in the present, a transition from the past to the future. I approach each new piece with a different interpretation. My art has feeling and character; the colors express love, pain, hope and joy. In the changing light from the morning to evening sun they develop an independent life, thereby transcending my intentions. When I made the two pieces for this show, I felt, though different in new ways, connected to my earlier work, felt it grounded in the same earth which nourishes me.

Danny Perkins

- Danny Perkins, 2014

Sonora (Left) - 2014 61 x 1 5 x 15� Mold blown and assembled glass

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Border (Right) - 2014 60 x 14 x 14� Mold blown and assembled glass Photo by the artist


This is not a question that I consider very often. Being an artist can be narcissistic enough. I worry myself with creating the best work that I can. I change series when I feel I am learning nothing new, or expressing nothing new. My ambition is to create work with content and craftsmanship. I will leave it to others to consider where it should be placed in a larger, art world context. - Marc Petrovic, 2014

Marc Petrovic

Predator & Prey - 2013

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20.5 x 20 x 5� Hot sculpted glass and fused murrini


Jenny Pohlman and Sabrina Knowles

We are not sure that the “art world’s” 21st century classification of artworks is important. Work that resonates and registers in the minds of the public, curators and critics will be considered art regardless of classification. That said, we regard our works as fine contemporary sculptures because they are original, well executed and stimulate the viewer’s imagination. Our works are memory prompters, narrative in content with a feminist backstory. At mid-career we place ourselves as sculptors embracing 21st century technology, as mentors to emerging artist of all mediums and as contributors to our culture. In addition to creating our work we are committed to our community through support of educational programs, arts organizations, and organizations to improve life on the planet. - Sabrina Knowles & Jenny Pohlman, 2014

Detail of image to left

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Willow Keeper - 2013 63 x 13 x 11.5” Blown, carved and sandblasted glass, mixed media All photos by Russell Johnson


Viewers used to seeing my pointillist approach to mixing and exploring color with thousands of murrini might be asking, “Where are the murrini?” My answer is that I have zoomed in for a microscopic view of the interaction between targeted color and light. It is an attempt at getting to the essence of color, breaking up light, simplifying the relationship between the viewer and my sense of color. Looking closer at each piece, one sees that the light breaks the color into a linear spectrum rather than the Seurat-like use of combining pointillist colors so prevalent in my earlier work. I am breaking color up rather than combining colors. At least some of this exploration of color can be attributed to my fascination with the color field painters of the 1960s and 1970s such as Kenneth Noland and, in particular, Gene Davis. Their linear mystic voyages continue to intrigue and inspire me. We call these new pieces “echoes” because we are as concerned with the refraction of color bouncing off of the surface behind the piece as we are with the surface of the actual piece of glass. Kaleidoscopic effects begin occurring as light is transmitted through the glass to paint a refraction of color on the surface behind, that then creates reflections on the underside of the glass piece. While we are mostly focused on the aesthetic results of the work, there are many technical concerns that have led us to where we are. As we choose colors we have to be aware of not only the hue and the intensity, but also the viscosity and the refractive character of the colored glass. All of these qualities are different for every color we use.

What I do is definitely a team effort. I want to especially thank Mitzi Elliott, DH McNabb, and Stephen Cox for their help in creating this new work.

- Stephen Rolfe Powell, 2014

Lascivious Cajun Twister (Top) - 2014 8.5 27.75 x 27.75” Blown glass and murrini

Stephen Rolfe Powell

Refractive qualities are key to the work. We have mostly abandoned opaque colors, despite their wonderful reflective nature, because of their negation of any color transmission to the refraction behind the piece. We certainly use many transparent colored glasses that do a great job with the transmission to the refraction behind, but they don’t add much to the reflective surface of the actual glass. The most interesting colors are translucent colors that, because of their chemical makeup, both transmit and reflect light. For now we are limited to a narrow range of translucent colors, mostly in the yellow to red range. I look forward to the development of translucent blues, greens and purples in the future.

Voracious Vertigo Vortex (Bottom) - 2014

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7.5 x 27 x 27” Blown glass and murrini


It is my intention that my work is perceived as material blind. In my studio practice, concept and meaning are paramount; glass is a material and the act of making is responsible for furthering the creative process. I have always embraced the difficult challenges of the contemporary art world, even movements that I fervently disagree with. I try each day to place myself squarely on a bridge that spans both the traditions and history of the past whilst embracing new paradigms of contemporary fine art practice.

Clifford Rainey

- Clifford Rainey, 2014

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Mourner - 2013 23.5 x 12 x 12� Glass, gold leaf, paint, rubber Photo by Doug Schaible


I use various media in my work including bronze, steel, stone and wood, but my principle medium is glass. It is just such an extraordinary material and I have developed facilities and expertise to work with it using traditional sculpture techniques of lost wax investment casting. I believe that the hard acquired skills my work demands have great value in enabling me to make these works. The skills are a tool, a means to an end and without them the work could not exist. It is important to me to make the pieces in my own studio. The works evolve and change as I make them. I do not design a piece then execute the design, the making is part of the creative process and the piece develops and changes, sometimes radically, during the making

My figurative work using lost wax casting in optical glass looks at familiar everyday objects in an unfamiliar way. I start with forms which surround us in our daily lives; books, fruit and vegetables, musical instruments etc. I present them as negative casts which at first appear abstract, but on closer inspection the figurative form is revealed within the glass, as a reflected image or seen through the glass. This plays with our perception in a surprising way and challenges our perception of the familiar. Recent work which I call ‘Colour Saturation’ is concerned with depth and intensity of colour in glass. I use simple strong forms, the circle, crescent, column and use them as a vehicle for complex strata of clear glass and intense colour. These forms appeal to our emotional response to strong primary colour. - Colin Reid, 2014

18.5 x 19 x 4.75” Kilncast, ground, polished glass

Colin Reid

Red Crescent - 2013

Ring of Aqua - 2013

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37.5 x 32.25 x 4.75” Kilncast, ground, polished glass


I've always felt myself to be a sculptor before a glass blower, glass just happens to be the medium that I use to make my work. Many artists spend their lives attempting to master one medium, whether it be a certain type of stone to carve, oil paint, ceramic, etc., and I've been working with hot glass for over 20 years, attempting to learn its intricacies to figure out how to manipulate the material into my sculpture. As far as where I would place my work, I think my work does fit outside of the glass community. I try to find galleries that represent mixed media artists, where regardless of media, the appreciation lies in the content of a sculpture rather than what it was made from. I usually think in terms of content & form rather than simply relying on the quality of the material to speak for itself.

Ross Richmond

- Ross Richmond, 2014

Beatific (Above) - 2014 25 x 7.5 x 7.5� Blown, hot scultped glass and steel

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Repose (Left) - 2014 14 x 7 x 5.5� Blown, hot scultped glass and steel All photos by Daniel Fox


“Let the material lead you…” Working with glass takes us down a path, not strictly determined by some preconceived vision or sketch. What evolves in the hot shop comes from a wonderful and sometimes technically challenging place between the touch and the flow of that one piece at any given moment. We balance what is predictable with the surprises, and there are always surprises. - Richard Ritter, 2014

Richard Ritter

Kindred Fruit - 2013

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6.5 x 14 x 6” Hot sculpted and etched glass


My work really started getting noticed in the Fine Art world and only later became known in the Glass world. I still think of it as sculpture first, though it is sculpture which derives much of its attraction through the mutable beauty of glass. So I don't really place myself in either camp. I just let the works find their own homes... Actually, the people who like my work are all really nice people. They have to be, my pieces are my babies, and they need to go to good homes! They seem to gravitate to collectors, who, though they may have many “names” in their collections, pick my works because they love them, not because they have been told they “should” have them. (Not that I mind that.) They do end up in museums and in big collections, but most of my pieces seem to end up in the hands of people who really love them and enjoy them every day.

Marlene Rose

I am fond of telling people who see my work for the first time that they are welcome, and expected, to touch the glass. Cast glass seems to respond to the tactile, to gentle hands tracing its forms and exploring its textures. And glass changes. As you move past it, it changes tones, as the seasons and the sun course gently behind it, as hard halogen light strikes its face. Reflections and refractions, inside the glass and out, fascinating the eye. I am in love with how light plays with my work. On another level, people seem to enjoy untangling the imagery of the work. I seldom tell what I was thinking about when I made the work and leave the viewers to complete the piece according to the whims and turns of their own imagining. And you know what, no matter what they say, they are always right...! - Marlene Rose, 2014

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African Mask Wall - 2014 54 x 38 x 8” Sandcast glass, steel and copper Photo by David A. Monroe


What is the spectrum of the art world? It can be anywhere from charcoal drawings in a cave to new media sculpture and installation. Glass fits in just as any other material plays a role in how we, as humans, express ourselves. This includes an exploration of emotion, intellect, science, nature, spirituality, or even the question of one’s placement in the greater universe. My work has always been about investigating my personal life and interactions with others. In the 1980s, we were all about exploring the material and what can be done with it. That evolved and I used the material to physically represent times in my life and the growth of my family. Now the work has moved into another realm where I am looking at the components that multiply and make up nature and the universe. Where glass fits in the spectrum of the art world is an issue that can, is and will be debated by critics and historians. At this point, it is a medium that we, as sculptors, use to express ourselves. - Richard Royal, 2014

Richard Royal

Solid Nautical Spiral - Geometric Series - 2014

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18 x 19.5 x 17.5� Cast, carved and laminated glass Photo by the artist


To me, it seems the evolution of glass as an art form has recently progressed exponentially in a relatively short amount of time. I have a unique perspective on the development of the medium: I come from a lineage of Muranese glass workers that dates back to the early 16th century and I continue to live and work on Murano, the island that is considered to be the birthplace of most of glassmaking techniques. Venetians have traditionally produced functional objects, yet they have always pushed the envelope of technique to create these objects in a complex decorative fashion. As a result, I grew up thinking of glass as primarily functional or utilitarian, but with a drive to think creatively about their execution.

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Davide Salvadore

Until as recently as 60 years ago, glass was not considered to be an art form by many people. Since I was a young man, I have heard stories about the beginning of this transformation from craft to art, when famous artists such as Picasso, Chagall and Leger would come to Venice to work with Murano masters to create works in glass. Around the same time, venerated glass houses such as Venini collaborated with artists, designers, and architects to create objects that did not serve a purpose whatsoever except to be decorative or sculptural. These collaborations started to spread internationally as the knowledge and experience of glassmaking became more widespread. In my opinion, the United States has been at the forefront of this movement of glass as an art form for some time, with the Studio Glass Movement. This particular movement has affected me greatly, as I originally created mostly functional objects in my studio. Midway through my career I was compelled to evolve my skills and concepts into artistic creations. The moment I began to work in this way, I changed my view about glass and could no longer think of making glass objects for functional use. Throughout the past fifteen years, I have developed my skills to make work that comes directly from my imagination. My inspirations are derived from passions in my life such as music, nature and culture, especially that of my homeland, Venice, and the colors, landscapes, and patterns found on the African continent. Many have considered various series of my work, especially the non-functional glass musical instruments I create to be strictly representational since they so closely resemble musical instruments such as a guitar, harp, or drum. My intention, however, is to represent something intangible thought these objects – to evoke a feeling of longing for the culture that created it, or inspire the viewer to imagine the sound of its music. Glass is evolving, and as it does, it is much more commonly used as a sculptural material. I see my work in the context of contemporary sculpture, but I never forget the longstanding tradition of Venetian glass. - David Salvadore, 2014

Arpa - 2013 34 x 24 x 8� Blown and carved glass Photo by Doug Schaible


I am a sculptor who works with glass as the primary media of my art. That is how I have always defined myself from my earliest pieces working in the contemporary glass movement. I understand the material and try to utilize its specific and unique properties which allow me to play with space, luminosity and fragility. Combining these qualities with other materials such as steel or bronze creates the signature presence which defines me as an artist. - Jack Schmidt, 2014

Jack Schmidt

Pepper III - 2013

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58.5 x 15 x 10� Blown, assembled glass, steel Photo by Doug Schaible


Glass has always fit into the art world. It is craft that has had a hard time squeezing in.

Mary Shaffer

One world is not better than the other, just different. Art people tend to be informed about art, both past and present. Glass collectors like to be informed about artists working with glass. Art collectors tend to get a tickle out of ideas in the work. Glass collectors tend to like complex process, perfect execution, highly decorated or patterned works, art collectors to the chagrin of glass collectors don't use the same criteria. My work has always been 'art' and seen in both the glass world and the art world. Just to make that particular point, I'm showing, for this annual Habatat International, earlier work, based on a tongue in cheek play of glass as water. I use the very tools our forefathers used in the service of obtaining water. In times to come, as clean, pure, drinking water gets more polluted through our mega farming practices and “Fracking”, the care and hard work our forefathers used in reaching water will be remembered.

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- Mary Shaffer, 2014

Well Wheel #101-22 - 1996 18 x 10 x 4” Hot sculpted glass, metal

Covered Wheel #21897 - 1997 11 x 4 x 7” Hot sculpted glass, metal


My work with glass transforms the notion that Native artists are only best when traditional materials are used. It has helped advocate on the behalf of all indigenous people -- affirming that we are still here -- that we are declaring who we are through our art in connection to our culture. My work continues to evolve and connect my personal cultural perspective to current modern art movements, and I have received much attention for striving to keep the work fresh and relevant. I have been honored that my success has inspired other artists from underrepresented indigenous cultures to use glass and other non-traditional materials in their work, and hope that I can continue to encourage more innovation in this area as my career progresses. - Preston Singletary, 2014

Preston Singletary

Through teaching and collaborating in glass with other Native American, Maori, Hawaiian, and Australian Aboriginal artists, I've come to see that glass brings another dimension to indigenous art. The artistic perspective of indigenous people reflects a unique and vital visual language that has connections to the ancient codes and symbols of the land, and this interaction has informed and inspired my own work.

Indian Curio Shelf - 2014

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10 x 52 x 14� Blown and carved glass, steel, paperstone shelf Photo by Spike Mafford


Glass has undergone the same evolution as the other materials like wood, stone, bronze, etc. First they were used like useful practical materials for tools. Later, thanks to better technologies, they also became materials used for sculpture. Besides painting, I work with range of different sculptor materials: plaster, concrete, bronze. For me it is highly important not to mix craft and art. Using glass I certainly handle its specific qualities, but I try to avoid working purposeless with its optical effects. The shape, color and soul, – they are, for me, the basic matters of expression.

Ivana Šrámková

My sculptures are calm, dignified and somewhat monumental figures. They are non-flashy introverts, who do not vie for a top spot in a beauty contest. They do not harm or aggravate, but there is something disquieting in them, which makes you think. They are strong personalities. It is difficult to translate these feelings into words; maybe it isn’t even possible. And that may be good. I can analyze the sculptures structurally, but verbally I can only approximate their message. We perceive and experience art subjectively through the sensors of our soul. Formally my figures are inspired by the art of indigenous peoples, Egypt and antiquity. I am interested in their inner character and work to capture it in my sculptures. I struggle to retain it while working on the surfaces of the glass – sometimes I fail and sometimes I succeed. Some of my sculptures stay in my studio for a long time and it can take months or even years before I understand how they need to be finished. Formally I consider myself as classical sculptor with certain affinity and understanding to glass. - Ivana Šrámková, 2014

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Yellow Parrot - 2013 14 x 4 x 8” Cast glass


My work is a celebration of nature. I am most interested in exploring the themes of sex, death, and God: sex as in the pollination and evolution of flowers to fruit; death as in withering and the last stage of life cycle; and God as the fecundity guiding all natural energy. In art history, there are countless examples of artists and art works challenged and inspired by the natural world. Like the expansive Romantic landscape paintings, my work is not a scientific rendering of nature. It is referential to native flowers but celebrates the mysteries of the life cycle, not just of flowers but of all living things. Like the great poets who explore man’s connection to nature, such as Walt Whitman, Mary Oliver, William Wordsworth, and William Blake, my work explores the spiritual component of the plant kingdom. By incorporating symbols, such as human forms, masks, and insects, I engage the viewer in a visual dialogue that suggests the significance of nature to our sanity. And as a twenty-first century artist (and in the spirit of Whitman), I am concerned with presenting and preserving the ordinary as extraordinary. - Paul Stankard, 2014

Paul Stankard

Floral Bouquet with Prickley Fruit - 2012

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4 x 4 x 4� Lampworked glass Photo by Ron Farina


Art began with a handprint on a wall, and thus the development of telling stories through visual dialogue began. Recently, my sculptural works of representational forms explore the narrative and storytelling. Using glass as a material to speak of my concepts, I have become the storyteller - of an individual’s economic and social positioning as well as their gender role in society. I engage the audience and challenge the viewer with contemporary topics of the sociological aspects of the working-class and the tools of their blue-collar labor. My work is dynamic and open-ended, allowing the audience to think beyond the physical object, evoking a sense of empathy from within the viewer. Through my anthropomorphic compositions, I challenge the observer to feel a human psychology, experience, or a memory. Using mixed media and glass; I have the ability to express the diversity and complexity of the human existence - of strength and fragility, beauty and pain. Glass displays ghostly reminiscences, representing a personal history or memory left behind. It can also portray a lack of memory, representing the invisibility of an uncomfortable emotion. Glass becomes a window for the viewer to explore what might otherwise never be seen.

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Cassandra Straubing

- Cassandra Straubing, 2014

He had a family to support; but when the housing crisis hit hard, his pants and belt hung unattended, awaiting the economy to pick up again - 2014 Detail of image to right

30 x 18 x 4� Cast glass and found objects Photo by Elizabeth Torrence


Fortunately, glass with mixed media has already been accepted into the broader art world. If you go to Art Basel/Miami, you will see more glass/mixed media work than any given SOFA. It’s just not as concentrated as SOFA is and does not break down by media. Isn’t this just what we have all worked towards all these years? To have glass accepted in the greater art world. Well, in a way, it did. It just may not always take the forms we are comfortable with. I couldn’t be happier than to fit equally well into two such diverse and compelling venues. - Tim Tate, 2014

Tim Tate

She goes walking after midnight - 2014

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10 x 14 x 1” Cast glass and video Photo by anythingphoto.net


I have shown work at Habatat Galleries for the past 36 years and it is considered Modernist. There are cultural and socioeconomic matters that explain this genre. It is an excellent example of arts influencing social consciousness, and contributing to progressive change. Wikipedia describes Modernism as a philosophical movement in the arts, that along with cultural trends and changes, arose from wide-scale and far-reaching transformations in Western Society in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Michael Taylor

Modernism, in general, includes the activities and creations of those who felt the traditional forms of art, architecture, literature, religious faith, social organization and activities of daily life were becoming outdated in the new economic, social, and political environment of an emerging fully industrialized world. The poet Ezra Pound's 1934 injunction to "Make it new!" was the touchstone of the movement's approach towards what it saw as the now obsolete culture of the past. All the same innovations, like the stream-of-consciousness novel, twelve-tone music and abstract art, all had precursors in the 19th century. A notable characteristic of Modernism is self-consciousness, which often led to experiments with form, along with the use of techniques that drew attention to the processes and materials used in creating a painting, poem, building, etc. Modernism explicitly rejected the ideology of realism and makes use of the works of the past by the employment of reprise, incorporation, rewriting, recapitulation, revision and parody. Some commentators define Modernism as a socially progressive trend of thought that affirms the power of human beings to create, improve and reshape their environment with the aid of practical experimentation, scientific knowledge, or technology. From this perspective, Modernism encouraged the re-examination of every aspect of existence, from commerce to philosophy, with the goal of finding that which was 'holding back' progress, and replacing it with new ways of reaching the same end. Others focus on Modernism as an aesthetic introspection. This facilitates consideration of specific reactions to the use of technology in the First World War, and anti-technological and nihilistic aspects of the works of diverse thinkers and artists spanning the period from Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900) to Samuel Beckett (1906–1989)

- Michael Taylor, 2014

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Inertia - 2013 23 x 28 x 20� Cut and polished glass Photo by the artist


My sculptures are distinguished by a formal quality which is very characteristic of the European visual-arts tradition. Many of my works consist of monumental, elementary forms that capture light and space. In that respect I feel an affinity with Roni Horn. I use my technical knowledge, precision and energy to transform glass into a 'strong-willed' object that gives free rein to space and light and yet, at the same time, possesses an intensity that transcends the tangibly present matter. In my hands glass not only becomes form. It also makes light visible: light that is everywhere and nowhere, impalpable and, above all, timeless. The light creates form, evokes an atmosphere and fills the space. It gives an autonomy and eloquence to my sculptures. That is why I want them to be quiet and subdued. This is a quality that I admire so much in the works of Wolfgang Laib and James Turrell, great sources of inspiration. Just as Turrell creates an experience of light in his installations, I capture it in my sculptures.

- Winnie Teschmacher, 2014

Winnie Teschmacher

My works focus on perception and contemplation. Because the compact, pronounced forms capture and intensify light, the light is condensed but also liberated from the substance of glass. This duality has an influence on perception: ordinary observation turns into looking through things, into understanding. Since light changes constantly, the sculptures manifest themselves differently from every angle and with each passing moment.

Akasha - 2010

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8 x 14 x 14� Cut and polished glass Photo by Gerrit Schreurs


Glass is a wonderful enigma which is decoded differently according to its creator. Its destiny cannot be seen in advance as someone can appear at any time to divert its direction. We are just one of the infinite possibilities hidden in glass and we create accordingly. I think its controlling depends only partly on us. All our thoughts milling around in our mind may determine what will happen to our glass. If an idea crashes into a material it can create. Our deeds might affect the future but cannot change the past.

Margit M. Tóth

- Margit Toth, 2014

Friendship (Above)- 2014 19 x 6 x 8.25” Pate de verre

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Baby (Left) - 2014 23.75 x 15.75 x 10” Pate de verre


I certainly draw from certain aspects within the tenets of minimalism, formalism and abstract expressionist work. My heart certainly lies within romanticism. The belief that humans can, through interaction with each other, and the world at large find value, purpose and meaning. I do search for beauty and even the sublime. I feel that this approach serves as a valuable counterpoint to the ephemeral nature of much of current work. I use the word counterpoint in the strictly musical sense whereas different entities work toward a common goal in harmony while, as some might say, “dancing to the beat of a different drummer.” - Brian Usher, 2014

Brian Usher

Punctus contra punctum - 2014

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41.5 x 23 x 3.5” Kiln cast glass


50 years from now I will be 125 years old. Men in Sweden today live many years longer than men did 50 years ago. Who knows, I could still be working in the factory (if there is still a factory) in 2063.

Detail of image below

I have been working for 50 years with glass and have seen amazing developments during that time. If that exploration continues at the same pace for the next half century it will probably be a continuation of the way that glass can be used as a medium of artistic expression. I just learned that 3-D printers can be used with glass. No more sweaty ladling and the most fantastic pieces you can imagine will be designed on the computer. Possibly glass that talks, sings, and depending on the light, changes color and the viewer’s mood. Glass that contains memories and hopefully still, wine. For me, I will stick to the sandbox. I feel that I have just learned to play the piano, and by then maybe, a major symphony.

Bertil Vallien

- Bertil Vallien

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See Man - 2013 60� Sandcast glass Photo by Doug Schaible


My work envelopes photographic images, so it's not too hard to imagine myself as a photographer and photographic sculptor. However, the medium of glass is so flexible. It's never a solid, but not always a liquid. You can poke it with a wooden stick when it's hot, and hit it with a hammer when it's cold. It can be blown, cast, fritted. The possibilities are endless to combine with other mediums. I can't ever imagine a time when there won't be anything left to experiment. - Mary Van Cline, 2014

Mary Van Cline

Floating Sea of Time - 2014

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72 x 60� Photosensitive glass


“And it dawned on me that I might have to change my inner thought patterns... that I would have to start believing in possibilities that I wouldn't have allowed before, that I had been closing my creativity down to a very narrow, controllable scale... that things had become too familiar and I might have to disorientate myself.” - Bob Dylan The above quote by Bob Dylan very much speaks to me, as I am also of the opinion that, as an artist, one must keep moving, changing and re-considering, in order not to stagnate in the comfort of familiarity and repetition. Still following the vision I had when I first began working with the material, I am continuing my quest to produce artwork of an involving and challenging nature, and in this way I feel more akin with those artists who, through their work, cater to the mind before pleasing the eye.

Janusz Walentynowicz

Viewed from my niche of the art scene, the primary role of the artist is to make the viewer consider what he / she may not have considered, or to wonder about what he / she may not have given thought to before, in other words, in some way to move, bend or simply just touch the viewer’s mind. As the glass scene has been evolving over the past 50 years, it has branched out into different disciplines, all under one big umbrella, sharing the same material and techniques, but with different goals. The same diversity of artistic intent and direction is true for most other artistic media, and it only seems natural that glass has followed this path. As a media, glass has established itself strongly as a “Beaux” Art material, where It seems still to be struggling in achieving broad acceptance in the niche of the larger art world, where concept takes precedence over visual appeal. Question is whether “glass” is currently moving toward greater acceptance by the larger art community of its branch of artists, that are attempting to push the material beyond its natural comfort zone, or whether is it more or less stagnant in it’s current “one size fits all” structure. - Janusz Walentynowicz, 2014

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Ultima - 2014 18 x 19 x 19” Cast glass


It is difficult to place my art neatly into the spectrum of the art world. While my sculpture is clearly figurative, it is ancient in its origins, subjects and some of its materials, and contemporary in its use of cast glass as a significant element of its design. My work is sometimes referred to as "Asian Figurative Sculpture.” I have been primarily inspired by the historic paintings and sculptures of the women and children of the Tang and Song dynasties of ancient China and the Heian Period of ancient Japan. This explains the subjects in my work, the child emperors of ancient China and Japan, the women and children of the royal courts and, in my most current work, ancient Japanese warriors.

My current work involves the adding of precious and semi-precious stones to my sculptures. I am an artist who creates ancient Asian figurative sculptures with contemporary overtones in mixed media. That’s why it’s difficult to categorize what I do. - Vivian Wang, 2014

Vivian Wang

In my use of materials, I reflect both the old and the new. Figurative sculpture in ancient times was made in ceramics, stone and wood and I have followed that tradition by using clay for the bodies in my pieces. Though glass was invented over 2,000 years ago in China, it was used only for religious artifacts and decorative ornaments. And even then its purpose was to mimic the precious stone, jade. In contrast, I use glass as glass to create the head, hands and feet of my figures, a very contemporary use of materials. This contrast of old and new can also be seen in the patterning on the ceramic clothing of my pieces. Though inspired by ancient textile designs, they have a decidedly contemporary feeling.

Birds - 2014

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23 x 15 x 13.5” Cast and Stoneware with Steel Base Photo by Gregory Ross


Leah Wingfield & Steve Clements

This is a question of where we see ourselves fitting in the "art world" is one we can't seem to answer. It's not so important for us to fit somewhere in the art world as it is for us to create an original expression of an idea. Being original can keep you outside the spectrum by nature, and attempts to fit in can stifle originality. It's always a crap shoot as to whether your work touches another individual in a moving way. We think that our work is fitting in precisely the right place when it moves a person to live with it. And that really is the goal as opposed to fitting into the “art world". - Leah Wingfield & Steven Clements, 2014

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Conversation…21 - 2014 78 x 20 x 14” Cast glass and steel Photo by Robert Jaffe


Go on be curious There was enough excitement to bring a medium to fairly high levels. Results will be assorted and move into the realm of FINE ART. Glass on its way to leave GLASS ART ? FINE. - Ann Wolff, 2014

Ann Wolff

Large Blues - 2011

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41 x 38.75 x 6.75� Cast glass


The question for the 2014 42nd Habatat International Exhibit is: “Looking beyond the Glass Community, where would I place myself and work in the greater spectrum of the “art world” and why?” This is an interesting question, both personally, and for the “Glass Movement” in general. For about fifty years the studio glass movement has been largely content to go it’s own way. It was held together by a belief in glass as an appropriate and avant-garde medium of “artistic” expression, by a largely-insular collector-base subculture, and by a limited, but international, number of material-exclusive galleries. Despite aspirations to be recognized as a full-grown art form, the medium to date has, to a significant extent, been excluded from the larger artworld. Why now the need to find a place?

John Wood

I’ve always thought The “Glass Movement” is best understood as another in the long line of, possibly short-lived, modern art movements, such as Pop Art – that, at its heart, is inherently Cubist in multiplicity of view and dimension. The Glass Movement did not initially require or seek institutional recognition, but as the movement evolved beyond it’s craft origins, the collector support group aged, and the Gallery marketing system

matured, institutional approbation has increasingly been sought to broaden the collector group and the movement’s reach. Fifty years later, the movement is at a cusp. Public recognition of “glass art”, spurred by the general acceptance of Dale Chihuly’s mass marketing of the medium, is at a high point not seen for perhaps a hundred years. The question remains however, will the dominant museum-led institutional definition of “art” include glass in its ranks of recognized artistic mediums? Or has the Glass Movement seen it’s peak, and is inevitably destined to be relegated to just one more material among a universe of possible mediums for artistic expression? The jury is out, but I am hopeful. The quality and diversity of work now being produced can not be denied. As for myself, if I must place my work somewhere in the art world, I think of myself as reflective of a combination of influences of The Modern Age: Fauvist in color sensibility, Cubist in multiplicity of viewpoint, and Abstract Expressionist in spirit. But I don’t need a place in “artworld”. I just need the inestimable joy of creation, of moving that initial whisper of an idea, from concept to reality, in a medium that always surprises me with voice of its own. That’s my artworld, and it is sufficient. - JBWood, 2014

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Blue Cut Cube - 2014 10 x 10 x 10” Cast glass Photo by Doug Schaible


Japanese nature surrounding me is changing every day. However it is really balanced and has harmony. I would like to say everything is just right with nature. The natural world gives me the meditation of quietness. My mind becomes really peaceful. As an artist inspired by nature, I work hard to create this moment of time in my work and capture it in the form of sculpture, using glass and metal. Always in my work I have combined the quality of glass along with metal embellishments to be creating a vision. I respect the way the materials can be harmonious as in nature. In this way my work has always been mixed media sculpture with glass as the foundation. I appreciate being accepted as an artist and a glass artist as well. I hope my work can be seen as having transcended a boundary or definition and be recognized as sculpture reflecting nature. I would like to share the moment that inspires my pieces with everyone. - Hiroshi Yamano, 2014

Hiroshi Yamano

From East to West - Scene of Japan #116 - 2012

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5.25 x 11.75 x 11� Blown, cold and lamp worked glass, copper plating


“The expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, typically in a visual form such as painting or sculpture, producing works to be appreciated primarily for their beauty or emotional power” I doubt this definition will change much in the near or distant future but let me add something I heard once as a young artist, “The best of anything is art and creativity takes courage”. I will do my best to carry on.

Albert Young

- Albert Young, 2014

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Little Dragon - 2014 30 x 26 x 14” Cast glass and steel Photo by Leslie Patron Photography


Evolution is necessarily rooted in the past. Last year we celebrated 50 years of studio glass, and it was interesting to look at the variety of expression artists have come to realize. As we gain control and access of this particularly alluring and illusive media, there can be as many directions as individuals involved. One thing that seems common is that there are compelling reasons some of us choose glass over other media. The work selected for the 42nd International Invitational, are a reflection of influences grounded in the past, our history and the history of object making. This grounding has allowed me to move fluidly, amongst those things that I enjoy, from nature, to folk art to fine art and sculpture. In the last ten years, I have been working with an evolving construction idea that has allowed me to explore these notions and build them in ways not previously considered. The “basket” and the “anvil” form are excellent examples of how my work has evolved to fine art. While rooted in craft, folk art and objects representing “handwork”, each piece is ironically rendered in a way that is as delicate and ephemeral as tumbleweed. It is the “irony” that creates a dialogue between the object, the maker and the viewer. This dialogue then, becomes an important driver and moves the work from being defined amongst the decorative, towards that which can be loosely defined as fine art and sculpture. It has been suggested that these definitions are being redefined with every generation of artist/makers who define and are being defined by these definitions. Motive then is to be true to ourselves and our history while exploring our ideas and media. - Brent Kee Young, 2014

37 x 25 x 18” Flame worked glass

Brent Kee Young

Matrix Series - A Passing Breeze (Above) - 2014

Matrix Series - Revere the Past (RIght) - 2014

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10 x 29 x 9” Flame worked glass All photos by Dan Fox


One of the functions of contemporary art is the education of our senses. Great artists such as James Turrell or Anish Kapoor perform visual and spatial situations which invite us to penetrate perceptual environments celebrating powerful fundamental optical phenomena. Stimulating our sensitivity, large scale installations created by these artists make us dive into overwhelming light and colour installations. As a glass painter and glass sculptor, I have been inspired for a long time by the work of these artistic giants. In my small scale sculptures I propose perceptual experiences based on colour, and of course light makes them alive. The glass medium enhances the expressive possibilities by trapping visual phenomena within the body of the material. Light seems to materialize in the glass-colour-space. My small objects concentrate elementary color compositions without any narrative support. They echo my work in monumental dimensions such as large installations and public art applications. These two directions of my research are complementary and influence each other. One of these large scale works is to be placed shortly in the new CathĂŠdral of Paris/Creteil (France), designed by Architecture Studio, one of the leading French architectural firms. My design for a 57 meters long colour glass arch, celebrating red-green-blue as the constituents of the ''invisible light'' has been selected for integration in this astonishing contemporary building. I believe the complex visual possibilities of the material and its related metaphoric symbolisms make glass an important expressive medium for artistic research in the coming years. In this context the glass artists out of the studio glass movement, the new pioneers, should not fear the necessary future conceptual and technical confrontation with ''fine art artists'' using the material glass.

Udo Zembok

- Udo Zembok, 2014

Horzon 1-2014 - 2014 22.25 x 22.25 x 2� Fused and polished glass

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Vertical Horizon 1-2014 - 2014 14 x 27.75 x 2� Fused and polished glass


I've never really felt that I was confined to any particular community, whether in the art world or any other world. I make work that matters to me and its pretty spread around the world. As to where else I might place myself, that would probably be much more often in warm sparkling tropical waters somewhere far from everything else. Voila. - Toots Zynsky, 2014

Toots Zynsky

Prosperoso - 2014

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6.5 x 26.5 x 8.75� Fillet du verre Photo by the artist


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Shelley Muzylowski Allen

Rick Beck

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions:

39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Born: Manitoba, Canada

Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Museum of Northwest Art, La Conner, WA 42th Glass Invitational – Habatat Galleries, MI 41th Glass Invitational – Habatat Galleries, MI 2013 Solo Glass Exhibition - Blue Rain Contemporary, Scottsdale, AZ 2013 Art Palm Beach - Habatat Galleries, MI 2013 41st Annual International Glass Invitational – Habatat Galleries, MI 2012 “Menagerie” Solo Glass Sculpture Exhibition Blue Rain Gallery, Santa Fe, NM 2012 “Midas” Solo Glass Sculpture Exhibition - Blue Rain Contemporary, Scottsdale, AZ 2012 “50 Years of Studio Glass” - Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, Louisville, KY Art Palm Beach – Palm Beach, FL – Habatat Galleries SOFA Chicago - Habatat Galleries, MI Toyama City Institute of Glass Arts, Permanent Collection - Toyama, Japan Solo Exhibition – Traver Gallery, Seattle, WA SOFA NY – Blue Rain Gallery, NY, NY

Herb Babcock

Born: Bloondale, Ohio, 1946

Columbus Museum of Fine Art, Columbus, Ohio Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, MI Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Glasmuseum Frauenau, Frauenau, Germany J & L Lobmeyer, Vienna, Austria, Vienna, Austria Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, Coburg, Germany Morris Museum, Moristown, New Jersey Museum die Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg, Germany Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, Michigan Tittot Glass Art Museum, Taipei, Taiwan Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio

Asheville Art Museum, Asheville, NC Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC Fletcher Barnhart, White Corp., Charlotte, NC Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Hickory Museum of Art, Hickory, NC McDonald’s Corporate Collection Mint Museum of Craft and Design, Charlotte, NC Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, LA Wustum Museum of Fine Art, Racine, WI

Michael Behrens

Born: Dusseldorf, Germany, 1973

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Seven Bridges Museum, Greenwich, CT Uroboros Glass Studios, Portland, OR Museum Ajeto, Novy Bor, Czech Republic Ernsting Foundation, Coesfeld, Germany Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf, Germany Museum of Modern Glass, Öhringen, Germany Glass Museum Immenhausen, Germany Glass Museum Lauscha, Germany

Selected Exhibitions:

2014 42nd Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 2014 Art Fair Breda, Etienne Gallery, The Netherlands 2014 Palm Springs Fine Art Fair, Habatat Galleries, MI 2014 Art Palm Beach, Habatat Galleries MI 2013 Art & Antique Vienna, Sikabonyi Gallery, Austria

Howard Ben Tré

Born: Brooklyn, New York, 1949

Corning Museum of Glass, NY Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY National Museum of American Art, Washington, DC Detroit Institute of Arts, MI High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington,DC Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Huntington Museum of Art, WV Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain, Nice, France Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Lausanne, Switzerland Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA Royal Ontario Museum of Art, Toronto, ON, Canada

Robert Bender

Born: New York, New York, 1962

Selected Exhibitions:

42nd Glass International, Habatat Galleries, Michigan 40th Glass International, Habatat Galleries, Michigan Glass Invitational 50 Anniversary Studio Glass Movement, Blue Spiral, NC Publications: 2011 New Glass Review 333, corning Glass Museum, New York

Selected Writings and Illustrations:

Lima Beans Would be Illegal: Children’s Ideas of a Perfect World, Dial Books, 2000 Ribbit Riddles, Dial Books, 2001 Never Eat Anything that Moves: Good, Bad, and Very Silly Advice From Kids, Dial, 2002 The Baobab Tree by John Archambault, Childcraft, 2004

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39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational

Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Artist Résumés

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Born: Alberta, Canada, 1960


Alex Bernstein

Martin Blank

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions:

Born: Celo, North Carolina, 1972

Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Palm Springs Art Museum, CA Corning Museum of Glass, NY Glassmuseum Frauenau. Frauenau, Germany Royal Caribbean – Oasis of the Seas, FL Deloitte & Touche, Boston, MA Wallace Memorial Library, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY The Dean of Liberal Arts, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY Mellon Financial Corporation, Harrisburg, VA Wachovia Financial Group, Greenville, SC Bascom-Louise Gallery, Highland, NC

Cassandria Blackmore

Seven Bridges Foundation, Greenwich CT Naples Museum of Art, Naples, FL Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Steninge Palace Cultural Center, Sweden Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, QC, Canada Bergstrom-Mahler Museum, Neenah, WI New Britain Museum of America Art, CT Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Krannert Art Museum, Champaign, IL Honolulu Academy of Art, HI Shanghai Museum of Fine Art, China Millennium Museum, Beijing, China Museum of Contemporary Art, Lake Worth, FL

Awards:

Zoltan Bohus

Artist Résumés

Born: San Diego, California, 1968

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Born: Sharon, Massachusetts, 1962

2007 Renwick Smithsonian, featured Art of month, Washington D.C. 2002 John Hauberg Fellowship, Pilchuck, Stanwood, WA 1994 Award of Excellence in Art, The Fashion Group, Portland, OR 1993 Dean’s List Award, Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland, OR

Selected Exhibitions:

2013 Duane Reed Gallery, SOFA Chicago 2013 Blue Rain Gallery, Glass Group Show 2013 Habatat Galleries Glass International, Expose, Michigan 2013 Art Palm Beach, Duane Reed Gallery 2012 Hawk Galleries, Solo Show, Columbus, OH 2012 SOFA Chicago, Hawk Galleries, Chicago, IL 2012 Heather Gaudio Fine Art, New Canaan, CT 2012 SOFA New York, Duane Reed Galleries, New York, NY 2012 Art Palm Beach 3, Palm Beach FL 2011 SOFA New York, NY 2011 Glass Weekend, Hamptons, NY 2011 G.A.S. Seattle, WA 2011 Art Palm Beach, Palm Beach, FL 2011 SOFA, Chicago, IL

Born: Endrod, Hungary, 1941

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Musée du Verre, Sars Poteries, France Veste Coburg, Germany Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf, Germany MUDAC, Lausanne, Switzerland MAVA, Madrid, Spain Corning Museum of Glass, NY Carnegie Museum of Arts, Pittsburgh, PA Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Indianapolis Museum of Arts, IN Kentucky Art and Craft Foundation, KY

Péter Borkovics

Born: Salgótarján, Hungary, 1971

36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 2013 International Exhibition of Glass Kanazawa, Honorable Mention award Selected Exhibitions:

2014 42nd Glass International, Habatat Galleries, Michigan 2014 Contemporary Glass exhibition 2014 Coburg 2014 Dubai design week 2013 41st Glass International, Habatat Galleries, MI 2013 International Exhibition of Glass Kanazawa” Kanazawa, Japan 2013 With Gyuri Gáspár and Balázs Sipos,Rippl Rónai Múzeum, Kaposvár 2012 40th Glass International, Habatat Galleries, MI 2012 Tent London Design Exhibition, London 2012 Hungarian Glass Exhibition Gyor/ Hungary 2012 Hungarian Glass Exhibition AVRAN Art& Design Gallery, Laguna Beach 2012 International Glass Exhibition Karlovy Vary 2012 International Glass Exhibition Krakkow, Wroclav

STANI

(Stanislaw Jan Borowski) Born: Krosno, Poland, 1981

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions:

42nd International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 41st International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 40th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 39th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI Art Palm Beach January 2010, Habatat Galleries, MI Sofa Chicago November 2009, Habatat Galleries, MI Solo Exhibition December 5th 2009, Habatat Galleries, MI 38th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 37th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 36th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 35th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 34th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 33th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI PAN Amsterdam Kunstmesse, Etienne & Van den Doel, Expressive Glass Art, Netherlands Compositions Gallery, San Francisco, CA International Frankfurt Fair TENDENCE

Christina Bothwell

Born: New York, New York, 1960

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Glasmuseet Ebeltoft, Museum of International Contemporary Glass, Denmark SMOG, Shanghai Museum of Glass, Shanghai, China


Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL Tutsek-Stiftung Foundation, Munich, Germany The Smithsonian Museum of Art’s Archives of American Art, Oral History Collection Fuller Craft Museum, MA Racine Museum, Racine, WI Corning Glass Museum, NY Palm Springs Museum, CA Lowe Art Museum, FL Virginia Groot Foundation Collection, IL

Latchezar Boyadjiev Born: Sofia, Bulgaria, 1959

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

D.S.M. collection, Delft, NL Kunst und Gewerbe Museum Hamburg, Germany Museum Jan van der Togt, Amstelveen, NL Museo de Arte en Vidrio MAVA, Madrid, Spain Glasmuseum Alter Hof Herding, Coesfeld Lette, Germany Den Haag, Gemeentemuseum, NL Palm Springs Art Museum, USA National Liberty Museum Philadelphia, USA Seven Bridges Foundation, Greenwich, USA

Emily Brock

Born: Des Moines, Iowa, 1945

39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Peter Bremers

José Chardiet

Born: Maastricht, The Netherlands. 1957

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Low Art Museum, University of Miami, FL Museum of Fine Arts, MA Museum of Arts and Design, NY Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC American Craft Museum, NY Corning Museum of Glass, NY Yokohama Museum of Art, Japan Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Lausanne, Switzerland High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Detroit Institute of Art, MI Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC

Born: Lynn, Massachusetts, 1957

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Cleveland Museum of Art, OH Milwaukee Art Museum, WI Museum of Fine Arts, CA The High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA American Craft Museum, New York, NY Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Toledo Museum of Art, OH Portland Museum of Art, ME Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Art, WI Rockford Art Museum, IL Museum of American Glass, Wheaton, NJ Museum of Art, Fukui, Japan

Deanna Clayton

35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions:

Ferro Corporation, Cleveland, OH Janus Mobile Art Collection Denver, CO Ritz Carlton, Grand Cayman The Four Seasons, Doha, Qatar The Four Seasons, Miami, FL SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, MI SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, FL 36th-42nd International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI

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National Glassmuseum Leerdam, NL AON, London, England Dutch Ministry of Justice, NL Glasmuseum Alter Hof Herding, Coesfeld Lette, Germany Kunstgewerbe Museum, Berlin, Germany Glasmuseet Ebeltoft, Denmark Mobile Museum, Mobile, USA

39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Daniel Clayman

Artist Résumés

De Young Museum, San Francisco Naples Museum of Art Museum of Applied Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Glassmuseum, Ebeldorf, Denmark Glassmuseum der Ernsting Stiftung, Germany Museum de Alcorcon, Spain First Interstate World Trade Center Los Angeles, CA Scottsdale Center for the Arts, AZ The White House, Washington DC New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA

Rockford Art Museum, IL Bergstrom-Mahler Museum, Neenah, WI Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, QC, Canada Franklin Park Conservatory, OH Patrick and Beatrice Haggerty Museum of Art, Marquette University, WI Hsinchu Cultural Center, Taiwan Racine Art Museum, WI Columbus Museum of Art, OH Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Albuquerque Museum, NM Museum of American Glass, Wheaton Village, NJ University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA The Toledo Museum of Art, OH Shimonoseki City Art Museum, Japan Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA

Asheville Museum of Art, NC Museum of American Glass, Wheaton Village, NJ Racine Art Museum, WI Cincinnati Art Museum, OH Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, QC, Canada


Keith Clayton Born: 1964

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions:

Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2013 “A Passage Through Glass”, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2013 Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2012 Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2011 Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2010 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, MI Kaiser Permanente Building Collection, Cleveland, OH Janus Mobile Art Collection, Denver, CO Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2009 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, MI Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2008 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, FL Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2007 Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 2006 Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, FL, 2006 Solo Exhibition, Pismo Gallery, Aspen, CO, 2005 Large Scale Glass Outdoor Sculpture, Oakland Arts Center, Pontiac, MI, 2005 Solo Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, FL, 2005

Stephen Clements

(with Leah Wingfield) Born: Richmond, California, 1948

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Artist Résumés

Selected Collections:

Arizona Commission on the Arts Phoenix, AZ Brockton Museum - Boston, MA Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, De Young Museum San Francisco, CA Kishijimi Collection - Japan The National Gallery of American Art & Renwick Gallery - Smithsonian Institution- Washington DC Prisident’s Collection - People’s Republic of China Richmond Art Museum - Richmond, CA Standard Oil Corporation – California Museo Del Vidrio - Monterrey, Mexico

Brian Corr

Born: Denver, Colorado, 1976

Awards:

National Gallery of Australia GlazenHuis, Belgium Art Gallery of Western Australia Australian National Glass Collection Australian National University Hamilton Regional Art Gallery

Collections:

National Gallery of Australia GlazenHuis, Belgium Art Gallery of Western Australia Australian National Glass Collection Australian National University Hamilton Regional Art Gallery

Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan Racine Art Museum, WI Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY Toledo Museum of Art, OH

Matthew Curtis

Miriam Di Fiore

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Born: Luton, England, 1964

Etihad Towers, Abu Dhabi, UAE Art Trust, Australia National Gallery of Australia Wagga Wagga National Glass Collection, Australia Mobile City Art Glass Museum Collection, America Ernsting Stifting, Glass Museum, Coesfelfd Germany De Young Museum, Saxe Collection, San Francisco, America Palm Springs Museum, CA. USA Societe General, Singapore

Selected Exhibitions:

2014 Glass International, Habatat Galleries, MI 2014 “Tree” CAnberra Glassworks 2013 A Line of Symmetry, Sabbia Gallery, Sidney 2013 Tom Malone Glass Prize Finalist, Art Gallery of W A Australia 2013 Glass International, Habatat Galleries, MI 2012 Global + Local, Museum of Fine Arts St Petersburg, FL 2012 SOFA Chicago, co Pismo Gallery USA 2012 Glass International, Habatat Galleries, MI

Dan Dailey

Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1947

39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Corning Museum of Glass, NY Darmstatt Museum, Darmstatt, Germany Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, MA High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, TN Huntington Museum of Art, WV Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Louvre, Paris, France Musee de Design et d’arts Appliques Contemporains, Lausanne, Switzerland

Born: Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1959

Corning Museum of Glass, NY Newark Fine Art Museum, NJ Cafsejian Museum of Contemporary Art, Armenia Mobile Museum of Fine Arts, AL Museo Nazional del Vidrio, Segovia, Spain. Coleccion Estable de la Revista del Vidrio, Barcelona, Spain Hotel Murano, Tacoma, WA “A Path to Art”, Pegli, Genoa, Italy. Fused Glass Windows of the Town Hall of Suria, Barcelona, Spain

Laura Donefer

Born: Ithaca, New York, 1955

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Museum of Civilization, Hull, Quebec, QC, Canada Museo del Vidrio, Monterrey, Mexico Corning Museum of Glass, NY Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, WI Claridge Collection, Montreal, QC, Canada Pilchuck Permanent Collection, Stanwood, WA Clay and Glass Gallery, Waterloo, ON, Canada Indusmin, Toronto, ON, Canada University of Iowa Hospital Collection, Iowa City, IA Royal Bank of Canada Collection, Toronto, ON, Canada Skydome Glass Collection, Toronto, ON, Canada Julian Art Collection, Trinidad. Mendel Glass Collection, Montreal, QC, Canada


Beverly Fishman

Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1955

Selected Collections:

Toledo Art Museum, Ohio Miami Art Museum, Florida Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio Detroit Institute of Arts, Michigan Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas Borusan Contemporary, Istanbul Stamford Museum and Nature Center, Connecticut Cranbrook Art Museum, Michigan Kresge Art Museum, Michigan Maxine and Stuart Frankel Foundation for Art United Nations Embassy in Istanbul Hallmark, Inc., Progressive Art Collection UBS Financial Services Inc. Daimler-Chrysler Corporation Prudential Life Insurance

Irene Frolic

Born: Stanislavov, Poland, 1941

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Susan Taylor Glasgow

Born: Superior, Wisconsin, 1958

Selected Exhibitions:

37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Canada Lowe Museum of Art, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, AL Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, PA DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, MA Charles A. Wustum Museum, Racine, WI J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY Detroit Institute of Art, David Jacob Chordorkoff Collection, MI Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY

Sean Hennessey

Born: Boonton, New Jersey, 1972

Collections:

Howard TheatreTrumpet on The Jazzman Sculpture Washington, DC Library of Congress, Adams Building Reproduction of the Lee Lawrie Doors Washington, DC The Wilson Building heART of the City Washington, DC The City of Washington DC Art Collection Prince Georges County Art Collection, Maryland

Selected Exhibitions:

2013 The Dunes Gallery “The Luxury of Dreams, Washington, D.C. 2013 Habatat Galleries eXpose Royal Oak, MI 2013 Duncan McClellan Gallery Art in Glass St Petersburg, FL 2013 Edison Place Gallery International Glass and Clay Washington, DC 2012 Aqua Art Miami Alida Anderson Art Projects South Beach Miami, FL

Eric Hilton

Born: Bournemouth, England, 1937

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Corning Museum of Glass, NY Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Japan Lowe Art Museum, FL Musee Des Arts Decoratifs, France Musee Des Arts Decoratifs, Switzerland Otari Memorial Art Museum, Japan Pilkington Glass Museum, England Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Liuligongfang Museum, Shanghai, China

Tomáš Hlavicka ˇ

Born: Prague, Czech Republic, 1950

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Museum of Decorativ Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Glass Museum Koganezaki Crystal Park, Japan Glass Museum Kanazawa, Japan The Finnish Glass Museum, Riihimäki, Finland Dennos Museum, Traverse City, MI, USA Museum Pardubice, Czech Republic

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2011-14 Habatat Galleries International Glass Invitational Award Exhibition, Royal Oak, MI 2013 “Couture de Verre”, Heller Gallery, NYC, NY 2011 “ Cycles and Symbols: Nature in Glass” American Museum of Glass, Millville, NJ 2010 “Glass Uprising”, Swanson Reed Gallery, Louisville, KY. Glass Art Society 2009 “Love Hurts”, Heller Gallery, NYC, NY. Solo exhibition 2009 “The Communal Nest”, George Caleb Bingham Gallery, Columbia, MO

Robin Grebe

2012 410 Good Buddy Gallery Reimagining Alice Washington, DC 2012 Washington Craft Show with Maurine Littleton Gallery Washington, DC 2012 Blue Spiral Gallery Glass Secessionism Asheville, NC 2012 Delaplaine Arts Center Constructing Content Frederick, MD 2011 Long View Gallery Artists of The Washington Glass School Washington, DC

Artist Résumés

Bergstrom Mahler Museum. Neenah, WI Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery. Waterloo, ON Clairidge Collection. Montreal, QC Contemporary Crafts Gallery. Portland, OR Indusmin Corporate Collection. Toronto, ON Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Montreal, QC Museum of Decorative Art, Lausanne, Switzerland Museo del Vidreo, Monterrey, Mexico National Liberty Museum. Philadelphia, PA North Lands Creative Glass. Lybster, Scotland

2008-09 “Absence of Body”, Pittsburgh Glass Center, Pittsburgh, PA 2008 Glass Concepts, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 2005-08 SOFA Chicago. Represented by Heller Gallery, NYC 2007 Arkansas Center for the Arts, Little Rock, Arkansas. Permanent Collection 2007 “Reminiscence”, Grounds For Sculpture, Hamilton, NJ


Jacqueline HoffmannBotquelen Selected Exhibitions:

2013 41st Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2013 Musee du Vitrail, Swiss Glass Artists, Romont, Switzerland 2012 Primal Inspiration”, Museum tour, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 “Pâte de verre”, Europaisches Museum für Modern Glas, Veste Coburg, Germany 2012 Swiss art space, Lausanne, Switzerland 2011 Musee du Vitrail, Romont, Switzerland 2011 Zürich ART, Sanske Galerie 2010 Sanske Galerie, Zürich, Switzerland 2009 La Nef, Le Noirmont, Switzerland. 2009 Contemporary European Glass artists, Sanske Galerie- Creative Glass, Kindhausen, Switzerland 2009 Glass beads,”TheTempest”, Switzerland, Europe, USA 2008 Sanske Galerie, Zürich, Switzerland 2008 Glas Galerie Stadler, Linz, Austria

Petr Hora

Born: Brno, Czech Republic, 1949

102

Artist Résumés

39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions:

Naples Museum of Art, Naples, FL Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Heller Gallery, New York, NY Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, FL Kinsky Gallery, Chateau Zdar nad Sazavou Consument Art, Nuremberg, Germany Czech and Japan Glass Festival - Prague, Tokyo, Hiroshima, Nagano Gallery Schalkwijk, Schalkwijk, Netherlands Sofa Chicago - Heller Gallery, New York, NY Habatat Galleries, Pontiac, MI Klub Vytvarnych Umelcu Horacka, Zdar nad Sazavou, Czech Republic Habatat Galleries, International Glass Exhibition in Beijing and Shanghai, China

David Huchthausen

Born: Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, 1951

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Bergstrom-Mahler Museum, Neenah, WI Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, VA Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Hokkaido, Japan Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, WV Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis, IN Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Musée Cantonal des Beaux Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland Museum of Arts & Design, New York, NY National Gallery of American Art, Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC J. B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, WA Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, OH

Toshio Iezumi

Born: Ashikaga City, Tochigi Prefecture, Japan, 1954

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

St. Louis Museum of Art, St. Louis, MI Detroit Institute of Art, Detroit, MI Milwaukee Museum, Milwaukee, WI Los Angeles County Museum, Los Angeles, California Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, Wausau, Wisconsin Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, Ohio Kyoto Museum of Moden Art, Kyoto, Japan Museum of Decorative Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland Shimonseki Art Museum, Shimonseki City, Japan Hokkaido Museum of Modem Art, Sapporo, Japan

Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario American Craft Museum, New York City Yokohoma Museum of Art, Yokohama, Japan

Martin Janecky

Born: Liberec, Czech Republic, 1980

38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions:

“Heroes”, Habatat Galleries, MI Art Palm Beach, Habatat Galleries, MI Art Naples, Habatat Galleries, MI Art Sarasota, Habatat Galleries, MI “Theatre” Solo Exhibition Habatat Galleries, MI SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, MI, Art and Craft, Novy Bor, Czech Republic Pilchuck Glass School, WA Marta Hewett Gallery, OH Pilchuck Auction, Seattle, WA Habatat Galleries, Chicago, IL “International Invitational”, Habatat Galleries, MI Traver Gallery, Tacoma, WA Marta Hewett Gallery, Cincinnati, OH Jean-Claude Chapelotte Gallery, Luxembourg Galerie K, Maastricht, Netherlands

Michael Janis

Born: Chicago, Illinois

Selected Exhibitions:

2014 Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art, Chicago, IL, ‘Glass & Clay Exhibition’ 2014 Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI, 42nd Annual International Art Invitational 2013 Sunderland Museum, Sunderland, UK ‘International Glass & Clay Exhibition’ 2013 Maurine Littleton Gallery / Chicago, IL ‘S.O.F.A. Chicago’ 2013 Creative Cohesion Gallery / Edinburgh, UK ‘Edinburgh Art Fair 2013 Morgan Contemporary Glass, Pittsburgh, PA, ‘Common Discourse’ 2013 Maurine Littleton Gallery / Wheaton Arts Center, Millville, NJ ‘Glass Weekend 2013 2013 Duncan McClellan Gallery, St. Petersburg, FL, ‘Artists of the Washington Glass School’ 2013 Edison Place Gallery, International Glass & Clay Exhibition, Washington, DC


Richard Jolley

Born: Wichita, Kansas, 1952

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Chrysler Museum at Norfolk, Norfolk, VA Coburg Museum, Coburg, Germany Corning Museum of Glass, NY Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, TN International Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Knoxville Museum of Art, TN Lowe Art Museum, Coral Gables, FL Mint Museum of Craft & Design, Charlotte, NC Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL Museum of Contemporary Arts and Design, New York, NY Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY

Vladimira Klumpar

Born: Rychnov nad Kneznou, Czech Republic, 1954

Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Seven Bridges Foundation, Greenwich, CT Regionalni Museum Mikulov, Mikulov, Czech Republic Glass Museum, Novy Bor, Czech Republic North Bohemian Museum of Liberec, Czech Republic Museum of Glass and Jewelry, Jablonec nad Nisou, Czech Republic Corning Museum of Glass, NY Lannan Foundation, Palm Beach, FL Wusham Museum of Art, Racine, WI Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC American Arts and Craft Museum, New York, NY Cafesjian Museum Foundation, Yerevan, Republic of Armenia

38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions:

2013 Melissa Morgan Fine Arrt 2013 Art Palm Beach, Echt Gallery, Chicago, IL 2013 41st International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2013 Solo Exhibition, Echt Gallery, Chicago, IL 2012 Solo Exhibition- Habatat Galleries, FL 2012 Liberty in Bloom, American Libery Museum 2012 Boca Museum of Art, Boca Raton, FL 2012 40th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 Art Palm Beach, Echt Gallery, Chicago, IL 2012 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 SOFA New York City, Echt Gallery, Chicago, IL 2012 Samuel Lynne Gallery Featured Artist, Dallas, TX

Antoine Leperlier

Born: Evreux, France, 1953

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Musée des Arts Décoratifs de Paris, France Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, Paris, France Corning Museum of Glass, NY Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Japan Collection du Conseil Régional de Haute Normandie, Rouen, France Morris Museum, Morristown, NJ Museum for Contemporary Art Glass, Scottsdale, AZ Victoria & Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom Leperlier glass art fund, Vendenheim, France Liuligongfang Museum, Shanghai, China Museum of Art & Design, New York, NY

Stanislav Libensky & Jarolsava Brychtova

Born: SL – Sezemice-Mnichovo Hradiste, Czechoslovakia, 1921- deceased 2002 JB – Zelezny Brod, Czechoslovakia, 1924

Selected Collections:

Brooklyn, Museum of Art, NY Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, Germany Corning Museum of Glass, NY Glasmuseum Hentrich im Kunstmuseum Ehrendorf, Duesseldorf, Germany Hamburg, Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg, Germany Museum of Art, Indianapolis, IN National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan Victoria and Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom City Art Gallery, Manchester, United Kingdom Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, VA Musee des arts Decoratifs – Louvre, Paris, France Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sappora, Japan Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney, Australia Toledo Museum of Art, OH

Steve Linn

Born: Chicago, IL, 1943

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Indianapolis Museum of Art, IN Albany Museum of Art, GA Museum of American Glass, Millville, NJ Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Lausanne, Switzerland New York City Fire Museum, New York, NY Verrerie Ouvrière d’Albi, Albi, France National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, PA Museum of Art and History, Anchorage, AK Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL

Artist Résumés

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Shayna Leib

103


Marvin Lipofsky

Born: Barrington, Illinois, 1938

Selected Collections:

Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, OH National Museum of Glass, Leerdam, NL National Gallery, Canberra ACT, Australia Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Art, MI International Glass Museum, Ebeltoft, Denmark National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan Musee des Arts Decoratifs (Fonds National d’Art Contemporin) Paris, France Huntington Museum of Art, WV Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, New York, NY Mint Museum of Craft + Design, Charlotte, NC Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL Tacoma Art Museum, WA

László Lukácsi

Born: Budapest, Hungary, 1961

104

Artist Résumés

37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 2014 Special Award of COBURG Glass Exhibition, Germany 2010 GOLD-prize at the International Exhibition of Glass Kanazawa, Japan Selected Collections:

Victoria&Albert Museum of London, UK Bakony Museum, Veszprém, Hungary Museum of Applied Arts, Budapest, Hungary Glassmuseum of Frauenau, Germany Michigan Life Insurance, Michigan, USA PEPSI- Challenge Cup, USA

Lucy Lyon

Born: Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1947

Selected Exhibitions:

2013 Connections, LewAllen Contemporary, Scottsdale, AZ 2013 41st International Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 40th International Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 Bold Women-Translucent Expressions, RC Gorman Gallery, Taos, NM 2012 SOFA Chicago, represented by Thomas Riley Gallery, Cleveland, OH 2011 Clear and Present, LewAllen Contemporary, Santa

Fe, NM 2011 Glass Weekend, Wheaton Village NJ represented by Thomas Riley Gallery 2011 SOFA Chicago, represented by Thomas Riley Gallery, Cleveland, OH 2010 38th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2010 Feel Free to Touch,Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities, Carbondale, CO 2010 Luminous Forms, LewAllen Contemporary Santa Fe, NM

Mira Maylor Selected Installations:

Let There Be Light, 32 sqm. sculpture, Presidential Residence, Jerusalem Secrets, The Hebrew University Mount Scopus, Jewish Studies Faculty, Jerusalem Memorial, The Hebrew University Faculty of Medicine, In Memory of Prof. Metzger, Jerusalem Entrance Wall, Shaare Zedek Hospital, Jerusalem Home, Homage to the First Settlers, Front Courthouse, Petah Tikva.

Selected Exhibitions:

2014 42nd Glass International, Habatat Galleries, MI 2014 Art Palm Beach, with Echt Gallery, Chicago, FL 2014 Danse Macabre, Binyamin Gallery, Tel Aviv 2013 SOFA event, Echt Gallery, IL 2013 Magia Naturalis, P8 Gallery, Tel Aviv 2012 Carrying a Brick, two person show, Artists’ House, Tel Aviv 2012 2012 Zemack Gallery, Tel Aviv 2012 Personal Affects, Artifiera, Bologna 2012 La Parabola, Ramat Gan Museum, Ramat Gan 2012 Anatomy My Dear, Artist residence, Herzliya

John Miller

Born: New Haven, CT, 1966

33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL Tacoma Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Glazen Huis, Lommel, Belguim Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Museum of Arts & Design, New York, NY Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, WA Museum of American Glass, Millville, NJ

Selected Exhibitions:

SOFA Chicago Blue Plate Special, Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Fifty by Fifty, Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI XL, Neusol Glassworks, Cincinnati, OH Studio Glass at 50: A tradition in Flux, Illinois State University, Normal, IL Class Heat, LeMay Car / Tacoma Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Fire Nation Glass Studio and Gallery, Holland, OH

Charlie Miner

Born: Modesto California, 1947

39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Telfair Museum, Savannah, GA Art Museum of South Texas, Corpus Christi, TX Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA Corning Museum of Glass, NY Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Museum of Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX New Orleans Museum of Art, LA New Mexico Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe, NM Tucson Museum of Art, AZ

Debora Moore

Born: St. Louis, Missouri, 1960

37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections: Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI

Selected Exhibitions:

2013 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, Chicago, IL 2013 41st International Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 Fifty by Fifty: Celebrating 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass, Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, FL 2012 Evolution/Revolution: 50 Years of American Studio


Glass, Naples Art Museum, Naples, FL 2012 Liberty in Bloom, National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, PA 2012 50 Years of Studio Glass, Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, Louisville, KY 2012 40th International Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2011 Convergence Zone, Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue, WA 2011 Glass Quake 2011, Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA 2011 Seattle Reigns, Ken Saunders Gallery, Chicago, IL 2011 39th International Glass Invitational, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak MI

William Morris

Born: Carmel, California, 1957

39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Kathleen Mulcahy

Born: Newark, New Jersey, 1950

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Born: Zlin, Czechoslovakia, 1944

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions:

Slovak National Gallery, Bratislava, Slovakia Museum of Fine Arts, Kanazawa, Japan Dutch Quin Collection, Netherlands Museum of Applied Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Nationale Netherlanden, Rotterdam, Netherlands Castle Lemberk, Collection of Symposia, Czech Republic Victoria & Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom Green House, Bratislava, Slovakia Gallery Jean-Claude Chapelotte, Luxembourg Gallery Komart, Bratislava, Slovakia

Albert Paley

Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1944

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

British Museum, London, UK Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Cambridge University, The Fitzwilliam Museum, United Kingdom Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, Australia High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, TN Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX Smithsonian Institution, Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC Toledo Museum of Art, OH Victoria & Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom The White House, Washington, DC Wustum Museum of Fine Art, Racine, WI

Born: Bratislava, Czechoslovakia, 1947

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, Coburg, Germany Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Nationale Nederlanden, Rotterdam, NL Shimonoseki Museum of Modern Art, Japan Slovak National Gallery, Bratislava, Slovakia Ulster Museum, Belfast, Ireland Victoria & Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom Corning Museum of Glass, NY Dutch Quin Collection, Netherlands Koganezaki Glass Museum, Shizuoka, Japan

Danny Perkins

Born: Frankfurt, West Germany (American), 1955

38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, WA Boston Museum of Fine Art, Boston, MA Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburg, PA Coming Museum of Glass, Corning, NY MacAllen International Museum, McAllen, TX Mircosoft Corporation, Seattle, WA National Museum of American Art, Renwick Gallery (Smithsonian), Washington DC Oakland Museum of Art, Oakland, CA Palm Springs Museum of Art, Palm Springs, CA Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA Taco Bell Corporation, Irvine, CA Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, FL Victoria & Albert Museum, London, England

105

American Art Museum, Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. American Eagle Outfitters Headquarters, Pittsburgh, PA American Craft Museum, NY

Stepan Pala

Zora Palova

Artist Résumés

American Craft Museum, New York, NY Auckland Museum, New Zealand Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, Racine, WI Corning Museum of Glass, NY Daiichi Museum, Nagoya, Japan Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Hunter Museum, Chattanooga, TN J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Mobile Museum of Art, AL Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, France Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Toledo Museum of Art, OH Victoria and Albert Museum, London, England

Heinz History Center, PA State Museum of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, PA Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, PA The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY


Marc Petrovic

Born: Lyndhurst, Ohio, 1967

Selected Collections and Exhibitions:

Habatat Galleries, MI Niijima Museum of Glass, Tokyo, Japan Charlotte Mint Museum, NC Tucson Museum of Art, AZ Racine Art Museum, WI Arkansas Arts Center Foundation Collection, Little Rock, AR Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA Vero Beach Art Museum, FL Irvine Contemporary, Washington, DC eo art lab; Chester, CT Reynolds Gallery; Richmond, VA Heller Gallery; New York, NY

Jenny Pohlman & Sabrina Knowles Born: JP – Monterey, CA 1955 SK – Cincinnati, OH 1960

106

Artist Résumés

Selected Collections and Exhibitions:

Cancer Care Alliance Center, Seattle WA Mobile Museum of Art, AL Racine Art Museum, WI Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Museum of American Glass, Millville, NJ Habatat Galleries, MI Duane Reed Gallery, MO Pismo Gallery, CO Butters Gallery, PR Edmonds Museum, WA Thomas Riley Galleries, OH

Stephen Rolfe Powell

Born: Birmingham, Alabama, 1951

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Racine Art Museum, WI Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, TN Muskegon Museum of Art, MI Corning Museum of Glass, NY Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, Racine, WI Cleveland Museum of Art, OH Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Wagga Wagga City Art Gallery, Australia Sydney College of Art, Sydney, Australia

The Auckland Museum, Auckland, New Zealand Huntsville Museum of Art, AL Mobile Museum of Fine Art, AL Birmingham Museum of Art, AL Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia

J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky, USA National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Candada Seven Bridges Foundation, USA Shanghai Museum of Glass, China

Clifford Rainey

Ross Richmond

Born: Whitehead, Country Antrim, Northern Ireland, 1948

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Ulster Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Belfast, Northern Ireland Municipal Gallery, Dublin, Ireland American Museum of Art and Design, New York Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, Ireland Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Lausanne, Switzerland Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan Institute du Verre, Hate-Normandie, France Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio De Young Museum, San Francisco, California The Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky The Corning Museum, New York Tutsek-Stiftung, Munchen, Germany

Colin Reid

Born: Cheshire, England, 1953

Selected Collections:

Victoria & Albert Museum, London Corning Museum of Glass, New York Kunstmuseum der Stadt Dusseldorf, Germany. Musee de Design et d’Arts Appliques Lausanne, Switzerland. Ebeltoft Glass Museum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art, Japan Hokkaido Museum of Art, Japan Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Birmingham, UK National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indiana, USA Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague, Czech Republic Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Art. Racine, Wisconsin

Born: Bethesda, Maryland, 1971

Selected Collections:

Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI Tacoma Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA

Selected Exhibitions:

2014 42nd Annual International Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 2013 Reflections, Neusole Glassworks, Cincinnati, OH 2013 41st Annual International Invitational, Habatat Galleries, MI 2013 Figure Studies and Gestures, Hooks-Epstein Galleries, Houston, TX 2012 Northeast Ohio Art Dealers Association Art Exposition, Thomas Riley Galleries, OH 2012 Toledo GAS Conference, Thomas Riley Galleries, OH 2012 Fifty by Fifty, Muskegon Museum of Art, MI 2012 “In the realm of Yin and Yang” An Exploration of Creativity, Friesen Gallery, Sun Valley, ID 2012 Coming Together, Duane Reed Gallery, MO 2012 SOFA New York, Duane Reed Gallery, MO 2012 SOFA Chicago, Duane Reed Gallery, MO

Richard Ritter

Born: Detroit, Michigan, 1940

37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Detroit Institute of Arts, Aviva and Jack A. Robinson Studio Glass Collection, MI Chrysler Museum, Norfolk VA Corning Museum of Glass, NY High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hunter Museum, Chattanooga, TN J.B. Speed Museum, Louisville, KY Milwaukee Art Museum, WI Mint Museum of Craft and Design, Charlotte, NC Racine Art Museum, WI Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC American Art Museum, Smithsonian Institution,


Washington, DC St. Louis Art Museum, MO The White House Permanent Art Collection, Washington, DC

Marlene Rose Born: 1967

39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Leepa-Rattner Museum of the Arts, St. Petersburg, FL National Gallery for Foreign Art, Sofia, Bulgaria Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL Museum of Contemporary Art, Yerevan, Armenia Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI Ritz-Carlton, Hong Kong Seven Bridges, Greenwich, CT

Selected Exhibitions:

2013 Kuivato Gallery, Sedona, AZ 2012 ngela King Gallery New Orleans, LA 2011 Watson MacRae Gallery, Sanibel, FL 2010 PISMO Galleries, Aspen, CO 2010 Hodgell Gallery, Sarasota, FL 2009 Manitou Gallery, Santa Fe, NM 2008 Kuivato Gallery, Sedona, Az 2008 Gallery DeNovo, “Eastern Light” Sun Valley, ID 2008 Hawthorn Gallery, Birmingham, AL 2008 Evan Lurie Gallery, “Pop in the Midwest”, Carmel, IN

Richard Royal Born: 1952

Selected Collections:

Born: Murano, Italy, 1953

38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions:

Naples Museum of Art, Naples, FL Art Palm Beach, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI International Glass Exhibition, Litvak Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI SOFA Santa Fe, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Invitational Exhibition, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Art Amsterdam, Participation KunstRAI, Amsterdam, NL Hooks-Epstein Galleries, Houston TX Thomas R. Riley Galleries, Cleveland, OH SOFA New York, Thomas R. Riley Gallery, Cleveland, OH Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI

Jack Schmidt

Born: Toledo, Ohio, 1945

36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Alpena Power and Electric Company, Alpena, MI Bellerive Museum, Zurich, Switzerland Bowling Green State University, OH Chubu Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Japan Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Art, MI General Electric Company, Milwaukee, WI Illinois State University, Normal, IL Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI Rochester Institute of Technology, NY Shaw Walker Company, Muskegon, MI Toledo Federation of Art, OH National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

Mary Shaffer

Born: Walterboro, South Carolina, 1945

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY

Preston Singletary

Born: San Francisco, CA, 1963

Selected Collections:

The British Museum, London, UK The Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, NY Corning Museum of Glass, Corning NY (Rakow Commission) Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA Ethnografiska Museet, Stockholm, Sweden Detroit Institute of the Arts, Detroit, MI Fred Jones, Jr, Museum of Art, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK Heard Museum of Art, Phoenix, AZ Mint Museum of Art & Design, Charlotte, NC Museum of Art + Design, New York, NY Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, WA Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS Tweed Museum of Art, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN

Ivana Sramkova

Born: Liberec, Czechoslovakia, 1960

Selected Collections:

National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia Museum of Arts and Crafts, Prague, Czech Republic National Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic Northbohemian Museum, Jablonec, Czech Republic Victoria and Albert Museum, London, Great Britain Corning Museum of Glass, Corning Museum of Modern Art, Lausanne, Switzerland Ulster Museum, Belfast, Ireland Regional Museum Pardubice, Czech Republic Toyama Museum, Japan

107

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan Museum of Art & Design, New York, NY Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Montreal, QC, Canada Huntington Museum, WV Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland Museum of Decorative Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Musee du Verre; Sars-Poteries, France Corning Museum of Glass, NY Stadt Museum; Frauenau, Germany Glas Museum; Ebeltoft, Denmark Indianapolis Museum, IN

Artist Résumés

Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton, FL City Centre, Pilchuck Glass Collection, Seattle, WA Daiichi Museum, Nagoya, Japan High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA IBM Collection, New York, NY Mint Museum of Art & Crafts, Charlotte, NC Monte Cristo Hotel, Everett, WA Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA Palm Springs Art Museum, Palm Springs, CA Price/Waterhouse, Phoenix, AZ Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI Rigel Capital Managment, Seattle, WA SAFECO Collection, Seattle, WA Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, WA Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, FL

Davide Salvadore


Paul Stankard

Born: Attleboro, Massachusetts, 1943

39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Corning Museum of Glass, NY GlasMuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Huntington Museum of Art, WV Hsinchu Cultural Center, Taiwan Indianapolis Museum of Art, IN J.B. Speed Museum, Louisville, KY Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Mobile Museum of Art, AL Musee des Arts Decoratif, Palais du Louvre, Paris, France Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Renwick Gallery, The Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Victoria & Albert Museum, London, England

Cassandra Straubing

Born: Pasadena, California, 1978

108

Artist Résumés

Awards:

2012 Jurors Choice Award, Benefit Auction, Bay Area Glass Institute, San Jose, CA 2011 Dorothy and George Saxe Fellowship Award, Bay Area Glass Institute, San Jose, CA 2010 Emerge “Kiln Casters Award”, Bullseye Gallery. Portland, OR 2008 “Exhibition First Place Award”, Cabrillo Art Gallery, Santa Cruz, CA 2007 “Alumni Scholarship Award”, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY 2007 “Library Purchase Prize”, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY 2006 NICHE Finalist for cast glass “Buttons” 2003 “Emerging Student Artist,” California Glass Exchange, CA

Selected Exhibitions:

2013 Chroma Culture, Bullseye Gallery, Portland, OR 2013 eXpose, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2013 SOFA Chicago, IL 2012 Playing with Fire: Artists of the Studio Glass Movement, Oakland Museum of California Art, CA

2012 This Fragile Skin, Emeryville, Bullseye Gallery, CA 2012 SJSU Faculty Exhibition, Natalie and James Thompson Gallery, San Jose, CA 2011 GlassWeekend 2011, Creative Glass Center of America, Wheaton Arts, NJ 2011 SOFA Santa Fe, NM

Tim Tate

Born: Washington D.C., 1960

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Library of Congress – Historic Glass Doors Prince Georges County Courthouse, Upper Marlboro, MD Food and Friends Donor Wall – Washington, DC District Government Project - Wilson Building Public Art, Washington, DC Liberty Park at Liberty Center, Outdoor Sculpture Commission, Arlington, VA The Adele, Outdoor Sculpture Commission, Silver Spring, MD US Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building Courtyard, Outdoor Sculpture Commission, Washington, DC National Institute of Health (NIH) Sculpture Commission, Hatfield Clinic, Bethesda, MD American Physical Society / Baltimore Science Center, Sculpture Commission, Baltimore, MD Holy Cross Hospital, Sculpture for Oncology Ward, Silver Spring, MD

Michael Taylor

Born: Lewisburg, Tennessee, 1944

38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

National Collection of American Art, Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, ON, Canada Sung - Jin Glass Museum, Kimpo, Korea Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC Corning Museum of Glass, NY National Museum of Glass, Marina Grande, Portugal Notojima Museum of Art, Japan Del Vedrio Vidricra, Monterrey, NL, Mexico

Glas Museum Ebeltoft, Ebeltoft, Denmark Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, TN National Museum of Glass, Leerdam, Netherlands Kunsthaus Am Museum, Köln, Germany Düsseldorf Museum of Art, Düsseldorf, Germany

Winnie Teschmacher

Born: Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 1958

Selected Collections:

Museum Boymans van Beuningen, Rotterdam Museum van der Togt, Amstelveen, NL Nationaal Glasmuseum, Leerdam, NL Musée du Verre, Sars Poterie, France Ernsting Stiftung Alter Hof Herding, Germany Several city councils like Vlaardingen, Pijnacker, Den Haag, Rotterdam Organizations and private collections including Rabobank, AKZO Nobel, NIBC Bank, ABN/ Amrobank, DSM art collection, Nolet Distillery

Margit M. Toth

Born: Hajkuszoboszlo, Hungary, 1963

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions:

Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Compositions Gallery, San Francisco, CA Art Glass Centre, Netherlands Museum of Applied Arts, Budapest Brauckman Gallerie, Netherlands Dennos Museum, Traverse City, MI Habatat Galleries, Mi Wheaton Village 2005, 2007, 2009 Habatat Galleries Mi Sofa Chicago, 2004 - 2010 Habatat Galleries, MI, Art Palm Beach, 2006 - 2011

Brian Usher Born: 1963

Selected Exhibitions:

2014 42nd International Glass Invitational Habatat Detroit USA 2014 Large Glass Sculpture Art Access SLC USA 2014 Art Palm Beach Glenn Aber Gallery Palm Beach USA


2014 Group Show Addison Gallery Del Ray FL USA 2013 ART MRKT San Francisco Julie Nester Gallery San Fran USA 2013 Spectrum Art Fair Glenn Aber Gallery NYC USA 2013 Summer Show Julie Nester Gallery Park City USA 2013 Todays Paper Whitespace Contemporary Ogden Utah USA 2013 Utah Glass Artists St. George Museum of Art St. George USA 2013 SOFA Chicago Glenn Aber Contemporary Chicago USA 2012 40th International Glass Invitational Habatat Detroit USA 2012 Solo Show Julie Nester Gallery Park City USA

Bertil Vallien

Born: Stockholm, Sweden, 1963

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Mary Van Cline

Born: Dallas, Texas, 1954

Selected Collections:

Born: Dygowo, Poland 1956

32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Ebeltoft Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark. Handelsbankens Kunstforening, Copenhagen, Denmark. Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Rockford Art Museum, IL Hsinchu Cultural Center, Taiwan Museum, Beelden ann Zee, Scheveningen, Netherlands National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, PA Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Milwaukee Art Museum, WI Museum of Fine Art, Montreal, QC, Canada Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL

Vivian Wang

Born: Shanghai, China

Selected Collections:

Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton, Florida

Selected Exhibitions:

2014 42nd Glass International, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2014 Art Palm Beach, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2013 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2013 41st Glass International, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2013 Art Palm Beach, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 SOFA Chicago, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 “Children of the Past”, Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI 2012 “Glass Act; Contemporary Studio Art Glass Turns 50”, Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton, FL 2012 “New Work” by Gallery Artists, Stewart Fine Art, Boca Raton, FL

Leah Wingfield

(with Stephen Clements) Born: Phoenix, Arizona, 1957

Selected Collections and Exhibitions:

Naples Museum of Art, Naples, FL Galerie International du Verre - Biot, France Museo del Vidrio - Monterrey, Mexico Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburg, PA Toledo Museum of Art, OH Lux Center for the Arts, Lincoln, NE Habatat Galleries, Royal Oak, MI Miller Gallery, New York, NY Compositions Gallery, San Francisco, CA Habatat Galleries, Chicago, IL Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Japan Hsinchu Cultural Center, Taiwan

Ann Wolff

Born: Gotland Kyllaj, Sweden, 1937

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 36th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Corning Museum of Glass, NY Ebeltoft Glasmuseum, Denmark Frauenau Museum, Germany Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Japan Lobmayr Museum, Wien, Austria Metropolitan Museum, New York, NY Mint Museum of Craft & Design, Charlotte, NC Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, France Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Museum Bellerive, Zürich, Switzerland National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, Japan National Museum, Stockholm, Sweden Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands Victoria and Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom

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American Ambassador’s Residence, Seoul, Korea Smithsonian Institution, National Gallery of American Art and Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA Huntsville Museum of Art, Huntsville, Alabama Kanazawa Design Institute, Kanazawa, Japan

Janusz Walentynowicz

2011 “Rising Star”, Stewart Fine Art, Wheaton Glass Weekend, Millville, NJ

Artist Résumés

Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, Australia Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark H. M. the King of Sweden’s Collection, Stockholm, Sweden Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Japan Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY MUDAC, Musée de Design et d’Arts Appliqués Contemporains, Lausanne, Switzerland Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, France Museo del Vidrio, Monterrey, Mexico Museum of Arts & Design, New York, NY National Museum of Art, Stockholm, Sweden National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, Japan Pilkington Glass Museum, St. Helen’s, Merseyside, UK Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, ON, Canada Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK

Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY La Verre de Biot Museum, Biot, France Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, Racine, WI Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Wheaton American Glass Museum, Millville, NJ Detroit Institute for the Arts, Detroit, Michigan Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, WV Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Hokkaido, Japan Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, Tennessee Niijima Glass Art Museum, Niijima, Japan Museum fur kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg, Germany Lowe Art Museum, Florida


John Wood

Brent Kee Young

Udo Zembok

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections and Exhibitions:

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Selected Collections:

Born: 1944

Habatat Galleries, 42nd International Glass Invitational, Royal Oak, MI Habatat Galleries, 41st International Glass Invitational, Royal Oak, MI Habatat Galleries, 40th International Glass Invitational, Royal Oak, MI Habatat Galleries, 39th International Glass Invitational, Royal Oak, MI Habatat Galleries, 38th International Glass Invitational, Royal Oak, MI Seven Bridges Foundation Jewish Community Center, West Bloomfield, Michigan University of Michigan -- The Alfred Berkowitz Gallery CCS President’s Permanent Exhibit (2006) Alan B. Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland, MI Flint Institute of Arts, MI

Hiroshi Yamano

Born: Fukuoka, Japan, 1956

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Artist Résumés

40th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 33rd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 32nd Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

USA Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY Gerald L. Cafesjian Museum of Contemporary Art, Yerevan, Armenia Grand Crystal Museum, Taipei, Taiwan Kurokabe Glass Museum, Nagahama, Japan Lowe Art Museum, Miami, FL, USA Museum of American Glass, Millville, NJ, USA Museum of Arts and Crafts, Itami, Japan Rochester Institute of Technology Library, Rochester, NY Winter Park City Hall, Winter Park, FL, USA Potash Corporation, Northbrook, IL, USA Palm Springs Art Museum, Palm Springs, CA, USA Hotel Murano, Tacoma, WA, USA

Born: Los Angeles, California, 1946

American Glass Museum, Millville, NJ Bergstrom Mahler Art Museum, Neenah, WI Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY First Contemporary Glass Museum, Alcorcon (Madrid), Spain High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA Hokaido Museum of Art, Sapporo, Japan Niijima Contemporary Glass Art Museum, Niijima, Tokyo, Japan New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA Racine Art Museum, Racine WI Smithsonian Museum of American Art, Renwick Gallery, Washington, D.C. The Toledo Museum of Art, Glass Pavilion, Toledo OH

Albert Young

Born: Mt. Clemens, Michigan, 1951

38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 35th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Exhibitions:

Muskegon Museum of Art, MI Hodgell Gallery, Sarasota, FL Habatat Galleries, Chicago, IL Habatat Galleries, Boca Raton, FL Habatat Galleries, Pontiac, MI Miller Gallery, New York, NY Vesperman Gallery, Atlanta, GA Flint Institute of Arts, MI Museo Del Vidrio, Monterrey, Mexico Habatat Galleries, International Glass Invitational, Royal Oak, MI “Sculpture Objects Functional Art” SOFA Exhibition, Chicago, IL

Born: Braunschweig, German, 1951 Alexander Tutsek Stiftung, München, Germany Musée-Atelier du Verre, SarsPoteries, France Europïsches Museum für Modernes Glas, Coburg, Germany Communauté Urbaine, Strasbourg, France Museo de Arte en Vidrio de Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain City Hall, St. Just-St. Rambert, France Préfecture de L’Allier (regional administration), Moulins, France Frac Haute-Normandie, Rouen, France Musée des Beaux-Arts, Lyon, France Entergy Corporate Collection, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, Alabama, USA Seven Bridges, Foundation, Greenwich, CT, USA

Toots Zynsky

Born: Boston, Massachusetts, 1951

41st Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 39th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 38th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 37th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner 34th Int’l Glass Invitational Award Winner Selected Collections:

Corning Museum of Glass, NY Detroit Institute of Arts, MI Glasmuseum, Ebeltoft, Denmark Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Japan Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, TN Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, WV J.B. Speed Museum, Louisville, KY Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Musée de Design et D’Arts Appliqués, Lausanne, Switzerland Musée des Arts Décoratifs du Louvre, Paris, France Museo Municipal de Arte en Vidrio de Alcorcon, Spain Museo del Vidrio, Monterrey, Mexico National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC


Laura De Santillana

MASTERWORKS: A Contemporary Glass Auction

Harvey Littleton Nico las Afr ican o Jo el P h ilip M yer s Leah Wingfield

April 24th, 2014 at 8:00 pm 47 works of contemporary glass artwork

Dan iel Claym an M ich ael Glan cy William M o r r is Bertil Vallien Dan te M ar io n i T o o ts Z yn s ky Dan Dailey Mark Peiser Ann Wolff & M an y M o r e

Contact Habatat for a catalogue of the auction Online: www.habatatglass.com


Participating Artists Shelley Muzylowski Allen

Miriam Di Fiore

Laszlo Lukacsi

Mary Shaffer

Herb Babcock

Laura Donefer

Lucy Lyon

Preston Singletary

Rick Beck

Beverly Fishman

Mira Maylor

Ivana Sramkova

Michael Behrens

Irene Frolic

John Miller

Paul Stankard

Howard Ben Tré

Susan Taylor Glasgow

Charlie Miner

Therman Statom

Robert Bender

Robin Grebe

Debora Moore

Cassandra Straubing

Alex Bernstein

Sean Hennessey

William Morris

Tim Tate

Cassandria Blackmore

Eric Hilton

Kathleen Mulcahy

Michael Taylor

Martin Blank

Tomas Hlavicka

Stepan Pala

Winnie Teschmacher

STANI

Jacqueline Hoffman-Botquelen

Albert Paley

Margit Toth

Zotan Bohus

Petr Hora

Zora Palova

Brian Usher

Peter Borkovics

David Huchthausen

Danny Perkins

Bertil Vallien

Christina Bothwell

Toshio Iezumi

Marc Petrovic

Mary Van Cline

Latchezar Boyadjiev

Martin Janecky

Jenny Pohlman & Sabrina Knowles

Janusz Walentynowicz

Peter Bremers

Michael Janis

Stephen Powell

Vivian Wang

Emily Brock

Richard Jolley

Clifford Rainey

Leah Wingfield & Steven Clements

José Chardiet

Vladimira Klumpar

Colin Reid

Ann Wolff

Daniel Clayman

Judith LaScola

Ross Richmond

John Wood

Deanna Clayton

Shayna Leib

Richard Ritter

Hiroshi Yamano

Keith Clayton

Antoine Leperlier

Marlene Rose

Albert Young

Brian Corr

Stanislav Libensky & Jaroslava Brychtova

Richard Royal

Brent Key Young

Matthew Curtis

Steve Linn

Davide Salvadore

Udo Zembok

Dan Dailey

Marvin Lipofsky

Jack Schmidt

Toots Zynsky


42 ND ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL GLASS INVITATIONAL – HABATAT GALLERIES

G L A S S EVOLVED

Profile for Habatat Galleries

2014 Glass International Catalogue Habatat Galleries2014invitational issuuversion  

Celebrating Habatat Galleries 42nd International Glass Invitational Award Exhibition! Grand Opening April 26th 2014! Royal Oak Michigan. T...

2014 Glass International Catalogue Habatat Galleries2014invitational issuuversion  

Celebrating Habatat Galleries 42nd International Glass Invitational Award Exhibition! Grand Opening April 26th 2014! Royal Oak Michigan. T...